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robertogreco : curating   46

TILT #1: librarians like to search, everyone else likes to find
"My father was a technologist and bullshitter. Not in that "doesn't tell the truth" way (though maybe some of that) but mostly in that "likes to shoot the shit with people" way. When he was being sociable he'd pass the time idly wondering about things. Some of these were innumeracy tests "How many of this thing do you think could fit inside this other thing?" or "How many of these things do you think there are in the world?" Others were more concrete "Can I figure out what percentage of the movies that have been released this year will wind up on Netflix in the next twelve months?" and then he'd like to talk about how you'd get the answer. I mostly just wanted to get the answer, why just speculate about something you could know?

He wasn't often feeling sociable so it was worth trying to engage with these questions to keep the conversation going. I'd try some searches, I'd poke around online, I'd ask some people, his attention would wane. Often the interactions would end abruptly with some variant of head-shaking and "Well I guess you can't know some things..." I feel like many, possibly most, things are knowable given enough time to do the research. Still do.

To impatient people many things are "unknowable". The same is true for users of Google. Google is powerful and fast, sure. But they've buried their advanced search deeper and deeper over time, continually try to coerce you to sign in and give them location data, and they save your search history unless you tell them not to. It's common knowledge that they're the largest media owner on the planet, more than Disney, more than Comcast. I use Google. I like Google. But even though they're better than most other search engines out there, that doesn't mean that searching, and finding, can't be a lot better. Getting a million results feels like some sort of accomplishment but it's not worth much if you don't have the result you want.

As filtering and curating are becoming more and more what the internet is about, having a powerful, flexible, and "thoughtful" search feature residing on top of these vast stores of poorly archived digital stuff becomes more critical. No one should settle for a search tool that is just trying to sell you something. Everyone should work on getting their librarian merit badges in order to learn to search, not just find."
jessamynwest  search  internet  google  libraries  2016  filtering  curating  web  online  archives  algorithms 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit
"The MOCAD Teen Council is a select group of young creatives from metro Detroit and the surrounding areas. These teens come together to plan, and with the help of museum professionals, produce programming for youth and adults here at the MOCAD."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjmdkxT1vSc ]

[via: https://medium.com/why-2015-wont-suck/2-you-will-summer-in-detroit-91e6f0e0cb96

"But more than brick and mortar, what makes Detroit’s creative atmosphere special are programs truly investing in the city, like MOCAD’s Teen Council. Select high school students win yearlong mentorships with contemporary art pros and, as a group, they design and produce museum programming of their choice. No doubt, these are America’s coolest docents."]
mocad  detroit  art  museums  museumeducation  curation  curating  teens  youth 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Alexandra Lange on the problems with the museums experience
"This is Mexico's most visited museum, frequented, on the day I was there, by tourists from many countries – Mexicans, families, old, young, rambunctious, quiet. There was space for them all and there was time for them all. You did not have to read a word (I don't speak Spanish) to feel that you had learned something. All you had to do was walk and look, and the alternation of indoor and outdoor spaces meant that you tired less easily. The oscillation between small and large meant that you had to adjust your eyes more often and look again. It felt like a walk in the park, but it was a museum. And we need more museums that let us relax into knowledge, showing, not telling us everything by audioguide.

In New York, at least, the friction of timed tickets, crowds and lines are now baked in to many big museum experiences: one can rarely expect to be able to just walk in, buy a ticket, see a show. Lines for the Museum of Modern Art-hosted Rain Room this summer stretched past the four-hour mark – and that's a separate line from the one for tickets that forms along 53rd Street.

My experience at the MNA caused me to think back on other museum discussions and visits of the past year, big and small: the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, stunts like the Rain Room or James Turrell at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Donald Judd’s House at 101 Spring Street in SoHo. Art may be more delicate than Aztec heads, but there isn't only one way to show it. Thinking about each of these visits as variations on a theme, I have found what I crave is not more access but less: a discrete, informal, and time-limited chance to look at work in peace. To wander rather than move in lock-step. To walk in the front door, look at art or artifacts for as long as I want, and leave."
museums  museumeducation  education  art  experience  2014  alexandralange  exploration  curating  curation  showing  telling  exposing  exposition  exhibitiondesign  design  exhibits  exhibitions  guides  wandering  time  space  attention  learning  howwelearn  informal  informality  artifacts 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Opinion: Alexandra Lange on how architects should use social media
"It’s easy to make fun of Bjarke Ingels on Instagram. Selfie, LEGO selfie, girlfriend (I hope), Gaga, monograph, fog, fox socks. His Instagram has a lot to do with the architecture of self-promotion, but little to do with actual building. The same goes for many architects' Twitter feeds: lecture, lecture, award, positive review, lecture. You could say that's just business today. But social media can do more for architecture than showcase pretty faces and soundbites. Architects need to start thinking of social media as the first draft of history.

There's an unofficial rule of thumb that you should only tweet about yourself 30 percent of the time. That's a rule many architects break over and over again. They treat Twitter and Instagram as extensions of their marketing strategy, another way to let people know where their partners are speaking, that their projects are being built, and that the critics like them. Happy happy happy. Busy busy busy. Me me me. In real life, most architects aren't quite as monomaniacal as their feeds. (There are exceptions.) They read reviews written about others. They look at buildings built by others. Heck, they even spend some time not making architecture. That balance, between the high and the low, the specific and the general, the obvious and the obscure makes life, not to mention design, much more interesting.

That unselfish reading, writing, seeing and drawing form part of the larger cloud of association that, one day, critics will use to assess and locate the architecture of today. A more flexible, critical and conversational use of social media could suggest interpretations before the concrete is dry. As an example, consider Philip Johnson, perhaps the most networked architect of his day. Philip Johnson would have been really good at social media. He understood, better than most, that interest is created by association. That was the principle of his salons, drawing the latest and greatest from a variety of cultural realms. Those young artists and architects helped him stay young and current, he helped them by offering literal or metaphorical institutional support.

Isn't that how these platforms work too? I look better when I spread the word about everyone's good work, not just my own. And seeing others' projects gives me new ideas. Johnson was a curator at the Museum of Modern Art, but he was also a "curator" in contemporary parlance, collecting and distributing people and objects and styles.

