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Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts –
"The Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts is debt and grade free experiment in education. It assumes the constructivist maxim that all art propagates the conditions of its own conception and making. The Co-Work Space will address issues having to do with advertising, global warming and the university.

A project by Avi Varma and curated by Sofia Bastidas hosted by SMU Pollock Gallery."



"The Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts is a radical experiment in art and education. It is radical in that it resists, in its conceptualization, design and implementation all paths of least resistance to producing stuff in an art gallery setting. In this way its goal is to avoid the forces of normativity, lassitude, and entropy that have rendered spaces of art, education, spirituality and social justice ultimately toothless in their most contemporary American histories. It asks the fundamental question: What would artists do if Drawing I and its derivatives ceased to exist? The Co-Work Space thinks itself Virgil, and Gagosian the seventh circle of Hell.

The Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts is an experiment in that it has no performative identity to cite as antecedent. The color of its walls is a hopeful guess, yet a guess nonetheless; the arrangement of the space is hopeful, yet a guess nonetheless; its video, sound piece, catalogue, website and this very text itself are hopeful expressions, but ultimately just guesses. What the Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts guesses is that the languages of advertising, the legal-juridical battles of sovereignty for the rights of the environment and for dying species, and the infrastructures of the 21st century such as scalable platforms and co-work spaces are the materials at hand for art making, the way pigment and ground glass were those of Titian. This is guesswork. The Co-Work Space asks the fundamental question, What would art be if it exited the indeterminate, stuff-making paradigms of Contemporary Art?

If since the 13th century, when financier Scrovegni colonized the pagan spaces of the mother-goddess with his chapel and sought out Giotto’s craftwork to absolve him of the sins of usury, art has had social utility as the valuation of value, as the material ordination of financial power, then the Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts asks the question: what would art do if it ceased to be the secret in money and was instead a promise to the world?

This desire is not new. One sees in the persistent references to polytheistic, non-western, non-heteronormative modes of spiritual technique and artistic practice in the Co-Work Space Course Catalogue a deep yearning for art’s separateness to cease and for the practice of art to vacate the gallery, the studio, and its very own rules of engagement. This desire is not new, of course, though the strategies mapped out here may very well be different from those that made Dream House, Spiral Jetty, Lightning Field, General Idea, Ocean Earth Development Corporation, Monument to the Third International, Black Mountain College, EGS, and Temenos such exceptional projects at the end of the twentieth century.

Each of the projects listed abrogated to themselves the right to set an ambitious trajectory in large-scale projects whose duration extended years. They aspired to be alternative universes, let alone alternative spaces. A consequence of such ambition is a strangeness that in effect undermines a sense of reality. And what today is the reality that ineluctably encroaches upon us but that of capitalism, the endless agricultural mess of the anthropocene and global warming, with all of their diverse and expanding algorithms.

The Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts considers itself a vehicle of interstellar and intertemporal travel that seeks to beat the present reality-machine to its ultimate endpoint, and to carve out space for the future before the future is eliminated. That endless grey, timeless world without beginning or end has a name: ecofascism. It is being discerned by activists such as Micah White and intelligence operatives at the Pentagon, who are composing speculative training videos to prepare for it. Both art and politics need to reorient themselves so that their visions are as ambitious as that of their enemies.

Such a reorientation will have a number of consequences. It will create an alternative space; in the language of trauma recovery, a healing vortex. Who will be enlivened? Every single being and body that feels the need to move beyond capitalism and the anthropocene as both a mode of survival and liberation. One only needs to drive past Abilene, Midland, Odessa and smell the sulfurous fumes of oil rigs and hydraulic fracking at 70 miles per hour to realize that Big Oil is Sauron, Greg Abbott and Dan Patrick are ringwraiths, and the whole topography of Central Texas is turning into Mordor. To recover from this mass trauma, to escape the ceaseless repetition of the traumatic event both consciously and unconsciously in the central autonomous nervous system, the Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts is a form or resource generation.

Over the course of this installation and its future iterations, participants will use the Co-Work Space platform to create an abundance of resources and projects–all speculative, hyperstitional, and post-contemporary–an abundance that will operate within an ecosystem in permanent toxic shock syndrome yet unable to lift in flight from its own diseased repetitions. The Co-Work Space is a poem performing Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy on the vision of the world so that it can see beyond Ivanka Trump’s cleavage.

This process takes place all at once, in the central autonomous nervous system, the Amazon rainforest and the George Bush Turnpike, accelerated, expanding, and iterative.

The Co-Work Space for Potential Dropouts combines elements of both horizontal and vertical political platforms. Though it is a highly structured environment, and though the way one may flow through and experience the Pollock Gallery has a highly narrative framework, participants are highly encouraged to follow their inspiration where it leads them. Sit down, peruse the Course Catalogue, and pursue authors and subjects of one’s interest in the Co-Work Space library. Should one have the time and the inclination, one can watch the promotional videos, read the Course Catalogue and listen to the sound installation; or, likewise, one could gather with friends to perform a seance and invoke the queer spirits and spirits of color through shamanic ritual following the guidance of artist AA Bronson’s course. Then one might form a think tank that seeks to create, perform and iterate seances that encourage hybrid identities such as bisexuality in deep red states, using the instructions from ICA Miami Curator of Programs Gean Moreno’s course on think tanks. That’s not all. One could then try to link to legal frameworks and get the federal government to fund experimental residencies for shamanic research in locations as exotic as Spokane and Northampton. The possibilities for modular combination of course-pursuits and lines of flight are limited only by the participants’ own vision.

It is important to say at this point that the Co-Work Space is not an incubator space. It is not promoting “equity” or “representation” or any other neo-liberal buzzword of “social practice art” that puts the wolf’s work in sheep’s clothing and promotes social stasis. The Co-Work Space is not a closed loop but an expanding cone, whose base intends to incorporate a greater and greater majority of users (the logic of capitalist growth) but whose apex is not the creation of surplus value, but rather a strategy that may explode the terrifying eco-fascist future we seem to be so horrifically hurling towards. Additionally, we want our users to get credit for the projects they create and to build verifiable portfolios. To this end, the Co-Work Space, in March, will begin an experiment in blockchain certification for participants who have dedicated their time and energy to visionary projects. It will grant digital certificates. This is a radical step. Typically only major institutions such as MIT and the European Union have attempted to do the same.

This use of blockchain as a method for certification validates the work participants will do into greater and more global perspectives, above the constraints of the university as we know it.

The politics of the Co-Work Space is in its form and not its content. It is seeking to re-orient art, education, spirituality and justice away from a cyclical and ineffective reactivity towards the obvious and logical endpoint of the neoliberalism (eco-fascism) as it transforms into green-zone demagoguery. The movement for the future needs to be 4 steps ahead and not 3 steps behind if it wants to win. As Nick Srnicek describes, our current de facto response to overwhelming social injustices is invariably a “folk political” one: reactive, humanistic, local, small-scale, paltry, failing. It has no proposal for the future, and it fails to address the problematics of global, complex systems at large. Rather, folk politicians create a circular logic within the problem, whose boundaries they cannot escape.

The future is happening in the present and it is accelerating. Yet its very speed is its vulnerability. The Co-Work Space is not static, it is a project in motion, changing, evolving, truly progressive, in a motion that creates gaps within the establishment. It uses their resources–flexible labor and the university– in order to hack into the common sense of how we see and act within the infrastructures that are already in place.

DROPOUT!"
art  arteducation  dropouts  coworking  globalwarming  highered  education  alternative  constructivism  sofiabastidas  avivarma  radicalism  resistance 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Cobot - managing coworking spaces
"Cobot is the leading management software for coworking spaces, office hubs, and flexible workspaces around the world."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/cobot_me/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiOzLvhlgtq/ ]
coworking  lcproject  openstudioproject  management  office  service  software  via:morgansully 
may 2018 by robertogreco
ALENA MUSEUM
"Alena Museum is nonprofit 501(c)3 creative space that houses multi-disciplinary arts and work studios to cultivate the cultural richness of the African Diaspora. In the African language of Tigrinya Alena translates to  “we are here!"  Alena Museum declares that "we are here" by providing access for the African Diaspora to create original work and keep dedicated space for creative expression, in the face of the rapid displacement of these communities as a result of gentrification. We are empowering our community to be active players in this new economy in order to directly  mitigate displacement and marginalization."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/alenamuseum/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiOzLvhlgtq/ ]
lcproject  openstudioproject  art  arts  coworking  gentrification  studios  africandiaspora  diaspora  oakland  bayarea  tovisit  via:morgansully 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Agora Collective - Center for Collaborative Practices
"The Agora Collective - Berlin-based Center for Contemporary Practices - was originally founded in 2011 by a multidisciplinary team as an independent project space in Mittelweg, 50 Berlin. Since then, Agora expands its mission to be a place to conceive and experiment with models of working together; providing stable spaces for artists to engage within collaborative and community-based practices."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/agora_collective/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiOzLvhlgtq/ ]
lcproject  openstudioproject  coworking  berlin  art  collaborative  collaboration  community  via:morgansully 
may 2018 by robertogreco
The mystery of the white dress shirt: Makeshift Society Brooklyn postmortem — Medium
"We hosted rad events with nationally recognized partners including Adobe, HP, and SXSW on the assumption that if we get people to visit, we would get more conversions to memberships. But we saw little correlation between event attendees and future memberships. We also tried referral bonuses and monthly discounts for different skill sets (e.g. 50% off for photographers in May). That didn’t work either. The one thing that did work quite well, ironically, was a “three months for the price of two” membership offer that we launched when we had exactly 3 months left before closing. This resulted in about four conversions, which sounds small but is not insignificant (about 6% of the core membership base we were counting on in our original business plan). We probably should have experimented more with membership packages, but we were trying to avoid the situation where current members feel burnt by deals offered to new members. Strong impulses towards fairness are a liability for capitalists."



