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robertogreco : cyoa   48

Valdivia, Ecuador - 2100 BC
["I made a text adventure game called "Valdivia". It's about a woman on a mission, feelings and family. You can play it here: https://helena.computer/valdivia/ "

https://www.linkedin.com/in/helenajaramillo/ ]
cyoa  helenajaramillo  textadventures  games  gaming  twine  ecuador  interactivefiction  if  srg 
january 2019 by robertogreco
These Hand-Drawn Maps Helped Create 'Choose Your Own Adventure' Books - Atlas Obscura
"When Jay Leibold started writing Choose Your Own Adventure books in the 1980s, no one told him exactly how to create a branching story with a passel of different endings. “It was a seat-of-the-pants, use-your-intuition kind of thing,” he says.

As the story developed, dividing along different branches, Leibold would map its shape on 8 1/2-by-11-inch pages. One page, two pages, then a branching choice. “There was lots of erasing, crossing out, trying again,” he says. As the story grew and the first half became more settled, though, a standard, letter-sized piece of paper wasn’t large enough to hold the whole map of the story. Eventually, he had to tape two large pieces of paper board together in order to hold it.

After reading Atlas Obscura’s story about maps that reveal the hidden structure of Choose Your Own Adventure stories created by the publisher ChooseCo, Leibold sent us images of the original, hand-drawn maps he used to create some of his CYOA books. Here’s the final map of Sabotage, the first book Leibold contributed to the series:

[map]

Sabotage had 30 possible endings. “It was so challenging, and it really did feel pretty great to have it finished and take it in all at once, on one chart,” he says.

Leibold would eventually write 15 Choose Your Own Adventure books, and each time he developed a better feel for how to shape the story, he says. Each branch, for instance, could not divide into many choices. Some had to come to an end relatively quickly. “We had the idea that there should be a choice on nearly every page,” says Leibold. “It was never dictated but I think that’s the feeling we all had.”

[image]

Building in so many choices to the story meant enough action had to be condensed in between each branching point. One challenge was telling enough story in between each branching point that the next choice still felt meaningful; another was building enough material into each storyline so that each different ending felt satisfying. “Part of the game for me was for the reader to find the story lines that went on the longest,” he says.

One way to make story lines last longer was to allow some of them to loop back to an earlier moment in the book. The challenge, though, was making what came next consistent with both paths that led there. Leibold also experimented with stories with fewer choices. One of his books, Surf Monkeys, has the fewest endings of any book in the series. Even when a story had a certain linear progression built into it, though, say when a plot revolved around a journey, it was possible to branch off in many directions. For the book Grand Canyon Odyssey, Leibold created stories that brought in geology, dinosaurs, and Native America tribes, and he found it helpful to map both the geography of the trip through the canyon (top image) and the structure of the story (below).

[map]

Having fewer choices, he says, “put pressure on the choices to feel really meaningful. When you’re doing a choice every page or two, sometimes you just scramble—you have to come up with some kind of choice. Not that much has happened. Sometimes the choices were more mundane or seemingly trivial, even though they might lead to very different consequences.” With fewer choices, each one could be a bigger, more weighty decision.

“Maybe the best way to describe writing these books is that it’s a real juggling act,” says Leibold. “You’re juggling storylines and possibilities. The number of pages and space. The choices and branches and how do they balance out. It’s like three different dimensions of things that you’re juggling. It requires a certain flexibility of mind.” Having a map to keep the whole picture in one place helps all those pieces stay in the air, tumbling and flying into graceful, shifting stories."
maps  mapping  cyoa  interactivefiction  2017  via:austinkleon  if  classideas 
july 2017 by robertogreco
These Maps Reveal the Hidden Structures of 'Choose Your Own Adventure' Books - Atlas Obscura
"Reading a “Choose Your Own Adventure” book can feel like being lost in a maze and running through twists and turns only to find dead ends, switchbacks, and disappointment. In the books—for those not familiar with them—you read until you come to a decision point, which prompts you to flip to another page, backward or forward. The early books in the series, which began in 1979, have dozens of endings, reached through branching storylines so complex that that trying to keep track of your path can seem hopeless—no matter how many fingers you stick into the book in order to find your way back to the key, fateful choice. You might end up back at an early fork again, surprised at how far you traveled only to reemerge at a simple decision, weighted with consequences that you couldn’t have imagined at the beginning.

