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Why NASA wants you to point your smartphone at trees - The Verge
"This NASA app gives nature walks new purpose"



"NASA would like you to take a picture of a tree, please. The space agency’s ICESat-2 satellite estimates the height of trees from space, and NASA has created a new tool for citizen scientists that can help check those measurements from the ground. All it takes is a smartphone, the app, an optional tape measure, and a tree. So to help, the Verge Science video team went on a mission to measure some massive trees in California as accurately as they can.

Launched in September 2018, the ICESat-2 satellite carries an instrument called ATLAS that shoots 60,000 pulses of light at the Earth’s surface every second it orbits the planet. “It’s basically a laser in space,” says Tom Neumann, the project scientist for ICESat-2 at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. By measuring the satellite’s position, the angle, and how long it takes for those laser beams to bounce back from the surface, scientists can measure the elevation of sea ice, land ice, the ocean, inland water, and trees. Knowing how tall trees are can help researchers estimate the health of the world’s forests and the amount of carbon dioxide they can soak up.

But Neumann says that a big open question is how good those measurements from space actually are. That’s where the citizen scientist comes in — to help verify them. Some are more challenging than others. “You can’t really ask a bunch of school kids in Pennsylvania to go to Antarctica to measure the ice sheet height for you for a calibration,” he says. But you can ask them to take their smartphones outside, which is exactly what NASA is doing with its GLOBE Observer app. “You’ve got all sorts of great terrain and features right in your backyard that you could go out and do these measurements that would be useful for us,” Neumann says."
nasa  maps  mapping  measurement  2019  trees  citizenscience  crowdsourcing  classideas  math  mathematics  trigonometry 
may 2019 by robertogreco
Are.na / Blog – Towards A Library Without Walls
"Collaboration has also become key to the way we conceive associative indexing on today’s version of the Internet, which could not have been anticipated by Bush at today’s scale. In “As We May Think,” Bush does acknowledge the possibility of sharing links generated by the Memex in the example of a researcher reproducing a trail on the Turkish bow for inclusion in a colleague’s “more general” trail.6 However, the scale of a hypertextual tool such as Are.na, which has over 20,000 users, far exceeds the one-to-one exchange Bush envisioned for his Memex, with significant implications for associative indexing. This phenomenon has its own neologism, “crowdsourcing,” wherein large numbers of users, most typically through the Internet, contribute to an information platform, as seen widely from commercial endeavors such as Google-owned Waze to non-profit projects such as Wikipedia. The relative advantages and disadvantages of crowdsourcing for knowledge production are the subject of much literature but could be briefly alluded to here in terms of diversity of material, collective intelligence, increased scale, and lack of consolidated control. But at its most promising, crowdsourcing creates the potential for rich communities that can form around information sharing, as is well articulated by Paul Duguid and John Seely Brown writing on the social life of information:
“[D]ocuments do not merely carry information, they help make it, structure it, and validate it. More intriguing, perhaps, documents also help structure society, enabling social groups to form, develop, and maintain a sense of shared identity. Viewing documents as mere information carriers overlooks this social role.”7
"



"Considering the ways in which Are.na operates within a community of artists and culturally-engaged individuals, contrasting Are.na with Bush’s Memex highlights the importance of conceiving how knowledge forms, knowledge tools, and knowledge communities all interplay with one another. By acknowledging other forms of knowledge beyond the scientific and better understanding the role sociality plays in our contemporary experience of information, we can better define what constitutes information and how best to describe, classify, organize, and make it accessible as librarians. Rather than prioritizing static information, fixed organization, and solitary experiences as the conventional library environment is known to do, those of us who work in LIS can adopt the more boundless strategies that we encounter in hypertextual tools such as Are.na for the benefit of the communities that we serve, essentially working towards becoming a library without the brick walls that Lampland and Star refer to in regards to infrastructure that fails to serve user needs. Parallel to thinking about what Are.na might mean for librarianship, we can look to extant projects such as the Prelinger Library and the Sitterwerk’s Kunstbibliothek, whose methods for organizing their material also exist as an alternative to more traditionally-organized libraries.

So to expand on Sam’s question and its inverse: What could a reference interview that uses Are.na look like? What would happen if books in an OPAC were nodes that could be linked by users? And what if the discovery tools we design actually encouraged research that is social, elusive, and nonlinear?"
are.na  libraries  internet  web  online  2017  karlywildenhaus  mlis  archives  archiving  marthalampland  susanleighstar  hypercad  hypertext  vannevarbush  paulotlet  tednelson  stéphanemallarmé  knowledge  information  clissification  taxonomy  accessibility  librarians  social  memex  paulduguid  johnseelybrown  crowdsourcing  aswemaythink  connections  collaboration 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Opendronemap by OpenDroneMap
"OpenDroneMap is an open source toolkit for processing aerial drone imagery. Typical drones use simple point-and-shoot cameras, so the images from drones, while from a different perspective, are similar to any pictures taken from point-and-shoot cameras, i.e. non-metric imagery. OpenDroneMap turns those simple images into three dimensional geographic data that can be used in combination with other geographic datasets.

In a word, OpenDroneMap is a toolchain for processing raw civilian UAS imagery to other useful products. What kind of products?

1. Point Clouds
3. Digital Surface Models
3. Textured Digital Surface Models
4. Orthorectified Imagery
5. Classified Point Clouds
6. Digital Elevation Models
7. etc.

So far, it does Point Clouds, Digital Surface Models, Textured Digital Surface Models, and Orthorectified Imagery.

Users' mailing list: http://lists.osgeo.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/opendronemap-users

Developer's mailing list: http://lists.osgeo.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/opendronemap-dev

Overview video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UctfoeNB_Y "
mapping  maps  aerialimagery  drones  crowdsourcing 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Towards an Internet of Living Things – OpenExplorer Journal – Medium
"Conservation groups are using technology to understand and protect our planet in an entirely new way."

"The Internet of Things (IoT) was an idea that industry always loved. It was simple enough to predict: as computing and sensors become smaller and cheaper, they would be embedded into devices and products that interact with each other and their owners. Fast forward to 2017 and the IoT is in full bloom. Because of the stakes — that every device and machine in your life will be upgraded and harvested for data — companies wasted no time getting in on the action. There are smart thermostats, refrigerators, TVs, cars, and everything else you can imagine.

Industry was first, but they aren’t the only. Now conservationists are taking the lead.

The same chips, sensors (especially cameras) and networks being used to wire up our homes and factories are being deployed by scientists (both professional and amateur) to understand our natural world. It’s an Internet of Living Things. It isn’t just a future of efficiency and convenience. It’s enabling us to ask different questions and understand our world from an entirely new perspective. And just in time. As environmental challenges — everything from coral bleaching to African elephant poaching— continue to mount, this emerging network will serve as the planetary nervous system, giving insight into precisely what actions to take.

It’s a new era of conservation based on real-time data and monitoring. It changes our ecological relationship with the planet by changing the scales at which we can measure — we get both increased granularity, as well as adding a truly macro view of the entire planet. It also allows us to simultaneously (and unbiasedly) measuring the most important part of the equation: ourselves.

Specific and Real-Time

We have had population estimates of species for decades, but things are different now. Before the estimates came from academic fieldwork, and now we’re beginning to rely on vast networks of sensors to monitor and model those same populations in real-time. Take the recent example of Paul Allen’s Domain Awareness System (DAS) that covers broad swaths of West Africa. Here’s an excerpt from the Bloomberg feature:
For years, local rangers have protected wildlife with boots on the ground and sheer determination. Armed guards spend days and nights surrounding elephant herds and horned rhinos, while on the lookout for rogue trespassers.

Allen’s DAS uses technology to go the distance that humans cannot. It relies on three funnels of information: ranger radios, animal tracker tags, and a variety of environmental sensors such as camera traps and satellites. This being the product of the world’s 10th-richest software developer, it sends everything back to a centralized computer system, which projects specific threats onto a map of the monitored region, displayed on large screens in a closed circuit-like security room.

For instance, if a poacher were to break through a geofence sensor set up by a ranger in a highly-trafficked corridor, an icon of a rifle would flag the threat as well as any micro-chipped elephants and radio-carrying rangers in the vicinity.

[video]

These networks are being woven together in ecosystems all over the planet. Old cellphones being turned into rainforest monitoring devices. Drones surveying and processing the health of Koala populations in Australia. The conservation website MongaBay now has a section of their site dedicated to the fast-moving field, which they’ve dubbed WildTech. Professionals and amateurs are gathering in person at events like Make for the Planet and in online communities like Wildlabs.net. It’s game on.

The trend is building momentum because the early results have been so good, especially in terms of resolution. The organization WildMe is using a combination of citizen science (essentially human-powered environmental sensors) and artificial intelligence to identify and monitor individuals in wild populations. As in, meet Struddle the manta ray, number 1264_B201. He’s been sited ten times over the course of 10 years, mostly around the Maldives.

[image]

The combination of precision and pervasiveness means these are more than just passive data-collecting systems. They’re beyond academic, they’re actionable. We can estimate more accurately — there are 352,271 elephants estimated to remain in Africa — but we’re also reacting when something happens — a poacher broke a geofence 10 minutes ago.

The Big Picture

It’s not just finer detail, either. We’re also getting a better bigger picture than we’ve ever had before. We’re watching on a planetary scale.

Of course, advances in satellites are helping. Planet (the company) has been a major driving force. Over the past few years they’ve launched hundreds of small imaging satellites and have created an earth-imaging constellation that has ambitions of getting an image of every location on earth, every day. Like Google Earth, but near-real-time and the ability to search along the time horizon. An example of this in action, Planet was able to catch an illegal gold mining operation in the act in the Peruvian Amazon Rainforest.

[image]

It’s not just satellites, it’s connectivity more broadly. Traditionally analog wildlife monitoring is going online. Ornithology gives us a good example of this. For the past century, the study of birds have relied on amateur networks of enthusiasts — the birders — to contribute data on migration and occurrence studies. (For research that spans long temporal time spans or broad geographic areas, citizen science is often the most effective method.) Now, thanks to the ubiquity of mobile phones, birding is digitized and centralized on platforms like eBird and iNaturalist. You can watch the real-time submissions and observations:

[image]

Sped up, we get the visual of species-specific migrations over the course of a year:

[animated GIF]

Human Activity

The network we’re building isn’t all glass, plastic and silicon. It’s people, too. In the case of the birders above, the human component is critical. They’re doing the legwork, getting into the field and pointing the cameras. They’re both the braun and the (collective) brain of the operation.