That's why his physical library at his Glass House in New Canaan, CT remains of interest: the shelves reveal what he thought worth reading and keeping. Outside, its form reveals the same: the work of architect Michael Graves, promoted and digested. Even earlier, in the September 1950 issue of Architectural Review, Johnson set out the inspirations – possibly decoys – for that same Glass House. There's Mies, of course, but there are also the less expected references to Suprematist painter Kasimir Malevich and eighteenth century architect Claude Nicolas Ledoux. There's an image showing the Brick House, the almost windowless box set behind the Glass House where he actually slept, a building often eliminated from later photography of the site. There are many readings of this combination of text and images, few of them straightforward. But I'll take false fronts and red herrings over pure self-promotion any day. Trails of breadcrumbs like this are catnip for critics then and now. Johnson used a prestigious journal to try out his version of the Glass House genealogy. You architects could be doing this every day.

Instagram is popularly characterised as a more perfect version of everyday life: the artfully mismatched tablescape, the colour-balanced Christmas tree, the accessorised child. But it doesn't have to be that way. We get enough better-than-reality images of buildings on sites like Dezeen. I’ve started Instagramming my visits to exhibitions and buildings, as a way of sharing the first cut, taking visual notes, and focusing on details and moments that didn't make the press packet. We so often see the same images of a building, over and over. What about the rest of it? My unprofessional photographs pick up on different things. At Herzog & de Meuron's Parrish Art Museum, for example, I snapped the sign required to point you to the "Main Entrance." And the ten-foot, blackened, windowless doors that could flatten a five-year-old. These images can be critical in a different way - fleeter, funnier, like popcorn - from the endangered building review. Could architects point out their own mistakes? Or – with love, of course – those of their colleagues? Of their heroes?

At a higher artistic level, there's the example of the Instagram of architectural photographer Iwan Baan. His Instagram reveals that he has seen more contemporary architecture (and more of it from helicopters) than anyone. I find something aggrandising, even aggressive, about the relentlessness of his travel and the harsh aerial views. There's also something humanising about his Instagram as a series of outtakes, capturing the surround for the more perfect images that end up on the websites of the architects. We see the faces of people, the buildings imperfectly lit or weathered. The heroic and the ordinary combine in this extra work, and will ultimately contribute to the way we look at the official pictures too. It would be even better if the architects were right there beside him, taking pictures of what else they see. I know architects make design pilgrimages. Why not take us there?"



"Social media can make criticism, interpretation, dialogue and history part of daily life. Don’t leave it to the critics.

In a more recent example, the announcement that the American Institute of Architects would award its first Gold Medal to a woman to Julia Morgan, dead these 56 years, was announced, praised, dissected, and reconsidered, all in a matter of hours on Twitter. Dezeen's own post on the matter quoted me from Twitter; Architect Magazine created a reaction story to its own story by Storifying a discussion between several architecture critics (and didn’t have to pay us a dime). What do architects think of her work? What woman would you have nominated? It shouldn’t just be critics in on that discussion.

Architects sometimes forget what other people don’t know – or forget to share the positive assets of the past before, during and after they are threatened. Social media collects in real time. You can hashtag your firm. You can collate your campus work. You can geolocate your project. You can tip your hat to a colleague. You can tell us what you're reading. In doing so architects contribute to a broader dialogue about what makes a good experience. What social media can do for architects is make criticism, interpretation, dialogue and history part of daily life. Don't leave it to the critics. Don't farm it out to your communications staff. That's boring. Surely you don’t want to be boring? I'd be surprised if one social media platform or another weren't part of most designers' daily practice (at least those under 50). Let the rest of us in, so it doesn't take bankruptcy, demolition or obituary to get people talking about architecture."
2014  instagram  alexandralange  process  iwanbaan  bjarkeingels  socialmedia  howto  curating  curation  design  architecture  architects  context  communication  sharing  conversation  criticism  critique  interpretation  dialog  history  juliamorgan  philipjohnson  twitter  #daydetroit  #folkmoma  archives  tumblr  glasshouse 
december 2014 by robertogreco
What's a Curator? | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios - YouTube
"PBS Digital Studio's The Art Assignment asks what the title "curator" really means, both traditionally and as it is used today. Can you be a curator of vintage sneakers? Let's talk about it in the comments."
curating  curation  via:anterobot  art  museums  2014  curators 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Telling the Story of Our Cultural Neighbors Through a Mobile Museum | Creativity on GOOD
"Phil and I brought together our skills as a graphic and industrial designer respectively. We were interested in re-designing a museum, in a portable, and temporary way. It felt appropriate to create something that had a relevance to travel, as a counterpoint to the pop-up cafés, boutiques and bookstores that were starting to show up everywhere at the time.

Our intention was to celebrate small gestures through curating temporary shows that were light on resources and brought culture to places that a traditional museum could not. Unlike a conventional museum, the collection is always changing, with every new location dictating a different curatorial theme. Since it’s humble origins in April, 2011 the Mobile Museum has popped up in Milan, London, Brussels, Helsinki, Luxembourg, Beijing, and Hong Kong."

[More at: http://www.themobilemuseum.net/ ]
pop-ups  pop-upmuseums  museums  mobile  nomadism  fabrica  2013  dean  brown  themobilemuseum  lcproject  openstudioproject  glvo  curation  curating  nomads 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Subject, Theory, Practice: An Architecture of Creative Engagement on Vimeo
“Tell me to what you pay attention and I will tell you who you are.” José Ortega y Gasset

A 'manifesto' for the curious architect/designer/artist in search of depth, but in love with plenty, in the saturated world of the 21st Century.

"In a world where grazing is the norm, in which the bitesize is the ideal that conflates ease of consumption with value, where yoghurts are increased in sales price by being reduced in size and packaged like medicines, downed in one gulp; in a world where choice is a democratic obligation that obliterates enjoyment, forced on consumers through the constant tasting, buying and trying of ever more gadgets; a world in which thoughts, concepts -entire lives- are fragmented into the instantaneous nothings of tweets and profile updates; it is in this world, where students of architecture graze Dezeen dot com and ArchDaily, hoovering up images in random succession with no method of differentiation or judgement, where architects -like everyone else- follow the dictum ‘what does not fit on the screen, won’t be seen’, where attentions rarely span longer than a minute, and architectural theory online has found the same formula as Danone’s Actimel (concepts downed in one gulp, delivered in no longer than 300 words!), conflating relevance with ease of consumption; it is in this world of exponentially multiplying inputs that we find ourselves looking at our work and asking ‘what is theory, and what is practice?’, and finding that whilst we yearn for the Modernist certainties of a body of work, of a lifelong ‘project’ in the context of a broader epoch-long ‘shared project’ on the one hand, and the ideas against which these projects can be critically tested on the other; we are actually embedded in an era in which any such oppositions, any such certainties have collapsed, and in which it is our duty –without nostalgia, but with bright eyes and bushy tails untainted by irony- to look for new relationships that can generate meaning, in a substantial manner, over the course of a professional life.