The last installment of the original “Choose Your Own Adventure” series came out in 1998, but since 2004, Chooseco, founded by one of the series’ original authors, R.A. Montgomery, has been republishing classic volumes, as well as new riffs on the form of interactive fiction that seemed ubiquitous in the 1980s and ’90s. The new editions also carry an additional feature—maps of the hidden structure of each book."
cyoa  visualization  2017  maps  mapping  classideas  interactivefiction  if 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Twine Texting Project by shindigs
"A presentation layer for Twine 1.4x that allows you to tell stories through text conversations. Built on top of Jonah. Download to access the commented project file.

Please tweet me @shindags with any questions, suggestions, and especially if you made something with this asset!

Development was streamed on www.twitch.tv/shindigs "
twine  chat  2017  webdev  cyoa  texting  messaging  if  interactivefiction  webdesign 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Twine as a Process Modeling Tool – Track Changes
"Twine is a tool that lets you make point-and-click games that run in a web browser—what a lot of people refer to as “choose your own adventure” or CYOA games.

It’s pretty easy to make a game, which means that the Twine community is fairly big and diverse. You can play the games in your web browser, and compose them in a browser, too. Or download an app.

I tried Twine years ago and never really got anywhere, but out of idle curiosity I started to play with it again not long ago, with the idea that I’d make a little game that simulated what it’s like to work with Postlight. I.e.—

You step out of an elevator. Do you want to talk about

1. Working with us as a client?

2. Working with us as a team member?

As silly as it sounds it was fun to model the office out as a game. After an hour of messing around I’d modeled out the elevator (click a button!) and put in some basic scoring, and started to create some fake conversations between the player/reader and “characters” that included myself and my business partner Rich Ziade. Just what the world needs—a meeting simulator! If I ever finish it I’ll put it up online.

There are a lot of tools that you can use to do information architecture and to sketch out processes. Visio, PowerPoint, Keynote, or Omnigraffle, for example. In the programming world, some people use UML tools to draw pictures of how a program should operate, and then turn that into code, and a new breed of product prototyping apps are blurring the line between design and code, too. But it has always bummed me out that when you draw a picture on a computer it is, for the most part, just a picture. Why doesn’t the computer make sense of those boxes and arrows for you? Why is it so hard to turn a picture of a web product into a little, functional website?

This is a huge topic — why are most digital documents not presented as dynamic programs? (One good recent exploration of the subject is Bret Victor’s “Up and Down the Ladder of Abstraction.”) And in some ways the Twine interface is a very honest testing and prototyping environment, because it is so good at modeling choices (as in, choose your own adventure). Playing around, I made a little “game” about writing this newsletter. It took twenty minutes and is not serious—yet it made me think about schedules, information sources, my tendencies toward distraction, and the overall processes. It started as a joke but was an actually productive half-hour. I can see lots of ways to model social and business processes using the friendly, easy-to-use, and open-sourced Twine system. That the end result is a game shouldn’t distract you from the fact that the software is free and the exercise was useful."
twine  cyoa  prototyping  paulford  games  interactivefiction  speculativefiction  productmanagement  infoarchitecture  gaming  play  2016  if 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Haiti
"Four years after the earthquake, how is Haiti rebuilding itself? If you were part of the process, would you be able to make the right choices? Find out with this multimedia interactive story."
via:senongo  cyoa  haiti  interactive  history  if  interactivefiction 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Playing games in the digital library | Wellcome Collection Blog
"So we asked three games designers to approach our collections using Twine, a popular tool for games and interactive fiction. Twine offers an experience like a story where you get to make decisions: click on the highlighted text to move through. Sometimes there are many choices, sometimes just one; each choice will take you somewhere new on the journey towards the game’s end."

[via: https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/633071370642006019 ]
games  gaming  libraries  via:tealtan  twine  interactivefiction  if  museums  classideas  cyoa  archives  classiseas  glvo  edg  srg 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Stories You Can Win: Margaret Robertson for the Future of StoryTelling 2012 on Vimeo
"Games have always needed stories, says celebrated game designer Margaret Robertson. For many, the first ever videogame was 1962's Space War. It couldn't have been simpler to look at: startlingly abstract wireframes only. Space War could hardly be a smaller story, but it allowed players to make sense of the abstract shapes, of the strange new interaction unfolding before them. And from that point on, games have consistently chased a richer relationship with stories. Technology has always made that hard, though. There were great stories in early games, but ones that you had to sip through the thinnest of straws. Everything we take for granted in other mediums of storytelling was brutally rationed in early gaming.

