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robertogreco : dance   61

26 | Black Mountain College — Do Not Touch
"We're going back to school and learning about an arts college in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina. For 24 years the college attracted famous teachers and produced students who would go on to achieve their own fame. I have two guests speaking to me about Black Mountain - Kate Averett from the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center and Professor Eva Diaz from Pratt Institute."
bmc  2018  blackmountaincollege  bauhaus  annialbers  johndewey  art  arts  education  highered  highereducation  alternative  experimental  unschooling  deschooling  democracy  horizontality  evadiaz  kateaverett  history  arthistory  pedagogy  lcproject  openstudioproject  form  exploration  liberalarts  roberrauschenberg  willemdekooning  abstractexpressionism  howwework  discipline  self  identity  johncage  mercecunningham  self-directedlearning  self-directed  learning  howwelearn  howweteach  teaching  vision  cognition  expressionism  expression  music  dance  buckminsterfuller  technique  chance  happenings  anarchism  ego  spontaneity  unknown  improvisation  radicalism  transilience  northcarolina  transience  hippies  communes  integration  jacoblawrence  almastonewilliams  outsiders  refugees  inclusion  inclusivity  openness  gender  rayjohnson  elainedekooining  karenkarnes  dorothearockburn  hazellarsenarcher  blackmountaincollegemuseum  susanweil  maryparkswashington  josefalbers  charlesolson  poetry  johnandrewrice 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Keire Johnson en Instagram: “Shout out @finhan_ for making this after watching Minding the Gap! What I take from this piece (personally) : The paper bag over the…”
"Shout out @finhan_ for making this after watching Minding the Gap!
What I take from this piece (personally) : The paper bag over the skater's face to me represents how skateboarding suppresses all the negative emotions you can feel growing up and acts almost as a cloak of some sort.

When you take the bag off after skating, all of the bullshit comes back to you. Skateboarding cures heartache however it has limited powers. It can't cure everything.

That's where other creative outlets come in.
Music, art, dance, writing, and ect.
I am luck enough to have multiple outlets but I recommend finding a creative outlet that works for you. It's good for you.
Thanks again @finhan_"
keirejohnson  skateboarding  skating  2018  adolescence  youth  teens  self-medication  escape  creativity  music  art  arts  dance  writing  outlets  identity 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Stand | KQED Truly CA - YouTube
"Stand depicts South LA residents using krump dancing to take a stand and is part of the episode Truly CA Shorts: State of Discovery, which features five short films exploring the California experience.

http://ww2.kqed.org/trulyca/stand/

A dance style from South Los Angeles, “krump” has taken street dance to a new level by adding percussive movements and providing a safe and cathartic way for at-risk youth to express their emotions. Stand follows a krump group called Demolition Crew, which has become a nexus for its community, offering an alternative to gangs and a healthy outlet for aggression. Krucial the Liberator, one of the crew’s leaders, says, “Krump was created to let out those harsher emotions.”

A film by Melanie D’Andrea.

http://www.raiseyourstand.com/
https://www.facebook.com/standmovie
https://twitter.com/CHOOSETOSTAND "
dance  krump  losangeles 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Ranu Mukherjee
[via: https://deyoung.famsf.org/exhibitions/ranu-mukherjee-bright-stage ]

[see also:
https://www.instagram.com/ranumukherjee/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BkQWt-SlCnE/
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bkx2wXDln4h/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BlJdETEFHMK/ ]

"“There is cultural time and there is material time. The body connects to both.” from notes on Shadowtime, Ranu Mukherjee 2016-17

Ranu Mukherjee creates video installations, bodies of drawing and painting and collaborative projects that have to date included choreography, pirate radio, procession, exhibition and book making. She works with images as time based phenomena that unfold in the traffic between visionary and mediated perception. In a process of making and unmaking, she uses fragments and layers to pry open a space between performance and representation, and to encourage active ways of seeing and being present.

Mukherjee's work is driven by her mixed heritage, dreams of global citizenship and uncanny sensations and events related to climate shift. In making it she places importance on destabilizing established origin stories, holding space for the unknown, negotiating continuous change, celebrating resilience and connecting with residual forms of animism as a means of imagining alternate futures. Her works embody the experience of colliding time frames marked in cultural, ecological and technological terms and the ongoing construction of culture through the forces of creolization, migration, ecology, speculative fiction and desire.

.

awkwardness and beauty. engaging the visceral through a hybrid and visibly crafted aesthetic

color. the space of color, the life of color, the non white-ness of color. Michael Taussig’s What Color is the Sacred? color as an actor, context or stage. color as an animate force and an embodiment of time

creolization. inventing visual forms of Creole, encouraging broad recognition of the complex legacies making up the urban environment. elements sometimes flow together smoothly, and at others are jammed together awkwardly. this is the construction of culture. the making of work that is at least bi-lingual. migration is the origin story

excess. paying a certain kind of attention. working with the excess produced by instrumentalized narratives, information, bodies, objects, everything. the sheer amount of focus and work it takes to resist the forces of instrumentalization

fragment as a unit of measurement. pictorial wholeness no longer makes sense. the incomplete is familiar. it is imperative to leave an opening for what we don't know

figure-ground a new urgency around figure-ground relationships pervades

landscape as a stage and an energetic body. the compressed spaces of body, stage and picture plane. the specificity of place. the importance of the experiential in the making of meaning. the crossing syntaxes of project based work and picture making

neo-animist. vibrant matter, a distributed body. identification with a wide spectrum of organic matter.deep ecology. expansiveness. see the work of Betti Marenko

neo-futurist. speculative fiction. the narratives we have about the future- literary, journalistic, popular and data driven. the other side of the Modernist dream- a watershed moment for industrial production

nomadic. the condition of contemporary life- the un-static. the contradiction between a desirable philosophical space and a potentially exhausting life style. sometimes through desire, sometimes a condition of work, war and other forms of violence, economics. an uprooting and spreading of visual matter and information. a demand. a demand on artists.

0rphandrift a collective artist/entity that emerged in 1994 through Suzie Karakashian, Ranu Mukherjee, Mer Maggie Roberts and Erle Stenberg, plus several collaborators. www.orphandriftarchive.com

procession a form able to carry individual expressions within collective production. the performance of reassembled mythologies for the purposes of re-alignment and recognition. an honoring.

race and abstraction being visibly mixed in a precarious and divisive historical time and place makes the question of pictorial representation- of bodies in particular- tricky and sticky. (not to mention questions of identity)

shadowtime a word invented with the Bureau for Linguistical Reality in 2015 to convey the feeling of living simultaneously in two distinctly different time scales, or the acute consciousness of the possibility that the near future will be drastically different than the present.

time travel. the expansiveness of the body and the ability to perceive differing temporal scales- some that are epic. The scale by which energy takes affect.

tentacles i am the mother of triplets. i make things in 3’s. i have been 2 boys and a girl. i have grown 3 organs. i was well prepared for motherhood through speculative fiction and cyberpunk. i make work which has at least one easily accessible dimension. i think about what we leave. Octopi have 3 hearts and great shape shifting capacity, some day I will find a way to communicate with one.

unknown, the stranger within myself. the stranger that is half of my DNA. making space for the unknown to guide the work. the resistance to explaining it all away.

unmaking occupying images and forms as an artist, to unmake them. re-mak ing them into artworks that have a performative capacity. teasing out tensions between performance and representation,

xeno-real. pictures from late 19th and early 20th century India which describe the beginning of the post-colonial. the playing out of the post-colonial.seethe work of Christopher Pinney"
ranumukherjee  art  artists  sanfrancisco  choreography  dance  video  multimedia  performance  representation  presence  creolization  globalcitenzenry  citizenship  globalcitizenship 
july 2018 by robertogreco
West coast is something nobody with sense would understand. : Open Space
""West coast is something nobody with sense would understand."