"Is community a side, or the main dish?

On the coworking as community — commodity spectrum, we existed somewhere in the middle. The feel of Makeshift Society Brooklyn was relatively communal and friendly, but ultimately it was a pay-to-play membership organization. We found that people genuinely seek community when it comes as a freebie side dish, but it’s somewhat rare that people want to pay for it as the main dish. In retrospect, this makes sense. One pays for golf at the club because paying explicitly for access to likeminded peers feels dirty. Even Airbnb, who claim to offer belonging (which is dubious, but we’ll take it at face value for now), are actually selling accommodations. The feeling of belonging is a mint on your pillow — the thing you enjoy most but would never pay for on its own.

When prospective members came through our doors asking about what amenities we offer, I could usually tell that they were not going to choose to join our community. Whereas other spaces offer hard amenities such as free beer on tap or access to legal advice, our biggest “amenity” was the ability to get to know a group of down to earth people who did something relatively close to what you’re doing, to call on them for emotional support, and occasionally to do some work together. Second to this, daylight and a dignified workspace were our primary distinctions (this says a lot about what passes for ‘quality’ in the state of workspaces). If you’ve already gotten wasted on the free beer, worked in your glass cubicle, and still haven’t found a supportive community of practice, you’d be more likely to arrive at the doors of MSS BK genuinely in search of what we offered. Leigh summed it up nicely:
At Makeshift I’m surrounded by amazingly smart and creative individuals. Whether it’s asking for a second set of eyes from a deskmate or seeing the other things members are building, being surrounded by that energy is inspiring.

It was also important to us that our people feel connected to the broader community of the neighborhood and the city, which is something that Matt and Cory picked up on:
Makeshift has all the productivity benefits of a coffee shop without the drawbacks. Well, it doesn’t have coffee, but that’s actually a benefit too. There are plenty of great cafés [nearby] that are easy to walk to. One of my favorite things about Makeshift’s space is that it really encourages creativity by making it easy to get up and move around. The location is a big, airy, bright area right on street level, on a nice quiet street, which makes it very easy to get up and get out for a quick walk outside to clear one’s head… Other co-working spaces that I’ve worked at are on high floors and I have to pack up my computer in my backpack before I can get outside, which makes it subtly harder to get up and move around. At Makeshift I can just get up, walk around, and get right back to work.

Before the Brooklyn expansion, Rena and I discussed converting MSS into a non-profit. We decided not to because we wanted to retain agility. As MSS BK was struggling I spent a good amount of time considering this as an alternative future for the space. By sliding from our midpoint on the community — commodity spectrum to somewhere more resolutely on the community side of things, such as a co-op, we would give up some or all control over the community, perhaps even the operations of the space. From the perspective of the balance sheet this could work out OK. Giving up control to a co-op could also mean freeing the MSS business entity of the responsibility to look after and pay for every little thing (printer toner, cleaning, etc) as those become shared responsibilities.

By the time we got to seriously considering converting ourselves into a co-op, we were too late to practically make the transition. It would have required a new cooperatively owned entity taking over the lease, which would require enough co-op members to assemble the tens of thousands of dollars needed just for the security deposit, not to mention a similarly formidable monthly sum to cover rent. In theory MSS could have retained the lease and sublet the space to a new co-op, but that’s a risky transition with a lot of opportunity for things to fall apart. Too risky.

By the time we were ready to do it, there was not enough money in our bank account to protect MSS in the event that the transition was less than perfect. Instead I’ll daydream of a benevolent co-op that performs hostile takeovers, converting struggling but beloved for-profit businesses into community-owned infrastructure. In the meantime, I’ll be watching Prime Produce closely as they progress with their co-op in midtown with the assist of “sympathetic investors”."
bryanboyer  2015  capitalism  coworking  makeshiftsociety  business  marketing  events  community  agility  markets  communication  cooperatives 
november 2015 by robertogreco
CivicLab, a place for co-working, workshops and innovation for civic engagement,
"CivicLab is a co-working space in Chicago’s West Loop at 114 N. Aberdeen Street dedicated collaboration, education and innovation for social justice and civic engagement. We’re a “do tank.” Our call to service is – Investigate. Fabricate. Educate. Activate. We opened our doors on July 1, 2013.
Watch a one minute video introduction. [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyPqTNjbi40 ]"
civiclab  chicago  coworking  civics  socialjustice  openstudioproject  lcproject  makerspaces  collaboration  education 
june 2015 by robertogreco
PAWA254 | ArtRising
"PAWA254 is Nairobi's unique social enterprise through which innovative professionals from diverse artistic fields exploit their creative genius to foster social change. Among the creatives who collaborate in this dynamic space are photographers, graphic artists, journalists, musicians and poets. Significantly, promising youths are invited, both to make their contribution in this informal powerhouse and to receive mentorship from the experts. The end result of the PAWA254 collaborative effort is work that is as inspiring as it is far-reaching simply, work of unparalleled social impact. The PAWA254 hub houses, fosters, and catalyzes creative and community-driven projects for social change across Kenya. It is the first of its kind in Africa.

The Message

Used together as PAWA254, the words convey the message Power Kenya, and symbolize national strength and unity in a context of devotion to Kenya, a once-peaceful nation that almost went to ruin with the post-2007 election-related violence. But there is an interesting twist to the PAWA254 story: usage of the slang term Pawa captures the colloquial, informal nature of the limited company PAWA254 which seeks innovation in a casual and relaxed creative office environment. Here, there is little room left for the usual, stiff formalities of a traditional office setting.

The two-wing PAWA254 hub facilitates use of visual and graphic arts, independent and citizen journalism, documentary film and photography, as well as digital and social media as means of civic expression and social action.

To meet its objectives, the hub facility brings together established and aspiring photographers, cartoonists, animators, creative designers, videographers and filmmakers, as well as entrepreneurs and activists, to work, learn, and share in an environment that inspires creativity and innovative effort, the ultimate aim being to facilitate social change.

How It Works

PAWA254′s community of like-minded and active professionals meets and works daily in its flexible co-working space. This space also serves as an open resource for a range of collaborative youth meetings and efforts, and as an exhibition centre for photography and journalism, among other artistic endeavours.

The space is a haven for investors and others seeking to support social change in Kenya. Regular programmes and training sessions foster skill-sharing and empower a new generation of young professionals and disadvantaged youth to effect social change through tangible, innovative projects.

Primary programmatic focus is on photography and visual arts, documentary and mixed media, traditional and citizen journalism, as well as community organizing. Regular training programmes, workshops, clinics, and photography salons at the space are free of charge and are open to the public. The space is also available for rental to entrepreneurial creatives who seek state-of-the-art conferencing facilities in an atmosphere that is easy and amazingly hospitable.