But now we've beaten those constraints. Modern games have scripts tens of thousands of pages long. They record tens of thousands of lines of dialogue and display perfectly lifelike facial expressions and body movement. Natural language conversations are becoming possible with artificial characters. Some game developers even consider that the artificial creations they make can be meaningfully said to be alive. So does that mean we've cracked story? Not quite. Story is hard. Story is fragile. Story is expensive. Players chew through it fast, and expect it to be endlessly responsive to their actions. Writing one good straight story is hard enough at the best of times. Producing one that's expected to last twenty times as long as most feature films and have a hundred credible endings is next to impossible.

So how do we fix that problem? We fix it by letting games work their own particular magic. Games are engines for making stories. Their rule sets and objectives are mechanisms that engender the things that drive stories—courage, failure, shame, greed, sacrifice, surprise—and gives them context and structure. If you build a captivating world and give players interesting rules, then they'll tell a thousand stories for you. And we fix it by letting games go free range. Whereas you needed to gather round a monolithic PDP-1 to play Space War, now most of us carry one computer in our pocket and another in our backpack. Games are leaking out on to our streets and our parks and our campuses and our beaches, and there is enormous potential to use those environments to tell new kinds of stories. This is what excites Robertson the most as a game designer: being able to give players a stage from which they can start to tell their own stories."
games  videogames  storytelling  2012  gaming  history  margaretrobinson  technology  cyoa  passage  jasonrohrer  spacewar  augmentedreality  play  arg  srg  if  interactivefiction  ar 
september 2014 by robertogreco
A Tumblr devoted solely to the violent deaths in choose-your-own-adventure novels
"We love ourselves some old-school pick-a-path novels around these parts, mostly for the litany of confusing deaths that were foisted upon the barely literate reader. The proprietors of the Tumblr "You Chose Wrong" also remember these many horrendous demises fondly and have thus devoted an entire blog to them."

[Tumblr at: http://youchosewrong.tumblr.com/ ]
death  tumblrs  endings  jumor  cyoa  if  interactivefiction 
july 2012 by robertogreco
inkle | interactive literature
"inkle is a software and creative design company formed from videogame industry talent.

We specialise in finding new ways to tell stories on mobile devices, but our creative services extend to any kind of iOS app. We pride ourselves on the beauty and polish of everything we produce.We’ve developed a unique format for interactive literature: the “inklebook“. Our inklebooks can be of any genre or style, and are as versatile as the written word. The format is powering Frankenstein, written by Dave Morris, and published by Profile Books."

[InkleWriter is here: http://writer.inklestudios.com/ ]
[Frankenstein, as an example: http://www.inklestudios.com/frankenstein ]
appilications  ios  inklewriter  inkle  ebooks  books  fiction  publishing  cyoa  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  text  edg  srg  writing  interactivefiction  if  storytelling  interactive 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Playfic
"Welcome to Playfic, the online community that lets you write, remix, share, and play interactive text-based games with the world."
publishing  interactive  edg  cyoa  playfic  srg  writing  text  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  games  storytelling  interactivefiction  if 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Varytale
"Varytale is a publisher and retailer of interactive books.

Interactive books allow you to influence the narrative. From big choices that affect the whole story, through changes in viewpoint, to special features and extras that shed new light on the author's imagination.

The books we publish range from literary fiction, through to genre and young adult work. We also allow writers to self-publish through our site.

Varytale books can be read on any internet connected device, and your bookmarks are automatically up to date wherever you read from.

Writers

Varytale has the most comprehensive tools for authors wishing to create interactive books.

You create books through our on-line tools. They support individual authors, or large writing teams with editorial work flow.