That’s a line from Jack Spicer’s “Ten Poems for Downbeat,” written in 1965, just before the Los Angeles-born poet died, age forty, in San Francisco. Was it true then, is it true now? What are some ways to make sense of this place (which isn’t one place), in this time (when it seems like there’s so little time)? Speculative, subversive, meditative: here are a few attempts."
westcoast  sanfrancisco  losangeles  jackspicer  1965  2017  place  speculative  subversion  speculation  meditation  pendarvisharsha  art  guadaluperosales  elisabethnicula  sophiawang  jennyodell  suzannestein  sandiego  cedarsigo  leorafridman  trees  fog  annahalprin  dance  eastla 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Aaron Stewart-Ahn on Twitter: "Our media literacy about movies tends to prioritize text over subtext, emotion, and sound vision & time, and it has sadly sunk into audience… https://t.co/pdGb93PJqL"
"Our media literacy about movies tends to prioritize text over subtext, emotion, and sound vision & time, and it has sadly sunk into audiences' minds. I'd say some movies are even worth a handful of shots / sounds they build up to."

[in response to (the starred part of this thread):
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933796336683515904
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933797652914872321
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933798079618105345
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933798628635709440
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933800708960174080 [****]
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933801838733701121
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933802333053501440
https://twitter.com/RealGDT/status/933808111663513600

"13 Tweets on why I am interviewing Michael Mann and George Miller (2 weeks each) about their films this Sabbatical year.

I sometimes feel that great films are made / shown at a pace that does not allow them to "land" in their proper weight or formal / artisitic importance...
18 replies 172 retweets 763 likes

As a result, often, these films get discussed in "all aspects" at once. But mostly, plot and character- anecdote and flow, become the point of discussion. Formal appreciation and technique become secondary and the specifics of narrative technique only passingly address

(adressed, I mean).

I want to do it because I want to know. I want to read their words, their reasons and I want to review their films as I would revisit a painting or a dance piece or a music number- I want to discuss lens choices and the vital difference between a dolly, techno crane or mini jib.

I would love to commemorate their technical choices and their audiovisual tools. I would love to dissect the narrative importance and impact of color, light, movement, wardrobe and set design. As Mann once put it: "Everything tells you something"

[****] I think we owe it to these (and a handful of filmmakers) to have their formal choices commemorated, the way one can appreciatethe voigour and thickness and precision of a brushtroke when you stand in front of an original painting.

A travelling shot IS a moral choice- but also a narrative one, that goes beyond style when applied by a master. I remember that epic moment in which Max steps out of the interceptor in Mad Max and removes his sunglasses- the wide lens pushes in and jibs up- underlining emotion

Uh- it's not quite 13 tweets yet but you catch my drift- and I have brussel sprouts in the frying pan- gotta go. But, there- that's the idea behind those 4 weeks of visit to two masters. Hugs to all.

I had my caramelized brussel sprouts. Nice.

Anyway, my hope is that we can dissect the importance of audiovisual tools delivering/reinforcing theme and character in a film. If these interviews / dialogues are useful I would keep having them. Filmmakers to filmmaker."]

[My response:

https://twitter.com/rogre/status/933806291461423105
"Our education system prioritizes text. Deviation from text is discouraged."

https://twitter.com/rogre/status/933808601608552448
"“To use the language well, says the voice of literacy, cherish its classic form. Do not choose the offbeat at the cost of clarity.” http://some-velvet-morning.tumblr.com/post/166694371846/shinjimoon-nothing-could-be-more-normative [from “Commitment from the Mirror-Writing Box,” Trinh T. Minh-Ha, Woman, Native, Other]

https://twitter.com/rogre/status/933808729937526784
"Clarity is a means of subjection, a quality both of official, taught language and of correct writing, two old mates of power; together they flow, together they flower, vertically, to impose an order."]
medialiteracy  aaronstewart-ahn  2017  guillermodeltoro  michaelmann  georgemiller  multiliteracies  text  film  filmmaking  plit  character  necdote  flow  dance  color  light  movement  wardrobe  trinhminh-ha  audiovisual  emotion  madmax  technique  canon 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Interview: Mati Diop (Simon Killer) on Vimeo
"Interview with actress Mati Diop star of Simon Killer - 2012 Sundance Film Festival. Written and directed by Antonio Campos. Cinematographer: Joe Anderson. Editor: Antonio Campos, Babak Jalali, Zac Stuart Pontier. Producer: Sean Durkin, Josh Mond, Matt Palmieri. Co- producer: Melody Roscher. Also starring: Brady Corbet, Michael Abiteboul, Solo, Constance Rousseau, Lila Salet. Interview conducted by Eric Lavallee. IONCINEMA.com"
matidiop  film  filmmaking  2012  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  music  dance  imagery  photography 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Freedom - International Day of the Girl - YouTube
"Every day girls around the world are fighting for their freedom. This International Day of the Girl - join them and raise your voice:

1. Share the film and tell us what #FreedomForGirls means to you
2. Take action at http://www.globalgoals.org/dayofthegirl

In 2015 when leaders signed up to the UN Sustainable Development Goals – the Global Goals - they made a promise – to empower all girls. There has been progress but we need to keep up the pressure. If we work together we can make sure world leaders deliver and every girl grows up healthy, safe, empowered and able to fulfil her dreams.

This new film from director MJ Delaney featuring ‘Freedom’ by Beyoncé, calls for action on some of the biggest challenges girls face like access to education, child marriage and the threat of violence´

Last year we asked you to share #WhatIReallyReallyWant for girls and women – this year we want you to raise your voice for freedom.

This can’t wait – we need action now if we are to achieve the Global Goals and equality for all girls."
girls  video  2017  beyoncé  kendricklamar  girlpower  dance  mjdelaney  globalgoals 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Danza de Los Superhéroes: Zapotec Immigrant Tradition in Transnational Transfer – Boom California
"Now, as performed, Los Superhéroes is no joke. Its performative function is one where Familia Zapoteca breathes new life into a dance tradition that enables them to make sense of being in diaspora."



