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robertogreco : crowds   24

Avoiding the crush - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
"Put simply, the time-to-collision law suggests that all individuals make subconscious calculations whenever they move, working out in advance who or what is likely to bump into them.

According to the theory, those calculations are made simultaneously and constantly; but, says Guy, the only assessments that are acted upon are those where a person or object is determined to be within two to three seconds of collision.

‘If two people are going to collide very imminently you feel really strong discomfort from that interaction, whereas if they are walking close to you but in the opposite direction there's almost no effect.’

The theory’s veracity, says Guy, is based on an examination of a vast amount of visual data.

‘Thanks to surveillance cameras, thanks to advances in computer vision, we can get hundreds and hundreds of trajectories of people walking in different kinds of environments. Something that's nice about living in the 21st century is there's lots of data.

‘We had data from previous researchers who studied people in bottlenecks, people on college campuses, people just outside of shopping malls, and what we can see is we have lots of trajectories, lots of paths that these people are taking, and we look for patterns in these paths, patterns in the trajectories.’

Time-to-collision isn’t a complete answer to how people move in a crowded environment. Dr Guy acknowledges that cultural differences can also play a part, which is why foreign tourists often find themselves instinctively walking on the wrong side of the footpath, but he argues the theory has enormous potential benefits for future urban planning and design.

‘It's a nice, simple law,’ he says. ‘It automatically suggests a new way to simulate crowds. When you have more accurate simulations you are able to better utilise your space. You are able to make buildings that have more effective hallways and more effective layouts of how people will flow.’

‘As we have more people sharing less space, understanding these movements better is going to allow us to have more efficient utilisation.’

A case of watch this space."
urban  urbanism  crowds  people  2015  via:alexismadrigal  antonyfunnell  stephenguy  time-to-collision  navigation  cities  pedestrians  trajectory 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Principles at MIT Media Lab
"There are nine or so principles to work in a world like this:

Resilience instead of strength, which means you want to yield and allow failure and you bounce back instead of trying to resist failure.

You pull instead of push. That means you pull the resources from the network as you need them, as opposed to centrally stocking them and controlling them.

You want to take risk instead of focusing on safety.

You want to focus on the system instead of objects.

You want to have good compasses not maps.

You want to work on practice instead of theory. Because sometimes you don’t why it works, but what is important is that it is working, not that you have some theory around it.

It disobedience instead of compliance. You don’t get a Nobel Prize for doing what you are told. Too much of school is about obedience, we should really be celebrating disobedience.

It’s the crowd instead of experts.

It’s a focus on learning instead of education."
mitmedialab  mit  joiito  openstudioproject  lcproject  resilience  failure  practice  praxis  crowds  expertise  education  learning  howwelearn  disobedience  compliance  compasses  safety  risk  via:sebastienmarion  medialab 
june 2014 by robertogreco
jeweled platypus · text · Leveling up conferences
"I’m in Portland for Community Leadership Summit this weekend, I’ll be at Defcon soon, and I’m going to XOXO in September, so I’ve been thinking about things AdaCamp did that I’d like to see more conference organizers consider. Of course I like the idea of making tech events better for women, but this stuff is especially interesting to me because worthwhile efforts to make a tech event more welcoming to women also make the event more welcoming to other non-majority types of people (for example, including women means not just including able-bodied women). It’s the magic of intersectionality! Some of these ideas are conveniently compiled on the page of resources for conference organizers on the Geek Feminism Wiki, but here’s my list too:

• If you have an application process, like AdaCamp and XOXO do, it’s great for the application to be as encouraging and inclusive as possible, with detail about how the conference is aiming for a crowd that is diverse in x and y and z ways. …

• Before the conference, providing a list of nearby low-cost hostels and hotels. …

• Giving people a choice of badge lanyards: green meaning “photographs always ok”, yellow meaning “ask before photographing”, and red meaning “photographs never ok”. …

• Laying blue tape on the floor to mark access paths where people shouldn’t stand or put chairs/bags; you can label them “walk and roll” (ha ha). …

• Being explicitly inclusive of people of all gender identities, including considering labeling all-gender bathrooms along with men-only bathrooms and women-only bathrooms. …

• Setting up a dedicated “quiet room” with a rule against talking in that room; people can use the space to nap or work/relax quietly. …

• Having a series of 90 second (1 slide) lightning talks - I thought 90 seconds sounded impossibly short compared to normal 5 minute lightning talks, but it turned out to be great.