Pawa254 Programs and Events

A principal part of Pawa254’s mission has been to make the space and its resources accessible to persons at the grassroots level. Besides building a strong community in-house, PAWA254 has engaged more than 100,000 youths since its inception. This has been achieved through training sessions and diverse outreach programs. We continue to recruit, train, and equip a new generation of bold creative’s whose outlook will help reshape the media landscape in Kenya, the aim of impacting society positively through the arts. At the heart of the PAWA254 undertaking is improvement of the socioeconomic situation of youth from underprivileged backgrounds. Also, for self-motivated youths, participation in our training sessions and workshops leads to professional employment, and can be a spur to fruitful self-employment. Here is an inventory of the programs hosted at the PAWA254 hub:"

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/user/PAWA254TV/ ]
pawa254  kenya  nairobi  africa  socialchange  lcproject  openstudioproject  mentoring  collaboration  community  communities  creativity  art  arts  photography  journalism  bonifacemwangi  coworking 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Library as Infrastructure
"For millennia libraries have acquired resources, organized them, preserved them and made them accessible (or not) to patrons. But the forms of those resources have changed — from scrolls and codices; to LPs and LaserDiscs; to e-books, electronic databases and open data sets. Libraries have had at least to comprehend, if not become a key node within, evolving systems of media production and distribution. Consider the medieval scriptoria where manuscripts were produced; the evolution of the publishing industry and book trade after Gutenberg; the rise of information technology and its webs of wires, protocols and regulations. 1 At every stage, the contexts — spatial, political, economic, cultural — in which libraries function have shifted; so they are continuously reinventing themselves and the means by which they provide those vital information services.

Libraries have also assumed a host of ever-changing social and symbolic functions. They have been expected to symbolize the eminence of a ruler or state, to integrally link “knowledge” and “power” — and, more recently, to serve as “community centers,” “public squares” or “think tanks.” Even those seemingly modern metaphors have deep histories. The ancient Library of Alexandria was a prototypical think tank, 2 and the early Carnegie buildings of the 1880s were community centers with swimming pools and public baths, bowling alleys, billiard rooms, even rifle ranges, as well as book stacks. 3 As the Carnegie funding program expanded internationally — to more than 2,500 libraries worldwide — secretary James Bertram standardized the design in his 1911 pamphlet “Notes on the Erection of Library Buildings,” which offered grantees a choice of six models, believed to be the work of architect Edward Tilton. Notably, they all included a lecture room.

In short, the library has always been a place where informational and social infrastructures intersect within a physical infrastructure that (ideally) supports that program.

Now we are seeing the rise of a new metaphor: the library as “platform” — a buzzy word that refers to a base upon which developers create new applications, technologies and processes. In an influential 2012 article in Library Journal, David Weinberger proposed that we think of libraries as “open platforms” — not only for the creation of software, but also for the development of knowledge and community. 4 Weinberger argued that libraries should open up their entire collections, all their metadata, and any technologies they’ve created, and allow anyone to build new products and services on top of that foundation. The platform model, he wrote, “focuses our attention away from the provisioning of resources to the foment” — the “messy, rich networks of people and ideas” — that “those resources engender.” Thus the ancient Library of Alexandria, part of a larger museum with botanical gardens, laboratories, living quarters and dining halls, was a platform not only for the translation and copying of myriad texts and the compilation of a magnificent collection, but also for the launch of works by Euclid, Archimedes, Eratosthenes and their peers."



"Partly because of their skill in reaching populations that others miss, libraries have recently reported record circulation and visitation, despite severe budget cuts, decreased hours and the threatened closure or sale of “underperforming” branches. 9 Meanwhile the Pew Research Center has released a series of studies about the materials and services Americans want their libraries to provide. Among the findings: 90 percent of respondents say the closure of their local public library would have an impact on their community, and 63 percent describe that impact as “major.”"



"Again, we need to look to the infrastructural ecology — the larger network of public services and knowledge institutions of which each library is a part. How might towns, cities and regions assess what their various public (and private) institutions are uniquely qualified and sufficiently resourced to do, and then deploy those resources most effectively? Should we regard the library as the territory of the civic mind and ask other social services to attend to the civic body? The assignment of social responsibility isn’t so black and white — nor are the boundaries between mind and body, cognition and affect — but libraries do need to collaborate with other institutions to determine how they leverage the resources of the infrastructural ecology to serve their publics, with each institution and organization contributing what it’s best equipped to contribute — and each operating with a clear sense of its mission and obligation."



"Libraries need to stay focused on their long-term cultural goals — which should hold true regardless of what Google decides to do tomorrow — and on their place within the larger infrastructural ecology. They also need to consider how their various infrastructural identities map onto each other, or don’t. Can an institution whose technical and physical infrastructure is governed by the pursuit of innovation also fulfill its obligations as a social infrastructure serving the disenfranchised? What ethics are embodied in the single-minded pursuit of “the latest” technologies, or the equation of learning with entrepreneurialism?

As Zadie Smith argued beautifully in the New York Review of Books, we risk losing the library’s role as a “different kind of social reality (of the three dimensional kind), which by its very existence teaches a system of values beyond the fiscal.” Barbara Fister, a librarian at Gustavus Adolphus College, offered an equally eloquent plea for the library as a space of exception:
Libraries are not, or at least should not be, engines of productivity. If anything, they should slow people down and seduce them with the unexpected, the irrelevant, the odd and the unexplainable. Productivity is a destructive way to justify the individual’s value in a system that is naturally communal, not an individualistic or entrepreneurial zero-sum game to be won by the most industrious.


Libraries, she argued, “will always be at a disadvantage” to Google and Amazon because they value privacy; they refuse to exploit users’ private data to improve the search experience. Yet libraries’ failure to compete in efficiency is what affords them the opportunity to offer a “different kind of social reality.” I’d venture that there is room for entrepreneurial learning in the library, but there also has to be room for that alternate reality where knowledge needn’t have monetary value, where learning isn’t driven by a profit motive. We can accommodate both spaces for entrepreneurship and spaces of exception, provided the institution has a strong epistemic framing that encompasses both. This means that the library needs to know how to read itself as a social-technical-intellectual infrastructure."



"In libraries like BiblioTech — and the Digital Public Library of America — the collection itself is off-site. Do patrons wonder where, exactly, all those books and periodicals and cloud-based materials live? What’s under, or floating above, the “platform”? Do they think about the algorithms that lead them to particular library materials, and the conduits and protocols through which they access them? Do they consider what it means to supplant bookstacks with server stacks — whose metal racks we can’t kick, lights we can’t adjust, knobs we can’t fiddle with? Do they think about the librarians negotiating access licenses and adding metadata to “digital assets,” or the engineers maintaining the servers? With the increasing recession of these technical infrastructures — and the human labor that supports them — further off-site, behind the interface, deeper inside the black box, how can we understand the ways in which those structures structure our intellect and sociality?

We need to develop — both among library patrons and librarians themselves — new critical capacities to understand the distributed physical, technical and social architectures that scaffold our institutions of knowledge and program our values. And we must consider where those infrastructures intersect — where they should be, and perhaps aren’t, mutually reinforcing one another. When do our social obligations compromise our intellectual aspirations, or vice versa? And when do those social or intellectual aspirations for the library exceed — or fail to fully exploit — the capacities of our architectural and technological infrastructures? Ultimately, we need to ensure that we have a strong epistemological framework — a narrative that explains how the library promotes learning and stewards knowledge — so that everything hangs together, so there’s some institutional coherence. We need to sync the library’s intersecting infrastructures so that they work together to support our shared intellectual and ethical goals."
shannonmattern  2014  libraries  infrastructure  access  accessibility  services  government  civics  librarians  information  ethics  community  makerspaces  privacy  safety  learning  openstudioproject  education  lcproject  zadiesmith  barbarafister  seattle  nyc  pittsburgh  culture  google  neoliberalism  knowledge  diversity  inequality  coworking  brooklyn  nypl  washingtondc  architecture  design  hackerlabs  hackerspaces  annebalsamo  technology  chicago  ncsu  books  mexicocity  mexicodf  davidadjaye  social  socialinfrastructure  ala  intellectualfreedom  freedom  democracy  publicgood  public  lifelonglearning  saltlakecity  marellusturner  partnerships  toyoito  refuge  cities  ericklinenberg  economics  amazon  disparity  mediaproduction  readwrite  melvildewey  df 
december 2014 by robertogreco
100state
"100state creates a community and home for problem-solvers, creatives, and entrepreneurs. We inspire collaboration and create connections to unleash our community's potential.

Our organization has grown organically around the 100state of mind, which is a mindset of pursuing passion, adding value through solving problems, daring to create the world we truly want to live in and enjoying life along the way. We bring people who pursue this state of mind together to collaborate. This drives synchronistic and authentic interaction, and enables a vibrant environment in which our members thrive.

We invite all people who align with our mission, vision, and values to connect with us. We offer memberships for individuals, startups, and organizations to use our network and workspace. We also hold problem-solving brainstorms for anyone in need, and facilitate unique events and workshops open to the public.

We've been fortunate to partner with dozens of organizations, and have grown to over 140 members in our first year. We don't plan on slowing down anytime soon.

Vision

100state's vision is to unleash our community’s potential through a worldwide community of people who collaborate to solve real problems and make the world a better place.

We envision a community working together to create a new model of innovation that helps the world navigate the evolving human experience of the 21st century.