This film is a short section through this process from May 2012."

This montage film is based on a lecture delivered by Madam Studio in May of 2012 at Gent Sint-Lucas Hogeschool Voor Wetenschap & Kunst.

A Madam Studio Production by Adam Nathaniel Furman and Marco Ginex

[via: https://twitter.com/a_small_lab/status/310914404038348800 ]
via:chrisberthelsen  joséortegaygasset  theory  architecture  cv  media  dezeen  archdaily  practice  nostalgia  actimel  marcoginex  2013  tcsnmy  understanding  iteration  darkmatter  certainty  postmodernism  modernism  philosophy  relationships  context  meaningmaking  meaning  lifelongproject  lcproject  openstudioproject  relevance  consumption  canon  streams  internet  filtering  audiencesofone  film  adamnathanielfurman  creativity  bricolage  consumerism  unschooling  deschooling  education  lifelonglearning  curation  curating  blogs  discourse  thinking  soundbites  eyecandy  order  chaos  messiness  ephemerality  ephemeral  grandnarratives  storytelling  hierarchies  hierarchy  authority  rebellion  criticism  frameofdebate  robertventuri  taste  aura  highbrow  lowbrow  waywards  narrative  anarchism  anarchy  feedback  feedbackloops  substance  values  self  thewho  thewhat  authenticity  fiction  discussion  openended  openendedstories  process  open-ended 
march 2013 by robertogreco
stillspotting nyc
"While the vitality and stimulation of the urban environment can be pleasant, those living in or visiting densely populated areas, such as New York, can have wildly different experiences. The ever-present cacophony of traffic, construction, and commerce; the struggle for mental and physical space; and the anxious need for constant communication in person or via technology are relentless assaults on the senses. One wonders how locals and visitors can escape, find respite, and make peace with their space in this “city that never sleeps.”

The Guggenheim Museum responded with stillspotting nyc, a two-year multidisciplinary project that took the museum’s Architecture and Urban Studies programming out into the streets of the city’s five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island. Every three to five months between June 2011 and October 2012, “stillspots” were identified, created, or transformed by architects, artists, designers, composers, and philosophers into public tours, events, or installations.

In conjunction with the projects organized around the city, the Spatial Information Design Lab (SIDL) at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University was commissioned to develop a mapping study on silence and noise in New York City. The interactive map developed by SIDL presents actual noise complaints generated by New York residents when calling 311, the city’s phone number for government information and non-emergency services. Reading the complaints offers insights into the city’s noise, and the contrasts between private and social space and between residential and commercial necessities."

[via: http://studiox-nyc.tumblr.com/post/44630860758/sound-city ]
maps  mapping  silence  nyc  stillspotting  curating  exhibition  soundscapes  sound  space 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Granary Books - Publisher of Artist's Books
"For nearly thirty years, Granary Books has brought together writers, artists, and bookmakers to investigate verbal/visual relations in the time-honored spirit of independent publishing. Granary's mission—to produce, promote, document, and theorize new works exploring the intersection of word, image, and page—has earned the Press a reputation as one of the most unique and significant small publishers operating today.


Our project has been strengthened by a growing involvement in the organization, preservation, and sale of archives, manuscripts, and rare books by important contemporary writers and artists. While publishing remains central to Granary's purpose, we are also deeply involved with a widespread and local community of writers, poets, and artists. For years Granary occupied a gallery space in Soho, hosting countless public events, lectures, and readings while curating exhibits related to books, book art, poetry, and writing. We believe that Granary's publishing, preservation, and community outreach has significant long-term implications for the fields of writing and book art. Since the mid-nineties Granary has sought to produce, promote, and contextualize scholarship investigating an emerging history of small press publishing, poetry, and artists' books. Many of the books we have produced in this vein, including Johanna Drucker's essential The Century of Artists' Books, Jerome Rothenberg and Steve Clay's A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing, and Steve Clay and Rodney Phillips's A Secret Location on the Lower East Side are now being used as textbooks at the college level, further opening and legitimizing the field for a new generation of scholars and practitioners.

Granary Books remains committed to publishing innovative written and visual work, observing progressive scholarship, and supporting adventurous bookmaking while exploring the relationships between seeing and reading, reading and seeking."
books  publishers  publishing  nyc  bookmaking  art  visual  progressivescholarship  granary  granarybooks  poetry  poets  artists  events  curation  curating  johannadrucker  jeromerothenberg  steveclay  rodenyphillips  artistsbooks  artbooks 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Meg Cranston - Hammer Museum Made in LA 2012
"With levity and a great deal of wit, Meg Cranston (b. 1960 Baldwin, New York) has for many years investigated the intersections between individual and shared experience and how imagery and objects acquire meaning in our culture. With an eye equally enamored of color theory, design, fashion, and supermarket advertising, she makes energetic collages pairing found imagery with monochromatic abstract forms. Having moved to Los Angeles in the 1980s, she has become conversant with the city’s history and finds much inspiration in its cultural life. While oftentimes taking personal attributes or historical events as a jumping-off point, Cranston’s work is ultimately concerned with the formal language of art and the role the artist plays in helping us see the world in new ways. An iconic blond California girl greets visitors from the east wall in Cranston’s California (Full Size) (2012). A playful nod to the notion of the artist as seer or mystic, Cranston’s Fireplace 12 (2012) on the north wall borrows its colors from a spring–summer 2012 color forecast for fashion and home design. Symbols of the fire that they produce, the larger-than-life lighters conjure everything from rock concerts to religious rituals."