Keeping humans in the loop has it’s benefits. It’s allowing these networks to scale faster. Birders with smartphones and eBird can happen now, whereas a network of passive forest listening devices would take years to build (and would be much more expensive to maintain). It also makes these systems better adept at managing ethical and privacy concerns — people are involved in the decision making at all times. But the biggest benefit of keeping people in the loop, is that we can watch them—the humans—too. Because as much as we’re learning about species and ecosystems, we also need to understand how we ourselves are affected by engaging and perceiving the natural world.

We’re getting more precise measurements of species and ecosystems (a better small picture), as well as a better idea of how they’re all linked together (a better big picture). But we’re also getting an accurate sense of ourselves and our impact on and within these systems (a better whole picture).

We’re still at the beginning of measuring the human-nature boundary, but the early results suggests it will help the conservation agenda. A sub-genre of neuroscience called neurobiophilia has emerged to study the effects on nature on our brain function. (Hint: it’s great for your health and well-being.) National Geographic is sending some of their explorers into the field wired up with Fitbits and EEG machines. The emerging academic field of citizen science seems to be equally concerned with the effects of participation than it is with outcomes. So far, the science is indicating that engagement in the data collecting process has measurable effects on the community’s ability to manage different issues. The lesson here: not only is nature good for us, but we can evolve towards a healthier perspective. In a world approaching 9 billion people, this collective self-awareness will be critical.

What’s next

Just as fast as we’re building this network, we’re learning what it’s actually capable of doing. As we’re still laying out the foundation, the network is starting to come alive. The next chapter is applying machine learning to help make sense of the mountains of data that these systems are producing. Want to quickly survey the dispersion of arctic ponds? Here. Want to count and classify the number of fish you’re seeing with your underwater drone? We’re building that. In a broad sense, we’re “closing the loop” as Chris Anderson explained in an Edge.org interview:
If we could measure the world, how would we manage it differently? This is a question we’ve been asking ourselves in the digital realm since the birth of the Internet. Our digital lives — clicks, histories, and cookies — can now be measured beautifully. The feedback loop is complete; it’s called closing the loop. As you know, we can only manage what we can measure. We’re now measuring on-screen activity beautifully, but most of the world is not on screens.

As we get better and better at measuring the world — wearables, Internet of Things, cars, satellites, drones, sensors — we are going to be able to close the loop in industry, agriculture, and the environment. We’re going to start to find out what the consequences of our actions are and, presumably, we’ll take smarter actions as a result. This journey with the Internet that we started more than twenty years ago is now extending to the physical world. Every industry is going to have to ask the same questions: What do we want to measure? What do we do with that data? How can we manage things differently once we have that data? This notion of closing the loop everywhere is perhaps the biggest endeavor of … [more]
davidlang  internetofthings  nature  life  conservation  tracking  2017  data  maps  mapping  sensors  realtime  iot  computing  erth  systems  wildlife  australia  africa  maldives  geofencing  perú  birds  ornithology  birding  migration  geography  inaturalist  ebird  mobile  phones  crowdsourcing  citizenscience  science  classideas  biology 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Experiment | Crowdfunding Platform for Scientific Research
"Experiment is an online platform for discovering, funding, and sharing scientific research.

We're based in New York City. We're a team of scientists, designers, and technologists passionate about helping ideas grow. Our mission is to democratize science.

Where does the most impactful science come from? What makes science beautiful? What if anyone could be a scientist? There are a lot of big questions in science, but these are the ones we ask."
science  crowdfunding  funding  research  crowdsourcing  academia 
february 2017 by robertogreco
An Xiao Mina at Biased Data - An Xiao Mina - Open Transcripts
"Just to close, as we think about the role of lan­guage on the Internet, it really biases our expe­ri­ence, and there are a lot of risks and chal­lenges there, espe­cially as peo­ple from the Global South are com­ing online. The abil­ity for them to access con­tent and for them to con­tribute to impor­tant con­ver­sa­tions online will be severely lim­ited. It’ll look more like this, and I think some of the most impor­tant work we can do in tech is to bring it out into lan­guages that they can under­stand."
anxiaomina  language  languages  internet  online  web  2016  mikemcdandless  translation  blacklivesmatter  umbrellamovement  crowdsourcing  machinetranslation  sarahkendzior  russian  uzbek  opentranslationproject  aiweiwei  meedan  inequity  socialjustice  wechat  audio  chinese  china  bias  experience 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Crowdforcing: When What I “Share” Is Yours
"One phenomenon that has so far flown under the radar in discussions of peer-to-peer production and the sharing economy but that demands recognition on its own is one for which I think an apt name would be crowdforcing. Crowdforcing in the sense I am using it refers to practices in which one or more persons decides for one or more others whether he or she will share his or her resources, without the other person’s consent or even, perhaps more worryingly, knowledge. While this process has analogs and has even itself occurred prior to the digital revolution and the widespread use of computational tools, it has positively exploded thanks to them, and thus in the digital age may well constitute a difference in kind as well as amount.

Once we conceptualize it this way, crowdforcing can be found with remarkable frequency in current digital practice."



"Crowdforcing effects also overlap with phenomena researchers refer to by names like “neighborhood effects” and “social contagion.” In each of these, what some people do ends up affecting what many other people do, in a way that goes much beyond the ordinary majoritarian aspects of democratic culture. That is, we know that only one candidate will win an election, and that therefore those who did not vote for that candidate will be (temporarily) forced to acknowledge the political rule of people with whom they don’t agree. But this happens in the open, with the knowledge and even the formal consent of all those involved, even if that consent is not always completely understood.

Externalities produced by economic transactions often look something like crowdforcing. For example, when people with means routinely hire tutors and coaches for their children for standardized tests, they end up skewing the results even more in their favor, thus impacting those without means in ways they frequently do not understand and may not be aware of. This can happen in all sorts of markets, even in cultural markets (fashion, beauty, privilege, skills, experience). But it is only the advent of society-wide digital data collection and analysis techniques that makes it so easy to sell your neighbor out without their knowledge and consent, and to have what is sold be so central to their lifeworld.

Dealing with this problem requires, first of all, conceptualizing it as a problem. That’s all I’ve tried to do here: suggest the shape of a problem that, while not entirely new, comes into stark relief and becomes widespread due to the availability of exactly the tools that are routinely promoted as “crowdsourcing” and “collective intelligence” and “networks.” As always, this is by no means to deny the many positive effects these tools and methods can have; it is to suggest that we are currently overly committed to finding those positive effects and not to exploring or dwelling on the negative effects, as profound as they may be. As the examples I’ve presented here show, the potential for crowdforcing effects on the whole population are massive, disturbing, and only increasing in scope.

In a time when so much cultural energy is devoted to the self, maximizing, promoting, decorating and sharing it, it has become hard to think with anything like the scrutiny required about how our actions impact others. From an ethical perspective, this is typically the most important question we can ask: arguably it is the foundation of ethics itself. Despite the rhetoric of sharing, we are doing our best to turn away from examining how our actions impact others. Our world could do with a lot more, rather than less, of that kind of thinking."

[Quote below relevant to a specific concern in my neighborhood]

"Sharing pictures of your minor children on Facebook is already an interesting enough issue. Obviously, you have the parental right to decide whether or not to post photos of your minor children, but parents likely do not understand all the ramifications of such sharing for themselves, let alone for their children, not least since none of us know what Facebook and the data it harvests will be like in 10 or 20 years. Yet an even more pressing issue occurs when people share pictures on Facebook and elsewhere of other peoples’ minor children, without the consent or even knowledge of those parents. Facebook makes it easy to tag photos with the names of people who don’t belong to it. The refrain we hear ad nauseum—“if you’re concerned about Facebook, don’t use it”—is false in many ways, among which the most critical may be that those most concerned about Facebook, who have therefore chosen not to use it, may thereby have virtually no control over not just the “shadow profile” Facebook reportedly maintains for everyone in the countries where it operates, but even what appears to be ordinary sharing data that can be used by all the data brokers and other social analytic providers. Thus while you may make a positive, overt decision not to share about yourself, and even less about the minor children of whom you have legal guardianship, others can and routinely do decide you are going to anyway."

[related to that concern: http://soheresus.com/2015/06/12/down-syndrome-genoma-copyright-infringement/ ]
davidgolumbia  crowdforcing  crowdsourcing  collaboration  access  data  2015  photography  privacy  sharingeconomy  externalities  airbnb  uber  economics  neighborhoodeffects  socialcontagion  children  photogaphy  facebook  socialmedia  internet  online  web  socialnetworks 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Snapshot Serengeti
"Over the last 45 years, the University of Minnesota Lion Project has discovered a lot about lions – everything from why they have manes to why they live in groups. Now we’re turning our sights to understanding how an entire community of large animals interacts. We currently monitor 24 lion prides in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, using radio-tracking. To collect information about other species, we’ve set out a grid of 225 camera traps. With photographs from these cameras, we’re able to study how over 30 species are distributed across the landscape – and how they interact with lions and one another."

[via: http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/slide-show-secret-lives-of-the-serengeti
and http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-snapshot-serengeti-20150610-story.html

See also: http://e360.yale.edu/feature/camera_traps_emerge_as_key_tool_in_wildlife_research/2469/
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/03/pictures/130301-giant-armadillos-rare-science-animals-brazil/ ]
animals  cameras  photography  identification  crowdsourcing  africa  science  zooniverse  tanzania  serengeti 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Ideas About Education Reform: 22 Things We Do As Educators That Will Embarrass Us In 25 Years by Terry Heick
"22 Things We Do As Educators That Will Embarrass Us In 25 Years
by Terry Heick

Saw a picture today from the 1970s of a mother driving her car with her newborn baby in the passenger seat (no car seat). This, of course, got me thinking about education. What do we do now that in 25 years we’ll look back on and shake our heads? What are our “doctors smoking cigarettes while giving check ups” moments? I have a feeling we’re going to look back and be really confused by quite a bit. There’s probably a lot more than this, but I had to stop somewhere.

22 Things Education Does That Will Embarrass Us In 25 Years

1. We separated literacy from content.
And were confused when we couldn’t properly untangle them.

2. Meter progress by grade levels.
Right now, progress through academia is incremental, like inches on a ruler. These increments are marked by “grade levels,” which really has no meaning other than the artificial one schools have given it in the most self-justifying, circular argument ever.

3. We frowned upon crowdsourced content (e.g., Wikipedia)
Even though it has more updates and cross-checks than more traditional sources of info. It’s not perfect, but it’s the future. Err, present.