• For evening meals: creating a spreadsheet on Google Docs with a list of nearby restaurants, and inviting people to type in their names to create small groups for dining out."
conferences  brittagustafson  howto  eventplanning  conferenceplanning  photography  2013  adacamp  xoxo  defcon  inclusiveness  impostorsyndrome  accessibility  crowds  quiet  diversity  gender  universaldesign  planning  events  inclusion  inclusivity  inlcusivity 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Junior Seau Is Dead, Cont. - Ta-Nehisi Coates - The Atlantic
"I can't really over-emphasize how much this is a personal decision, and not—as one commenter put it—a "personal boycott."

I have no real designs to keep grown men from playing football. I don't really have designs on anything. I think as progressives we sometimes get trapped into discussing morality strictly in the paradigm of "affecting change."

But I think morality in the Emersonian paradigm—that "nothing is at last sacred, but the integrity of your own mind," that religion is what you do when no one's looking—is just as important. The Montgomery Boycott is not "only" important because of its results. You don't just protest segregation as a demonstration to other people, you also do so as a demonstration to self.

In football, as in so many other things, each of has to decide where that demonstration to self must be made. Personal morality is rarely improved in a crowd.

More later."
morality  healthcare  self  religion  spectators  personalmorality  crowds  professionalsports  ethics  headinjuries  americanfootball  sports  juniorseau  ta-nehisicoates  2012 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Resiliency, Risk, and a Good Compass: Tools for the Coming Chaos | Wired Business | Wired.com
"There are nine or so principles to work in a world like this:

1. Resilience instead of strength, which means you want to yield and allow failure and you bounce back instead of trying to resist failure.
2. You pull instead of push. That means you pull the resources from the network as you need them, as opposed to centrally stocking them and controlling them.
3. You want to take risk instead of focusing on safety.
4. You want to focus on the system instead of objects.
5. You want to have good compasses not maps.
6. You want to work on practice instead of theory. Because sometimes you don’t why it works, but what is important is that it is working, not that you have some theory around it.
7. It disobedience instead of compliance. You don’t get a Nobel Prize for doing what you are told. Too much of school is about obedience, we should really be celebrating disobedience.
8. It’s the crowd instead of experts.
9. It’s a focus on learning instead of education."
onthecheap  innovation  startups  collaboration  change  work  mapping  maps  compass  adaptability  howwework  cv  failure  systemsawareness  systemsthinking  systems  crowdsourcing  crowds  experts  disobedience  compliance  theory  practice  education  deschooling  hierarchy  control  unschooling  objects  tcsnmy  safety  pull  push  resiliency  2012  joiito  risktaking  risk  resilience  networks  learning 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Riot psychology « Mind Hacks
"The psychology of crowd control is largely based on the policing of demonstrations and sports events where the majority of people will give the police the benefit of the doubt and assume their status as a legitimate force. … it strikes me that most of the rioters probably never thought of the police as a legitimate force to begin with. This goes beyond establishing police legitimacy on the day and means many of the standard assumptions of behind crowd control probably don’t work as well. But the fact that thousands of young people across the country don’t have faith in police is a much deeper social problem that can’t be solved through street tactics. I have no easy answers and I suspect they don’t exist. Politicians, start your clichés."
riots  2011  uk  london  psychology  ethics  police  crowds  behavior  policing 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Ochlophobia - Wikipedia ["Ochlophobia, enochlophobia & demophobia are terms for types of social phobia or social anxiety disorder whose sufferers have a fear of crowds.…"]
"In severe cases it manifests itself as a paralyzing fear that results in the sufferer avoiding anxiety-raising situations (running from the situation), having tantrums, crying, excessive sweating, freezing, excessive blushing, or stammering continuously. Sufferers may offer various rationalizations of the phobia, such as the fear being trampled in a crowd, getting a deadly disease from people w/in the crowd, getting lost in crowd, or feeling insignificant when surrounded by crowd.