We dream of a world in which everyone can earn a living doing what they love and believe we can get there if we're willing to do it together.

Values

People First
People are what matter. When the right people come together, great things happen.

Community Is Our Greatest Asset
The people around us influence our lives. We recognize it, and so should you.

Win - Win - Win
Truly great projects benefit everyone. We look for that in every project we undertake.

Collaboration Over Competition
Collaboration creates value; competition divides it.

Build On Trust
Good relationships are built on trust. 100state is built on relationships. Trust is key.

Be Positive
Negativity kills creativity.

Appreciate Honesty
Expect nothing less. Teamwork is hard, and communication is key. Even if it hurts, appreciate it.

Be Courageous
Follow your passion. What ends up lasting and inspiring is what started with passion and courage."
via:michaelmccabe  madison  wisconsin  lcproject  openstudioproject  collaboration  communities  community  coworking 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Café Soloistá | The 24 hour video lounge for independent workers.
"Join our free always-on video café of independent workers, each doing their own thing while still being part of a great community

Be part of a beautiful thing
Join a sofa
 
Café Soloista sofas are hosted on Google Hangouts and are free to join

Our video café is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year."
coworking  remote  video  hangouts  googlehangouts  workinginpublic  internet  web  online 
july 2014 by robertogreco
coffee shop best practices for the transient info-worker | THE STATE
"While the coffee shop is generally an accepted place in which to set up one’s laptop and get to work, there is a bit of social obscurity to this exchange, and some aspects of the everyday capitalist potlatch through which one must navigate. Coffee shops are still interpreted by society at large as a place for buying and selling coffee, and to utilize one as a workspace requires some knowledge and skilled negotiation of certain grey market operations coursing just underneath the surface of the associated caffeination industries.

Due to bad negotiation of these market niceties on the part of info-workers attempting to use these facilities, some coffee shops have launched a backlash against their perception as a workspace. Particularly in places like the cutthroat capitalist region of San Francisco, coffee shops have disconnected their Wifi entirely, and in some places, done away with tables altogether in an effort to disband the info-working classes that have attached themselves to their services like a lamphrey to the belly of a whale—sucking up their data, energy, and seating space without contributing anything in return. They believe they can make more money without these parasites attached. Make no mistake, renting a table from a coffee shop is a market exchange in which a service is being exchanged for a price. But it is a market with an unspoken lack of definition. To attempt to abuse this lack of definition is to crush its weak structure, and make our presence pathological. Therefore, if computer users of the world wish this grey market to perpetuate, there are certain rules of its functioning by which we must abide.

General Principle: the transient workspace can only exist as long as the coffee shop continues to exist.



Rule One: pay for your time.



Rule Two: decide upon your rate.



Rule Three: consider your footprint.



Rule Four: consider your psychological impact.



"The difficulty with being a transient info-worker is that you cannot rely upon coffee shops in the way that one might rely on a rented office space or one’s home. This economy is by nature a precarious one. You are relying upon what is available unless you pay the premium to reserve a dedicated co-working space, which requires the sort of economic investment that many of us cannot make. This puts us in a delicate position. We do not owe anything to the coffee shops where we do our daily work, and yet, we are reliant upon their continued existence. We cannot afford the guaranteed service of a real customer, nor the part-ownership of a co-op member. Given our inability to play on the level of a dedicated, contractual customer, we must negotiate this grey market. These rules, therefore, do not take the form of ethical imperative, but instead, best practices and the optimist spirit of the opportunist, not the pessimistic spirit of the parasite. These rules are not fixed, but will no doubt shift as the markets we are forced to live within also shift, taking our daily existence with them."
coffeeshops  neo-nomads  infoworkers  coworking  etiquette  2014  adamrothstein  capitalism 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Workspace of: Makeshift Society in NYC | VSCO
"Makeshift Society provides multi-faceted workspaces in both San Francisco and New York City that are geared towards entrepreneurs, creatives, and freelancers. A little while back, we featured Makeshift Society’s San Francisco location on the Journal, which you can view here. Since then, they successfully funded a Kickstarter of $30,000 for seeding a New York coworking space, and just recently, they finished building out the gorgeous 4,000 square foot workspace, which is located in a hundred year old pencil factory in Brooklyn.

For the configuration of their New York workspace, Makeshift Society created an open, airy, and bright layout that utilizes the large warehouse windows and vaulted ceilings. There are plenty of cozy corners, quiet areas, and meeting rooms where members can discuss privately with clients and collaborators. A range of options for membership, from a single day pass up to a full-time, 5 day a week plan, allows for individuals to create a schedule suitable to their needs.

In celebration of the completion of their New York workspace, Makeshift Society is throwing an open house with refreshments, demos, and talks on Wednesday, June 4th from 9am - 6pm. This event is free and open to the public. If you would like to attend the event, make sure to reserve a spot here as spaces are limited.

We were very excited to interview Makeshift Society regarding their beautiful and functional new space. Read on below to learn more about the differences between their New York and San Francisco spaces and the types of creatives they house. All of the wonderful images documenting their simple, inspiring, and warm workspace were taken by Noah Sahady and processed using VSCO Film 04."
makeschiftsociety  nyc  brooklyn  coworking  workplace  design  interiors  lcproject  openstudioproject  2014  via:nicolefenton  furniture  workspace  workspaces 
june 2014 by robertogreco
indy johar founder of HUB westminster on co-working spaces
"designboom visited architect indy johar in london to learn more about his extensive study into socially driven sustainable urban organization. ‘the intersections of culture and technology have contributed to a mindset of ‘own less, use more‘, he explains, ‘and the concept of ‘ecosystems’ fits the contemporary landscape of work much better than the centralized model of decades past’.

‘we’re effectively going to see the corporate model become the uncorporate model,’ johar predicts, with large companies breaking down into separate but interwoven branches for their physical infrastructure, investment, and learning platforms. as a result, there is a pressing need to open up the office, moving away from divided departments and cubicles and towards what he describes as a ‘fluid mix’ wherein executives, startups, suppliers, and talent makers are all part of a larger ecosystem. as a result, there is a pressing need to open up the office, moving away from divided departments and cubicles and towards what he describes as a ‘fluid mix’ wherein executives, startups, suppliers, and talent makers are all part of a larger ecosystem."



"most HUBs are comprised of three types of environments: collaborative, semi-private, and private.all of them are conceptualized as blank canvases — while they provide basic furniture and necessities, the focus of the space is not on superfluous decoration but rather how people fill it and what they do with their time there. hubbers bring all kinds of personal objects and possessions to make their workspace, even in the sprawling open collaborative areas, feel uniquely theirs; and the HUBs feature creative touches inside and out, whether they’re built to resemble a giant red bus as in singapore or highlight their walls with colorful assemblages designating the HUB locations worldwide. microcosms of the work world in themselves — and thus a prevision of grander changes in society and culture — the HUBs are a perfect place to study human behaviour and watch out for the next trends in office furniture."



"the diversity of new needs means that office furniture manufacturers are also for the first time not restricted to international standards and regulations regarding the precise dimensions and production specifications of chairs and desks, permitting an expanded level of creativity and aesthetic vision. but the enduring effects of the new world of work will extend far beyond that. the design of office furniture and environments is equally shaped by changes within office culture and its increasing emphasis on collaboration and communication."

[video also here: https://vimeo.com/83300452 ]
indyjohar  coworking  2014  howwework  lcproject  openstudioproject  sharing  ownershap  hub  community  work  officespaces  offices  interiors  furniture  classroomdesign  design  architecture  organizations  officeculture  flexibility  ecosystems  place  thirdspaces  communitymanagement  uncorporate  infrastructure  platforms 
january 2014 by robertogreco
A Kickstarter for co-working space Makeshift Society raises questions about what we freelancers need to be productive.: Observatory: Design Observer
"Rena Tom and Bryan Boyer have been thinking about how freelancers work, personally and professionally, for much of their careers. Rena owned and operated the cult design store and gallery Rare Device, and has also worked as a designer of jewelry, stationery and web pages. Bryan, trained as an architect, was most recently Strategic Design Lead at Sitra, the Finnish Innovation Fund. Among his projects there was Brickstarter, about which I wrote here. But rather than industrial design machines like cubicles, cases or office landscapes, they've created an idiosyncratic place to which freelancers can bring their laptops, headphones, and caffienated beverages. A space in which, they hope to create a sense of community and strenth in numbers.

In September 2012, Tom opened Makeshift Society in San Francisco. The society is,
an organization that fosters creativity, collaboration and community through a coworking space/clubhouse, innovative programming, and support for freelancers and small business owners. We want to enable everyone to make, learn, teach, and think.
Now they are bringing that model to Brooklyn, in a larger space in Williamsburg. They have the money to build it out, but they are currently running a Kickstarter campaign to create a creative tool lending library for that space. New York apartments make it hard to store, and use, the books, materials and equipment one needs once and a while.