4. We gave vacations.
Why do we feel the need to provide months off at a time from learning to read, write, and think? We made school so bad that students couldn’t stand to do it without “vacations”? We cleaved it so cleanly from their daily lives that they “stopped” learning for months at a time?

5. We closed off schools from communities.
Which was the first (of many) errors. Then we let the media report on school progress under terms so artificially binary that we ended up dancing to the drum of newspaper headlines and political pressure.

6. We made it clumsy and awkward for teachers to share curriculum.
Seriously. How is there no seamless, elegant, and mobile way to do this?

7. We turned content into standards.
This makes sense until you realize that, by design, the absolute best this system will yield is students that know content.

8. We were blinded by data, research, and strategies….
..so we couldn’t see the communities, emotions, and habits that really drive learning.

9. We measured mastery once.
At the end of the year in marathon testing. And somehow this made sense? And performance on these tests gave us data that informed the very structures our schools were iterated with over time? Seriously? And we wonder why we chased our tails?

10. We spent huge sums of money on professional development.
While countless free resources floated around us in the digital ether. Silly administrators.

11. We reported progress with report cards.
Hey, I’ve tried other ways and parents get confused and downright feisty. We did a poor job helping parents understand what
grades really meant, and so they insisted on the formats they grew up with.

12. We banned early mobile technology (in this case, smartphones).
And did so for entirely non-academic reasons.

13. We shoehorned technology into dated learning models.
Like adding rockets to a tractor. Why did we not replace the tractor first?

14. We measured mastery with endless writing prompts and multiple-choice tests.
Which, while effective in spots, totally missed the brilliant students who, for whatever reason, never could shine on them.

15. We had parent conferences twice a year.
What? And still only had 15% of parents show up? And we didn’t completely freak out? We must’ve been really sleepy.

16. We ignored apprenticeships.
Apprenticeship is a powerful form of personalized learning that completely marries “content,” performance, craft, and
communities. But try having a 900 apprentices in a school. So much for that.

17. We claimed to “teach students to think for themselves.”
LOL

18. We often put 1000 or more students in the same school.
And couldn’t see how the learning could possibly become industrialized.

19. We frowned on lectures.
Even though that’s essentially what TED Talks are. Instead of making them engaging and interactive multimedia performances led by adults that love their content, we turned passionate teachers into clinical managers of systems and data.

20. We ignored social learning.
And got learning that was neither personal nor social. Curious.

21. We tacked on digital citizenship.
The definition of digital citizenship is “the quality of actions, habits, and consumption patterns that impact the ecology of digital content and communities.” This is artificial to teach outside of the way students use these tools and places on a daily basis–which makes hanging a “digital citizenship” poster or teaching a “digital citizenship” lesson insufficient.
Like literacy, it needs to be fully integrated into the learning experiences of students.

22. We turned to curriculum that was scripted and written by people thousands of miles away.
We panicked, and it was fool’s gold.

Bonus 23. We chewed teachers up and spit them out
We made teachers entirely responsible for planning, measuring, managing, and responding to both mastery and deficiency. And through peer pressure, a little brainwashing, and appealing to their pride, somehow convinced them they really were."
education  schools  teaching  howweteach  howwelearn  unschooling  deschooling  terryheick  literacy  content  curriculum  gradelevels  agesegregation  crowdsourcing  wikipedia  community  vacations  standards  standardization  preofessionaldevelopment  money  waste  bureaucracy  technology  edtech  mobile  phones  smartphones  criticalthinking  socialemotional  civics  citizenship  digitalcitizenship  social  learning  lectures  data  bigdata  quantification  apprenticeships  testing  standardizedtesting  assessment  fail  sharing  socialemotionallearning 
march 2015 by robertogreco
MoMA | ArquiMoMA Instagram Project
"#ArquiMoMA

MoMA and Instagram are collaborating to celebrate the exhibition Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955–1980 (March 29, 2015–July 19, 2015). The exhibition features over 500 original works that have largely never been exhibited—even in their home countries—including historical architectural drawings and models, vintage photographs, and films from the period. To kick off the project, InstaMeets were held across Latin America on March 14, 2015. (See a list of InstaMeet locations below.)
We’re inviting you to share your images of buildings featured in the exhibition, to show their current context and how people see and use them today.

Share your photos of any of the locations in the complete list below at any time leading up to or during the exhibition using the hashtag #ArquiMoMA. Be sure to tag your location.
Select photos will be featured on a display in the exhibition galleries at The Museum of Modern Art and on MoMA.org."
moma  latinamerica  architecture  instagram  #ArquiMoMA  design  argentina  brazil  brasil  chile  colombia  ecuador  guatemala  mexico  uruguay  venezuela  cuba  perú  puertorico  dominicanrepublic  museums  socialmedia  photography  crowdsourcing  participatory 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Understanding Fair Labor Practices in a Networked Age - FairLabor [.pdf]
"Data & Society Research Institute
datasociety.net

Understanding Fair Labor Practices in a Networked Age
by Tamara Kneese, Alex Rosenblat, and danah boyd

Data & Society Working Paper, October 8, 2014
Prepared for: Future of Work
Project supported by Open Society Foundations

Brief Description

"Internet-enabled technologies allow people to connect in unprecedented ways. Although everyday social practices are widespread and well known, these same tools are reconfiguring key aspects of work. Crowdsourcing and distributed labor technologies increasingly allow companies to outsource everything from mundane tasks(e.g., Amazon Mechanical Turk) to professional services (e.g., oDesk). Sharing economy – or peer economy – tools (e.g., Airbnb) allow people to barter goods or services or get paid for these exchanges outside of the dominant business framework. These services have enabled new forms of contract or freelance labor and reduced risk for companies; however, there is often an increase in risk for the associated laborers. At the same time, divisions between what constitutes work, hobby, and volunteerism get blurred,especially as many organizations rely on volunteer labor under the assumption that it’s mutually beneficial (e.g., blogs and journalistic enterprises that republish work or see the offer of a platform as valuable in and of itself). While all of these labor issues have unmediated precedents (e.g., free internships), technology magnifies the scale of these practices, minimizes the transactional friction, and increases the visibility of unpaid and freelance work. Collectively, this raises critical questions about what fair labor looks like in a networked world, where boundaries dissolve and existing mechanisms of labor protection do not address the varied work scenarios now available."

[via tweets by @ashedryden via @aredridel:
https://twitter.com/ashedryden/status/520645315255214080

What does fair labor look like in world where existing mechanisms of labor protection aren’t enough? http://bit.ly/1oYmZpz (v @brainwane)

“Union models don’t apply to many industries; worker protections have disappeared in sectors while protections haven’t emerged in others.”

Deleuze links the emergence of tech to controls that are less defined by structure, but as insidious as strict hierarchies in industrial era

This paper does a good job of drawing the line from hobby to unpaid labor for corporations; “feel good” peer economies, etc

“[the internet is] a feature of the cultural economy, an important unacknowledged source of value in advanced capitalist societies”

“As labor and production become increasingly immaterial, free labor becomes a central part of the digital economy.”

See: hungry advertising marketplaces masquerading as social networks, open source, etc

This free, unpaid labor sneaks in because we feel compensated for how it makes us *feel*, meanwhile others financially profit of our labor.

“At the heart of the technology industry, the incentive to work 80 hours a week is heightened by a sense of pleasure in work.”

“Work will no longer be a place, and home no longer an escape.” Sound familiar?

On Uber, TaskRabbit, etc: (paraphrased) “Employees make good money, receive full benefits. Micro-taskers the employees profit from don’t.”

As technologists who create, profit from, & make use of these new models of labor, we’re ethically obligated to understand its impact.

We’ve created an increasingly high population of underpaid, un- and underinsured, workers, expecting “happiness” to compensate them.

The dreams of technology-aided labor providing for a healthy society that can work less, is compensated fairly & equally are lost on us.

“Uber drivers in LA tell passengers that they enjoy the job in order to protect from receiving a low rating.” That’s coerced “happiness”.

When we’re looking at who is taking these “micro-tasking” jobs, they’re largely those that are un- or underemployed; high numbers of PoC

Not only are PoC facing discrimination in pay from the traditional labor market they’re being underpaid for piecemeal work to make ends meet ]
danahboyd  alexrosenblat  tamarakneese  2014  labor  work  uber  economics  crowdsourcing  airbnb  amazonmechanicalturk  taskrabbit  odesk  unions  rights  fordism  sharingeconomy  via:ariastewart  markets  compensation  internet  web  online  technology  happiness  coercion  exploitation  inequality 
october 2014 by robertogreco
BIC - Universal Typeface Experiment
"Unifying the world’s handwriting into a universal typeface. Explore existing contributions, or add your own writing to the experiment."

[via: http://digiday.com/brands/bic-goes-digital-crowdsourced-universal-typeface-campaign/ ]
crowdsourcing  typography  bic  fonts  typefaces  2014  handwriting  averages 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Communal work - Wikipedia
"Communal work is when a gathering takes place to accomplish a task or to hold a competition. A number of cultures have such gatherings, often for the purpose of holding a competition, as in a spelling bee, or for providing manual labour, as in a barn raising.

Especially in the past, the tasks were often major jobs, such as clearing a field of timber or raising a barn, that would be difficult to carry out alone. It was often both a social and utilitarian event. Jobs like corn husking or sewing, could be done as a group to allow socializing during an otherwise tedious chore. Such gatherings often included refreshments and entertainment provided by the group. Different words have been used to describe such gatherings."

[talkoot references here: http://www.cityofsound.com/blog/2014/05/essay-designing-finnishness-for-out-of-the-blue-gestalten.html ]
communalwork  community  interdependence  mutualaid  collectivism  barnraising  bees  bee  gadugi  talkoot  meitheal  dugnad  mink'a  minka  naffir  gotong-royong  bayanihan  imece  harambee  crowdsourcing  gatherings  events  allhands 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Design in Times of Crisis
"What is it?

Design in Times of Crisis is a work-in-progress reflection for a scenario of the everyday present and near future. It is also a series of short-term block seminars (TBA).

It is part of the PhD investigation of two Brazilian design researchers located in Berlin, Germany: Pedro Oliveira - www.partidoalto.net - and Luiza Prado - www.doisedois.net.

It is through an observation of the current state of affairs mostly outside the so-called “developed world” that we aim to construct our scenario. Of course many of our concerns also do apply to other places in the world, but our focus is more looking home.