[Same here: http://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/detail/exhibition_id/222 ]

[Otis interview: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H8UrVaq_38 ]

["An an ongoing series frieze asks curators, artists and writers to list the books that have influenced them" http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/meg_cranston/ ]

[Posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/42633481565/california-meg-cranston-2006-via-24700-via-made ]
megcranston  art  losangeles  artists  collections  books  booklists  curation  curating  california 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Big Red & Shiny: Did someone say 'Adhocracy'? An interview with Ethel Baraona Pohl
"…how are you working with Joseph Grima…around the idea of 'adhocracy', something that "captures opportunities, self-organizes and develops new and unexpected methods of production. ""

"…the concept of adhocracy is almost inherent in design. Work tools, new technologies and forms of communication, and strategies that facilitate self-organization—like DIY projects—are readily developable, urban actions that have a real impact on our environment."

"…there was some confusion on the part of the participants on the topic 'imperfection'—the overall theme of the Biennial—and the concept of adhocracy was brought up as a response to the proposals."

"…Peter Gadanho…recently said…"curating is the new criticism""

"…the most beautiful aspect of our times (and this is also related to the adhocracy), is that there is room and respect for all."

"multi-connected society can be very saturating for some people, but it also allows them, from their loneliness and isolation, to find what they need…"
ebooks  print  kindle  bottomup  bottom-up  hierarchy  tumblr  paufaus  laciudadjubilada  wikitankers  mascontext  quaderns  postopolisdf  postopolis  openconversation  conversation  stories  dpr-barcelona  anamaríaleón  klaus  tiagomotasaravia  nereacalvillo  claranubiola  amazon  booki  github  publishing  epub  domus  léopoldlambert  aurasma  communication  online  internet  digital  books  crowdfunding  douglascoupland  linkedin  pinterest  vimeo  twitter  youtube  facebook  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  socialmedia  society  networkedsociety  networks  web  loneliness  cv  isolation  shumonbasar  markusmiessen  opencalls  collaboration  curating  curation  diy  participation  petergadanho  josephgrima  ethelbaraona  2012  istanbulbiennial  istanbul  adhocracy  adhoc  epubs 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis on futurism, the New Aesthetic, and why social media isn't killing our children | The Verge
"Futurism's gotten harder to write, because the future arrives so quickly — even a few years ago, I was having to rewrite comics on the fly because the future had caught up to their speculation before the damn book had been drawn — but it's too much fun to drop for long."

"The New Aesthetic is an act of noticing, as much as anything: we are already in a machine-vision world, we are already in a world where the digital is erupting into the physical, and we just didn't really notice it, in the entire breadth of its creeping wave, until now."

"It could become an artistic movement. But, to me, the New Aesthetic is about the sighting of the New Normal."

"I think blogging is a muscle that most people wear out. Also, Twitter's taken over the curational role in large part, so that the interesting weird stuff comes to me rather than me having to seek it out and paste it on my blog so I don't lose it. Tumblr's my visual notebook, these days."
curation  curating  thenewnormal  blogging  twitter  socialmedia  howwework  workflow  tumblr  future  society  technology  sciencefictioncon  sciencefictioncondition  noticing  newaesthetic  2012  warrenellis 
november 2012 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] aren't callback numbers just links? [Too much to quote. GOOD: See these. BETTER: see also those in the Tumblr link. BEST: read it all.]
"I did a paper about Galleries, in 2010, talking about the larger trend of people not only discovering but starting to flex what I called a curatorial muscle.

I talked about how there was a still nascent but very confusing smushing up of the roles and distinctions happening between traditional critics, experts (or curators) and docents. This felt like a similar blurring that had been going on for a while between art and craft and design."

"The economics around production and distribution that have, until now, buttressed the distinctions between art and craft and design have all but bottomed out today…

As a result one measure of confidence in our ability to judge things has gotten completely messed up and we are still trying to find new bearings.

"the distinction between museums and archives (and by extension libraries) is collapsing in most people's minds. Assuming it ever existed, in the first place."

[Tumbled here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/35249075133/ ]
galleries  flickr  change  digital  design  craft  art  curating  curation  access  distribution  production  texture  service  open  trust  smithsonian  cooper-hewitt  otaku  collections  libraries  archives  museums  2012  aaronstraupcope 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The New Administration of a Fine Arts Education
"…a conversation series with leading individuals in contemporary art, culture & education who engage in multiple & overlapping artistic & pedagogic practices. Their exhibitions, actions, writing & artworks are at times seamless integrations of cultural production, lifestyle, studio & teaching. Some of them operate from inside or in coordination with art education institutions, challenging tradition from within. Others combine education & creative economic strategies to sustain practices in the realm of contemporary art & beyond & to realize new institutions. In all cases they are dismantling, intentionally or not, rigid definitions of what it means to be an artist, curator and educator today."

"What exactly is a cultural producer? How has the portrait of the solitary artist working in the studio been reshaped as the artist simultaneously making objects, writing, curating and teaching? What are the challenges posed by these interchangeable and expanding identities and platforms?"
pedagogy  teaching  curation  curating  lcproject  deschooling  unschooling  culturalproduction  highereducation  highered  education  art 
august 2012 by robertogreco
You Are Not a Curator, You Are Actually Just a Filthy Blogger | The Awl
"Anyway, replace "curator" with "people who are really picky with what they share on Facebook" and maybe Joe Hill will be right on the money! Although I suspect that in the 16th century, if not "painter," then actually the "patron" was the "artist-king." (Commissioning is an art! Ask Pope Julius II!) And then that "editors" were the dominant influence in the 19th. And "studios" in the 20th. So I guess now either "ad sales people" or "web engineers" are at the top of the artistic food chain? Oh dear."
culture  curation  internet  blogging  art  choiresicha  2012  curating 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Curated Thoughts on Curation • Quisby
It’s clear to me (with a few years under my belt of posting to The Feature) that the simple act of passing along a link or nugget of information really isn’t particularly valuable. Someone that’s good at it can gain a reputation and a substantial following, as Popova has, but the discrete acts that contribute to that reputation aren’t that valuable on their own. Whenever I’ve seen something that literally adds value to its source material by transforming it in someway before passing it along (be it an essay, a mashup, a piece of art, or, sure, a gif) it seems to me that its creative forefathers are consistently well-credited. Is it maybe the case that just passing it on isn’t an act loaded with creative authorship at all?
internet  curation  information  quisby  web  blogging  linkblogs  attribition  choiresicha  via:tealtan  2012  curating 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Claire Warwick's Blog: Inaugural lecture
"One of the great assets of the digital, and what it encourages and enables is multiple voices entering into a dialogue and creating new knowledge out of conversation and discussion."