Our tools show you exactly what readers are reading and enjoying about your book. You can start with a short story, and see how successful it is within a matter of days, adding and expanding content as readers demand…"
publishing  interactive  edg  games  storytelling  writing  cyoa  books  text-basedgames  text  text-basedadventures  srg  if  interactivefiction  varytale 
june 2012 by robertogreco
StoryNexus - A platform for storygames, by Failbetter Games
"A platform for storygames, by Failbetter Games

StoryNexus allows you to play, and build, storygames like Fallen London and The Night Circus."
publishing  games  gaming  failbettergames  storygames  text  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  thenightcircus  fallenlondon  interactive  writing  stories  cyoa  srg  edg  books  interactivefiction  if  storynexus 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Gamasutra - News - In-depth: Is it time for a text game revival?
"In a market where books and games are close rivals for the most popular category on app stores, what happens when today's new gamers are hungry for something more than word puzzles?"

"Gamers are hungry for deeper characterization and worlds to which they can truly attach, and text can be a way to illuminate inner worlds, thought processes or other elements that aren't easily demonstrated by imagery."
via:caseygollan  text-basedadventures  text-basedgames  books  srg  if  games  interactivefiction  gaming  videogames  cyoa 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Imaginary Friend Books
"…a unique interactive platform that allows kids & parents to read & play together. We don't want to just add interactive elements to books. We want to build from the ground up a new type of book. Kids are going to experience books not just on the pages in front of them but all around them. They're gonna be able to interact with the characters & become a character in the story. The videos that they watch online, the messages that they're gonna get in their inbox, the games that they play are all going to relate to the story as it's happening and they are going to be a part of it. We are talking about a collaboration. It's going to be the author who wrote the story, the parent who controls and customizes the story and then the child who experiences the story. These books are gonna be immersive, not disruptive."

[Quote is caption to this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2ZMhLh7aME ]
imaginary  cowriting  immersive  imaginaryfriendsbooks  video  ebooks  interactive  social  reading  children  childrenliterature  interactivefiction  books  if  cyoa 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Choice of Games
"Choice of Games is a small partnership dedicated to producing high-quality, text-based, multiple-choice games. We produce games in house, beginning with Choice of the Dragon and Choice of Broadsides. We have also developed a simple scripting language for writing text-based games, ChoiceScript, which we make available to others for use in their projects, and we host games produced by other designers using ChoiceScript on our website. All of our games are available for free on the web. We also produce mobile versions of our games that can be played on iPhones, Android phones, and other smartphones."
coding  choicescript  interactivefiction  if  interactive  free  online  ios  iphone  edg  srg  applications  android  gaming  games  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  choiceofgames  cyoa  kindle  appstore 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Choose Your Own Adventure - Choose Your Own Adventure eBooks
"Introducing Choose Your Own Adventure eBooks for the iBookstore.  10 titles now available in our ground-breaking electronic format:

CYOA has been in digital format since just a few years after it was first printed, appearing on Atari and Commodore computer systems in the very early 1980s.  We've improved the electronic experience a little bit:

Touch-screen technology lets us keep the interactive experience compelling and immersive.  And because you can't keep your fingers in a digital page, we've added a colorful map that lets you skip around and ahead in the book.  It's not cheating, we swear!

If you have an iTunes account, head over and check us out.  You'll need an iPad or iPhone with iBooks 1.5 or later (it's free!) and iOS 5.0 or later.  As always, we'd love to hear what you think."
ebooks  books  2012  ibookstore  ibooks  cyoa  if  interactivefiction 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Penumbra - Samantha Gorman
"Penumbra is a hybrid art/literature application in development for tablet media. It expands “ebook” conventions by carefully integrating video, illustration and fiction. These media work equally together to inform the total reading. Tablets are a promising literary medium with the potential to redefine our reading practice beyond a simple emulation of print on screen. Increasingly, ebooks could represent a growing platform for the consumption and dissemination of media art: a platform that is inherently interactive and readily mobile.

Investment in actively reading the interface relies on our experience with interaction design; the goal is to implement touch-screen gestures in service of the story’s content. Touching and tilting the screen places the reader in the position of the main protagonist. The reader can use the interface to decide how long the protagonist focuses on his external vs. internal world."

[Now called Pry: http://samanthagorman.net/Pry
http://prynovella.com/
https://vimeo.com/78973518

Penumbra video:
https://vimeo.com/33515808 ]
floatingtext  animation  perspective  worldswitching  thebookofjudith  ephemerality  gestures  mediaart  penumbra  ios  interactivefiction  content  video  futureofmedia  literature  storytelling  interactiondesign  interaction  tablets  ebooks  ebook  2012  samanthagorman  reading  ipad  digitaltext  if  applications  cyoa  ephemeral  pry  novellas 
april 2012 by robertogreco
The Most Dangerous Gamer - Magazine - The Atlantic
"Thoreau…“With a little more deliberation in the choice of their pursuits,” he proclaimed, “all men would perhaps become essentially students and observers, for certainly their nature and destiny are interesting to all alike.”