This is, of course, nothing new. Its idea stemmed from the very nice "Design for the New Normal" developed by Superflux (if you ended up here, you should definitely check out their work). We think that their outline is indeed fruitful and very necessary, but coming from a different political and social background there are some elements we’d like to disagree, and others we’d like to suggest.

Differently from them, however, we decided to call it the "Times of Crisis" because it does concern the immediate present and the probable future. We think that, as design researchers, it is of paramount importance that we investigate this projection and prepare ourselves for it.

In a nutshell, the links posted here will fall in a few categories, which are the characteristics we are framing as constituents of this scenario. They are:

All Technology is Proprietary

Brands and the State will control your technology. What they do is only to lure you into using their services in order to collect data about everything, everywhere. Crowdsourcing at its best. The obsession with the “quantified self” only leads to the loss of privacy and the more proprietary the technology is, the less control you have over your data. In these times of crisis, people comply with giving their data over to brands and the state under an alleged “full disclosure” of their use. In poorer and emergent countries, particularly, the use of proprietary technology, that is, branded tech, is still a form of social and economical affirmation and status, particularly in lower classes. Open-source tech can and will come to the empowerment of small groups and initiatives, but consumerist ideals and patterns are likely to boost, particularly when formerly poorer classes/countries start to gain more economical power.

You Are what You Consume

Brands and consumption are the biggest form of social insertion. Brands explore that ad infinitum and you belong to those groups where your favorite brand fits in. With the rise of a “new middle class” in developing countries, the patterns of consumption are likely to change and grow; the brand is the greatest form of social status. Musical movements in favelas and ghettos praise brands as something to be desired and proudly worn or used, while at the same time brands try to detach themselves from these movements to protect their capital.

Surveillance is Desired

Reality shows become the norm, they are a preparation for an acceptance of a Police State (cf. Laurel Halo in The Wire). Surveillance gives the false illusion of safety, of “watching out against the other”, but also of being watched against yourself. Drones and Bugs are everywhere for the sake of peace maintenance and the quantified self. Proprietary Tech collects your data with games and research projects. Your data is everyone’s data.

Cities are Corporations are Cities

The association (both legal and illegal) of Business and State leads to a City whose form of social and urban control relies on the interests of brands. Big industries support “eco-initiatives” in order to promote a false state of sustainability while securing their own profit through exploring real estate, mobility and other issues that should be of concern from the State. (cf. Carlos Vainer) - also, prices go crazy because regulation is left to a “minimal State” (Estado Mínimo). Giant sporting events and conferences sell an image of a city devoid of its poorer and “unwanted” social components in favor of its market value as commodity.

——

Here in this blog we aim to collect evidence, reflections and projections for this scenario.

A good starting point for the scope of this discussion you can find here. In this text, we pointed out some things we think that are problematic when approaching Speculative and Critical Design from a narrow perspective of the world.
Naturally, this is an open, stream-of-consciousness idea. Comments, critique and additions to it are more than welcome.

Shout it loud at pedroliveira [at] udk-berlin or luiza.prado [at] udk-berlin.de "
luizaprado  pedrooliveira  design  everyday  present  future  nearfuture  superflux  tomesofcrisis  crisis  technology  crowdsourcing  data  control  consumption  brands  branding  surveillance  policestate  laurelhalo  safety  privacy  security  cities  corporations  corporatism  urban  urbanism  socialcontrol  systainability  carlosvainer  estadomínimo  minimalstate  commodities  business  law  legal  specialinterests 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Old Weather - Our Weather's Past, the Climate's Future
"Old Weather aims to recover worldwide weather observations to help improve climate model predictions"
crowdsourcing  data  history  science  weather  oldweather  climate 
january 2014 by robertogreco
thoughts on failure | Proboscis
"As I’m sure others who’ve launched kickstarter projects have experienced, I received a number of messages offering me advice and professional services to enhance the campaign. Essentially all the advice boiled down to a simple nugget, that the only way to succeed was to already have a significant “fanbase” who could be “activated” or motivated to pledge support and then amplify it by sharing the fact they’d supported the project to their friends and social circles. If I’ve learnt anything then its probably that Proboscis doesn’t have a fanbase as such to activate.

The irony, too, was not lost on me of trying to raise funding for a project about free play and improvisation without rules, winners or rewards on a crowdfunding platform entirely structured around rewards and goals – where there are only winners (those who reach or surpass their goal) and losers. Could there be more to this than just irony? Could it be that the conceptual nature of the PlayCubes (indeed of my whole practice) is just so diametrically opposite to the way in which kickstarter and the communities which form around it operate that it was always unlikely to succeed? Tim’s post also quotes Tom Uglow writing about a project they collaborated on, #dream40"

[See also (linked within): http://timwright.typepad.com/main/2013/10/some-thoughts-about-innovation-and-failure.html ]
kickstarter  crowdsourcing  art  2013  gileslane  rewards  goals  funding  fundraising  learning  innovation  metrics  audiences  organizations 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Place Pulse | Mapping Urban Perception
"Place Pulse aims to quantitatively recognize which areas of a city are perceived as wealthy, modern, safe, lively, active, unique, central, adaptable or family friendly.

With enough user participation, Place Pulse can identify which neighborhoods in Bangkok are perceived better than neighborhoods in New York City or to examine how the distribution of a certain perception in Mexico City compares with that same perception in Tokyo.

For curious researchers, the Place Pulse dataset can even be used to study the association between urban perception and other datasets, such as violent crime, creativity or economic growth."
maps  mapping  urbanism  architecture  crowdsourcing  data  research  cities  place  placepulse  césarhidalgo  deepakjagdish  danielsmilkov  tokyo  nyc  mexicocity  mexicodf  bankok  streetview  googlesteetview  df 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Brickstarter – Brickstarter the book
"Brickstarter the book contains 80 dense pages filled with the research presented here, refined and reformatted, as well as entirely new essays and illustrations. This book is a primer for people working on problems at the intersection of crowdfunding/sourcing, social media, urban planning and decision-making. So in other words, it’s about contemporary cities and how we might create new platforms to enable more effective debate about the future of our shared spaces."
brickstarter  bryanboyer  books  2013  crowdsourcing  crowdfunding  urban  urbanism  cities  josephgrima  danhill  prototyping  lcproject  openstudioproject 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Design for the New Normal (Revisited) | superflux
"I was invited to talk at the NEXT Conference in Berlin by Peter Bihr, as he felt that a talk I gave last year would fit well with the conference's theme Here Be Dragons: "We fret about data, who is collecting it and why. We fret about privacy and security. We worry and fear disruption, which changes business models and renders old business to ashes. Some would have us walk away, steer clear of these risks. They’re dangerous, we don’t know what the consequences will be. Maintain the status quo, don’t change too much.Here and now is safe. Over there, in the future? Well, there be dragons."

This sounded like a good platform to expand upon the 'Design for the New Normal' presentation I gave earlier, especially as its an area Jon and I are thinking about in the context of various ongoing projects. So here it is, once again an accelerated slideshow (70 slides!) where I followed up on some of the stories to see what happened to them in the last six months, and developed some of the ideas further. This continues to be a work-in-progress that Superflux is developing as part of our current projects. "

[Video: http://nextberlin.eu/2013/07/design-for-the-new-normal-3/ ]
anabjain  2013  drones  weapons  manufacturing  3dprinting  bioengineering  droneproject  biotechnology  biotech  biobricks  songhojun  ossi  zemaraielali  empowerment  technology  technologicalempowerment  raspberrypi  hackerspaces  makerspaces  diy  biology  diybio  shapeways  replicators  tobiasrevell  globalvillageconstructionset  marcinjakubowski  crowdsourcing  cryptocurrencies  openideo  ideo  wickedproblems  darpa  innovation  india  afghanistan  jugaad  jugaadwarfare  warfare  war  syria  bitcoins  blackmarket  freicoin  litecoin  dna  dnadreams  bregtjevanderhaak  bgi  genomics  23andme  annewojcicki  genetics  scottsmith  superdensity  googleglass  chaos  complexity  uncertainty  thenewnormal  superflux  opensource  patents  subversion  design  jonardern  ux  marketing  venkateshrao  normalityfield  strangenow  syntheticbiology  healthcare  healthinsurance  insurance  law  economics  ip  arnoldmann  dynamicgenetics  insects  liamyoung  eleanorsaitta  shingtatchung  algorithms  superstition  bahavior  numerology  dunne&raby  augerloizeau  bionicrequiem  ericschmidt  privacy  adamharvey  makeu 
april 2013 by robertogreco
you are here
"you are here is an experimental service to let people record opinions about where a place is and to publish those opinions as a free and open dataset. you are here is sort of like "geo-corrections as a service"."

"Now that you've got a latitude and longitude the website will fetch all of the places of a particular type that intersect that point. The current list of place types to choose from are: neighbourhoods, localities, aerotropolii, timezones. You can jump up and down the hierarchy of place types until you find something sounds right and then associate that spot on the planet with a unique Where on Earth (WOE) identifier for that place."
aaronstraupcope  geolocation  internet  maps  neighborhoods  cities  mapping  crowdsourcing  names  naming  placenames  geography  local 
april 2013 by robertogreco
NYPL Map Warper: Home
"he NYPL Map Warper is a tool for digitally aligning ("rectifying") historical maps from the NYPL's collections to match today's precise maps. Visitors can browse already rectified maps or assist the NYPL by aligning a map. Play the video above to tour the site and learn how to rectify a map yourself.

Everyone is welcome to participate!"
history  maps  nypl  crowdsourcing  mapping  mapwarper  via:kissane  cartography 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Cicada Tracker | WNYC
"WNYC invites families, armchair scientists and lovers of nature to join in a bit of mass science: track the cicadas that emerge once every 17 years across New Jersey, New York and the whole Northeast by building homemade sensors and reporting your observations."
arduino  crowdsourcing  data  diy  wncy  cicadas  insects  2013  sensors  newjersey  newyork  northeast 
march 2013 by robertogreco
a brief history of participation
"These activities were not always congenial to the program of government reform towards democratization. Many of them used participatory methods instead to net poor peoples into networks of debt and reliance on hierarchical authorities.

The reasons for the failures of participatory technology are actually quite specific.