In the Q&A below, Rena and Bryan talk about their lessons learned about workspace, community, and how to develop a business out of your own needs."



"Makeshift was at first just going to be a lending library for design books, and I’d split the rent with a couple friends Victoria Smith (sfgirlbybay blogger) and Suzanne Shade (creative director/muse at Minted) and eventually it turned into what it is today."



"As a place, we focus on having a diversity of micro-environments that suit our members at different times and in different moods. Even though SF is not quite 1000 square feet we have bright corners and darker ones, work desks and softer spots like sofas, seats for up to 20 and even a nap loft if someone needs down time. Despite making claims of freeing their members from the corporate grind, a number of the coworking spaces we saw when doing research for Makeshift look rather like a nicely appointed corporate office."



"Fast internet, WiFi, and copious power outlets are the starting point. A printer helps. We’ve thought about adding a fax machine in NYC because it’s the sort of thing that you use very seldomly, but when you do it’s often the only option and finding one can be so annoying.

The qualities of the space are the more important amenities, really. Things like an easily-accessible location; a nice, calm, well-designed environment; great daylight. These relate to aspects of the community as well: being able to leave your things around while you step out for a bit saves a lot of the hassle that one endures when working as a constant guest. Being surrounded by people who are working as hard as you are helps create a contagious sense of motivation. And being in a place where your peers are working on interesting things is critical."



"As you think about opening the Brooklyn space, what are you designing differently?

RT: I have a feeling that Brooklyn members will more results-oriented than the San Francisco crew, or at least they are in a greater hurry to get there! We’ll accommodate that with tighter programming (events and classes), but we also want to import some of the West coast vibe, which has a somewhat longer-term and broader definition of “results”, along with acting in a mutually beneficial manner. (Adam Grant’s book Give and Take has quite a bit more to say about that.) We want to show that flipping roles and being a teacher sometimes and a student other times is extremely valuable.

One of the ways that this will be expressed architecturally is a very slight emphasis on the more traditional studio model. In SF we do not have dedicated desks, but in NYC we will. In SF we have one small conference room, in NYC we’ll have one small room for focused discussion as well as one larger room for presentations, and a number of phone booths.

BB: I also want to mention something that’s not going to change in BK. We’re making a commitment in this location to having an open workspace, so you will not see any miniature glass cubicles. We’re going to keep BK as open as possible, just like SF."



"How do you see your spaces as interacting with the cities and neighborhoods around them?

We’re deliberately choosing neighborhoods that are lively, with bubbling street life and a significant number of local residents. Makeshift Society works best on the ground floor where big windows encourage passers-by to enter, and where the view of the street provides visual stimulation for our members.

Most of the SV companies you’ve written about start from the premise that they need to protect their secrets and capture 100% of their workers’ intellectual capital, which has the effect of turning them inwards as closed campuses where every idea has a whiteboard to land on, and every door secured by a keycard. The city itself is humanity’s best engine for connections and inspiration, but again and again we see corporations recreate a sanitized, interior version of a city all for themselves. The city-within-a-city architectural strategy becomes irrelevant or even counter-productive if you’re not constrained by the same IP concerns.

Makeshift has the freedom to embed ourselves in the existing networks of the city itself, and to benefit from the actual, spectacular diversity that’s already there. We don’t need to have our own privatized transportation system, we need to be located near public transit like the subway and citibike; we don’t need to go through the gymnastics of creating ‘interior streets’ or plazas. We have a real street right outside our windows!"
workspaces  makeshifsociety  bryanboyer  renatom  howwework  openstudioproject  classroomdesign  schooldesign  interiors  alexandralange  2013  coworking  community  lighting  openspaces  tcsnmy  cv  lcproject  workspace 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Creating Co-Working Spaces in Museums and Libraries | The Pop-Up Museum
"The MLK Library in Washington DC’s Chinatown just opened a brand-new, beautifully designed co-working space for entrepreneurs. It was unveiled last week, and applications to claim a spot are now open. The dedicated co-working space has room for 50 entrepreneurs, and resides within the new Digital Commons Space. This space has 3-D printers, espresso machines, and conferences rooms.

There is a one-page application to apply, and other than already having your own startup company, the only requirement is that you have a DC library card. You can get this in person and takes about two minutes; you don’t need to be a DC resident to obtain a card."
museums  libraries  coworking 
august 2013 by robertogreco
VAULT
"IN THE HEART OF A CITY BUILT BY PIONEERS, THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT LIVES ON.

For generations, daring people have started businesses here that now feed and connect the world. With hard work and imagination, they created what at first only they could see. After an epic flood, we have the opportunity to do it once again.

THIS IS A PLACE FOR THE NEXT WAVE OF BUILDERS.

Gather your supplies, get a kick in the pants, and keep moving this city forward. We’ll grow what has been planted here, and we’ll take it to the next level. We will rebuild, reinvent and redesign and change the world in the process.

We are the next generation of pioneers. Our hands and spirits shape this place. Make no mistake, the entrepreneurial spirit lives here. We’re here to Vault. 

VAULT 100

The Vault community has set forth a 3-part mission to ensure that Cedar Rapids will always be a place where ideas grow and entrepreneurs thrive. To this end, we commit ourselves and challenge our fellow citizens to: 

Connect 100 working entrepreneurs across the metro.
See the directory.

Produce 100 events to help people build businesses here.
See the calendar.

Launch 100 new companies in Cedar Rapids.
See the portfolio.

Grow to 100 members to make Vault 100 a reality.
Join today!"
coworking  cedarrapids  iowa  via:lukeneff  makerspaces  thebigideschool  lcproject  openstudioproject 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Not An Employee
"You’re independent but you don’t have to be alone. In the past few years, the coworking movement has resulted in community-minded spaces for independent workers around the world. These are not stiff and stifling “business incubator” or “office condo” spaces. They are spaces where independent workers come together for collaboration and camaraderie.

If you are in the Ann Arbor, Michigan area, we invite you to join us at The Workantile Exchange - a coworking space in the heart of downtown. The location is outstanding, the community is vibrant and the benefits of membership are vast.

If you are not local to Ann Arbor, we encourage you to find not an employees around you. You can check the Coworking Wiki to see if there is an existing space near you, or you might consider starting your own ad hoc group. Most coworking spaces start out humbly, as groups of like-minded people getting together regularly at coffee shops or in other public spaces. Community comes first."
workantile  community  annarbor  independence  freedom  williamtozier  freelancing  freelance  coworking 
december 2012 by robertogreco
The Setup / Micah Elizabeth Scott
"It's really important to me that I have a computer that I can carry anywhere. I live in San Francisco, and I often feel like the whole city is my living room and office. Keeping the scenery fresh helps me feel less disconnected from the world when I'm deep inside my work."

"Really I'd love to work from a cafe/warehouse/beach/desert, on battery power, with a server elsewhere running my giant render or compile."
wherewework  howwework  sanfrancisco  openstudioproject  lcproject  coworking  thesetup  2012  micahelizabethscott  usesthis 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Brooklyn Writers Space
"All spaces provide writers with a desk, a lamp and a chair on a first come first serve basis. Coffee is always on hand, as well as provide your own paper printing, wi-fi(but if you are trying to get away from the internet we can help you with that too), storage ($30 per quarter), and kitchenette lounge areas for socializing.

Each space is unique by location and by services, the Garfield location has a roof deck with monster tomato plants, Room 58 has a beautiful art gallery and a lounge with really comfy couches, and the Court Street location has plenty of books and very comfy reading area. All spaces are accessible 24/7."
writers  coworking  community  nyc  brooklyn  writing 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Hacker Dojo
"…a community of members who share a common love of creating wonderful things and understanding how the world works. You don't need to be a programmer to use/enjoy the space… a do-ocracy run by members, including several self organizing teams like events, government, and operations.

…a community center in Mountain View which is about 1/3rd coworking space, 1/3rd events venue, and 1/3rd a big social living room. In the spirit of SuperHappyDevHouse, we're creating a physical community space for hackers and thinkers on the Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area. This is a location for events, lectures, parties, BarCamps, DevHouses, LAN parties, hackathons, knitting circles, tinkering, brainstorming, coworking, and more. We welcome visitors to many of our lectures and classes, and invite people to use the space on a drop-in basis. The Dojo is a community space first and foremost - this means that the focus of the layout and activities is to lend itself to be a useful place to throw…"
lcproject  hackerdojo  bayarea  mountainview  hackerspaces  hackers  coworking 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Invisible Dog Art Center
"The Invisible Dog Art Center opened in October, 2009, a raw space in a vast converted factory building with a charmed history and an open-ended mission: to create, from the ground up, a new kind of interdisciplinary arts center. Over the last two years, over 50,000 people have attended our events: visual art exhibits; dance, theater, and music performances; film screenings; literary arts and poetry readings; lectures; community events; and more.