"I was lucky enough to be taught by some of the greatest international authorities yet it was never assumed that their voice in the conversation was necessarily more important than mine. Far more important than who was talking was the quality of thought expressed and the nature of knowledge that emerged from the dialogue, and I think that's quite right."

"DH is…a collaborative field. We have to learn to work together and understand the different languages that are spoken by different partners in the dialogue: geeks, humanities scholars, information professionals, technical support people & indeed the public. In that sense, therefore, the voice of the DH scholar is of use as an interpreter between different languages & cultures. But interpreters cannot, but the nature of their job, exist in isolation."
information  mediadiversity  communication  diversity  complexity  email  affordances  gender  curating  curations  digitaldiversity  publicengagement  blogging  blogs  mentorships  mentoring  community  collaboration  socialmedia  facebook  twitter  socialization  media  context  understanding  meaningmaking  meaning  makingmeaning  hierarchy  dialogue  dialog  knowledge  lectures  2012  digital  discussion  conversation  learning  digitalhumanities  ethnography  education  teaching  academia  clairewarwick  mentorship 
february 2012 by robertogreco
The Gopher Hole | Popular Culture Across Borders
"A collaboration between aberrant architecture and Beatrice Galilee, our agenda is to explore new ways of curating ideas in popular culture and to provide a forum for critical debate on the arts and society"
lcproject  thegopherhole  aberrantarchitecture  design  education  galleries  glvo  curating  art  london  uk  beatricegalilee  popculture  discourse  debate  society  arts  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary 
october 2011 by robertogreco
The American Crawl : Wonderstruck – A Kids Book About Curation (and Other Stuff)
"Currently, I’ve been working on a chapter of my dissertation that, in part, looks at youth as curators and the transformative possibilities of this role. By taking ownership, labeling, collecting, and displaying ephemera within their communities, my students help guide a collective consciousness for their peers that establish opportunities for social improvement. The act of curation is a liberatory one. Or at least that’s what I’m arguing so far.

Wonderstruck finds its protagonist desperately holding onto the artifacts that make up an unclear past in search of meaning amongst them. Selznick’s narrative illuminates the personal power of curation and imbues it with the same sense of wonder that I attempted to achieve in the ARG I created. The book opens up paths of discussion that I’d love to someday host with students."
anterogarcia  brianselznick  curating  curation  curatedlearning  learning  labeling  collections  collecting  2011  teaching  wonderstruck 
october 2011 by robertogreco
The Never-Ending Story | design mind
Harris: "I think that’s something stories can do—prepare their way of finding meaning in this madness and bringing some order to the chaos.

…creating a space that’s more about slowing down and contemplating and being introspective is a prerequisite for getting people to tell stories that have impact.

…Cow Bird is basically a storytelling platform that people can use to tell stories online using photos, sound maps, timelines, videos, and casts of characters. It’s geared towards long-form narrative…when many different people tell stories, the system automatically finds connections between them and weaves them together into a kind of meta-story…The platform automatically analyzes all the text in your memory, figures out your cast of characters, and connects it to previous stories.

…one of the pieces of this system I’ve been building is that to tell the story you have to dedicate it to somebody, which creates a gift economy of stories."

[via http://twitter.com/frogdesign/status/105785778331852800 via @bobulate]
design  art  writing  storytelling  jonathanharris  cowbird  slow  slowness  multimedia  thisishuge  gamechanging  2011  interviews  classideas  curating  curation  twitter  facebook  longform  meaning  meaningmaking  meaningfulness  self-expression  internet  web  stories  social  socialsoftware  metastory  relationships  connectivism  narrative  memory  memories  soundscapes  soundmaps  timelines  video  gifteconomy 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Accessibility vs. access: How the rhetoric of “rare” is changing in the age of information abundance » Nieman Journalism Lab
"…digital archivists solve the barrier of accessibility, by making content previously tucked away in analog archives available to the world wide web…

What great curators do is reverse-engineer this dynamic, framing cultural importance first to magnify our motivation to engage with information…shares that manuscript in the context of how it relates to today’s ideals and challenges of publishing, to our shared understanding of creative labor and the changing value systems of authorship, will help integrate this archival item with your existing knowledge and interests, bridging your curiosity with your motivations to truly engage with the content.

Because in a culture where abundance has replaced scarcity as our era’s greatest information problem, without these human sensemakers and curiosity sherpas, even the most abundant and accessible information can remain tragically “rare.”"

[There's more to this. Better to read the entire thing.]
history  photography  information  archives  accessibility  mariapopova  curation  curating  curatorialteaching  curiosity  context  storytelling  relevance  flickrcommons  2011  digitalhumanities  classideas  cv  digitalcurators  infocus  openculture  dancolman  andybaio  metafilter  brainpickings  aaronswartz  filterbubble  elipariser  jamesgleick  abundance  scarcity  obscurity  infooverload 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero’s Blog - Sorting a Mass
"Right now, chronological ordering is the default way to arrange content online, & I wonder how that blanket presumption affects curation on the web. Does it make sense, because people check in frequently, or is it odd, like sorting a stack of photographs alphabetically by who is in them? There are indeed instances where sorting by time is the correct path, but it will be exciting over the next few months and years to see what happens to the web as we recognize the instances where the newest thing is not necessarily the most important thing. (And, as always, the additional problem on top of this: can this sorting process be automated?)

But can you curate on the web? Most curation comes to a point through narrative, and is narrative possible on the web? Stories require a certain amount of linearity, and we all know how the web disrupts that. Maybe it is the same problem that video games have, where interactivity subverts storytelling…"

[This article is now here: http://frankchimero.com/writing/2011/sorting-a-mass/ ]
web  curation  collecting  curating  sorting  frankchimero  storytelling  scrolling  2011  collections  bookmarks  bookmarking  flickr  interactivity  location  alphabet  hierarchy  categorization  time  chronology  chronoogical  pagination 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Maria Popova: In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
" If information discovery plays such a central role in how we make sense of the world in this new media landscape, then it is a form of creative labor in and of itself. And yet our current normative models for crediting this kind of labor are completely inadequate, if they exist at all."