Participation was appropriated during the 1970s as a means of cheap development without commitment of resources from above. The theme of participatory ownership of the city, pioneered in discussions about urban planning in the West, remained strong in the context of the developing world, and even grew in a context of spiraling urbanization. In India, the Philippines, and much of Africa and Latin America, postwar economies pushed peasants off of the land into cities, where the poor availability of housing required the poor to squat on land and build their own homes out of cheap building materials. At first, the governments of these towns collaborated with the World Bank to take out loans to provide expensive, high-rise public housing units. But increasingly, the World Bank drew upon the advice of western advocates of squatter settlements, who saw in western squats the potential benefits of self-governance without interference from the state. In the hands of the World Bank, this theory of self-directed, self-built, self-governed housing projects became a justification for defunding public housing. From 1972 forward, World Bank reports commended squatters for their ingenuity and resourcefulness and recommended giving squatters titles to their properties, which would allow them to raise credit and participate in the economy as consumers and borrowers.

Participatory mechanisms installed by the Indian government to deal with water tanks after nationalization depend on principles of accountability at the local level that were invented under colonial rule. They install the duty of the locality to take care of people without necessarily providing the means with which to do so.

We need developers who can learn from the history of futility, and historians who have the courage to constructively encourage a more informed kind of development. "
peertopeer  web2.0  joguldi  2013  conviviality  participation  participatory  government  centralization  centralizedgovernment  self-rule  history  1960s  democracy  democratization  reform  networks  mutualaid  peterkropotkin  politics  activism  banks  banking  patrickgeddes  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  planning  self-governance  worldbank  dudleyseers  gandhi  robertchambers  neelamukherjee  india  thailand  philippines  gis  geography  latinamerica  1970s  squatters  economics  development  africa  cities  resources  mapmaking  cartography  maps  mapping  googlemaps  openstreetmap  osm  ushahidi  crowdsourcing  infrastructure 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The Dream is Now
"JOIN US AS WE BUILD AN INTERACTIVE DOCUMENTARY that will send a clear message to Washington: ACT NOW on the Dream Act — create a path for undocumented youth to earn their citizenship. We won't rest until Congress hears our voices, with momentum building for immigration reform, the time is now. Tell your story, send in a picture, sign the petition and become a part of a living, breathing call to action that Congress can't ignore. Story by story, voice by voice we will make it happen."
dreamact  immigration  us  policy  activism  petitions  identity  documentary  documentaries  citizenship  congress  law  legal  crowdsourcing  via:nicolefenton 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The Reykjavik Grapevine - Life, Travel and Entertainment in Iceland / Please, Please, Please Stop Calling It "Crowdsourced"
"Calling Iceland's constitutional draft "crowdsourced" is wrong. As in, not right, factually inaccurate, and untrue. The draft of Iceland's new constitution was not "crowdsourced". It was not essentially written by average folks through Facebook and Twitter and then translated into legalese by a team of experts. It just wasn't, no matter how much you yearn to throw around these buzzwords and catchphrases. Really.

So let me attempt to set the record straight, here, once and for all, about where Iceland's constitutional draft came from and how the average Icelander participated in it…

First of all, there's the Constitutional Council…a group of 25 people…appointed by the Prime Minister…for the task of writing a draft of a new constitution…

Second, we have the drafting process. This is probably where the "crowdsource" meme arose…

Third, the draft has been handed over to parliament…go over it…likely make even more changes… It's democratic, certainly, but crowdsourcing it ain’t."
exaggeration  government  constitution  crowdsourcing  2012  iceland 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Finland is about to start using crowdsourcing to create new laws — European technology news
"Tech-driven democracy fans in other countries may not find the environment as conducive to crowdsourced legislation right now, but on the other hand they just got themselves a model to study. If crowdsourced legislation is going to work anywhere, Finland would be the right place for it to happen."
lawmaking  law  politics  crowdsourcing  democracy  via:tealtan  finland 
september 2012 by robertogreco
La mia Cura Open Source / My Open Source Cure
"CURE, in different cultures, means different things.

There are cures for the body, for spirit, for communication.

Grab the information about my disease, if you want, and give me a CURE: create a video, an artwork, a map, a text, a poem, a game, or try to find a solution for my health problem.

Artists, designers, hackers, scientists, doctors, photographers, videomakers, musicians, writers. Anyone can give me a CURE."

Note made by Jen Lowe on Reading.am:

"*update* @moebio's reported that there is some speculation that this is fake - art, perhaps a performance? I've no idea either way, but will say the sentiment (though of course not the gravity) holds for me regardless of the reality. cc @tealtan @maxfenton"
crowdsourcing  culture  via:jen  via:jenlowe  cures  health  opensource  opensourcecure 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Weathermob
"Who doesn’t have something to say about the weather…

Weathermob makes it easy to say something about the weather you’re in, through video, photo, comments or making a quick report by touching a couple of buttons – this is your chance to be a weatherwoman or weatherman.

Your local weather – live

Get the latest local forecasts alongside live reports on current weather conditions from Weathermob users.

See your friends’ weather

Follow reports from your friends and family – see who’s having the best weather and how they feel about it. Know your mother’s weather before you even speak to her…"
weathermob  mobile  crowdsourcing  iphone  applications  ios  weather 
august 2012 by robertogreco
WikiHouse / Open Source Construction Set
"WikiHouse is not a single, finished product, but an open community project, the aim of which is to make it possible for anyone to design for anyone else. There is no fixed design 'team' or 'studio', but a steadily growing community of designers from all disciplines who share in common the belief that developing freely available house design solutions which are affordable, sustainable, and adaptive to differing needs is a worthwhile aim.

Anyone who is interested in, or already working on, problems around this area is invited to become a collaborator on WikiHouse, regardless of what background they approach it from. There is already a growing community of followers, supporters, contributors, and developers who are working to improve on this early experiment…"

[via: http://www.domusweb.it/en/architecture/wikihouse-open-source-housing-/ via http://www.domusweb.it/en/architecture/young-architects-in-action-1-architecture-00/ ]

[Version map: http://www.architecture00.net/blog/?p=2436 ]

[video: https://wikihouse.wpengine.com/wikihouse-4-0/
https://vimeo.com/105855301 ]

[See also: https://www.opendesk.cc/ ]
lcproject  projectideas  glvo  wikihouse  yogeshtaylor  jonisteiner  ruphinachoe  beatricegalilee  austencook  stevefisher  tav  jamesarthur  nickierodiaconou  alastairparvin  architecture00  00:/  indyjohar  furniture  construction  housing  homes  crowdsourcing  3d  cnc  diy  design  architecture  opensource  classideas  modularity 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Kickstarter: Crowdfunding Platform Or Reality Show? | Fast Company
"…Pen Type-A, a slick stainless-steel enclosure for Japanese gel ink pens that I first saw on Kickstarter but pre-ordered shortly after their campaign raised more than 100 times its goal in August of last year… Yet the Pen Type-A is more than a $100 metal pen that never gets used, it's a memento of the excitement I felt after first seeing the product.

When faced with the reality of these products, disappointment is inevitable--not just because they're too little too late (if at all) but for even weirder reasons. We don't really want the stuff. We're paying for the sensation of a hypothetical idea, not the experience of a realized product. For the pleasure of desiring it. For the experience of watching it succeed beyond expectations or to fail dramatically. Kickstarter is just another form of entertainment. It's QVC for the Net set. And just like QVC, the products are usually less appealing than the excitement of learning about them for the first time and getting in early on the sale."
sponsorshipasentertainment  sponshorship  consumptionsasentertainment  entertainment  sourishong-porretta  micropatronage  crowdsourcing  ouya  cw&t;  products  qvc  experience  buyer'sremorse  consumerism  excitement  2012  ianbogost  kickstarter 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Resiliency, Risk, and a Good Compass: Tools for the Coming Chaos | Wired Business | Wired.com
"There are nine or so principles to work in a world like this:

1. Resilience instead of strength, which means you want to yield and allow failure and you bounce back instead of trying to resist failure.
2. You pull instead of push. That means you pull the resources from the network as you need them, as opposed to centrally stocking them and controlling them.
3. You want to take risk instead of focusing on safety.
4. You want to focus on the system instead of objects.
5. You want to have good compasses not maps.
6. You want to work on practice instead of theory. Because sometimes you don’t why it works, but what is important is that it is working, not that you have some theory around it.
7. It disobedience instead of compliance. You don’t get a Nobel Prize for doing what you are told. Too much of school is about obedience, we should really be celebrating disobedience.
8. It’s the crowd instead of experts.
9. It’s a focus on learning instead of education."
onthecheap  innovation  startups  collaboration  change  work  mapping  maps  compass  adaptability  howwework  cv  failure  systemsawareness  systemsthinking  systems  crowdsourcing  crowds  experts  disobedience  compliance  theory  practice  education  deschooling  hierarchy  control  unschooling  objects  tcsnmy  safety  pull  push  resiliency  2012  joiito  risktaking  risk  resilience  networks  learning 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Brickstarter
"Brickstarter is a 21st century social service. It enables everyday people, using everyday technology and culture, to articulate and progress sustainable ideas about their community. Brickstarter is a platform to turn possibilities into proposals into projects."

"The core of Brickstarter is a web service that provides a shared platform for citizens to suggest and build possibilities into proposals into projects. Brickstarter is a:

* Forum for citizens to articulate possibilities, and start aggregating attention
* Public story-telling platform, capturing the ebb and flow of debate around proposals
* Community fundraising tool for shared initiatives
* ‘Real-time dashboard‘ displaying the collective desires of a community that can be mapped against institutional strategies and legislative frameworks, enabling bureaucracy to work more effectively"
funding  fundraising  urbanism  urban  cities  yimby  nimby  crowdsourcing  crowdfunding  technology  sharing  platform  culture  sitra  danhill  brickstarter  community 
july 2012 by robertogreco
GOOD magazine lays off most of its editorial staffers | Poynter.
GOOD appears to be exploring a community-based publishing system with a public beta site described as “a platform for 21st century citizenship” that includes aggregation (GOOD Finder) and a tool for mobilizing locally (GOOD Maker).
journalism  good  goodmagazine  googfinder  goodmaker  community  community-basedpublishing  publishing  crowdsourcing  aggregation  aggregator  via:litherland 
june 2012 by robertogreco
A Cloud of My Own (Pinboard Blog)
"I have no idea what I'm doing. I do it, I write it up, and then wisdom pours down from the Internet."
tinkering  servers  hardware  twitter  crowdsourcing  web  internet  2012  learningbydoing  experimentation  learning  doing  maciejceglowski  pinboard  maciejcegłowski 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Emphas.is
"On Emphas.is photojournalists pitch their projects directly to the public. By agreeing to back a story, for a minimum contribution of $10, you are making sure that the issues you care about receive the in-depth coverage they deserve. In exchange you are invited along on the journey.

