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robertogreco : costamesa   4

the LAB Anti-Mall
[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BoKwCSpH85A/ ]

"Not everyone knows this, but The LAB stands for “Little American Business” and that’s exactly who we are and what we strive to support.

The LAB began its journey to combat retail monotony when it was recycled from a night-vision goggle factory, more than 25 years ago!

In the midst of Orange County’s suburbia, we recognized a need for an original, indoor-outdoor unconventional hang-out packed with a wide array of cafes, restaurants and retail that embraced a vibrant community of lovers in art, music, fashion and hip cuisine.

You'll find us located about a half a mile south of the 405 Freeway on Bristol Street in Costa Mesa, California. A quick look at our website will give you the inside scoop on happenings and special events including live music, maker markets and artist installations.

Welcome to The LAB."

[See also:
https://www.instagram.com/thelabantimall/
https://www.instagram.com/explore/locations/3796900/the-lab-anti-mall/ ]
costamesa  via:davidtedu  orangecounty  srg 
september 2018 by robertogreco
‘Modern Mexican’ Steps Into the Spotlight - The New York Times
"Rosio Sánchez, a Mexican-American chef who lives in Copenhagen, makes the best tortillas in Scandinavia.

That, she admits, isn’t necessarily saying much — like laying claim to the best pizza in Indonesia.

“It was so much worse,” she said, describing the state of Mexican food when she arrived in 2010 to work as the pastry chef at the celebrated restaurant Noma. “Imagine the worst Tex-Mex food in America, and imagine that being passed on like a game of telephone, by people who have no idea what real Mexican food is.”

That is beginning to change, and not only in Copenhagen, where Ms. Sánchez has opened a taqueria with freshly ground, hand-pressed corn tortillas.

It goes far beyond tacos and tortillas, though: Mexican cuisine has made the leap to the global stage of fine dining. Restaurants like Pujol, Rosetta and Quintonil in Mexico City; Laja and Malva in Baja California; Origen in Oaxaca; and Hartwood here in Tulum all produce creative, world-class menus from the lush variety of fruit, fish, vegetables, herbs, grains and flowers that grow around them.

In places like Barcelona, London and Melbourne, as well as Chicago, Los Angeles and New York, food lovers are seeing the cuisine of Mexico in a bright new light.

Chefs are making house-cured chorizo in Toronto, and Michelin-starred chilaquiles at Punto MX in Madrid. Last week, the Houston chef Hugo Ortega, who began his working life as a shoeshine boy in Mexico City, received the James Beard Foundation’s award for best chef in his region: a first for a Mexico-born chef.

“Everywhere, I see a new respect for Mexican culture,” said Martha Ortiz, a celebrity chef in Mexico who is opening a warmly elegant restaurant, Ella Canta, in the InterContinental London Park Lane hotel this summer. Ten years ago, when a taco in London might easily have contained canned baked beans, the idea of a Mexican restaurant in a posh hotel would have been mystifying.

“Our traditional food has always had a high value at home, and there is a lot of respect for the women who produce it,” she said. “But for people internationally to be excited about it and willing to pay for it? That is new.”

These developments are part of a movement, inside and outside Mexico, to finally vanquish the rice-and-beans stereotype and to celebrate its vast and sophisticated cuisine. Just as New Nordic cuisine brought global attention to Scandinavian rye bread, smoked fish and Arctic berries, the newly coined “Modern Mexican” shines a spotlight on ingredients like cacao, agave and cactus; pre-Hispanic varieties of tomatoes, squash and pumpkins; and the country’s all-important corn and chiles.

Outside Mexico, at places like Cosme and Empellón in New York; Hoja Santa, the Adrià brothers’ restaurant in Barcelona; Broken Spanish in Los Angeles; and Cala and Californios in San Francisco, chefs are carefully combining Mexican flavors with modern ideas and local references. At Atla, in Manhattan, the tostada with Arctic char, farmer’s cheese and capers deliberately echoes the Lower East Side’s traditional bagel with scallion cream cheese and lox."



"Claudia Prieto Piastro, a Mexican food anthropologist, said: “I don’t object to others working with our food. I do object to feeling like we’re supposed to be grateful that someone is shining a light on it.”

It should also be recognized that in parts of the country with less agriculture and fewer tourists, like Durango and Puebla, the culinary picture is not as rosy.

Most chefs, however, are happy to have Mr. Redzepi here. “Anything that helps put Mexican cuisine on the world map is good for all of us,” said Roberto Solís, the chef and owner of Nectar in Mérida, the largest city in the region, who specializes in the cooking of the Yucatán.

And, he said, even chefs in Mexico have a long way to go in learning about the food of their own nation. From north to south, Mexico covers the same distance that exists between Ireland and Greece, and Mexican cuisine is not easy to draw a line around.

“Chefs come here to have real cochinita pibil,” he said, referring to the region’s Mayan-style pit-cooked pig. “And then they tell me that they like the one in Mexico City better.”"
food  mexico  restaurants  mexicocity  df  mexicodf  costamesa  sanfrancisco  bajacalifornia  california  oaxaca  losangeles  barcelona  nyc 
may 2017 by robertogreco

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