People who are shy & introverted are most likely to experience ochlophobia. But not all introverted people have anxiety problems. Most people with the phobia feel unsafe around a lot of strangers, are just naturally very shy individuals, are afraid of being hunted by the news media, or feel the emotions of the people around them. Ochlophobic people are usually unable to handle situations involving 2+ other people, dating, parties, going to theaters, movie theaters, sports games, or the mall."
fear  phobias  crowds  themall  introverts  anxiety  definitions  ochlophobia  enochlophobia  demophobia  empathy  emotions  people 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Temple? School? Try Nightclub: The Soul of a New Museum | The New York Observer
"past year is culmination of decade-long effort to change museum's character, to turn it "interactive," place where people come to see, but also be seen; to not just look at art but participate in it. MoMA has made its mission to transform "into a social space from an treasure trove," according to the director…

But a resulting influx of people through the doors has lead influential art worlders like Robert Storr to lament rise of "Death Star Museums." These are places where "uninterrupted contemplation" is impossible. More people may be coming to contemp art museums, Mr. Storr wrote…, but "the mechanisms in play are horridly like those of a sci-fi monster that ingests people in great gulps."

"Museums of modern art are a kind of inherently unstable space," Mr. Lowry said. "If you're going to follow flow of contemp art, you have to constantly tweak & adjust. You can't lock it down & say this is what it should be for the next 10 years. Artists are moving much faster than that.""
via:foe  art  museums  moma  nyc  contemporary  events  participation  scenes  objects  social  robertstorr  design  paolaantonelli  accessibility  change  2010  attendance  quiet  crowds  yokoono  artclubbing  youth  ps1  ncmideas  participatoryart 
august 2010 by robertogreco
What to reject when you're rejecting... the wisdom of crowds: Tips for debunkers. - Jay Rosen: Public Notebook
"Let's wrap this up. You need to know what to reject when you're rejecting the idea that the collective is all-wise. Consulting the source code for the idea, we find that crowds are not inherently wise at all. Rather, they are wise when.... there's a right answer to the question, when the question isn't a matter of taste or cultural quality, when there is diversity of opinion and independence of mind among group members, when there are specialists who can draw on local knowledge, and when there's "a way of summarizing people's opinions into one collective verdict." Also, crowds can be blind and stupid, and there's no point in denying that.
jayrosen  technology  crowdsourcing  community  collaboration  statistics  socialmedia  journalism  wisdomofcrowds  web2.0  crowds  wisdom  theory 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Dirty Little Secret About the "Wisdom of the Crowds" - There is No Crowd
"Recent research by Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) professor Vassilis Kostakos pokes a big hole in the prevailing wisdom that the "wisdom of crowds" is a trustworthy force on today's web. His research focused on studying the voting patterns across several sites featuring user-generated reviews including Amazon, IMDb, and BookCrossing. The findings showed that a small group of users accounted for a large number of ratings. In other words, as many have already begun to suspect, small but powerful groups can easily distort what the "crowd" really thinks, leading online reviews to often end up appearing extremely positive or extremely negative."
wisdomofcrowds  technology  internet  psychology  readwriteweb  influence  marketing  socialmedia  information  crowdsourcing  ratings  yelp  crowds  socialnetworking  statistics  wikipedia  wisdom  community  research 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Odes 3.1 - Horace
Odi profanum vulgus et arceo [I hate the uninitiate crowd and keep them far
horace  latin  crowds  cv 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Core77 / The Crowd Will Save Us: How the green movement taps participatory networks to drive innovation, by Jen Van de Meer
"For designers embarking on their first green project, or suffering fatigue or from an overwhelming sense of exasperation that you haven't yet changed the world, remember that we're all in this together. Experiment with these platforms for participatory design, and see what big ideas you co-create with the crowd. Open innovation is our driver for sustainability."
design  web  online  internet  socialmedia  sustainability  collaboration  networks  crowds  crowdsourcing  mobs  flashmobs  participatory  innovation  activism  green  environment  environmentalism  consumer  business 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Running for Office: It's Like A Flamewar with a Forum Troll, but with an Eventual Winner
"My name is Sean Tevis [photo]. I'm an Information Architect in Kansas running for State Representative. I’ve decided to “retire” my current State Representative. I'm going to win. This is my story (XKCD homage style) so far. "
politics  comics  humor  government  congress  evolution  us  money  elections  democracy  donations  marketing  crowds 
july 2008 by robertogreco
MIT Media Lab: Reality Mining
"Reality Mining defines the collection of machine-sensed environmental data pertaining to human social behavior. This new paradigm of data mining makes possible the modeling of conversation context, proximity sensing, and temporospatial location throughou