NEW: The Emphas.is Book Collection

In 2012 we are taking the Emphas.is concept one step further by introducing Emphas.is Books. You can now help make a photography book project see the light simply by pre-ordering a copy. Your copy will be a signed and numbered collector's edition accompanied by a print."
film  documentaries  books  emphas.is  crowdsourcing  funding  photojournalism  photography  journalism  crowdfunding 
april 2012 by robertogreco
An Essay on the New Aesthetic | Beyond The Beyond | Wired.com
[New URL: http://www.wired.com/2012/04/an-essay-on-the-new-aesthetic/
See also: http://booktwo.org/notebook/sxaesthetic/
http://www.aaronland.info/weblog/2012/03/13/godhelpus/#sxaesthetic
http://www.joannemcneil.com/new-aesthetic-at-sxsw/
http://noisydecentgraphics.typepad.com/design/2012/03/sxsw-the-new-aesthetic-and-commercial-visual-culture.html
http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2012/03/sxsw-the-new-aesthetic-and-writing.html ]

"The “New Aesthetic” is a native product of modern network culture. It’s from London, but it was born digital, on the Internet. The New Aesthetic is a “theory object” and a “shareable concept.”

The New Aesthetic is “collectively intelligent.” It’s diffuse, crowdsourcey, and made of many small pieces loosely joined. It is rhizomatic, as the people at Rhizome would likely tell you. It’s open-sourced, and triumph-of-amateurs. It’s like its logo, a bright cluster of balloons tied to some huge, dark and lethal weight.

There are some good aspects to this modern situation, and there are some not so good ones."

"That’s the big problem, as I see it: the New Aesthetic is trying to hack a modern aesthetic, instead of thinking hard enough and working hard enough to build one. That’s the case so far, anyhow. No reason that the New Aesthetic has to stop where it stands at this moment, after such a promising start. I rather imagine it’s bound to do otherwise. Somebody somewhere will, anyhow."
machinevision  glitches  digitalaccumulation  walterbenjamin  socialmedia  bots  uncannyvalley  surveillance  turingtest  renderghosts  imagerecognition  imagery  beauty  cern  postmodernity  hereandnow  temporality  pixels  culturalagnosticism  london  theory  networkculture  theoryobjects  smallpieceslooselyjoined  collectiveintelligence  digitalage  digital  modernism  aesthetics  vision  robots  cubism  impressionism  history  artmovements  machine-readableworld  russelldavies  benterrett  siliconrounsabout  art  marcelduchamp  joannemcneil  jamesbridle  sxsw  brucesterling  2012  newaesthetic  crowdsourcing  rhizome  aaronstraupcope  thenewaesthetic 
april 2012 by robertogreco
A New, Noisier Way of Writing - NYTimes.com [Definitely not an OR, but and AND. Room for mix, room for both.]
"This opening up of the process may fit the zeitgeist, but it terrifies many writers. Yet is Mr. Coelho right? Must the writer, like corporations & governments everywhere, accept a fundamental shift in what is kept open & what kept closed?

Some serious writers show a way forward. Teju Cole…is an avid user of Twitter, using it not to expound on the Super Bowl, but to remix and rewrite Nigerian headlines in a deft, literary way. Salman Rushdie, a defender of Writing with a capital W, has found a way to balance that literary seriousness with new habits of launching tweet-wars, informing us where he is, and reviewing books in 140 characters, always with his trademark wit.

The question, perhaps, is this: As the writer surrenders to these new possibilities, what will be her role in the instantaneous, feedback-driven, open world? Will there be a place for those other, slower thoughts, ideas that take time and quiet to flower, truths that cannot be crowdsourced?"
slow  concentration  online  web  entrepreneurship  meritocracy  wikipedia  isolation  attention  anandgiridharadas  vsnaipaul  jonathanfranzen  salmanrushdie  waltwhitman  leavesofgrass  twitter  crowdsourcing  distraction  writing  2012  paulocoelho  tejucole 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Mapping Main Street » A Collaborative Documentary Media Project
"Once you start looking, you'll notice Main Streets are everywhere and tell all kinds of stories. There's a Main Street in San Luis, Arizona that dead-ends right into the Mexican border. The Main Street in Melvindale, Michigan runs through a trailer park in the shadows of Ford's River Rouge plant, once the largest factory in the world. Main Street is small town and urban center; it is the thriving business district and the prostitution stroll; it is the places where we live, the places where we work, and sometimes, it is the places we have abandoned.

Mapping Main Street is a collaborative documentary media project that creates a new map of the country through stories, photos and videos recorded on actual Main Streets. The goal is to document all of the more than 10,000 streets named Main in the United States. We invite you to capture the stories and images of the country today. Go out, look around, talk to people, and contribute to this re-mapping of the United States."

[See: http://www.mappingmainstreet.org/participate/index.php ]
stories  classideas  photography  video  baughmanreinhardt  josieholtzman  sarapellegrini  iangray  local  localprojects  matthewlong-middleton  jamesburns  jesseshapins  annheppermann  karaoehler  crowdsourcing  collaboration  flickr  storytelling  towns  cities  community  via:steelemaley  us  mapping  maps 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Whaling Songs | HiLobrow
"Imagine, if you will, a Venn Diagram composed of the following sets: Coders. Musicians. Marine Biologists. Paul Winter. Leonard Nimoy. Your high school English teacher. And Ishmael.

The sole resident of the intersecting set would be, of course, a whale.

Or perhaps the whale’s trace, in the form of a song."
whales  whale.fm  animals  biology  nature  science  sound  marinebiology  whalesongs  leonardnimoy  paulwinter  mobydick  zooniverse  crowdsourcing  venndiagrams  moby-dick 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Sal Randolph: A Call for Migratory Objects
"Do you have an object whose story you would like to share? An heirloom, an artwork, a toothbrush, a stone? An object which has inspired you, dominated you, educated you, exalted or degraded you? For our second exhibition of the Migration year, we invite you to lend us your object and include with it everything you know about its migratory story.

These objects will be our starting point for a three-month exploration of the Migration of Objects. We will view them as independent beings with stories of their own, stories that began before the object’s encounter with you and that will likely continue long after you part. Your story of the object may start with you but may necessarily migrate into the economic, the industrial, the political, the historical, the geologic, the environmental and so on.

Anyone can play. Here’s how it works:…"
salrandolph  objects  storytelling  migratoryobjects  art  stories  migrationofobjects  proteusgowanus  exhibitions  crowdsourcing  classideas  writingprompts 
november 2011 by robertogreco
The Fans Are All Right (Pinboard Blog)
"I learned a lot about fandom couple of years ago in conversations with my friend Britta, who was working at the time as community manager for Delicious. She taught me that fans were among the heaviest users of the bookmarking site, and had constructed an edifice of incredibly elaborate tagging conventions, plugins, and scripts to organize their output along a bewildering number of dimensions. If you wanted to read a 3000 word fic where Picard forces Gandalf into sexual bondage, and it seems unconsensual but secretly both want it, and it's R-explicit but not NC-17 explicit, all you had to do was search along the appropriate combination of tags (and if you couldn't find it, someone would probably write it for you). By 2008 a whole suite of theoretical ideas about folksonomy, crowdsourcing, faceted infomation retrieval, collaborative editing and emergent ontology had been implemented by a bunch of friendly people so that they could read about Kirk drilling Spock."
pinboard  2011  fanfiction  taxonomy  folksonomy  brittagustafson  del.icio.us  avos  bookmarking  bookmarks  tags  tagging  collaboration  collaborative  crowdsourcing  fans 
october 2011 by robertogreco
This Life - A Plugged-in Summer - NYTimes.com
"I concocted a scheme. During weekends this summer, I would pursue the opposite of an unplugged vacation: I would check screens whenever I could. Not in the service of work, but in the service of play. I would crowd-source new ideas for car games and YouTube my picnic recipes. I would test the prevailing wisdom that the Internet spoils all the fun. With back-to-school fast approaching, here’s my report.

For starters, the Web supplied an endless font of trivia and historical tidbits to enliven our days. I learned that a great debate still rages over who was the “Benedict” in eggs Benedict; that ancient mythologists believed fish were so afraid of the ospreys that they turned up their bellies in surrender; and that care packages like the one we sent my nephew at camp had their origins feeding starving Europeans in World War II and initially contained liver loaf and steak and kidneys…"
technology  vacation  brucefeiler  connectivity  twitter  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  handhelds  iphone  ipad  instantgratification  search  crowdsourcing  learning  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Local Projects: Change by Us
"This project is an evolution of Local Projects’ successful Give A Minute (giveaminute.info) initiative, already underway in Chicago and Memphis. Change by Us aims to invite ideas for civic solutions, intelligently form project groups, and effectively connect groups with resources to bring their ideas to life. Change By Us functions as "a social network for civic activity." Using both text messaging and the site itself, New Yorkers can submit ideas for a more sustainable city. Based on those ideas, the site then connects visitors, and invites them into project groups. Project groups can then easily form connections to existing city resources and community organizations that can help them achieve their goal. Change By Us launches in limited beta form on April 21, 2011—the eve of Earth Day—with the question, “Hey NYC, How can we make our city a greener, better place to live?”"
change  crowdsourcing  placemaking  social  socialnetworking  ceosforcities  local  nyc  grassroots  activism  community  civics  civicengagement  chicago  memphis  changebyus  localprojects  sustainability  urban  urbanism  cities  urbanplanning 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Google Map Maker
"Leave your mark on the map: Add and update the places you know for millions to see in Google Maps. Start adding your local knowledge to the map.<br />
<br />
Add businesses and building outlines. Move place markers to the right locations. Build a detailed map of your school campus. See live mapping by users around the world!"<br />
<br />
[Live mapping is here: http://www.google.com/mapmaker/pulse ]
google  maps  googlemaps  mapping  diy  crowdsourcing 
april 2011 by robertogreco
No Right Brain Left Behind
"…a speed innovation challenge, calling on the creative industries to concept ideas that can help the creativity crisis happening in U.S. schools today.

In collaboration with Social Media Week 2011, teams from creative industries will have 5 days to concept ideas. On the last day of the week, ideas will be submitted virtually to this site, and an expert panel will pick 3 winning ideas that are to be featured by our media partners. The best ideas are to be piloted in 2011 and 2012.

We are inviting teams of various sizes from advertising agencies, innovation companies, design consultancies, and communication schools. Ideas can be in form of tools, applications, or products, or whatever else we have not thought of…

It is not about creating more artists. It’s about giving the students tools to solve 21st century problems…."