Blow clicked off the stereo and turned to me. “I honestly didn’t plan that,” he said.

In so many words, Loud Thoreau had just described Blow’s central idea for The Witness. Whereas so many contemporary games are built on a foundation of shooting or jumping or, let’s say, the creative use of mining equipment to disembowel space zombies, Blow wants the point of The Witness to be the act of noticing, of paying attention to one’s surroundings. Speaking about it, he begins to sound almost like a Zen master. “Things are pared down to the basic acts of movement and observation until those senses become refined,” he told me. “The further you go into the game, the more it’s not even about the thinking mind anymore—it becomes about the intuitive mind."
literature  narrative  taylorclark  miegakure  marctenbosch  interactivefiction  asceticism  storytelling  payingattention  attention  observation  noticing  intuition  myst  littlebigplanet  money  belesshelpful  fiction  jenovachen  flow  tombissell  gamedev  chrishecker  einstein'sdreams  alanlightman  invisiblecities  italocalvino  jonblow  deannavanburen  art  2012  thewitness  thoreau  srg  edg  videogames  gaming  games  braid  jonathanblow  if  cyoa 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Klynt
"Edit Rich Narratives
*Mixed Media Editing: Texts, images, audios, videos and hyperlinks
*Multiple Interactive Layers: Manage unlimited story nodes
*Visual Storyboard: Edit your storyboard like a mind map

Connect Your Story To The Web
*Mash-up Ready: Mix YouTube videos and FlickR images
*Facebook & Twitter Friendly: Share your favorite sequences on social networks
*Custom Maps: Geolocalize your content

Publish Anywhere
*Quick Publishing: Automatically export your final edit
*Embedable Anywhere: Show your program on any webpage
*Tablet and Mobile Device Compatible: iOS player available this Spring"

[See this project example "Journey to the End of Coal": http://www.honkytonk.fr/index.php/webdoc/ ]
[Related: http://nofilmschool.com/2012/02/advice-creating-transmedia-documentary/ ]
[See also Bear 71: http://bear71.nfb.ca ]
klynt  remixing  dailymotion  youtube  flickr  onlinetoolkit  twitter  facebook  geolocation  mapping  maps  storyboards  hypertext  audio  text  vimeo  cyoa  interactivedocumentary  webdoc  media  software  journalism  video  interactive  tools  multimedia  fiction  if  interactivefiction  filmmaking  remixculture 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Plotto
“I just got my Weegee + Barthes + Chris Alexander + IF + symbolic logic + narratology fancies tickled at once.” —Max Fenton at 2/19/12 7:39 PM

(Source: http://twitter.com/maxfenton/status/171393503849488384 )
thinking  books  rolandbarthes  christopheralexander  maxfenton  weegee  interactivefiction  if  via:litherland  paulcollins  cyoa 
february 2012 by robertogreco
NFB/Interactive - Bear 71
[an interactive film about grizzly bears from the National Film Board of Canada]

"It's hard to say where the wild world ends and the wild one begins."

"The forest has its own language."

"If you look backward from any single point in time, everything seems to lead up to that moment."

"They'll have to learn *not* to do what comes naturally, and I wonder. Maybe the lesson is too hard."
deschooling  unschooling  parenting  flash  video  film  2012  tracking  visualization  classideas  storytelling  interactivenarratives  nationalfilmboardofcanada  nfb  bear71  bears  nature  animals  documentary  interactive  cyoa  interactivefiction  if  nfbc 
february 2012 by robertogreco
GET LAMP: THE TEXT ADVENTURE DOCUMENTARY
"…early 1980s, an entire industry rose over telling of tales, solving of intricate puzzles & art of writing. Like living books, these games described fantastic worlds to readers, & then invited them to live w/in them.

They were called "computer adventure games", & they used the most powerful graphics processor in the world: the human mind.

Rising from side projects at unis & engineering companies, adventure games would describe a place, & then ask what to do next. They presented puzzles, tricks & traps to be overcome. They were filled w/ suspense, humor & sadness. & they offered a unique type of joy as players discovered how to negotiate obstacles & think their way to victory. These players have carried memories of these text adventures to the modern day, & whole new generation of authors have taken up torch to present new set of places to explore.