"Alejo speaks with self-assurance and without a hint of satirical intent. He is hopeful and confident because he knows that behind the paper-plate shield of Captain America, deep beneath the backpacks bulging out Santa Claus’s belly, and the countless folded garments that shape up the characters, there lays the fundamental grain of a tradition that allows the dancers to sustain a dance that incorporates what is foreign into their own. For that reason, the dancers rehearse each step arduously."
familiazapoteca  losangeles  tradition  diaspora  dance  2017  performance  leopoldopeña  mexico  us  california  culture  luisdelgado 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Watch Goings On About Town | Alvin Ailey’s Enduring Vision | The New Yorker Video | CNE
"Robert Battle, the artistic director of Ailey’s namesake dance company, speaks about the historical role of the arts and finding our common humanity."
robertbattle  alvinailey  dance  art  2016  history  humanity 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Hack Circus: Archive Theory
"In this episode, Leila talks to archivist and writer Arike Oke. Arike looks after the archive at Rambert, one of the UK's leading contemporary dance companies, where Leila completed a residency earlier this year. They talk storytelling, dance and the challenges of acting as the custodian of the invisible, and plumb some of the fascinating and unexpected depths of archive theory."
archives  leilajohnston  hackcircus  arikeoke  dance  rambert  storytelling  archivetheory 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Zadie Smith: dance lessons for writers | Books | The Guardian
"“Fred Astaire represents the aristocracy when he dances,” claimed Gene Kelly, in old age, “and I represent the proletariat.” The distinction is immediately satisfying, though it’s a little harder to say why. Tall, thin and elegant, versus muscular and athletic – is that it? There’s the obvious matter of top hat and tails versus T-shirt and slacks. But Fred sometimes wore T-shirts and slacks, and was not actually that tall, he only stood as if he were, and when moving always appeared elevated, to be skimming across whichever surface: the floor, the ceiling, an ice rink, a bandstand. Gene’s centre of gravity was far lower: he bends his knees, he hunkers down. Kelly is grounded, firmly planted, where Astaire is untethered, free-floating.

Likewise, the aristocrat and the proletariat have different relations to the ground beneath their feet, the first moving fluidly across the surface of the world, the second specifically tethered to a certain spot: a city block, a village, a factory, a stretch of fields. Cyd Charisse claimed her husband always knew which of these dancers she’d been working with by looking at her body at the end of the day: bruised everywhere if it was Kelly, not a blemish if it was Astaire. Not only aloof when it came to the ground, Astaire was aloof around other people’s bodies. Through 15 years and 10 movies, it’s hard to detect one moment of real sexual tension between Fred and his Ginger. They have great harmony but little heat. Now think of Kelly with Cyd Charisse in the fantasy sequence of Singin’ in the Rain! And maybe this is one of the advantages of earthiness: sex."



"But both men were excellent dancers. Putting aside the difference in height, physically they had many similarities. Terribly slight, long necked, thin-legged, powered from the torso rather than the backside, which in both cases was improbably small. And in terms of influence they were of course equally indebted to James Brown. The splits, the rise from the splits, the spin, the glide, the knee bend, the jerk of the head – all stolen from the same source.

Yet Prince and Jackson are nothing alike when they dance, and it’s very hard to bring to mind Prince dancing, whereas it is practically impossible to forget Jackson. It sounds irrational, but try it for yourself. Prince’s moves, no matter how many times you may have observed them, have no firm inscription in memory; they never seem quite fixed or preserved. If someone asks you to dance like Prince, what will you do? Spin, possibly, and do the splits, if you’re able. But there won’t appear to be anything especially Prince-like about that. It’s mysterious. How can you dance and dance, in front of millions of people, for years, and still seem like a secret only I know? (And isn’t it the case that to be a Prince fan is to feel that Prince was your secret alone?)

I never went to see Michael Jackson, but I saw Prince half a dozen times. I saw him in stadiums with thousands of people, so have a rational understanding that he was in no sense my secret, that he was in fact a superstar. But I still say his shows were illegible, private, like the performance of a man in the middle of a room at a house party. It was the greatest thing you ever saw and yet its greatness was confined to the moment in which it was happening."



"The art of not dancing – a vital lesson. Sometimes it is very important to be awkward, inelegant, jerking, to be neither poetic nor prosaic, to be positively bad. To express other possibilities for bodies, alternative values, to stop making sense. It’s interesting to me that both these artists did their “worst” dancing to their blackest cuts. “Take me to the river,” sings Byrne, in square trousers 20 times too large, looking down at his jerking hips as if they belong to someone else. This music is not mine, his trousers say, and his movements go further: maybe this body isn’t mine, either. At the end of this seam of logic lies a liberating thought: maybe nobody truly owns anything.

People can be too precious about their “heritage”, about their “tradition” – writers especially. Preservation and protection have their place but they shouldn’t block either freedom or theft. All possible aesthetic expressions are available to all peoples – under the sign of love. Bowie and Byrne’s evident love for what was “not theirs” brings out new angles in familiar sounds. It hadn’t occurred to me before seeing these men dance that a person might choose, for example, to meet the curve of a drum beat with anything but the matching curving movement of their body, that is, with harmony and heat. But it turns out you can also resist: throw up a curious angle and suddenly spasm, like Bowie, or wonder if that’s truly your own arm, like Byrne.

I think of young Luther Vandross, singing backup a few feet behind Bowie, during Young Americans, watching Bowie flail and thrash. I wonder what his take on all that was. Did he ever think: “Now, what in the world is he doing?” But a few performances in, it was clear to everybody. Here was something different. Something old, and yet new."
zadiesmith  dance  dancing  writing  fredastaire  genekelly  haroldnicholas  fayardnicholas  michaeljackson  prince  2016  janetjackson  madonna  beyoncé  davidbyrne  davidbowie  rudolfnureyev  mikhailbaryshnikov 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Sarah Hendren on Vimeo
"Design for Know-Nothings, Dilettantes, and Melancholy Interlopers – Translators, impresarios, believers, and the heartbroken—this is a talk about design outside of authorship and ownership, IP or copyright, and even outside of research and collaboration. When and where do ideas come to life? What counts as design? Sara talks about some of her own "not a real designer" work, but mostly she talks about the creative work of others: in marine biology, architecture, politics, education. Lots of nerdy history, folks."
sarahendren  eyeo2016  2016  eyeo  dilettantes  interlopers  translation  ownership  copyright  collaboration  education  marinebiology  architecture  design  research  learning  howwelearn  authorship  socialengagement  criticaldesign  thehow  thewhy  traction  meaning  place  placefulness  interconnectedness  cause  purpose  jacquescousteau  invention  dabbling  amateurs  amateurism  exploration  thinking  filmmaking  toolmaking  conviviality  convivialtools  ivanillich  impresarios  titles  names  naming  language  edges  liminalspaces  outsiders  insiders  dabblers  janeaddams  technology  interdependence  community  hullhouse  generalists  radicalgeneralists  audrelorde  vaclavhavel  expertise  pointofview  disability  adaptability  caseygollan  caitrinlynch  ingenuity  hacks  alinceshepherd  inclinedplanes  dance  pedagogy  liminality  toolsforconviviality  disabilities  interconnected  interconnectivity 
august 2016 by robertogreco
2016 AICP Sponsor Reel - Dir Cut on Vimeo
"Method Design was tapped by production company RSA to concept and create this year’s AICP Sponsor Reel. The AICP awards celebrate global creativity within commercial production. Method Design wanted to create an entertaining piece of design that encapsulates the innovative and prolific nature of this industry. Our aim was to showcase the AICP sponsors as various dancing avatars, which playfully reference the visual effects used throughout production. Motion capture, procedural animation and dynamic simulations combine to create a milieu of iconic pop dance moves that become an explosion of colorful fur, feathers, particles and more.

