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robertogreco : cyberculture   10

William Gibson On MONDO 2000 & 90s Cyberculture (MONDO 2000 History Project Entry #16) | ACCELER8OR
"REGARDING THE ’90S UTOPIANISM: I never though that cyborgs and virtual worlds were particularly utopian, so I’ve never been disappointed. The world is always more interesting than some futurist’s vision. If you think it’s not, you’re not really looking."

"WHO WE ARE: Who we are is largely who we meet. Cities are machines that randomize contact. The Internet is a meta-city, meta-randomizing contact. I now “know” more people than I would ever have imagined possible, because of that. It changes who I am and what I can do."
urban  urbanism  contact  meta-city  life  whoweare  change  payingattention  noticing  reality  cyborgs  utopianthinking  online  web  internet  cities  vr  futurists  futurism  timothyleary  cyberpunk  cyberculture  rusirius  simonelackbauer  mondo2000  williamgibson  scifi  sciencefiction  virtualreality 
may 2012 by robertogreco
All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace Episode 1 | varnelis.net
"But I had high hopes for this series. It had been some time since he had made a new one and I thought that by now he would have reworked his style and produced something of striking originality. I had hoped for a fresh take on network culture. After all, I will be the first with my hand in the air to accuse network culture of promoting elitism and individualism. Its influence on our society, particularly on the academy and the creative fields, has been pervasive and pernicious.

All Watched Over, alas, almost descends into self-parody. The first episode seems to loosely take Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron's fifteen year old Californian Ideology article as a reference point (although he fails to mention that they coined the term in a critical essay and misses the point about the critical influence of the counterculture in forging Silicon Valley's libertarian mindset) but he veers off into a protracted discussion of Ayn Rand."
aynrand  kazysvarnelis  allwathedoverbymachinesoflovinggrace  adamcurtis  networkculture  networks  californianideology  andycameron  richardbarbrook  alangreenspan  wallstreet  chicagoschool  billclinton  geoffwaite  davidharvey  cyberculture  fredturner  thecenturyoftheself  2011 
june 2011 by robertogreco
D.I.Y.U.: An Experiment | DMLcentral
"Rheingold U, my current experiment in cultivating wholly online, multimedia, unaccredited, for-not-much-pay learning communities, grew out of a desire to follow the fun and act on impulse. When I impulsively tweeted  a couple of weeks ago, "Anyone willing to pay $100 for five-week Intro to Mind Amplifiers course?" I was long-practiced in the art of riding the waves of personal impulse. In fact, the most productive learning trails I've followed or blazed in life started with singular impulses that fulfill life-long interests but were triggered by superficial, even accidental proximate causes."
freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  howardrheingold  education  deschooling  unschooling  learning  diy  socialmedia  openaccess  free  colearning  2011  community  lcproject  pln  cyberculture  digitalmedia  diyu 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Cleaning Up Online Conversation - HBR Agenda 2011 - Harvard Business Review
"a rhetorical tragedy of the commons is occurring in many forums. All the participants have an incentive to have good conversations, but each participant also has an incentive to get the most attention. This tension suggests that increases in individual anonymity or in group size also increase the likelihood that someone will start acting like a jerk. Both anonymity & scale reduce what Robert Axelrod calls "the shadow of the future"—the sense that our current actions will have consequences down the road. That provides some options for turning the jerk dial down. One is to make identity valuable … Another approach is to partition public platforms, thus reducing the incentive to publicly act out. … another … is to enlist users in defensive filtering. … we're well behaved in environments that reward good behavior & punish bad … anyone who wants to get value out of convening many minds has to create & maintain the shadow of the future, or else risk activating the witlessness of crowds."
via:preoccupations  socialmedia  conversation  community  identity  anonymity  clayshirky  behavior  online  cyberculture  witlessnessofcrowds  2011 
january 2011 by robertogreco
About Flow: Doors of Perception 7 on Flow
"But an equally important use of information is much more vague. It’s why we read newspapers every day, exchange idle gossip or attend conferences. It’s why we suffer an education. We’re not seeking a specific piece of information. We’re accumulating a semi-random collection of data, ideas and gut feelings which have no immediate or apparent use.

We build up this semi-random cloud of mental stuff to equip ourselves with a continually updated ‘feel’ for events—so that, when in the hazy future a need or opportunity arises, facts and intuitions will hopefully fuse into patterns that allow us to take actions appropriate to their context. We also hope that, while wandering and wondering in this space, we might stumble across valuable facts or ideas which, had we sought them, might not have been found. Let’s call this imaginary cloud ‘a space for half-formed thoughts’."