"Finding a way to acknowledge content curation and information discovery (or, better, the new term we invent for these fluffy placeholders) as a form of creative labor, and to codify this acknowledgement, is the next frontier in how we think about “intellectual property” in the information age."

"Ultimately, I see Twitter neither as a medium of broadcast, the way text is, nor as one of conversation, the way speech is, but rather as a medium of conversational direction and a discovery platform for the text and conversations that matter."
education  writing  media  socialmedia  twitter  curation  curating  mariapopova  information  discovery  labor  contentcuration  ip  text  conversation  future  web  online  internet  broadcast  authorship  abundance  2011 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Text Patterns: curators and imitators
"So I’d suggest this as the beginnings of a taxonomy:

1) The Linker: That’s what most of us are. We just link to things we’re interested in, without any particular agenda or system at work…my Pinboard page…page of links.

2) The Coolhunter: People who strive to find the unusual, the striking, the amazing — the very, very cool, often within certain topical boundaries, but widely & loosely defined ones…Kottke & Maria Popova…

3) The Curator: There are some. Not many…tends to have a clear & strict focus…some particular area of interest…finds things that other people can’t find…easily…having access to stuff that is not fully public…putting stuff online for the first time…having a unique take on public material…Bibliodyssey is a genuinely curated site; also, just because of its highly distinctive sensibility, Things magazine.

…not saying that one of these categories is superior to the others. They’re just all different, and the difference is worth noting."
alanjacobs  via:lukeneff  curation  curating  online  web  blogging  kottke  mariapopova  taxonomy  links  bookmarks  del.icio.us  pinboard  blogs  tumblr  bibliodyssey  coolhunters  2011  language  sharing 
june 2011 by robertogreco
On firehoses and filters: Part 1 – confused of calcutta
"Ever since then, I’ve been spending time thinking about the hows and whys of filtering information, and have arrived “provisionally” at the following conclusions, my three laws of information filtering:

1. Where possible, avoid filtering “on the way in”; let the brain work out what is valuable and what is not.

2. Always filter “on the way out”: think hard about what you say or write for public consumption: why you share what you share.

3. If you must filter “on the way in”, then make sure the filter is at the edge, the consumer, the receiver, the subscriber, and not at the source or publisher."
jprangaswami  filtering  internet  clayshirky  georgeorwell  aldoushuxley  bravenewworld  1984  jonathanzittrain  elipariser  input  output  flow  socialsoftware  curation  curating  sharing  information  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Leigh Blackall: Situated art, situated learning - En Route by One Step At A Time Like This
"I think the artistic intent of these concepts could be enhanced with study of Joseph Beuys' work, particularly the Free International University, as well as Situationist International and their desire to create environments for discovering and appreciating the true value of things rather than their staged value.

All of this makes for excellent examples to add to my essay in progress on Ubiquitous Learning - a critique, where I'm trying to argue that the words ubiquity and learning have nothing inherently to do with technology, and are instead words of ethical dimension, so the phrase ubiquitous learning should become one more to do with an ethical approach or framework to learning, and not one suggesting a technological determination of it."
context  situated  situationist  leighblackall  comments  josephbeuys  newpublicthinkers  technology  art  situatedlearning  ubiquitouslearning  2837university  agitpropproject  agitprop  williamhanks  randallszott  colinward  learning  unschooling  deschooling  education  messiness  ethics  georgesiemens  curation  curating  curatorialteaching  connectivism  space  place  explodingschool  adamgreenfield  guydebord  enroute  street  urban  urbanism  cities  cityasclassroom  thecityishereforyoutouse  cv  lcproject  psychogeography  urbanscale  salrandolph  situatedart 
may 2011 by robertogreco
InCUBATE [Quotes from the 'about' page]
"InCUBATE is a research group dedicated to exploring new approaches to arts administration and arts funding. We at InCUBATE act as curators, researchers and co-producers of artists projects. These activities have manifested in a series traveling exhibitions called Other Options, an artist residency program, and various other projects such as Sunday Soup (a monthly meal that generates funding for a creative project grant). We don’t have non-profit status, instead we are interested in what kinds of organizational strategies could provide more direct support to critical and socially-engaged art and culture beyond for-profit or non-profit structures. Our core organizational principle is to treat art administration as a creative practice. By doing so, we hope to generate and share a new vocabulary of practical solutions to the everyday problems of producing under-the-radar culture. Currently we do not have a physical location and we work together on an ongoing project basis."

"Finally, it is worth noting how various models such as a labor unions, community centers, block-clubs, or religious institutions seem to resolve some of the key problems facing our concept of the slow build. Consider how these institutions provide space and resources, exert political influence, and allow for the participation of wider demographics. Our task for the future is to produce these effects without instituting a rigid hierarchy or overtly moralizing and dogmatic system in order to affect a more equitable, participatory, and democratic future."
art  economics  social  community  collaboration  anarchism  incubate  randallszott  lcproject  openstudio  curation  curating  hierarchy  flatness  slow  chicago  democracy  culture  culturehacking  activism  administration  engagement  organizations  organization  equity  participatory  residencies  pop-upculture  exhibitions  projects  horizontality  horizontalidad  ncm  participatoryart  everyday  amateurs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
FT.com / Arts / Film & Television - Joking apart
"…few years ago, I received an unsolicited e-mail asking me if I was interested in “submitting content”…Eventually it transpired that content-seeker wanted to know if I had any jokes that could be sold to be viewed on mobile phones…my material is written to be performed as part of a whole in particular sorts of places, & I have given a great deal of thought to how the acceptability and impact of ideas is affected by pacing, context and their position as part of a whole…didn’t want it being chopped up, miniaturised, de-contextualised…

"Next month I am curating a weekend of comedy and music at the Southbank Centre, London. I am a curator. What a dead word. It sounds like someone stirring turds in a toilet bowl with a stick. If something is being curated it already seems fixed and decayed – bands recreating their classic albums in their entirety, seasons of film screenings working towards a pre-ordained conclusion. To that end, I’ve tried to schedule events that are unrepeatable."
stewartlee  curation  curating  albums  johncage  indeterminacy  slow  simplicity  twitter  mobile  phones  speed  content  context  pacing  2011  events  uniqueness  reproduction 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Sad, Beautiful Fact That We're All Going To Miss Almost Everything : Monkey See : NPR
"Culling is easy; it implies a huge amount of control & mastery. Surrender, on the other hand, is a little sad. That's the moment you realize you're separated from so much. That's your moment of understanding that you'll miss most of the music, dancing, books & films that there have ever been & ever will be, & right now, there's something being performed somewhere in the world that you're not seeing that you would love.