CREDITS

Client: AICP/RSA
Project: 2016 AICP Sponsor Reel
Concept, Design & Direction: Method Design
Director: Rupert Burton
Creative Director: Jon Noorlander
Art Director: Johnny Likens
Production: Method Studios NY
Producer: Adrienne Mitchell
VFX: Method Studios
Houdini FX Artist: Tomas Slancik
Houdini FX Artist: Vraja Parra
Rigger: Ohad Bracha
Motion Capture: House of Moves
Music: Major Lazer - Light It Up (Remix)
design.methodstudios.com "

[via: http://kottke.org/16/06/motion-capture-dance-madness ]
video  dance  motioncapture  cgi 
june 2016 by robertogreco
That B.E.A.T. on Vimeo
"(Official Selection: SXSW 2014)
New American Noise. New Orleans. Bounce Music.
Director: Abteen Bagheri"
bounce  dance  music  neworleans  nola  abteenbagheri  documentary  film  2014 
february 2016 by robertogreco
The Tamborzão Goes to Thailand — Chrysaora Weekly — Medium
"It started with a WeChat Sight I received from my mom at 7 a.m. one morning. I squinted sleepily at the silent preview, amused by the elderly Asian woman’s adorable dance moves. Then the music kicked in, and I woke up fast. The woman was dancing on a sidewalk somewhere in Thailand, but the Portuguese rapping and the beatbox beat were unmistakably Brazilian.

This is the kind of world-spanning electronic music thing I live and skip meals for. I spent all my free time over the next two weeks investigating.

*********

The music I care about the most hasn’t settled on an umbrella label, but I know it when I hear it. To generalize wildly: it’s the kind produced by and for young people using pirated software all over the world. It’s loud enough to be its own drug, with a heavy foundation of bass to give people something to gyrate to at dance parties. It’s released online with file names that end in “FINAL DRAFT 05–12.mp3,” and is also sometimes sold in homemade mix CDs by street vendors. Often, it’s raunchy and violent enough to incite moral panic.

Well-made dance music, like design, is a highly functional form of art created in conversation with those who enjoy it. New songs are tested live at parties, often well before they’re finished, and co-evolve alongside the dance forms and fashions they accompany. Many of the genres are so tied to spaces that they’re named after their venues: dancehall, ballroom, or just (Baltimore/Jersey) “club.” The lyrics and instrumentals of the music are prone to sampling, soaking up references to mainstream music, pop culture, current events, and tech with in record turnaround time. The tracks are raw glimpses into their birthplaces, each one reflecting the place not as it was or as it would like itself to be, but as it is in the instant it’s made.

Though the sounds and contexts of these musical genres differ from place to place, they share a lot in common these days: production tools (Ableton Live, Fruity Loops, Roland drum machines), distribution platforms (SoundCloud, YouTube), and demographics (kids who want to party). These commonalities have allowed these regional club scenes to find, borrow from, and even work with each other. The dynamics of this interplay mostly reflect the globalization that connected the world in the first place, with European and American labels acting as brokers and gatekeepers. But occasionally an unexpected cross-pollination appears— like a Thai grandmother dancing to Brazilian music on the sidewalk."



"IRL, dances take place in hard-earned public spaces ruled — and sometimes run — by young people. These dance floors are important liminal spaces where identities and communities can be explored, normalized, and established, and where young people can simply have unsupervised, escapist fun with their peers.

Online, dance floors are asynchronous and global. People share videos of themselves dancing — sometimes in groups, often in their bedrooms or living rooms — and watch each other’s videos in turn to learn new moves or just to take a hit of contagious joy straight to the amygdala.

“Kawo Kawo” itself is not the pinnacle of music production, but it’s remarkable both as the result of an unlikely global discourse and as the rallying call for some incredible dance videos. It’d be overly naïve to claim that dance music alone can breed some kind of universal empathy, but in the success of “Kawo Kawo” I see a glimmer of hope for new global connections born in the rapture of music rather than in the trauma of colonialism.

When the sun is hot and the music is blasting, whether it’s during Songkran or Carnaval, anything seems possible."
christinaxu  2015  music  global  thailand  brasil  brazil  dance  internetonline  youtube  soundcloud  wechat  facebook  international  kawokawo  djchois  mcjairdarocha  crosspollination  remixing 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Mbongwana Star: Kala | NOWNESS
"​Confounding African musical traditions with the Democratic Republic of Congo supergroup

Mbongwana Star hail from Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s heaving capital, and the pulsating energy of “Kala” channels the nation’s rhapsodic heritage as the birthplace of kwasa kwasa rhythms and soukous dance music. 

The mercurial group’s origins can be traced back to world music stars Staff Benda Bilili, a 10-piece band of local street musicians who saw a stratospheric rise from early hardships with homelessness and polio to headlining London’s Royal Albert Hall in 2012. Following their split in 2013, the band’s Coco Ngambali and Theo Nsituvuidi called upon younger musicians, and Liam Farrell, aka Doctor L, an Irish producer known for collaborating with Afrobeat legend Tony Allen. 

Mbongwana translates as “change” and the band's disparate elements collide in a self-styled new genre: “space-afro punk-rock electro.” Ngambali and Nsituvuidi’s tongue-twisting vocals float above Doctor L’s post-punk distortion and relentless sounds of the townships."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJCwfjl_sXc ]
congo  africa  drc  music  dance  kinshasa  kala  mbongwanastar  theonsituvuidi  cocongambali  staffbendabilili  liamfarrell  doctorl  tonyallen  afrobeat 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Sacerdote - FALASTE O QUE music video on Vimeo
[Also on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M110x-d3xgc

"Artist Mc Sacerdote, Dama Linda and DJ Neli-T:
Song track Falaste o qué
Directed by Benjamin Taft & Teddy Goitom
Lineproducer: Hugo Salvaterra
Production by
Stocktown & Geração 80

Stocktown's own Teddy Goitom & Benjamin Taft and Hugo Salvaterra of local co-production team Geração 80 joined forces with Mc Sacerdote, to shoot a spontaneous music video for a track he had recorded just days earlier. The sun was scorching and the music blasted out of the sound system at deafening levels as the whole neighborhood of Sambizanga showed up to be a part of the experience. Dance crews showed up and stopped traffic in streets as they danced on top of moving vehicles.

Teddy Goitom & Benjamin Taft pour Stocktown et Hugo Salvaterra de l'equipe locale de co-production Geração 80 ont reuni leurs forces avec Mc Sacerdote pour filmer une vidéo spontanée d'un morceau enregistré quelques jours auparavant. Le soleil etait brulant et la musique souflée hors du sound system à des niveaux assourdissants, car tout le musseke quartier de Sambizanga est apparu pour faire partie de l'experience. L'equipe de dance arrivée peu aprés a arrété la circulation pour dancer sur les véhicules en mouvement.