Get Lamp is a documentary that will tell the story of the creation of these incredible games, in the words of the people who made them."
cyoa  computers  computing  getlamp  classideas  storytelling  writing  towatch  if  interactivefiction  documentary  history  gaming  text  games  edg  srg  via:litherland  interactive  fiction 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Bear 71: An Interactive, Experimental Documentary
"This interactive documentary blurs the line between wild and wired worlds"

"It’s usually a good thing when technology and creativity intersect, and that’s why it’s so easy to love projects like Bear 71, which surpasses everything I previously believed was possible to do with a documentary.

Produced by the National Film Board of Canada’s digital studio, the documentary is constructed as an interactive online experience that observes and records the intersection of humans, nature and technology.

The story follows a female grizzly bear, named Bear 71 by the park rangers who track her. The bear’s story speaks to how we coexist with wildlife in an age of networks, surveillance and digital information, and blurs the line between the wild and wired worlds."
nfbc  networks  storytelling  via:anterobot  surveillance  bears  animals  technology  nature  towatch  2012  bear71  documentaries  classideas  interactive  srg  edg  cyoa  interactivefiction  if  nfb 
january 2012 by robertogreco
http://www.literateprogramming.com/adventure.pdf
"The ur-game for computers — Adventure — was originally written by Will Crowther in 1975 and greatly extended by Don Woods in 1976. I have taken Woods’s original FORTRAN program for Adventure Version 1.0 and recast it in the CWEB idiom.

I remember being fascinated by this game when John McCarthy showed it to me in 1977. I started with no clues about the purpose of the game or what I should do; just the computer’s comment that I was at the end of a forest road facing a small brick building. Little by little, the game revealed its secrets, just as its designers had cleverly plotted. What a thrill it was when I first got past the green snake! Clearly the game was potentially addictive, so I forced myself to stop playing — reasoning that it was great fun, sure, but traditional computer science research is great fun too, possibly even more so.

Now here I am, 21 years later, returning to the great Adventure after having indeed had many exciting adventures in Computer Science"
adventure  history  1977  programming  fiction  interactive  via:robinsloan  willcrowther  cweb  coding  games  gaming  videogames  cyoa  filetype:pdf  media:document  if  interactivefiction 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Visual novel - Wikipedia
"A visual novel (ビジュアルノベル bijuaru noberu?) is an interactive fiction game featuring mostly static graphics, usually with anime-style art, or occasionally live-action stills or video footage.[1] As the name might suggest, they resemble mixed-media novels or tableau vivant stage plays.

In Japanese terminology, a distinction is often made between visual novels proper (abbreviated NVL), which are predominantly narrative and have very little interactive elements, and adventure games (abbreviated AVG or ADV), which typically incorporate problem-solving and other gameplay elements. This distinction is normally lost in the West, where both NVLs and ADVs are commonly referred to as "visual novels" by Western fans. Visual novels and ADVs are especially prevalent in Japan, where they made up nearly 70% of the PC game titles released in 2006."
games  writing  japan  classideas  multimedia  media  nvl  avg  adv  visualnovels  interactive  interactivefiction  fiction  gaming  videogames  if  cyoa 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Steins;Gate - Wikipedia
"The story of Steins;Gate takes place in Akihabara and is about a group of friends who have customized their microwave into a device that can send text messages to the past. As they perform different experiments, an organization named SERN who has been doing their own research on time travel tracks them down and now the characters have to find a way to avoid being captured by them. Steins;Gate has been praised for its intertwining storyline and the voice actors have been commended for their portrayal of the characters."
games  japan  interactivefiction  storytelling  timetravel  manga  xbox360  videogames  classideas  writingprompts  visualnovels  edg  srg  scifi  sciencefiction  akihabara  tokyo  anime  if  cyoa 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Post by Robin Sloan: Thursday question 001: What's the future of offline role-playing games?
"had a fun Twitter back-and-forth…about Dungeons & Dragons…made me think about a few things:

* Board games like HeroQuest, which offered a sort of stripped-down D&D experience, played across a reconfigurable plastic-and-cardboard labyrinth.