"We are a collective of thinkers, dreamers, doers, creators, educators, and provocateurs in the creative industries."
education  creativity  crowdsourcing  learning  lcproject  via:cervus  schools  prototyping  pilots  tcsnmy 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Sol Lewitt + Mechanical Turk : clementvalla
"Custom software recreates various Sol LeWitt drawings. The software also posts instructions on Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk. Human workers execute the drawings online based on the instructions from the program. The workers are paid 5¢ for each drawing. The software then assembles the drawings in a grid. The computer generated drawings, and the grids filled in by anonymous workers are displayed side by side."
art  design  robots  drawing  crowdsourcing  mechanicalturk  sollewitt 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Museum of Possibilities - a set on Flickr
"The city of Montréal needed designs to help inaugurate a public space within the new urban development of the Quartier des Spectacles, generating public interest in the vision & future of the area.

The ‘Museum of Possibilities’ was created for one day during Montréal’s city-wide open day for Museums. Members of the public could pick up a piece of paper & write down what they would like to have happen in that space in the future. Visitors entered the field of balloons to add an ‘entry’ to the museum of possible things which might happen on site. People also received a set of stickers so they could wander through the Museum of Possibilities & add a vote of approval for possible future events. This voting helped to turn ‘possibilities’ into probabilities & gave the client concrete data on public interest.

A collaboration w/ Melissa Mongiat, Mouna Andraos & Amélie Bilodeau, May 2010

www.livingwithourtime.com "
crowdsourcing  twitter  publicspace  designresearch  possibility  livingwithourtime  mounaandraos  améliebilodeau  montreal  opinion  imagination  balloons  museums  culture  community  the2837university  agitpropproject 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Rockefeller Foundation on “the future of crowdsourced cities” « Adam Greenfield's Speedbird [Great post as Adam shutters Speedbird.]
"These are some easily-foreseeable problems w/ purely bottom-up approaches to urban informatics. None of this is to denigrate legacy of Jane Jacobs…remains personal hero & primary touchstone for my work. & none of it is to argue that there oughn’t be central role for democratic voice in development of policy, management of place & delivery of services. It’s just to signal that things might not be as clearcut as we might wish—especially those of us who have historically been energized by presence of clear (& clearly demonizable) opponent.

If I’ve spent my space here calling attention to pitfalls of bottom-up approaches…because I think the promise is so self-evident…delighted to hear Anthony Townsend’s prognostication of/call for a “planet of civic laboratories,” in which getting to scale immediately is less important than a robust search of possibility space around these new technologies, & how citydwellers around world will use them in their making of place."
cities  technology  bottom-up  crowdsourcing  action  activism  datavisualization  urbancomputing  urban  urbanism  janejacobs  robertmoses  anthonytownsend  urbaninformatics  place  civiclaboratories  lcproject  possibilityspace  systems  government  democracy  policy  servicedesign  transparency  collaboration  scale  consistency  infrastructure  intervention  offloading  responsibilization  municipalities  seeclickfix  entitlement  moderation  laurakurgan  sarahwilliams  spatialinformation  maps  mapping  statistics  benjamindelapeña  carolcolletta  ceosforcities  rockefellerfoundation  greglindsay  lauraforlano  spatial  humanintervention 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Common Sense — Mobile sensing for community action
"We are developing mobile sensing technologies that help communities gather and analyze environmental data. We hope that this hardware and software will empower everyday citizens to learn more about their environment and influence environmental regulations and policy.

We have developed various research prototypes, which are being used in studies such as a deployment on street sweepers in San Francisco and a deployment of a handheld device in West Oakland. Right now we are focusing our efforts on air quality sensing. Our hope is that our research prototypes will demonstrate the utility of embedding environmental sensors in commercial commodity devices such as mobile phones."
mobile  sensing  community  technology  sensors  environment  crowdsourcing  sustainability  policy  data  datacollection  sanfrancisco  oakland  bayarea  phones 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Rise of the Micro-Medici: Change Observer: Design Observer
"Why does crowdfunding work where crowdsourcing fails? Because ideas are cheap and subjective, and money is expensive and objective. As Clay Shirky puts it in Cognitive Surplus, "People don't actively want bad design — it's just that most people aren't good designers.” Asking crowd members to put their money behind someone else's creativity does two things: It forces contributors to be more deliberate in their assessment of what constitutes a good idea, and it generates an absolute measure of merit based on the cumulative contributions of individuals."
design  thinking  crowdsourcing  crowdfunding  2010  mariapopova  clayshirky  kickstarter 
december 2010 by robertogreco
I Wish This Was
"New Orleans is full of vacant storefronts and people who need things. These stickers are an easy tool to voice what you want where you want it. Fill them out and put them on abandoned buildings and beyond.

These stickers are custom vinyl and can be easily removed without damaging property. They're free and can be found in corner stores, cafes, bookstores, bars, hair salons, and other places around New Orleans. See select photos here and share more on Flickr (tag your photos "iwishthiswas") or email photos or locations.

This project was created by local designer Candy Chang and launched with exhibit Ethnographic Terminalia at DuMois Gallery. Come to the opening Nov 19 or visit the show until Dec 3 2010 for good times and free stickers."
candychang  crowdsourcing  stickers  urbanism  neworleans  location  labels  papernet  city  nola  activism  iwishthiswas  via:migurski  cities  classideas  civics  potential 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Give a Minute!
"Give a Minute is a new kind of public dialogue. It only takes a minute to think about improving your city, but your ideas can make a world of difference. "Give a Minute" is an opportunity for you to think out loud; address old problems with fresh thinking; and to enter into dialogue with change-making community leaders. Soon, you’ll also be able to link up with others who have similar ideas and work on making your city an even better place. This initiative is happening in multiple cities: Chicago Memphis, New York, San Jose"
civicengagement  change  crowdsourcing  creativity  giveaminute  classideas  civics  community  collaboration  activism  behavior  environment  agency  technology  government  society  public  mobile  localism  local  csl  texting  chicago  ideas  memphis  nyc  sanjose 
november 2010 by robertogreco
The Public Square Goes Mobile - NYTimes.com
"Give a Minute launched with the question, “Hey Chicago, what would encourage you to walk, bike or take CTA more often?” Citizens, who are learning about it from billboards, ads on the L and in the local paper, are texting their ideas and posting them to the Give a Minute Web site. You can look here to find the responses texted so far (1,000 in the first two weeks), which range from “lower CTA fares” to “organized walking groups going roughly the same route with similar interests” to “play classical music on train system” to “I need to bring my daughter with me, so the streets need to be kid-safe.”

“We’re just culling through all the different ideas that run from the specific to the hilarious to the utopian,” says Barton. “But one thing that does seem clear is that they are far more diverse and often smaller scale, and actionable on different scales including individual, neighborhood and government.”"
civicengagement  change  crowdsourcing  creativity  giveaminute  classideas  civics  community  collaboration  activism  behavior  environment  agency  technology  government  society  public  mobile  localism  local  csl  texting  chicago  sanjose  nyc  memphis 
november 2010 by robertogreco
What a Hundred Million Calls to 311 Reveal About New York | Magazine | Wired.com
"Whether it happens through government services such as 311, private-sector startups, open source initiatives, or, most likely, a combination of all three, it’s clear that the 21st-century city is going to be immensely more efficient at solving clear, definable problems like graffiti and transportation routes. The question is whether these platforms can also address the more subtle problems of big-city neighborhoods—the sins of omission, the holes in the urban fabric where some crucial thread is missing. After all, when people gripe about their neighborhood, it’s usually not the potholes or clogged storm drains they have in mind; it’s the fact that there isn’t a dog run nearby or a playground or a good preschool with space available. “We’re really interested in tackling things that are problems not because they’re broken but because they don’t exist,” Ashlock says."
stevenjohnson  infographics  crowdsourcing  government  mapping  maps  nyc  opendata  statistics  datavisualization  information  visualization  urbanism  urban  infographic  community  cities  data  open311  311 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Galaxy Zoo: Hubble
"Galaxy Zoo: Hubble uses gorgeous imagery of hundreds of thousands of galaxies drawn from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope archive. To understand how these galaxies, and our own, formed we need your help to classify them according to their shapes — a task at which your brain is better than even the most advanced computer. If you're quick, you may even be the first person in history to see each of the galaxies you're asked to classify."
space  astronomy  maps  mapping  physics  crowdsourcing  science  galaxies  classification  collaboration  community  diy  distributed 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Moon Zoo
"Welcome to Moon Zoo — with your help, we hope to study the lunar surface in unprecedented detail. Thanks to the help of the Moon Zoo community we have already visually classified 1,236,747 images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)."
astronomy  collaboration  crowdsourcing  moon  maps  mapping  nasa  moonzoo  space  science  spacetravel  spaceexploration 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Mule Design Studio’s Blog: Dear Gap, I have your new logo.
"And for the sake of full disclosure I should let you know that I’ve also frequently shopped at your stores. You sell good stuff. But never in my experience has any of your employees offered me a free pair of pants because the ones I was wearing looked bad. I wouldn’t expect them to. Their job is to sell me clothes.

My job is to sell design.

I believe we understand each other. I anxiously await your call and look forward to negotiating a fair value for the greatest logo on Earth."
gap  business  design  economics  redesign  crowdsourcing  logos  money  competitions 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Twitter / Twitter Translation Community
"Twitter has become a valuable tool for folks to exchange timely bits of information, whether it be a momentous news event, a personal story, or a random thought. We want everyone in the world to have the opportunity to engage in this important exchange, so we're calling on the help of real Twitterers to translate our site into their own language. You've helped define what's important about the product, so you should define your local experience, too."
crowdsourcing  twitter  translation  reading 
august 2010 by robertogreco
prettymaps
"prettymaps is an experimental map from Stamen Design. It is an interactive map composed of multiple freely available, community-generated data sources:

All the Flickr shapefiles rendered as a semi-transparent white ground on top of which all the other layers are displayed.

Urban areas from Natural Earth both as a standalone layer and combined with Flickr shapefiles for cities and neighbourhoods.

Road, highway and path data collected by the OpenStreetMap (OSM) project.