Directed by Benjamin Taft & Teddy Goitom
Lineproducer: Hugo Salvaterra

Production by
Stocktown & Geraco 80"

More info: http://www.okayafrica.com/news/video-sacerdote-falaste-o-que/ ]
scaerdote  mcsacerfdote  africa  angola  luanda  sambizangamusic  dance  kuduro  2012  video  stocktown  damalinda  djneli-t  banjamintaft  teddygoitom  hugosalvaterra  geração80 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Our Favorite Poem For National Poetry Month Came From a First Grader - Studio 360
[Or as Alexis Madrigal says: "What children do to and with language is miraculous." http://tinyletter.com/intriguingthings/letters/5-intriguing-things-121

"On the last day of National Poetry Month, our favorite poem we saw all month came from an unnamed first grader:

We did the soft wind.
We danst slowly. We swrld
Aroned. We danst soft.
We lisin to the mozik.
We danst to the mozik. 
We made personal space."
poems  poetry  language  children  2014  alexismadrigal  music  dance 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Murmur – Sorting out Dyslexia | Ars Electronica Blog
"Aakash Odedra: Murmuration literally means when a flock of birds come together. They create a swarm. And the swarm changes the shape and size. What we have found in our research is, when you look at an object optically it’s transferred in your brain and the idea of the image starts to change. So this changing of reality, this capacity to be able to change objects, is what we want to also explore as well. Murmur basically is this idea of this flock, but the flow becomes very singular and then it divides again. How is it possible that one starling which is very intelligent as an individual then flies into a mass and then the dynamic of this one bird changes the mass? Basically it is this experience of dyslexia…

Lewis Major: Dyslexia was a starting point but this is from the very beginning what we’ve wanna make this about. In essence it’s the experience with dyslexia. The piece become the story of the individual finding its way through the world and learning to deal as with the way they see the world.

Aakash Odedra: Also, the common notion of dyslexia is even subconsciously challenged. Through research we found out that the speed of thinking of the brain of dyslectics becomes multiplied to 400 to 2.000 times. And then it becomes difficult to keep up. There is a pathway the individual has to find. And this piece is really about finding a pathway. Generally, in life everybody has to find a pathway to whatever the success may be. But this piece starts with the idea of dyslexia but then you find pathway to create a world or an universe which becomes relatable to everyone.

Lewis Major: Dance and technology, it’s not a completely new thing but I think the way we have come to work with Ars Electronica is perhaps a different way with approaching technology through a live performance. Because it has been such a collaborative exploration of dyslexia, the main theme of the piece. It’s not just about putting some pretty images on a dance piece. The dance is trying to say something and challenge peoples with ideas and concepts. Conceptions about dyslexia and I guess in a way in some sense dance. We are trying to use the technology to make what we say louder and make it bigger. Aakash is the only dancer and it’s a big space to fill in a lot of ways and a big bunch of ideas we are trying to explore using technology to accentuate those ideas and to extrapolate the concepts. This is the reason why we want to work with Ars Electronica Futurelab.

Aakash Odedra: If you look at technology and the computers we have, there is a system. In dance we also have a system as well. What often happens when we are using technology and dance that these systems seem to be separated. So there is technology and there is dance. But what’s important in this piece is that we want to integrate the two systems. The system of human thinking and dance, and the physicality of the body, and mechanics and the technology we have. And also to bring objects in space virtually. We live in world fully of technology and we use it all the time. Sometimes it’s also a virtual world we create which becomes sometimes one dimensional. But just to be able to enter into this world, to bring these two elements together, and to create this three dimensional universe that can be relatable to people. That is something we are trying to achieve with this project.

Lewis Major: The idea of the reality that we live in and also the idea of this surreal universe we live inside our head, this I think is a very good point: Technology can add this surreal element.

Aakash Odedra: Technology can give you an insight into the mind, not what’s happening in the mind exactly but it just allows you to create a window of imagination. Which is what we are trying to do with this piece: To allow a person also enter the world of imagination through technology."
2014  dyslexia  dance  aakashodedra  lewismajor  technology  mind  brain  via:jenlowe 
april 2014 by robertogreco
senselab: a laboratory for thought in motion
"The Sense Lab is a laboratory for thought in motion

The Sense Lab is composed of artists, academics, researchers, dancers, writers. We work together to explore the active passage between research and creation. We consider research to be creation in germ, and creation to produce its own concepts for thought.

Erin Manning founded the Sense Lab in 2004 in an effort to conceive a working and thinking environment for the creation of new modes of encounter. Since then, we’ve held monthly reading groups as well as a bi-monthly speaker-series entitled Bodies-Bits///Corps-Données which is a platform for the exploration of work in progress both local and international.

We host a series of international events under the rubric Technologies of Lived Abstraction. This event series was conceived as a vehicle for the exploration of modes of participation that take thought as their laboratory for creative practice and creative practice as a platform for thought. Our first event, Dancing the Virtual (2005), focused on the movements of thought through the prism of relational movement and philosophy. Housing the Body, Dressing the Environment (2007) was composed around platforms for relation that activated the constellation architecture-body-environment-thought. Society of Molecules (2009) invites participants to plan local micropolitical “molecules” engaging in aesthetico-political interventions in a distributive participatory model.

Since 2008, we have started hosting residencies. We welcome approaches to research-creation that seek to open thought."
senselab  art  creation  creativity  research  erinmanning  dance  writing 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Sigur Rós: Valtari - NOWNESS
"Two isolated individuals carnally collide in Swedish director Christian Larson’s collaboration with Antwerp-born choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui for the orchestral rockers Sigur Rós. "The dancers copy each other’s movements and flow into one another," Cherkaoui explains of the sensual ritual. The video is the 14th in the Valtari Mystery Film Experiment, a series commissioned by the Icelandic band to herald the release of their new album Valtari, giving filmmakers such as Ryan McGinley total creative freedom yet the same budget to interpret the record. Larson, also a trained dancer, has directed commercials for brands like Absolut and Roche Bobois as well as music videos for Tinie Tempah and Swedish House Mafia; for this film he chose four different tracks from Sigur Rós' recent release: "Ekki Múkk", "Valtari", "Rembihnútur" and "Varúð". Cherkaoui, who worked on projects with the Royal Danish Ballet, Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet and Anthony Gormley before starting his own company, Eastman, in 2010, enlisted Australian dancers James O’Hara and Nicola Leahey for this stirring piece. “There was an interesting contrast with this very harsh environment,” explains Larson of the fluid choreography for the film, shot in a disused MOD base. “I wanted to try and make a dialogue through movement, without anyone saying anything.""
sigurrós  sigurros  iceland  dance  video  christianlarson  sifilarbicherkaoui  valtari  2012  via:greatdismal 
october 2013 by robertogreco
New Degrees of Freedom
"Did cyberspace mix up your circadian rhythm? Have you lost your mind to the global brain? Do you energetically perpetuate an economy of boundaryless social and working life? Experiencing an “investiture crisis”? The physical world looks different against the landscape of the Internet. Immeasurable digital choices mark our bodies; frustrates them. Can we live our online projections? Have you ever considered “power dressing” by means of a real-life avatar?

--

Throughout time, from wheel to book to clothing, humans have created mediating technologies to extend their physical or mental faculties.

Early Internet mediums reached out for autonomous space and flexible identity. In these virtual confines, one could present oneself as one imagined oneself to be; projection and representation became flattened. One could be many things and in many places at the same time.