* The fact that my friend +Robert Lavolette seems to enjoy the sourcebooks (detailing various monsters, locales, & lost civilizations) more than the games themselves.

* +Matt Penniman's love of new-school indie RPGs, many of which sport radically reduced rule sets—you can play some w/ just index cards.

So: What's the future of offline role-playing games?

Is the rise of a game like Settlers of Catan a sign that the mainstream is ready for nerdier fare? If there was going to be a breakout RPG (one played in person, around a table) what would it be? Do you have a dream RPG?

I'm interested to hear from folks who haven't played RPGs—who know them by reputation, or who have always been curious…"
robinsloan  games  rpg  arg  gaming  offline  play  cyoa  2011  settlersofcatan  larp  books  werewolf  mafia  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Week 315 – Blog – BERG
"Your sensitivity & tolerance improve only with practice. I wish I’d been given toy businesses to play w/ at school, just as playing w/ crayons taught my body how to let me draw.

I’ve written in these weeknotes before how I manage three budgets: cash, attention, risk. This is my attempt to explain how I feel about risk, and to trace the pathways between risk and cash. Attention, & how it connects, can wait until another day…

I said I wouldn’t speak about attention, but here’s a sneak peak of what I would say. Attention is the time of people in the studio, & how effectively it is applied. It is affected by the arts of project & studio management; it can be tracked by time-sheets & capacity plans; it can be leveraged with infrastructure, internal tools, and carefully grown tacit knowledge; and it magically grows when there’s time to play, when there is flow in the work, and when a team aligns into a “sophisticated work group.”
Attention is connected to cash through work."
design  business  management  berg  berglondon  mattwebb  attention  flow  groups  groupculture  sophisticatedworkgroups  money  risk  riskmanagement  riskassessment  confidence  happiness  anxiety  worry  leadership  tinkering  designthinking  thinking  physical  work  instinct  frustration  lcproject  studio  decisionmaking  systems  systemsthinking  manufacturing  making  doing  newspaperclub  svk  distribution  integratedsystems  infrastructure  supplychain  deleuze  guattari  cyoa  failure  learning  invention  ineptitude  ignorance  deleuze&guattari  gillesdeleuze  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction  félixguattari 
june 2011 by robertogreco
A Dream About Augmented Reality Fiction - O'Reilly Radar
"augmented reality could be an important component of a new kind of storytelling, making today's 3D entertainments as dated as silent films. Elan Lee's Fourth Wall Studios is already chipping away at barrier between storytelling & daily life. The 1st augmented reality entertainments may be text based rather than video; eventually they will likely be as immersive as my dream.

Many years ago, I saw a play in LA called Tamara, story set in mansion where WWI hero & author Gabrielle D'Annunzio was held under house arrest by Mussolini...fascinating experiment in theater...took place in many different rooms of the house. As audience member, whenever scene ended, you had an opportunity to follow the character of your choice to another room. No audience member could see entire play. My wife & I went w/ her parents (back for 3rd or 4th time, seeing parts of play they'd missed on previous visits), & afterwards, we all compared notes for hours about what we'd seen & what we'd missed."
augmentedreality  fiction  tcsnmy  writing  timoreilly  future  gabrielled'annunzio  tamara  theater  cyoa  perspective  distributed  augmentedrealityfiction  literature  interactive  if  interactivefiction  ar 
february 2010 by robertogreco
SAMPLE REALITY · A History of Choose Your Own Adventure Visualizations
"Every six months or so it seems as if the entire Internet discovers for the first time that people are making data visualizations of the Choose Your Own Adventure books that were popular in the early eighties. Computer scientist Christian Swinehart’s stunning visualizations are only the most recent to capture the imagination of scores of old fans, academics, and data fanatics.

Here then is a brief history of these CYOA maps:"
cyoa  chooseyourownadventure  visualization  maps  mapping  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball Linked List: Fighting Fantasy Game Books
"Of all the various Choose Your Own Adventure-type books, the Fighting Fantasy series, created by Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone, was by far and away my favorite. I read/played them all, obsessively. They felt more like games than any of the others (and included a simple D&D-esque dice-based combat system), but were also much better written, better typeset, and better illustrated. Rather than going by pages, they went by numbered entries, generally with more than one entry per page. Most of the books had exactly 400 entries, so the gameplay was vastly more complex than any of the regular CYOB-style books. I’d love to see info-graphic diagrams of their decision trees a la the work by Christian Swinehart I linked to yesterday."