[see also: http://www.technologyreview.com/read_article.aspx?ch=specialsections&sc=emerging08&id=20247]
attention  culture  technology  phones  realitymining  reality  memory  location-based  privacy  future  data  context  research  social  mobile  datamining  networks  MIT  modeling  networking  psychogeography  pervasive  context-aware  crowds  behavior  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  mobilecomputing  mobility  location  locative  compsci  psychology  socialgraph  surveillance  statistics  visualization  visual  spatial  medialab  mapping  ai  mitmedialab 
april 2008 by robertogreco
.CSV » group think
"Now, new equations describing “crowd dynamics” are about to change our lives. And not always for the better. This is one of the most significant technology trends I have seen in years; it may also be one of the most pernicious."
behavior  personalinformatics  surveillance  systems  technology  psychology  simulations  social  society  government  crowds  perception  predictions  politics  culture  sociology  collaboration  software  modeling  socialsoftware 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Anatomy of a Mob: The Lacy/Zuckerberg Interview - TechnoSocial
"As citizens of the online world, we have a responsibility to step forward when we see people misbehaving. It doesn't take much to tone things down. People need to be reminded that the target of their frustrations is a real person."
sxsw  twitter  mobs  social  crowds  facebook  sarahlacy  statistics  visualization  community  relationships  psychology  keynote  socialmedia  society  etiquette  technology  alwayson  communication  analysis  casestudy  web  internet  online  howardrheingold  backchannel  via:hrheingold 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Collective intelligence spontaneously arises among ARG players -- paper from I Love Bees creator - Boing Boing
"Jane McGonigal, who helped develop the groundbreaking Alternate Reality Game "I Love Bees," has written a fascinating paper on the way that "collective intelligence" spontaneously arises among collaborative players of games like I Love Bees"
ai  bees  behavior  janemcgonigal  crowdsourcing  crowds  intelligence  information  systems  collective  research  socialmedia  mind  masses  play 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Evolution and Wisdom of Crowds
"reason that Wikipedia is as good as it is (and the reason that living organisms are as sophisticated as they are), is not due to the average quality of the edits (or mutations). Instead, it is due to a much harder to observe process: selection."
wikipedia  evolution  wisdom  datamining  statistics  folksonomy  crowdsourcing  behavior  reason  religion  human  information  intelligence  darwin  databases  collaboration  collective  collectiveintelligence  commons  community  economics  learning  algorithms  crowds  systems  recommendations  networks  socialsoftware  psychology  predictions  charlesdarwin 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Mohamed Amine Chatti's ongoing research on Technology Enhanced Learning: The Wisdom of Crowds
"Surowiecki mentions four conditions that characterize wise crowds: 1. Diversity of opinion 2. Independence 3. Decentralization 4. Aggregation"
crowds  crowdsourcing  wisdom  technology  learning  books  reviews 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Swarm Behavior - National Geographic Magazine
"A single ant or bee isn't smart, but their colonies are. The study of swarm intelligence is providing insights that can help humans manage complex systems, from truck routing to military robots."
ai  animals  bees  behavior  biology  bugs  business  chaos  cognition  collaboration  collective  collectivism  crowds  insects  intelligence  leadership  math  nanotechnology  nature  networks  psychology  politics  research  science  socialscience  sociology  stevenjohnson  technology  systems  structure  swarms 
july 2007 by robertogreco
area/code
"Big Games are large-scale, real-world games. A Big Game might involve transforming an entire city into the world's largest board game, or hundreds of players scouring the streets looking for invisible treasure, or a TV show reaching out to interact with
arg  games  play  space  urban  ubicomp  locative  location-based  gps  advertising  agency  collaboration  crowds  mobile  pervasive  street  social  reality 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Pruned: Modeling Urban Panic
"Paul Torrens is someone after our hearts, for he has developed a realistic computer 3D model that can predict crowd behavior in various spatial configurations."
visualization  space  social  pedestrians  population  public  simulations  behavior  urban  architecture  crowds 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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