Such affordances, or cyber-body freedom, have gradually disappeared as cyberspace has shifted away from a text-based environment dominated by user-generated role-playing and chat environments where anonymity and invented identities prevailed. The space has now become a visual arena where we are subject to constant imaging, surveillance, and the workings of information economy.

In effect, every new link between one’s online and offline identities removes a “degree of freedom”—each connection subsequently severs a limb from one’s Internet avatar. Multiple simultaneous lives, accelerated to Internet speed, incrementally meet their deaths; minds, metamorphosed into a global brain, are disconnected.

In the computer room, one finds oneself with a single body whose functional capacity exists in one point in space and time. And while humans are typically seen as psychophysical entities, limited by the frame of the body, this condition no longer seizes us in our self-understanding.

If the body cannot be emancipated online—indeed the Internet has proved to be not virtual enough—let us imagine new modes of existence in the physical world. Perhaps we should stretch out from the confines of what has become a normative space and start a process of self-actualization (again) inside human bodies. For this, we need a series of aberrant identifications beyond social essences—ones connected to us by way of names, titles, and degrees. We need to use bodily production and exchange beyond our structural limits, determining new zones within known space.

It is time to assume physical formlessness.

--

Like amoebas or acrobats, real-life avatars strive for autonomy in time and space by means of shape shifting. They demonstrate new ways of living in bodies—such as lending one’s body to another, being nebulously anywhere, or constantly reassembling—thus augmenting the presence of those that they represent.

The project of the real-life avatars operates twofold. On the one hand, they represent a precarious social and working life made of flesh—a critical illustration, exaggerating existing power relations through to their logical end point. On the other hand, they reappropriate the means of immaterial production, connecting bodies and minds in subversive ways—a means to self-actualize, or take time off, offline, off time.

--

New Degrees of Freedom is a media project by Jenna Sutela, with graphic designer Johanna Lundberg and collaborators."

[See also: http://www.twinfactory.co.uk/index.php/jenna-sutela-space-time-and-the-body/ ]
jennasutela  johannalundberg  internet  identity  freedom  art  avatars  movement  dance  newmedia  multimedia  offline  online  2013  form  formlessness  circadianrythms  cyberspace  immaterialproduction 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Parangolés – Wikipédia
"Os Parangolés, do artista brasileiro Hélio Oiticica, é um conjunto de obras que nasceu, segundo o próprio artista, de "uma necessidade vital de desintelectualização, de desinibição intelectual, da necessidade de uma livre expressão"."

[See also http://www.digestivocultural.com/colunistas/coluna.asp?codigo=856&titulo=Parangole:_anti-obra_de_Helio_Oiticica and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zTJDCugNB4 and
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/17/arts/design/17oiti.html?pagewanted=all and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9lio_Oiticica ]

"He also created works called Parangolés which consisted layers of fabric, plastic and matting intended to be worn like costumes but experienced as mobile sculptures. The first parangolés experiences were made together with dancers from the Mangueira Samba school, where Oiticica was also a participant."
heeliooiticica  paranolés  art  ncmideas  glvo  wearables  wearable  tropicália  brasil  brazil  gruponeoconcreto  dance  fabric  textiles  artists  costumes  sculpture  openstudioproject 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Tobias Revell on the future of art and design at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale, 24 May 2013 on Vimeo
"Tobias Revell outlines how the willing acceptance and grasping of uncertainty has led to a new way of thinking in the present and a resurgence of romantic futurism. He gives specific examples of solutions outside of a 'grand plan', new production methods that liberalise and free design and art from larger systems. He shows how science-fiction imagery and fantasy have penetrated the arts.
Opening lecture at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale on 24 May 2013, Enschede, the Netherlands."
tobiasrevell  2013  art  design  designfiction  futurism  systems  towatch  artez  uncertainty  video  debate  reflection  critique  change  futures  kickstarter  bitcoins  makerbot  3dprinting  reprap  globalvillageonstructionset  opensource  opensourceecology  cohenvanbalen  thomasthwaites  manufacturing  control  consumption  economics  systemsthinking  bigdog  robots  technology  normalization  marsone  uncannyvalley  spacetravel  space  film  nasa  hierarchy  music  vincentfournier  prosthetics  evil  googleglass  internetofthings  superflux  dance  computing  data  anabjain  iot 
june 2013 by robertogreco
75 Watt - COHEN VAN BALEN
"A product is designed especially to be made in China. The object’s only function is to choreograph a dance performed by the labourers manufacturing it.

The project seeks to explore the nature of mass-manufacturing products on various scales; from the geo-political context of hyper-fragmented labour to the bio-political condition of the human body on the assembly line. Engineering logic has reduced the factory labourer to a man-machine, through scientific management of every single movement. By shifting the purpose of the labourer’s actions from the efficient production of objects to the performance of choreographed acts, mechanical movement is reinterpreted into dance. What is the value of this artefact that only exists to support the performance of its own creation? And as the product dictates the movement, does it become the subject, rendering the worker the object?

The assembly/dance took place in Zhongshan, China between 10-19 March 2013 and resulted in 40 objects and a film documenting the choreography of their assembly."
via:bopuc  2013  75watt  china  manufacturing  factories  labor  choreography  assembly  objects  cohenvanbalen  art  revitalcohen  tuurvanbalen  biology  technology  design  electronics  dance 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Margaret Noble
"I create experimental, interdisciplinary installations and performances. I use found and designed objects with time-based media to activate environments. My work is influenced by the power of sound and visual media to trigger human beings to physically move their bodies through gesture and dance. I push myself to create visceral moments; I work towards activating imaginations.

Underneath my art practices lies a series of narratives. These stories explore environments, societies and the problems of communication. My work plays with time travel as I move between historical myths and future fantasies. I use symbolic sound, image and text to uncover the manipulations of mankind upon nature, space and itself."

[See also:
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/mar/24/Museum-of-Contemporary-Art-San-Diego-Noble/
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jun/16/MCASD-Noble/
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jul/07/captured-soundscape-taps-the-pulse-of-a/
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/aug/11/San-Diego-Foundation-Margaret-Noble/ ]
margaretnoble  art  sandiego  interdisciplinary  installation  performance  narrative  sound  dance  mcasd 
march 2013 by robertogreco
artists in the classroom (12-13) [A great use of Tumblr as a teaching tool.]
"My virtual workspace: a place where I scrapbook field notes, lesson plans, performance pieces, reflections, info, articles, noticings, documentations, points of inspiration, and general musings from my fourth year of work as an itinerant dance teaching artist in the San Francisco Unified School District. (2012 - 2013)"

[Previous years:
http://artistsintheclassroom3.tumblr.com/
http://artistsintheclassroom2.tumblr.com/
http://artistsintheclassroom.tumblr.com/ ]

[See also:
http://jakeytoor.com/
http://jakey.pbworks.com/ ]
art  dance  scrapbooks  sanfrancisco  fieldnotes  tumblr  teaching  education  jakeytoor  via:triciawang 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Hallowgreen | Art21 Blog
"While we often think of contemporary art and how our older students might respond to it, we are always pleased that our very youngest students are so enthusiastic about it, too. Nick Cave is one reason why.