[more: http://daringfireball.net/linked/2009/11/13/fighting-fantasy-flowcharts ]
games  gaming  cyoa  chooseyourownadventure  johngruber  reading  children  text  fightingfantasy  writing  books  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction 
november 2009 by robertogreco
cyoa [Choose Your Own Adventure visualizations]
"To get a sense for the distribution of pages within the actual cyoa books, I’ve prepared a dataset of 12 books. They earliest date from 1979 and at the later edge are a handful from 1986. They are laid out chronologically (or according to series order for books released in the same year) with the oldest at the top left and more recent books below. Each book has been arranged into rows of ten pages apiece."
visualization  books  cyoa  chooseyourownadventure  infographics  reading  design  games  play  gaming  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction 
november 2009 by robertogreco
A peek at the future of interactive storytelling? | EverydayUX: Everyday User Experience by alex rainert
"I was completely blown away by this video the first time through. Such a simple, low-tech, solution produces such an amazingly rich, engaging experience that’s just bursting with possibility for further creativity.

While it’s just a concept at this point, you can see how it can make a new kind of storytelling available to the masses in a way that wouldn’t have seemed possible not that long ago."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/4096 ]
iphone  books  applications  children  interactiondesign  japan  interactive  interactivefiction  gamedesign  storytelling  mobile  if  cyoa  ios 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Frotz - OLPC
"Frotz.activity lets you play interactive fiction games on your XO laptop. This activity is a wrapper around the Unix port of Frotz, which is an interpreter for Infocom games and other Z-machine games. It includes one game, the classic Adventure. You can download more games here: Frotz/Games." ... "Frotz.activity is free software, licensed under the GPL and so is the actual frotz interpreter. You can find the source code to the wrapper inside the .xo bundle. Source for the interpreter can be found on David Griffith's website: http://frotz.homeunix.org/frotz/ If you are interested in a python z-machine implementation see: http://code.google.com/p/zvm/ "

[more here: http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Frotz/Games]
srg  olpc  frotz  games  gaming  interactivefiction  writing  programming  if  cyoa 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The Colossal Cave Adventure page
"The Colossal Cave Adventure game, produced in the '70s, was the historic first "interactive fiction" game, in which the computer would simulate and describe a situation and the user would type in what to do next, in simple English.

The user would thus be a part of an ongoing story in a fantasy setting — in this case, an exploration of Colossal Cave in Kentucky. But this Colossal Cave, though remarkably similar to its real-life counterpart, was also very different: Magic was afoot in the cave... "
srg  frotz  games  gaming  history  interactivefiction  if  cyoa 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Frotz - Wikipedia
"Frotz was a verb in MIT slang, meaning "to play with" or "to manipulate". This presumably led to its use in certain Infocom games."
srg  frotz  words  games  gaming  interactivefiction  if  cyoa 
january 2009 by robertogreco
STORYTRON - Interactive Storytelling
"Do you love stories? Do they excite you, fascinate you, exhilarate you? Have you ever wanted to try to jump right into a story and speak to the people in it? Have you thought about playing the protagonist, letting your feelings and imagination steer the story in new, creative directions?"

[via: http://pmog.com/missions/a_sampler_platter_of_interactive_fiction ]
srg  interactive  interactivefiction  videogames  storytelling  narrative  writing  games  literature  interactiveliterature  fiction  commandline  text  gaming  if  cyoa 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Interactive fiction - Wikipedia
"Interactive fiction, often abbreviated IF, describes software simulating environments in which players use text commands to control characters and influence the environment. Works in this form can be understood as literary narratives and as computer games. In common usage, the word refers to text adventures, a type of adventure game with text-based input and output. The term is sometimes used to encompass the entirety of the medium, but is also sometimes used to distinguish games produced by the interactive fiction community from those created by games companies. It can also be used to distinguish the more modern style of such works, focusing on narrative and not necessarily falling into the adventure game genre at all, from the more traditional focus on puzzles. More expansive definitions of interactive fiction may refer to all adventure games, including wholly graphical adventures such as Myst."
srg  interactive  interactivefiction  videogames  storytelling  narrative  writing  games  literature  interactiveliterature  fiction  commandline  text  gaming  if  cyoa 
january 2009 by robertogreco

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