Long-term collaborations with artists are integral to The Invisible Dog’s mission, which is to create not only a new kind of art center, but also a new kind of artistic community.

The Invisible Dog brings together artists of all career stages, offering them unique opportunities for involvement. Over the last two years, the art center has evolved organically, developing with and alongside its diverse roster of collaborators… "
interdisciplinary  art  invisibledog  glvo  nyc  studios  coworking  arts  brooklyn 
october 2012 by robertogreco
sprout & co.
"sprout is a community education and research organization devoted to creating and supporting the community-driven learning, teaching, and investigation of science. We're united by a passion to reclaim science as a richly personal and creative craft. Through our PROGRAMS & STUDIOS, we're working to make our vision real in Somerville.

You might say we're working to create a community college that lives up to its name—not a college in a community or a school in a building, but a community of people who work together as colleagues to explore questions they care about."

[From the Studios page]

"Our studios are a bit unusual. Here you can find out WHERE they are, how you can use them as a COWORKING space, a community VENUE, a WORKSHOP AND LABSPACE for independent investigation, or WHATEVER ELSE you have in mind. And if you're interested, you can read about WHY we run our studios the way we do."
deschooling  unschooling  schooldesign  venues  workshops  labspace  coworking  glvo  shaunalynnduffy  alecresnick  michaelnagle  lcproject  openstudioproject  mit  massachusetts  somerville  learning  community  diy  sprout  makerspaces  hackerspaces  education  science  design  boston  sprout&co 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Makeshift Society
"Make, learn, teach, think. A clubhouse for creatives in San Francisco."

"Makeshift Society is an organization for those who crave camaraderie to fuel their creativity. Our members are curious and creative. They make with their heads and think with their hands.

We support collaborative projects and community-building activities through a coworking space/clubhouse, innovative programming, and support for freelancers and small business owners.

While we fully embrace technology and its ability to transform and enhance our businesses, we feel like there are many coworking and networking options for technology startups in San Francisco, but far fewer for those in other creative fields. We want to enable everyone to make, learn, teach, and think."
srg  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  bayarea  hackerspaces  makerspaces  making  coworking  sanfrancisco  2012  makeshift  makeshiftsociety  renatom 
september 2012 by robertogreco
General Assembly
"General Assembly is a global network of campuses for individuals seeking opportunity and education in technology, business, and design."

"We offer a wide variety of learning opportunities, from 90-minute classes to long-form courses. With new options added daily, your only limit is scroll speed."

"A whole may be greater than the sum of its parts, but it's our parts that make us great. From members and instructors to knowledge-seekers and partners, our community defines what we are: collaborative learning advocates, forward-thinking envelope-pushers, and capri-pant enthusiasts.

We're excited to serve as a base for so many creative, innovative, and passionate thinkers and makers. Here are some of the Member Startups in our Community: [list]"
schooldesign  learning  classes  coding  philadelphia  sanfrancisco  boston  berlin  sydney  toronto  london  coworking  nyc  startups  openstudioproject  lcproject  sharedspace  technology  design  entrepreneurship  education  generalassembly 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Agora
"…a multi-disciplinary gathering space of professionals, driven by the urge to explore new ways of interaction in today’s context. Seeking the balance between individuality & collectiveness. Individuals practicing and sharing their skills, providing to the collective a network, where connections are highly encouraged and facilitated resulting in a meaningful proactive community."

"…part of an artistic enterprise; a platform for the encounter of multi disciplinary projects, driven by urge to explore new ways of working & relating to projects & ideas in the actual context.

A space, a host for ideas in constant change agora provides space for artists, entrepreneurs, designers, bloggers, academics, programmers, accountants, performers, journalists, photographers, video makers, collaborators, writers, doers & dreamers.

Agora is a mix of individual initiatives & collective projects. Individuals exploring & creating a collective platform where connections & encounters are facilitated."
community  glvo  via:cervus  agoracollective  design  art  coworking  berlin 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Coworking Is Better for You Than Previously Thought
"In this European study, "93% and 86% of people say their personal and business circles have grown, respectively, and 76% say they're more productive. More importantly, 88% said their isolation has decreased, which probably influences their productivity (and happiness)."
work  communities  happiness  isolation  coworking  howwework  tcsnmy  lcproject  social  productivity  glvo  via:jbushnell  lifehacks  communitites 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Free Press opening Canada's first News Cafe - Winnipeg Free Press
"Ever wanted to have a cup of coffee with your favourite journalist?
Now’s your chance. The Winnipeg Free Press has signed an agreement with a local restaurant operator to open Canada’s first "News Cafe."

Situated at the corner of McDermot Avenue and Arthur Street in the Exchange District, the News Cafe will be a community hub where people can get something to eat or drink and interact with journalists working there.

The News Cafe will also house a small stage from which we will webcast a wide variety of programming. The stage will double as a performance space."

[See also: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com ]
winnnipeg  journalism  coworking  transparency  access  2011  newscafe  lcproject  sharedspace  conversation  engagement  canada  winnepegfreepress 
october 2011 by robertogreco
New Ways of Designing the Modern Workspace - NYTimes.com
"Adjustable desks, foldout benches & louvered shades have their place but…furniture is not the problem…But in the same way that bamboo floors, hybrid SUVs and eco-couture haven’t done much to curb carbon emissions, designing (& buying) more stuff for offices, no matter how sleek or sustainable it is, likely won’t help reset the culture of work.

Design itself is the problem because it is being used to solve the wrong ones…has to expand beyond noodling with the cubicle. I’m willing to bet that almost any office worker would happily swap Webcam lighting…for solutions to more pressing work issues like…burnout or fear of losing health coverage…

Two other factors often undervalued (and often ignored) in the workplace? Family and time…

We shouldn’t be rethinking the cubicle or corner office but rather rethinking all aspects of work…"
psychology  work  design  officedesign  allisonarieff  cubicles  classrooms  schooldesign  sustainability  productivity  life  families  parenting  time  workplace  workspace  nathanshedroff  furniture  homes  housing  babysitting  childcare  flexibility  coworking  efficiency  yiconglu  serbanionescu  jimdreilein  justinsmith  theminerandmajorproject  architecture  interiors  interiordesign  environmentaldesign  environment  broodwork  florianidenburg  jingliu  commonground  eames  froebel  kindergarten  andrewberardini  larrysummers  rachelbotsman  creativity  innovation  2011  autonomy  learning  workspaces  classroom  friedrichfroebel 
july 2011 by robertogreco
ADX / Portland, OR / Building a Community of Thinkers & Makers
"Equal parts workspace and incubator, our membership-based community unites multiple creative disciplines within a 10,000 square-foot facility that is accessible, collaborative & affordable."
portland  oregon  coworking  community  art  design  work  collaboration  incubator  lcproject 
june 2011 by robertogreco
not an alternative
"Not An Alternative is a hybrid arts collective and non-profit organization with a mission to affect popular understandings of events, symbols, and history. We curate and produce work that questions and leverages the tools of advertising, architecture, exhibit design, branding, and public relations. Programs are hosted at a variety of venues, including our Brooklyn-based gallery No-Space (formerly known as The Change You Want to See Gallery).

No-Space is host to free lectures, screenings, panel discussions, workshops and artist presentations. The space also consists of a production workshop, filming studio and video editing suite. During the day it is a collaborative office space (aka coworking) for freelancers and cultural producers."
activism  nyc  research  urbanism  art  architecture  brooklyn  galleries  no-space  notanalternative  coworking  studios  hackerspaces 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Marcel Kampman » Project Dream School dream start - "organization abandons the word “school”...becomes a bootcamp for design where youth & collaborating community members apply their creativity toward innovative applications..."
"traditional classroom is abandoned in favor of space that favors multidirectional collaboration...building that houses organization is designed to be...easily transformed & reconfigured as quickly as our ideas regarding teaching & learning evolve & transform."
netherlands  tcsnmy  learning  school  coworking  dreamschool  droomschool  kenrobinson  lcproject  schooldesign  unschooling  communitycenters  collaboration  schools  schooling  johnmoravec  marcelkampman  jeffjarvis  curation 
june 2010 by robertogreco
W+K12 Presents No Place Like Home [The boarding school of work environments?]
"In the 21st century, living is an art. Balancing home and work is just one aspect. We work to live; we live to work. The space in which that happens is ultimately changing. As houses evolve into workspaces, and workspaces become more hospitable to longer hours, we see the lines breaking down. Microwavable breakfastlunchdinner, office living rooms, wi-fi, cloud-computing, all are demanded evolutions of a space caught in crisis.