Cave, chair of the Department of Fashion Design at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, brings together his interests in fashion, performance and sculpture while making reference to African ceremonial costumes. Watch a video of Nick Cave, produced by United States Artists:"
nickcave  performance  performanceart  sewing  costumes  classideas  tcsnmy  art  fashion  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  design  glvo  wearable  textiles  sound  dance  sculpture  soundsuits  fabric  crossdisciplinary  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Nick Cave Lecture at Fowler Museum, Jan. 9, 2010 on Vimeo
"A lecture presentation by Nick Cave about his signature Soundsuits is followed by a conversation between Nick Cave and the Fowler Museum's director Marla C. Berns about the global resonances in the artist's work.

This event was organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Nick Cave: Meet Me At The Center Of The Earth" which is on view at the Fowler Museum at UCLA January 10 - May 30, 2010."
costumes  music  masks  nickcave  art  performance  fowlermuseum  ucla  lectures  conversations  2010  textiles  wearable  performanceart  sewing  sound  soundsuits  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  artists  expression  design  dance  sculpture  fabric  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago: Profiles: Nick Cave
"My work, clothing & fiber-based sculptures, collages, installations, & performances, explore use of textiles & clothing as conceptual modes of expression & pose fundamental questions about human condition in social & political realm…

I believe that what happens in my studio & living life as an artist are the single most important things I bring to the classroom. Artists must design their own pathways, work through plateaus in their work & understand that they will find themselves humbled by the very process of art-making.

I encourage my students to build their work w/ conviction, come face-to-face w/ truth of what they are attempting to create, & be open to experimentation.

I have been lucky to have been mentored by talented artists who taught me to challenge myself & build level of confidence & trust in my creative judgment…I hope to provide my students w/ knowledge that their art making holds the possibility for acting as a vehicle for change on a larger, global scale."
nickcave  art  performance  textiles  classideas  performanceart  design  collage  assemblage  life  living  teaching  education  learning  artists  glvo  cv  sound  interactive  sculpture  installation  expression  humancondition  society  politics  sensemaking  experimentation  doing  making  understanding  self  confidence  trust  wearable  fabric  sewing  change  costumes  dance  soundsuits  tcsnmy  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  pedagogy  howwework  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Art - Nick Cave, Dreaming the Clothing Electric, at the Yerba Buena Center - NYTimes.com
"Over the last decade Mr. Cave has become known for making colorful, extravagant sculptures with this kind of double life: they can stand alone in galleries as visually compelling art objects, or they can be worn by dancers as vehicles for sound and movement. He calls them Soundsuits.

Some Soundsuits, like a bouquet of metal toys and tops perched on top of a bodysuit made of crocheted hot pads, make a clanking commotion. Others, like the Soundsuits made of human hair (bought already dyed from a wholesaler in New York), tend to fall in the quiet, whispery range. All come to life in performance.

Yerba Buena’s director, Kenneth Foster, who described his institution as “deeply multidisciplinary,” called Mr. Cave a natural choice for the center for that reason. “So many visual artists cross over in a way that the performance world would be aghast at,” he said. “Nick is one of the rare artists as strong in his secondary field as he is in his home art form.”"
nickcave  design  performanceart  performance  dance  art  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  costumes  sound  soundsuits  2009  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  fabric  sewing  textiles  wearable  sculpture  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Soundsuits of Nick Cave: Contemporary Art or Material Culture? : Bad at Sports
"My own lack of familiarity  with Cave’s work makes me wonder, though: Why is Cave’s show traveling to the Fowler Museum, which is a museum of cultural history, and not an art museum that has an equally strong ability to support and exhibit interdisciplinary art of this nature, like, say, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) or even UCLA’s “other” arts institution, the white-hot Hammer Museum*?"
art  fashion  costumes  design  sound  nickcave  fowlermuseum  ucla  2009  classification  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  wearable  performanceart  performance  sewing  soundsuits  dance  sculpture  fabric  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
San Diego Dance Theater
"Founded in 1972 as a 501(c)3 professional company, the San Diego Dance Theater (SDDT) has for 39 years enriched the cultural life of San Diego through countless dance concerts and training for young dancers. Jean Isaacs was appointed Artistic Director in 1997 and under her direction, SDDT has earned its reputation as a company of fully-professional dancers committed to unconventional and deeply courageous programming which expands access to the stage for dancers of many nationalities, races, ages, and physical abilities. We are best known for our cross-border projects, our site-specific Trolley Dances, our summer dance workshops, and for the sheer beauty of our dancers."
music  sandiego  modern  theater  dance  glvo  tcsnmy 
may 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - Royston Maldoom - Vertrauen, Leidenschaft, Tanz, Pädagogik [Rhythm Is It]
"I think what children respond to in education at all ages is passion and people who want to share that passion and their experience with them. So, I don't usually use the word education. I call it adults sharing their passion and experience with children."

"There is a very strong case for getting artists into schools, but I don't think it's just artists. Schools should be porous. Children should be able to go out and others should be able to come in whether its carpenters, businessman, dancers, whatever. For me, school should be a meeting place, and not a ghetto where you take a child and say, "Despite the fact that everything of real interest is happening outside, you are going to sit there for the next fifteen years and we are going to educate you in isolation.""
arts  dance  education  roystonmaldoom  passion  tcsnmy  trust  teaching  learning  via:cervus  porous  schools  schoolascommunitycenter  realworld  explodingschool  openschools 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Dancing Towards Uncertainty - Notes from the Classroom - GOOD
"Brandon did not have a formal education of any kind until the 4th grade (his parents were content to let him run around in woods), he still managed to get higher scores on more AP tests than any student in the history of our school...since it is my job, I told him to stay in school, work hard, & climb ladder...Brandon, however, does not want the ladder. He wants to dance.