It's sad, but it's also ... great, really. Imagine if you'd seen everything good, or if you knew about everything good. Imagine if you really got to all the recordings & books and movies you're "supposed to see."…That would imply that all the cultural value the world has managed to produce since a glob of primordial ooze…can [be] gobble[d up]…in one lifetime…

If "well-read" means "not missing anything," then nobody has a chance. If "well-read" means "making a genuine effort to explore thoughtfully," then yes, we can all be well-read…"
culture  books  history  future  npr  music  films  cantkeepup  needfrequentremindersofthis  content  flow  control  culling  curation  curating  lindaholmes  rogerebert  humans  life  lifetime  reading  listening  watching  hearing  literature  science  fiction  nonfiction  beingwell-read  takethatedhirsch  culturalliteracy  beauty  insignificance  love  happiness  wisdom  thesumofhumanproduction  numbers  tv  television  art  cv 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Twitter / @Downes: Why is curation wrong? Bec ...
"Why is curation wrong? Because it's not subtractive. Learning is not about filtering and organizing resources, it's about tearing them apart"
stephendownes  learning  curating  curation  resources  deconstruction  organization  subtractive 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The myth of objectivity « Re-educate Seattle
"This attitude is part of the myth of objectivity that pervades traditional schooling. The curriculum is presented as objective, comprehensive, and factual. Sit in the chair, follow directions, and you will receive an objective, comprehensive, and factual education…

Education is a highly personal process. Every decision that teachers make, whether we’re conscious that we’re making it or not, is loaded with bias. History, for example, contains a seemingly infinite set of people, events, and stories; the bias comes not necessarily in how the teacher presents selected events, but in the process of selecting which stories to tell.

I don’t believe there’s anything wrong with being biased as a teacher. In fact, I don’t think there’s any way to teach authentically without bias. It’s when we surrender to the myth of objectivity that we do students a disservice."
stevemiranda  education  objectivity  teaching  schools  schooling  compliance  facts  traditionalschools  curating  curation  cv  bias  authenticity  2011  philosophy  pedagogy  truth 
april 2011 by robertogreco
CCK11: Educurator? « Connexions
"As a teacher/tutor, I will…create the space where learning can happen…create conditions that highlight know-how and “know-where.”…welcome learner interests…curate materials that learners may not know…model and demonstrate particular skills or approaches…enable learners to reflect and practice those skills or approaches…allow learners to teach each other (and me)…am extremely busy being present (an attentiveness to the network itself )."
connectivism  teaching  lcproject  tcsnmy  stephendownes  sugatamitra  via:steelemaley  curation  curating  learning  schools  presence  cv  studentdirected  interestdriven  modeling  accessibility  sharing  community  howwelearn  howwework  educurator  generalists  reflection 
march 2011 by robertogreco
A VC: Falling In Love With Twitter All Over Again
"I was in a rut with Twitter for much of the past year. I'd tweet out my blog post every day and not a lot more. I'd check my @mentions and a search on fred wilson a few times a day. It was a routine. Work.

But in the past few weeks, I've found myself reading tweets a lot more. I'm replying to tweets a bit more (something I've never loved to do for some reason). I'm retweeting more.

I just spent 20 minutes reading my timeline from this morning back to yesterday morning. I have built an amazing set of people I follow, 564 of them, all curated one by one over the past four years. The timeline is so rich, so full of different things from different people. Tech, sports, politics, music, family stuff, humor, and way more.

Twitter's mission is to instantly connect you to the things that are most important to you. It does that so well. It's love all over again."
fredwilson  twitter  curation  curating  flow  information  2011  people 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Film History 101 (via Netflix Watch Instantly) « Snarkmarket
"Robin is absolutely right: I like lists, I remember everything I’ve ever seen or read, and I’ve been making course syllabi for over a decade, so I’m often finding myself saying “If you really want to understand [topic], these are the [number of objects] you need to check out.” Half the fun is the constraint of it, especially since we all now know (or should know) that constraints = creativity."

[See also Matt Penniman's "Sci-fi Film History 101" list: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6492 ]
film  netflix  history  cinema  movies  timcarmody  snarkmarket  teaching  curation  curating  constraints  lists  creativity  forbeginners  thecanon  pairing  sharing  expertise  experience  education  learning  online  2010  frankchimero  surveycourses  surveys  web  internet  perspective  organization  succinct  focus  design  the101  robinsloan  classes  classideas  format  delivery  guidance  beginner  reference  pacing  goldcoins  surveycasts 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The 101 « Snarkmarket
"Some of the teachers I remember most from college are the ones who would say something like: “Listen. There are only two movies you need to understand to understand [whole giant big cinematic movement X]. Those two movies are [A] and [B]. And we’re gonna watch ‘em.” (I feel like this is something Tim is extremely good at, actually.) It’s a step above curation, right? Context matters here; so does sequence. So we’re talking about some sort of super-sharp, web-powered, media-rich syllabus. I always liked syllabi, actually. They seem to make such an alluring promise, you know? Something like:

Go through this with me, and you will be a novice no more."
curation  curating  robinsloan  frankchimero  lists  organization  experience  expertise  teaching  learning  online  web  classes  classideas  format  delivery  guidance  beginner  forbeginners  reference  2010  pacing  goldcoins  surveys  surveycourses  the101  education  internet  perspective  succinct  focus  design  history  constraints  creativity  thecanon  pairing  sharing  surveycasts 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - The Two Best Things on the Web 2010
"My top two choices, however, stood tall as perhaps the best stock I’ve had the pleasure of reading on the web, both in terms of their scope, but more interestingly about how they treated their content and audience. There’s a pattern here that I enjoy. I’d like to introduce you to them, and hopefully in the process make a bit of a point about the direction I want the web to take in the next year."