For "No Place Like Home" WK12 combines work and home by moving both into one living-breathing space. For the month of May, 12 eats, drinks, works, plays and sleeps in the lobby of Wieden + Kennedy. Our job is to create art. Our work is to design our space.

A house warming party is open to the public on the First Thursday of May."

[Lapsed domain. Here's the Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20110128112343/http://12noplacelikehome.com/ ]
wk12  wk  worklive  livework  work  housing  homes  balance  workspace  noplacelikehome  coworking  coliving  space  place  identity  lcproject  community  learning  working  computing  experiments  wieden+kennedy  workspaces 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Hvitträsk | Museovirasto
"Hvitträsk was built between 1901–1903 by architects Herman Gesellius, Armas Lindgren and Eliel Saarinen. The main building, designed in National Romantic style, built of logs and natural stone, was both a common studio and a home for Eliel Saarinen and Armas Lindgren for some years after it was completed. During that time, Gesellius lived in the courtyard building and later moved into the north-wing of the main building after Lindgren relocated in Helsinki.

During the early decades, the main building served as both an architectural office and as a cultural home. It was visited by such esteemed figures as Jean Sibelius, Axeli Gallen-Kallela and Maksim Gorki. The office's staff also lived at Hvitträsk, and this is where the plans were drawn up for the Helsinki Railway Station, the National Museum of Finland and the monumental Munkkiniemi-Haaga project, among other grand works."

[photos here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dw/sets/72157606590131117/ ]
hvitträsk  finland  elielsaarinen  eerosaarinen  livework  glvo  homes  design  architecture  lcproject  coworking  hermangesellius  armaslindgren  helsinki 
april 2010 by robertogreco
GAFFTA – Creative Spaces and Innovation
"Reflecting on role of creative spaces for their innovations, they proposed 3 types of spaces: mindset (brain space), location & work environment (physical space), & network (virtual space). They described how each of these played a pivotal role in facilitating their projects: how the lack of privacy had occasionally fueled tensions between residents but also forced everyone to – literally – listen to other ideas; how the lack of boundaries between work & life had surfaced a growing quest for “meaning” in what you do; how “curiosity, risk-taking, & challenging the status quo” had been the key requirements for a fully immersive experience (& how some of the residents weren’t able to cope with these demands). They stressed that scarcity (space & time limits) had propelled intimacy & urgency & thus increased output intensity, & that in the face of the abundance of information & social connections on the web the experience of face-to-face collaboration had changed their concept of work."
palomar5  space  creativity  tcsnmy  schooldesign  lcproject  coworking  sharing  trust  mindset  virtual  networking  networks  immersion  privacy  work  life  gaffta  innovation 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Palomar5
"Palomar5 is a network-organisation experimenting with new environments for creating positive innovations, and empowering individuals to create and realize new ideas. The topics and projects encompass the imaginations and talents of our community – and beyond -, ranging from global free internet, to giant artistic displays, from deep philosophical exploration, to hands on play and experimentation. Trust, love and respect, built upon common experience is the glue that bonds our community. Palomar 5 is looking for collaborators that can benefit from our collective output and participate in the creation of new experiences, exploring the space between living rooms and corporations, professional and amateur, reality and utopia."
berlin  change  collaboration  collective  entrepreneurship  conferences  coworking  germany  technology  network  initiatives  ideas  creativity  culture  design  do  innovation  community  tcsnmy 
april 2010 by robertogreco
OurGoods: A Future History of Education
"More than anything Trade School for me is an archetype of the plausible alternative to over-structured, hierarchical and standardized learning we now take for granted and use in the developmental transformation of over 1.1 million school children. Trade School is an opportunity to subvert the teacher/student relationship to be reciprocal. For me it’s about valuing our collective knowledge and not the expertise of just one person. It’s about finding ways to eliminate currency and the problematic funding structures that currently drive educational institutions and their “innovation”."

[kickstarter here: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/OurGoods/trade-school-0 ]
education  tcsnmy  learning  collectiveknowledge  tradeschool  nyc  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  hierarchy  schools  schooling  change  reform  lcproject  future  innovation  sharing  standardizedtesting  standardization  unstructured  schoolofthefuture  design  art  diy  school  bartering  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  teaching  popupschools  trading  alternative  learningondemand  coworking  ourgoods 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Trade School – Barter goods, services and knowledge in our pop-up storefront in New York City.
"Take a class every night with a range of specialized teachers in exchange for basic items and services. Secure a spot in a Trade School class by meeting one of the teacher’s barter needs."

[Now at: http://tradeschool.coop/ ]
nyc  education  design  art  diy  school  bartering  tradeschool  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  teaching  learning  lcproject  popupschools  trading  unschooling  deschooling  alternative  learningondemand  coworking  tcsnmy  ourgoods 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Trade School: Will Barter for Skills - GOOD Blog - GOOD
"From now until the first of March, OurGoods, an online barter network, is running a pop-up storefront on the Lower East Side of Manhattan called Trade School, where entry into classes is based not on money or talent, but on meeting the needs of a particular teacher. And while some classes like grant writing and butter making have already filled up, there's still plenty of room to learn more about irrational decision-making and chair-bound pilates, not to mention composting and improvisation."

[See also: http://tradeschool.coop/ ]
nyc  education  design  art  diy  school  bartering  tradeschool  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  teaching  learning  lcproject  popupschools  trading  unschooling  deschooling  alternative  learningondemand  coworking  tcsnmy  ourgoods 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Coworking San Diego, Co-Working Office, web 2.0, digital-telepathy
"Coworking is an emerging trend for a new pattern for working. Typically work-at-home professionals or independent contractors or people who travel frequently end up working in an isolated way. Coworking is the social gathering of a group of people, who are still working independently, but who share values and who are are interested in the synergy that can happen from working with talented people in the same space. We've opened our office up as a Coworking space in San Diego. We prefer to share our space with San Diego web design and other creative professionals working in the web 2.0 world that are open to sharing their perspectives, humor, ideas and energy. ... There is no cost to work in our office periodically and a small fee if you want to reserve a workstation on a consistent basis."

[more: http://coworking.pbworks.com/CoworkingSanDiego ]
coworking  sandiego 
february 2010 by robertogreco
San Diego's original coworking office
"We are a collection of creative working professionals that collaborate in the flexible coworking space known as: the HIVE. We are artists, designers, filmmakers, real-estate consultants, programmers, fashion industry innovators and people who like to work in a communal environment.

[see also: http://jellynyc.pbworks.com/JellyInSanDiego ]
coworking  sandiego 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Queen Street Commons
"The Queen Street Commons is organized to serve the common good of its members.
commons  lcproject  coworking  pei  tcsnmy  services  community  business  organizations  institutions 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Queen Street Studios
"QSS is a hub for artistic excellence, committed to the growth and success of the creative community in Nova Scotia. It is a place where social and creative minds come together to share ideas, resources and employment opportunities. We provide you with...