&...I want to join him. I, too, am tired of the coldly constructed educational approach that demands a clear answer to every question. I believe that before growth can happen there has to be a period of doubt & uncertainty. Certainty kills innovation, & while I need a degree of certainty in the surgeon poking around in my brain or the pilot flying my plane, I also hope that somewhere along the line they have learned how to be creative. When problems develop for which they have been provided no textbook answer, I need them to be able to step back, take a breath, & lose themselves in the dance of the moment."
certainty  uncertainty  art  dance  education  learning  passion  talent  highschool  genius  unschooling  design  deschooling  society  ratrace  challenge  tcsnmy  lcproject  creativity  problemsolving  criticalthinking  teaching  purpose 
june 2010 by robertogreco
handa gote
"the research and development of czech performance group, handa gote, is based on
art  diy  handagote  performance  dance  cargocult  glvo  edg  srg  sound  assemblage  theater  post-dramatictheater  craft 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Nico Muhly » Wormhole
"Did everybody process Michael Jackson dancing to R. Kelly: [video here] There is, in this video, one of the most amazing ten seconds of dance I have ever seen; it’s like Butoh and Tallis Cadences all at once. Watch the hands: he starts with these tight fists held close to the chin, and slowly slackens them. The left hand opens up and slowly falls, and then the right hand opens up, angles itself, and does a quick “come here” gesture. That gesture focuses the entire torso & head: watch as everything quickly tightens and the upper lip gets taut! It’s soooo good, and I love where it happens in the phrase: it’s in the beginning of the second bar of a four bar phrase, which is about as random a place as possible to put an accent — it’s like having a wild and crazy night out on a Tuesday rather than Friday. <3 Michael."
michaeljackson  dance  nicomuhly  music 
july 2009 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » The importance of being a dork
"my blanket prescription for making friends in other countries: Your best chances to connect with people in other cultures...eating, drinking, playing music, dancing, playing football (soccer)...“play with kids”...Are plane tickets the first ingredient in these equations? Do they need to be? I live just north of Pittsfield, MA, a city of fewer than 50,000 people. For years, the city has held an annual Ethnic Fair...My guess is that there’s an opportunity for me to learn something about Brazilian culture beyond enjoying the two Brazilian restaurants that have opened in town. I suspect it involves losing fifty pounds and playing soccer in a local league. Or putting on my best clubbing clothes and hanging out at Latin Night on Saturday at the Ecuadorian restaurant and dance club. I haven’t done either, and I find myself wondering if part of the equation is that I’m more comfortable looking like a dork in Dakar than in Pittsfield."
learning  culture  travel  ethanzuckerman  society  internet  psychology  music  communication  world  glvo  cv  local  immigration  inhibition  myexperience  sports  food  dance  children  immersion 
may 2009 by robertogreco
ArtPower
"ArtPower! at UC San Diego builds creative experiences in music, dance, film, exhibition and food for our collective pleasure and inspiration. We engage diverse audiences through vibrant, challenging, multi-disciplinary performances by emerging and renowned international artists. Through extensive partnerships, ArtPower! provides exciting opportunities for research, participation, and creation of new work, igniting powerful dialogue between artists, students, scholars and the community."
art  sandiego  glvo  performance  performingarts  dance  film  music  ucsd 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Nick Cave’s Soundsuits : Bad at Sports
"Nick Cave’s Soundsuits are fabulous creations made of thrift store finds, twigs, plastic bags, discarded thcotchkes, and just about anything else that strikes his fancy. Children loved seeing his work and guessing the materials they were made from, and seeing a video presentation of people inhabiting them. They enjoyed learning about his process, too. Often, Cave’s Soundsuits are assembled by a multigenerational, multicultural group of volunteers in his Chicago neighborhood.”

[see also: http://blog.art21.org/2008/10/29/hallowgreen/ ]
nickcave  children  art  glvo  wearable  via:regine  sound  dance  performance  recycling  costumes  design  sculpture  soundsuits  sewing  classideas  tcsnmy  fabric  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  performanceart  wearables 
december 2008 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » Cultural appropriation of the kick-ass kind
"Performing haka in north Texas isn’t an act of random cultural appropriation. The offensive and defensive lines of the Trojans are filled with Tongan players, representing 4,000 people of Tongan descent who live in town of 52,900. The size, speed and skill of these players has a lot to do with the emergence of Trinity as a football powerhouse - in a recent NPR piece on the team, one coach of the team remarked that his offensive line currently outweighed that of Washington Redskins...What’s fascinating to me is the way in which the Haka made it into Euless...wasn’t through elders communicating a dance tradition to children. Instead, some of the players watched the New Zealand rugby team perform the haka on YouTube and began learning the moves in a local park. With the permission and blessing of the local Tongan community, they began performing the dance at community events. It later worked its way onto the football field, where it’s become a critical part of Trinity football culture."
society  culture  sports  football  dance  haka  ethanzuckerman  via:migurski  yotube  culturalappropriation 
october 2008 by robertogreco
SignOnSanDiego.com -- Amid Tijuana's violence, cultural pulse is vibrant
"Even as a surge in violent crime has badly shaken Tijuana residents, the city's artists have pushed forward with concerts, festivals, book readings, art shows, and theater and dance performances. Their achievements reveal the vibrant side of this city of
tijuana  mexico  sandiego  art  culture  dance  music  theater 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Take a Chance . . . Let Them Dance: Validating Artistic Expression | Edutopia
" We have to rethink the fundamental principles on which we're educating our children. And the only way we'll do it is by seeing our creative capacities for the richness they are, and seeing our children for the hope they are. Our task is to educate our w
education  creativity  dance  engagement  innovation  kenrobinson  research  schools  learning  children  arts  edutopia  writing  play 
may 2008 by robertogreco
FUERZABRUTA
from one of the original De La Guarda creators
argentina  percussion  performance  theater  dance  art 
march 2008 by robertogreco
The Dance of Evolution, or How Art Got Its Start - New York Times
"many of basic phonemes of art, stylistic conventions and tonal patterns, mental clay, staples & pauses with which even the loftiest creative works constructed, can be traced back to the intimate interplay between mother and child."
art  evolution  dance 
november 2007 by robertogreco
The Encyclopedia of New York Video - New York Magazine
"In our highlight reel of more than 100 vintage New York videos, CBGB never closed, James Brown never died, and Madonna is still learning how to vogue."
video  music  film  art  nyc  architecture  literature  history  dance  classical  theater 
november 2007 by robertogreco
YouTube - Crutch
"Bill Shannon, aka "Crutch Master," puts the "free" into freestyling! 7 years in the making and with over 200 hours of footage."
video  documentary  crutch  crutches  movemet  mobility  dance  body  bodies 
november 2007 by robertogreco
STREB
"Once called the Evel Knievel of dance, Elizabeth Streb’s choreography, which she calls “PopAction,” intertwines the disciplines of dance, athletics, boxing, rodeo, the circus, and Hollywood stunt-work. The result is a bristling, muscle-and-motion v

[Update 15 March 2012: Changed link to new URL http://streb.org/ See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Streb ]
acrobatics  art  body  circus  dance  performance  physical  modern  theater  nyc  brooklyn  classes  kids  children  elizabethstreb  bodies 
october 2007 by robertogreco
The Bambiest
venue for "the everyone's new clothes" by Yoshikazu Yamagata / writtenafterwards
theater  performance  japan  children  dance  tokyo  art 
october 2007 by robertogreco
cage with butoh on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"Butoh dancers as random elements in John Cage's Fontana Mix remix at the Academy of Fine Arts "
butoh  japan  dance  johncage  music  randomness  patterns 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Keepon & the BeatBots
"This video was produced by WIRED, directed by Jeff Nichols, and made with the generous participation of Spoon and the RT robot store. Watch a high-resolution version at blip.tv, and see our other videos of Keepon on YouTube, particularly the one that sta
japan  video  keepon  robots  robotics  music  dance  people  tokyo 
september 2007 by robertogreco
:: Escola São Paulo >> Uma iniciativa inovadora!
"sala de aula, biblioteca, videoteca, cdteca, dvdteca, exposições, café, restaurante, loja. pessoas e empresas, brasileiras e estrangeiras, participam do projeto por ser a escola um espaço de estudos e pesquisa. acesso gratuito a atividades. desenvolv
lcproject  schools  schooldesign  brasil  sãopaulo  design  education  alternative  culture  art  place  theater  food  dance  cafes  architecture  events  meetings  classes  space  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject  brazil 
april 2007 by robertogreco

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