"I suppose I’m hungry for curated educational materials online. These are more than lists of books to read: they’re organized, edited, and have a clear point of view about the content they are presenting, and subvert the typical scatter-shot approach of half the web (like Wikipedia), or the hyper-linear, storyless other half that obsesses over lists. And that’s the frustrating thing about trying to teach yourself things online: you’re new, so you don’t know what’s important, but everything is spread so thin and all over the place, so it’s difficult to make meaningful connections."
education  learning  online  lists  2010  frankchimero  surveycourses  surveys  teaching  forbeginners  web  internet  curating  curation  perspective  organization  succinct  focus  design  history  constraints  creativity  thecanon  pairing  sharing  expertise  experience  the101  robinsloan  classes  classideas  format  delivery  guidance  beginner  reference  pacing  goldcoins  surveycasts 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Delicious's Data Policy is Like Setting a Museum on Fire
"Yahoo! is going to shutter its social bookmarking service Delicious, the web learned today, and with it will sink an incredibly valuable source of collectively curated knowledge. You can easily export your own bookmarks (no verdict yet where we should all meet up to import them to) but what if you want to export other peoples'? That's at least half the value of the service, socially curated discovery."
del.icio.us  yahoo  data  history  curation  curating  tags  tagging  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  2010  archives  loc  web2.0 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Are Distractible People More Creative? | Wired Science | Wired.com
"not enough to simply pay attention to everything—such a deluge of sensation can quickly get confusing. (Kierkegaard referred to this mental state as “drowning in possibility”. Some scientists believe that schizophrenia is characterized by extremely low latent inhibition coupled w/ severe working memory deficits…leads to a mind constantly hijacked by minor distractions.)…We need to let more info in, but we also need to be ruthless about throwing out useless stuff.

People bemoan infinite distractions of web, way we’re constantly being seduced by hyperlinks, unexpected search results, arcane Wikipedia entries. & yes, that’s all true—I just wasted 30 minutes searching for that Kierkegaard quote. (I ended up on a Danish culture website, which led me to a photography collection of Danish modern furniture…) But the problem isn’t distractibility per se—it's distractibility coupled w/ failure to curate our thoughts, to monitor relevancy of whatever is loitering in working memory."
jonahlehrer  neuroscience  attention  distraction  psychology  creativity  research  brain  behavior  intelligence  imaginzation  schizophrenia  memory  internet  online  cv  curation  curating  filtering  forgetting  focus 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Your blog sucks. And your work. And probably mine too.
"we “visual” people need to get off of our asses & write. Sounds painful, but I’m not talking about standardized-test/public-school, 5-paragraph-format, “This-leads-me-to-conclude” writing. I’m talking about real writing that communicates. Intended outcomes are labeled, process is documented, & you say why something was made into being. Tell me why.

I want more writing like Liz Danzico’s or Jason Santa Maria’s. I want thoughtful documentation of what it’s like to make stuff. Marco Arment, developer of Tumblr & Instapaper, does that exceedingly well. He lets us into the process, explains decisions & keeps us posted on his thoughts about his work & the things corollary to his development concerns. So, based on that, I ask you this: are we trying to keep design a mysterious black box? Because if that’s what you want, you’re doing a damn good job of it…

To do meaningful curation, it requires knowledge in multiple areas…Great designers are prone to have a wide base of knowledge."
frankchimero  writing  classideas  communication  process  criticism  curation  blogs  blogging  design  glvo  generalists  knowledge  bandwagons  enthusiasm  marcoarment  lizdanzico  jasonsantamaria  realwriting  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  thewhy  thinking  sharing  value  curating 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Zara Gonzalez Hoang : Sketchbook : Saying goodbye to badly curated content.
"There are a few that are staying, ones that do a great job of selectively curating content and are not just me-tooing what everyone else is posting. But the rest, the ones that constantly post things that I see ricocheting across the blogosphere, those are out.
curation  curating  content  stockandflow  attention  branding  zaragonzalezhong  infooverload  me-tooing  originality  valueadded  meaning  purpose 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Editor and the Curator (Or the Context Analyst and the Media Synesthete) | Tomorrow Museum
"Also implied by the word curator is an intuitive sense of pattern recognition and glyphs. More visual than a mere editor, the Internet requires a sense of the relationships between words, images, space, and shapes. The reason we call web content “content” is because every kind of it — be it text or game or photograph — communicates differently on the net. Online, art is no longer just an image, it becomes a collage that you made. I used to know someone who worked as a sound designer and I was constantly fascinated when he would do something like rub his hand across his collar and say “that’s a character moving in a space suit.” The media application of this is writing text and knowing exactly how to visually represent it. This is more than just photo editing, it is multi-platform mediamaking... Like remix culture, having a collage mind is essential in making something standout on the web."
medialiteracy  curating  curation  culture  art  criticism  journalism  media  editing  editors  internet  technology  mediamaking  mediainvention  remixculture  multimedia  tcsnmy  generalists  collageminfd  cv  patternrecognition  sensemaking  glyphs  relationships  content  remixing 
july 2010 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Method designing
"like many designers, I have to immerse myself in cultural context of my work in order to get results. I’ve come to think of this as ‘method designing’, after method acting; way of ‘getting into character’ that consciously & subconsciously informs design process. ...approach might come from fact that, as a designer, I’ve actually spent a lot of time writing, curating & doing strategic work. All...require ability to process vast amounts of data (often media) fairly rapidly & synthesise into some new form—as does designing, or at least the kind done by designers like me. I find it difficult to have a discussion around form & function w/out trying to get at ineffable, intangible aspects of project’s context, for which I’m yet to discover a good word. Raymond Williams’ ‘structure of feeling’ partly does it, & mise-en-scène does to a limited extent, but ‘context’ isn’t quite enough, & doesn’t get at the lived experience & cultural aspects as well as the socio-economic & form-based."
mise-en-scène  structureoffeeling  danhill  cityofsound  design  methoddesigning  methodacting  immersion  cities  helsinki  literature  understanding  howwework  howwelearn  experience  culture  process  tcsnmy  classideas  writing  curating  media  strategy  data  synthesis  context  toshare  topost 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Thinking about democratised curation – confused of calcutta
"Production, consumption and distribution of information have already been democratised. There’s no turning back. Curation will go that way. Which means that the very concept of the expert, the professional, the editor, the moderator of all that is great and good, changes."
curation  authenticity  2010  democratization  ericschmidt  filtering  growth  information  jprangaswami  editing  content  data  curating 
july 2010 by robertogreco

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