[via: http://plsj.tumblr.com/post/938736809/a-space-for-half-formed-thoughts ]
creativity  cyberculture  cyberspace  media  technology  theory  flow  williamgibson  sensemaking  patterns  patternrecognition  information  memory  generalists  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  alberteinstein  philliptabor  2002  half-formedthoughts  thinking  knowledge  data  retrieval  context  words  logic  play  expression  understanding  invention  design  psychology  imagination  space  substance  robertomatta  matta-clark  spacial  vagueness  fluidity  gordonmatta-clark 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Slow Media » The Slow Media Manifesto
"1. Slow Media are a contribution to sustainability. 2. Slow media promote Monotasking. 3. Slow Media aim at perfection. 4. Slow Media make quality palpable. 5. Slow Media advance Prosumers. 6. Slow Media are discursive and dialogic. 7. Slow Media are Social Media. 8. Slow Media respect their users. 9. Slow Media are distributed via recommendations not advertising. 10. Slow Media are timeless. 11. Slow Media are auratic. 12. Slow Media are progressive not reactionary. 13. Slow Media focus on quality. 14. Slow Media ask for confidence and take their time to be credible." [via: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/06/the-slow-media-manifesto/] [see also: http://www.nearfuturelaboratory.com/2010/06/29/slow-media-manifesto/ ]
slow  psychology  networkculture  media  manifesto  sustainability  mediatheory  slowmedia  journalism  internet  cyberculture  culture  criticaltheory  community  lifestyle  alternative  online  social  manifestos 
june 2010 by robertogreco
New School: How the Web Liberalized Liberal Arts Education | GOOD
"This is where neo-education steps in—not necessarily as a substitute for a university degree, at least not at this point, but as a necessary filler for the many gaps in today’s higher education, an essential exercise in flexing our inherent human curiosity about the world before it atrophies into the narrow scope of skill and vision that the original liberal arts model aimed to eradicate in the first place. In an age driven by the cross-pollination of ideas, viewpoints, and disciplines, it is only through such indiscriminate curiosity and exploration that we can truly liberalize our collective future."
education  academia  teaching  web  liberalarts  cyberculture  activism  ted  arts  socialmedia  technology  internet  free  change  autodidacts  unschooling  deschooling  curiosity  tcsnmy  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary 
november 2009 by robertogreco
OLPC-toting Rwandan students flock to airport for free WiFi - Engadget
"OLPC may be facing some tough times as of late, but there's no denying that the little-laptop-that-could has made an impact where it's been distributed, as evidenced by this latest indication of the project's reach in Rwanda. Apparently, in addition to helping students with their schoolwork, the laptop is also teaching them the fine art of finding free WiFi, and this particular group seems to have quickly discovered that the Kigali International Airport is one of the best spots in town. And just what are they using the laptops to look up in their time outside the classroom? Bruce Lee and Jean-Claude Van Damme, who, coincidentally, also brings the world together in his own special way."

[Related: Kids in Guinea Study Under Airport Lamps: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/19/AR2007071901225.html OR http://www.mylot.com/w/newsarticle/336286.aspx ]
olpc  africa  education  learning  wifi  cyberspace  cyberculture  technology  children  mobile  twitchboard  culture 
february 2009 by robertogreco
"Cyberspace and the American Dream: A Magna Carta for the Knowledge Age," Future Insight, Aug. 1994
"we constitute the final generation of an old civilization and, at the very same time, the first generation of a new one...Next, of course, must come the creation -- creation of a new civilization, founded in the eternal truths of the American Idea."
via:preoccupations  cyberspace  1994  history  internet  manifestos  knowledge  civilization  change  generations  classideas  society  estherdyson  alvintoffler  cyberculture  online 
july 2008 by robertogreco
The Californian Ideology
"At this crucial juncture, a loose alliance of writers, hackers, capitalists and artists from the West Coast of the USA have succeeded in defining a heterogeneous orthodoxy for the coming information age: the Californian Ideology."

[see also: http://www.imaginaryfutures.net/2007/04/17/the-californian-ideology-2/ ]
activism  business  buzzwords  california  ethics  history  ideology  opensource  politics  technology  culture  1995  californianideology  postmodern  cyberculture  future  web 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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