In all there are four different raster layers and six data layers (that means all the map data is sent in its raw form and rendered as visual elements by the browser) that may be visible depending on the bounding box and zoom level of the map."
cartography  crowdsourcing  flickr  stamen  maps  osm  mapping  location  openstreetmap  agitpropproject  the2837university  aaronstraupcope 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Unique Gift Ideas, Creative Gift Ideas, Product and Video Reviews - Daily Grommet
"At the heart of it, we're a bunch of regular folks with a passion for finding Grommets; wonderful products--with interesting stories--that people would love to know about. We're independent—no one pays us to select a product. In fact, the best thing is, lots of people help us by sharing their own favorite discoveries. We're enabling Citizen Commerce™. Our “team” is anyone who believes that we can make a difference by celebrating the useful, innovative, and beautifully crafted Grommets we collectively discover." [See also: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/08/business/08proto.html]
dailygrommet  diy  invention  marketplace  gifts  crowdsourcing  shopping  business  entrepreneurship  ecommerce  design  products 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Crowdmap
"Crowdmap allows you to...<br />
<br />
1. Collect information from cell phones, news and the web.<br />
2. Aggregate that information into a single platform.<br />
3. Visualize it on a map and timeline."
crowdmap  mapping  maps  ushahidi  tools  visualization  mobile  phones  collaborative  communication  geolocation  emergency  crowdsourcing  aggregator  cartography  cloud  sms 
august 2010 by robertogreco
CureTogether
"CureTogether helps people anonymously track and compare health data, to better understand their bodies, make more informed treatment decisions and contribute data to research."
activism  crowdsourcing  healthcare  medicine  opensource  education  health  curetogether  diagnosis  ehealth  aggregator  collaboration  community  socialsoftware  statistics  visualization  socialnetworking  tracking  research  patients  data 
july 2010 by robertogreco
BodyShock The Future - The Roy Amara Prize by Institute for the Future
"May the best health idea win. BodyShock is a call for ideas to improve global health over the next 3-10 years by transforming our bodies and lifestyles. Are you:
crowdsourcing  future  health  ideas  research  technology  medicine  competition  bodyshock  healthcare 
july 2010 by robertogreco
We invented social technologies, now let’s invent social organizations | Institute For The Future [via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/751129286]
"If we are to truly fulfill promise of tech tools we have created, we urgently need to design new governance models & ways of creating value. In the least, organizations whose value derives from communities they create should incorporate governance principles of successful commons organizations & use same tech platforms that are at core of their operations for governance purposes...some principles I believe they need to put into practice: 1. Clearly articulate promise of platform to participants, with all ensuing rights & responsibilities for members 2. Create or elect a community governance board (w/out direct financial incentives to project) to guide & review major policy & strategy decisions. 3. Crowdsource major decisions guiding development & evolution of such platforms. 4. Ensure radical transparency around key decisions & financial metrics 5. Create reward structures for management & employees more akin to those of non-profits or coops rather than for-profit entities."
crowdsourcing  organizations  leadership  management  tcsnmy  governance  social 
june 2010 by robertogreco
noah | networked organisms and habitats
"Noah is a tool that nature lovers can use to explore and document local wildlife and a common technology platform that research groups can use to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere."
animals  biodiversity  iphone  crowdsourcing  biology  environment  database  ecology  education  nature  mobile  mapping  data  wildlife  science  plants  network  geo  geolocation  applications  ios 
june 2010 by robertogreco
PlotWeaver: Automating xkcd's Movie Character Interaction Graphs - information aesthetics
"After noticing the beauty behind xkcd's beautiful graphs depicting the Interactions of Movie Characters, Stanford student Vadim Ogievetsky decided to develop an online software tool that would allow him to generate visually similar looking versions. Accordingly, PlotWeaver [stanford.edu] presents an efficient and effective layout algorithm that, with the users help, generates visual results similar to these hand-crafted posters. Ultimately, his aim is to even automate the whole process from movie script or IMDB quote page to a beautiful representative visual depiction.
art  crowdsourcing  data  film  movies  statistics  visualization  xkcd  storytelling  narrative  software  programming 
june 2010 by robertogreco
The new utility belt « Snarkmarket
"While we’re out scour­ing San Diego that after­noon, our allies leap into action. Fin­ished images are appear­ing in real-time. Every few min­utes I’ll check the Drop­box app on my iPhone, see some­thing new, announce it to the group, and every­one will gather around the tiny screen and ooh and ahh...This is the new utility belt: Twitter...Google Docs...Dropbox...So if these are the tools, what are the skills? Jane McGo­ni­gal has already fig­ured this out. She calls them the ten col­lab­o­ra­tion super­pow­ers. And in par­tic­u­lar, I think the first three are key:

* Mob­ba­bil­ity: the abil­ity to do real-time work in very large groups; a tal­ent for coor­di­nat­ing with many peo­ple simultaneously.
* Coop­er­a­tion radar: the abil­ity to sense, almost intu­itively, who would make the best col­lab­o­ra­tors on a par­tic­u­lar task.
* Ping quo­tient: mea­sures your respon­sive­ness to other people’s requests for engagement."
snarkmarket  dropbox  googledocs  twitter  socialnetworking  crowdsourcing  collaboration  robinsloan  storytelling  socialnetworks  technology  tools  onlinetoolkit  writing  thenewutilitybelt  tcsnmy  cv  shelldrake  tcsnmy7  sandiego  journalism  normalheights  alexismadrigal 
april 2010 by robertogreco
48 Hour Magazine
"Welcome to 48 Hour Magazine, a raucous experiment in using new tools to erase media's old limits. As the name suggests, we're going to write, photograph, illustrate, design, edit, and ship a magazine in two days.

Here's how it works: Issue Zero begins May 7th. We'll unveil a theme and you'll have 24 hours to produce and submit your work. We'll take the next 24 to snip, mash and gild it. The end results will be a shiny website and a beautiful glossy paper magazine, delivered right to your old-fashioned mailbox. We promise it will be insane. Better yet, it might even work."
heatherchamp  derekpowazek  alexismadrigal  sarahrich  mathewhonan  dylanfareed  magazines  crowdsourcing  collaborative  publishing  2010 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Human flesh search engine - Wikipedia
"Human Flesh Search (Chinese: 人肉搜索; pinyin: Rénròu Sōusuǒ) is a primarily Chinese internet phenomenon of massive researching using Internet media such as blogs and forums for the purpose of identifying and exposing individuals to public humiliation, usually out of Chinese nationalistic sentiment, or to break the Internet censorship in the People's Republic of China.[1][2] It is based on massive human collaboration. The name refers both to the use of knowledge contributed by human beings through social networking, as well as the fact that the searches are usually dedicated to finding the identity of a human being who has committed some sort of offense or social breach online. [3] People conducting such research are commonly referred to collectively as "Human Flesh Search Engines"."
china  google  crowdsourcing  human  wikipedia  privacy  internet  information  humanfleshsearchengine 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Vittana | Building a world where anyone can go to college
"1. Find a student: Search for and choose a student in the developing world you would like to lend money to. 2. Make a loan: Make a loan for as little as $25 to the student through our website. 100% of your funds are delivered to the student. 3. Student graduates: Using your loan, the student finishes college (or vocational school), gets a degree, and then gets a job. 4. You get paid back: When the student repays, Vittana repays you the full amount of your loan. Use the money to make another loan."
activism  banking  philanthropy  finance  community  crowdsourcing  development  nonprofit  microlending  microfinance  education  p2p  lending  nonprofits 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Ushahidi :: Crowdsourcing Crisis Information (FOSS)
"Our goal is to create a platform that any person or organization can use to set up their own way to collect and visualize information. The core platform will allow for plug-in and extensions so that it can be customized for different locales and needs. The beta version platform is now available as an open source application that others can download for free, implement and use to bring awareness to crisis situations or other events in their own locales, it is also continually being improved tested with various partners primarily in Kenya. Organizations can also use the tool for internal monitoring or visualization purposes.
activism  humanrights  visualization  opensource  violence  socialsoftware  maps  mapping  googlemaps  disaster  crowdsourcing  kenya  crisis  ushahidi  sms  foss  via:preoccupations 
april 2010 by robertogreco
::NoiseTube:: Turn your mobile phone into an environmental sensor and participate to the monitoring of noise pollution
"Noise pollution is a serious problem in many cities. NoiseTube is a research project about a new participative approach for monitoring noise pollution involving the general public. Our goal is to extend the current usage of mobile phones by turning them into noise sensors enabling each citizen to measure his own exposure in his everyday environment. Furthermore each user could also participate to the creation of a collective map of noise pollution by sharing automatically his geolocalized measures with the community.

By installing our free application on your GPS equipped phone, you will be able to measure the level of noise in dB(A) (with a precision a bit lower than a sound level meter), and contribute to the collective noise mapping by annotating it (tagging, subjective level of annoyance) and sending this geolocalized information automatically to the NoiseTube server by internet (GPRS)."

[via: http://www.iftf.org/node/3314 ]
noise  gis  gps  sensors  pollution  crowdsourcing  activism  mapping  environment  maps  experience  sound  monitoring  mobile  research  community  collaborative  audio  soundscape  sensornetworks  noisetube  soundscapes  sounds 
february 2010 by robertogreco
What to reject when you're rejecting... the wisdom of crowds: Tips for debunkers. - Jay Rosen: Public Notebook
"Let's wrap this up. You need to know what to reject when you're rejecting the idea that the collective is all-wise. Consulting the source code for the idea, we find that crowds are not inherently wise at all. Rather, they are wise when.... there's a right answer to the question, when the question isn't a matter of taste or cultural quality, when there is diversity of opinion and independence of mind among group members, when there are specialists who can draw on local knowledge, and when there's "a way of summarizing people's opinions into one collective verdict." Also, crowds can be blind and stupid, and there's no point in denying that.
jayrosen  technology  crowdsourcing  community  collaboration  statistics  socialmedia  journalism  wisdomofcrowds  web2.0  crowds  wisdom  theory 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Participatory media and why I love it (and must defend it)
"I love participatory media, collective knowledge systems, user-generated content and the like, and spent much of my life and career participating in them and making them. As I say in this post from 2005, the internet is built on a culture of generosity -- the first web page I built was when I noticed there was no page on Nabokov and realized I could just make one. Amazing! And it dawned on me that every other page on the web -- this was 1994 -- had come about for the same reason. Then the dotcom thing happened. And then Web 2.0 brought us back to the web's roots -- communication and contribution. That is why I love participatory media and must defend it."
caterinafake  jaronlanier  participatory  web2.0  communication  crowdsourcing  del.icio.us  tumblr  flickr  twitter  facebook  hunch  wikipedia  amateur  amateurism  collectiveintelligence  participatoryculture  culture  internet  social  media  collaboration  vladimirnabokov 
january 2010 by robertogreco
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