A working space, photo studio, meeting place, event venue and a public art space... A network, web presence, professional development, collective learning and a spirit of collaboration..."
novascotia  coworking  thirdplaces  lcproject  tcsnmy  collectivelearning  collaboration  networking  dartmouth  thirdspaces 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The Future of Libraries as Places | The Institute For The Future
"So libraries are more popular than ever. Another unanticipated outcome of the end of cyberspace. But what's most interesting is just how different the activities of these 21st century undergrads are from what I used to do in libraries during the 1990s. Whereas most of my peers looked to libraries as a place of solace and quiet focus, for these students they are intensely collaborative spaces.
libraries  future  change  lcproject  iftf  anthonytownsend  culture  books  learningspaces  community  collaboration  meetingplace  thirdplaces  networking  architecture  via:preoccupations  coworking 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Charlie's Diary: The bumpy ride hits toytown
"We've never actually seen a true global recession in a Web 2.0 world. What's it going to look like? How is it going to differ from a recession in a pre-internet world? Is it going to accelerate the hollowing-out of the retail high street as economy-conscious shoppers increasingly move to online shopping and comparison systems like Froogle? Are we going to see homeless folks not only living in their cars but telecommuting from them, using pay-as-you-go 3G cellular modems, cheap-ass Netbooks, and rented phone numbers to give the appearance of still having a meatspace office? Is the increasing performance curve of consumer electronics going to give way to a deflationary price war as embattled producers try to hold on to market share as Moore's Law cuts the ground away from beneath their feet? What have I missed?"
economics  futurism  latecapitalism  web  via:blackbeltjones  web2.0  change  tcsnmy  classideas  superstruct  recession  crisis  2008  markets  money  finance  banking  consumers  consumption  online  froogle  amazon  buyinghabits  deflation  worlplace  workspace  coworking  nomads  homelessness  neo-nomads  workspaces 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Bionic Office - Joel on Software
"There's a lot of evidence that the right kind of office space can improve programmer productivity, especially private offices...Private offices with doors that close were absolutely required and not open to negotiation."
officedesign  offices  psychology  workplace  workspace  work  coworking  architecture  interiors  productivity  programming  furniture  management  workspaces 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Hivelogic: Offices and The Creativity Zone
"surprises me that so many managers & operations officers have such a misconception about exactly productivity in relation to how people actually work...corporate world rewards based on perceived productivity rather than accomplishment"
productivity  officedesign  coworking  offices  privacy  organization  workspace  attention  creativity  design  spaces  layout  management  leadership  administration  workspaces 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Freelancers Union :: Platform for an Independent Workforce
"we’re helping freelancers to come together in a nationwide online community to find work and share their knowledge. We offer life, disability, and dental insurance throughout the U.S., and health insurance in 31 states."
artists  benefits  business  union  healthinsurance  health  glvo  work  insurance  freelance  nonprofit  networking  journalism  freelancing  collaboration  writing  jobs  employment  coworking  community  money  taxes  nonprofits 
march 2008 by robertogreco
PuertoBaires | design+branding
"estudio creativo ubicado en Buenos Aires (Argentina), especializado en diseño multimedia: diseño web, diseño gráfico y motion graphics. Hoy, este estudio es el portfolio personal de Fernando Maclen el cual dirije desde sus comienzos como diseñador f
argentina  buenosaires  webdesign  coworking  webdev 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Your Dream Office is Just Over There: Co-Working and the Instant Creative Community: Coroflot - Coroflot's Creative Seeds Blog
"temp on-site cubicle, home office, coffee shop...all lack most important quality of ideal creative workspace: other creatives with whom to interact...good ideas, creative work flow almost never flourish in vacuum, yet increasingly...asked to do so"
collaborative  coworking  creativity  freelance  innovation  workspace  work  howwework  design  lcproject  workspaces 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Where: Coexisting and Coworking
"A recent post on coworking (a trend that I am particularly enamored with) at Coroflot's Creative Seeds Blog inadvertently highlights why the internet has pushed people closer together rather than pulling them apart."
coworking  cities  creativity  innovation  social  work  isolation  crosspollination  internet  web  online  gamechanging  via:cityofsound  business 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Lunch over IP: LIFT08: Human/Machine, Nature/Culture - Holm Friebe and Philipp Albers, co-founders of Zentrale Intelligenz Agentur, (a "socialistic-capitalist firm") on the "hedonistic company"
"*7 "no": no office, employees, fixed costs, pitches, exclusivity, working hours, bullshit. *balance between internal & client projects *Instant gratification *Pluralism of methods *Fixed ideas *Responsibilities without hierarchies *power of procrastinati
work  offices  administration  management  antioffice  coworking  cooperation  collaboration  collaborative  gamechanging  organizations  hierarchy  socialism 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Nomads unite in 'coworking' offices - Dec. 26, 2007
"Evans has found that the benefits of coworking go well beyond getting people out of their cars. "It's about having a work community and being around people who are also interested and inspired."
coworking 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Study: stores put customer data at risk with poor WiFi security practices
"Be careful of using public wireless hotspots, even if they claim to be secure. There's a good chance they are still vulnerable to hacking and your personal data could be stolen, according to wireless security manufacturer AirDefense."
security  wireless  coworking  online  internet  web 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Victor Keegan: The office of the future is all around | Technology | The Guardian
"If virtual working catches on it would reduce the need for international travel, give people extra leisure time - since they wouldn't need to travel to work - and would eliminate the stress of working in a corporate hierarchy"
office  networking  business  telecommuting  work  coworking  travel  environment  sustainability  virtual  wordpress 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Vodafone Receiver » #19 | Generation Mesh
"For Generation Mesh, Starbucks – as well as independent cafés, parks and other public spaces where it is possible to access the wireless internet – is a vital site for social interaction, professional support, collaboration and, even, community."
wireless  coworking  telecommuting  social  computers  game  public  internet  online  wifi  web  interaction  relationships  society  work  collaboration  community  networks  networking  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  mobile  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  urban  urbanism  culture  economics  freelance  gamechanging  network  mesh  starbucks 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Google Maps - Coworking Spaces
"This is a list of coworking (or "semi-coworking") spaces in the US. Let me know if I missed any or any need changed. Hope this helps."
coworking  maps  googlemaps  mapping 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Co-Trabajo | Encuesta para Freelancers en Argentina
"Coworking es un movimiento para crear espacio de trabajo compartido entre desarrolladores, diseñadores, escritores y otros trabajadores independientes; generando una comunidad y un ambiente de colaboración entre sus miembros."
coworking  argentina  buenosaires  space  networks  networking  freelance  productivity  entrepreneurship  business  meatspace 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Coworking in Argentina « Coworking Community Blog
"I’m proud to announce the creation of a coworking space in Argentina, right in Buenos Aires city."
coworking  argentina  buenosaires  space  work  social  productivity  networks  networking 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Casual Office Space - Featured on BuzzFeed
"Freelancers are forcing themselves to congregate and retain some office culture in a casual setting. All those lucky bastards that get to work from home are now romanticizing the office life."
coworking  freelancing  entrepreneurship  social  workspace  work  place  space  location  socialnetworks  jelly  workspaces 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Jelly -- Working together is more fun for everyone!
"Jelly is casual coworking. We invite people to work from our home for the day. We provide chairs and sofas, wireless internet, and interesting people to talk to, collaborate with, and bounce ideas off of."
collaboration  jelly  collaborative  coworking  entrepreneurship  workspace  work  socialnetworking  networking  meatspace  productivity  nyc  conferences  social  freelance  environment  business  workspaces 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Jelly! - Casual coworking is awesome. wiki - The password is "j311y" (J-...
"What’s Jelly? Jelly’s our attempt to formalize this weekly work-together. We invite you to come work at our home. You bring your laptop and some work, and we’ll provide wifi, a chair, and hopefully some smart people."
nyc  coworking  jelly  austin  dc  washingtondc  portland  cities  place  space  work  networks  collaboration  collaborative  crosspollination  entrepreneurship  business  productivity  socialnetworking  telecommuting  freelancing  networking  community  social 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Coworking Community Blog
"Coworking is a movement to create cafe-like community/collaboration spaces for developers, writers and independents."
opensource  community  collaboration  blogs  communication  coworking  office  work  workspace  space  studio  freelance  entrepreneurship  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  productivity  cooperative  business  workspaces 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Coworking wiki - To establish a collaboration space fo...
"Coworking is cafe-like community/collaboration space for developers, writers and independents. Or, it's like this: start with a shared office and add cafe culture."
coworking  cooperation  cooperative  collaborative  collaboration  community  cohousing  alternative  entrepreneurship  openspace  office  networking  spaces  space  work  workplace  sanfrancisco  management  business  wiki  meatspace  environment  cafes  freelancing  workspace  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject  workspaces 
october 2007 by robertogreco
The Hub
The Hub is an incubator for social innovation. We offer membership of inspirational habitats in major world cities for social innovators to work, meet, learn, connect and realise progressive ideas. The Hub is a place for making things happen. All the tool
coworking  innovation  architecture  work  travel  toolbox  socialnetworking  space  serendipity  green  communication  community  commons  business  glvo  spaces  art  hub  ideas  lcproject  schooldesign  museums  activism 
july 2007 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Green Coworking: Interview with Chris Messina and Ivan Storck or Citizen Space
"Coworking, a group of individual entrepreneurs sharing a work space, can provide that community while also being an environmentally sustainable choice."
coworking  sustainability  interviews  work  collaboration 
july 2007 by robertogreco
CoworkingEugene.com
"Sure, we need a space with the atmosphere of a coffeehouse. That’s a good start. But we also need fast and reliable WiFi. A private conference room to meet with clients. A lounge with a comfy couch and chairs. A printer and scanner. An open space. A co
business  eugene  coworking  lcproject  work  space  sharing 
april 2007 by robertogreco
ballpark.ch / blog || Co-working facilities to foster innovation
"The concept is simple – fully equipped, flexible and affordable offices for the knowledge economy entrepreneurs – and it will probably have more positive impact on the economy than most traditional innovation encouragement initiatives."
coworking  offices  space  innovation  sharing  knowledge  economics  business  design 
april 2007 by robertogreco
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