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Why Should We Support the Idea of an Unconditional Basic Income? — Working Life — Medium
[Section titles: ]

"What would you do?
Didn’t they try this in Russia?
The magic of markets
Can we really improve capitalism or is this just theory?
Larger rewards lead to poorer performance.
Capitalism 2.0 sounds great and all but can we afford it?
Okay, it’s affordable… but wouldn’t people stop working?
But still, what about those few who WOULD stop working?
Why would (insert who you dislike) ever agree to this?"
universalbasicincome  capitalism  communism  economics  markets  2014  scottsantens  namibia  poverty  danielpink  productivity  power  choice  workweek  hours  thomaspiketty  psychology  motivation  canada  seattle  denver  1970s  taxes  taxation  inequality  alaska  mincome  employment  unemployment  work  labor  freedom  empowerment  ubi 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Beyond Measure Film
"Every day we hear stories about the troubles in American education: our test scores are stagnant, we’re falling behind our international peers, and our schools are failing to prepare future generations to succeed in the 21st century. For the last decade, this story – and the fear it inspires – has shaped the way we talk about our education system and informed our national education policies.

More pressure. More assessments. More of the same.

But what if the efforts we’ve been pushing so hard in our schools are actually the things that are leaving our education system worse off? What if the initiatives that narrow, standardize and pressure our school environments, are the reasons our children are less engaged in school and less prepared to be thoughtful, capable, contributing adults?

In Beyond Measure, we set out to challenge the assumptions of our current education story.

Rather than ask why our students fail to measure up, this film asks us to reconsider the greater purpose of education. What if our education system valued personal growth over test scores? Put inquiry over mimicry. Encouraged passion over rankings? What if we decided that the purpose of school was not the transmission of facts or formulas, but the transformation of every student? And what if this paradigm-shift was driven by students, parents, and educators, not by politicians and policymakers?

In Beyond Measure, we went in search of those answers and found a revolution brewing in public schools across the country. From rural Kentucky to New York City, we share the stories of schools that are breaking away from our outmoded, test-driven education culture and pioneering a new vision for our classrooms. These are schools that are asking our students to invent, to make, to think beyond their school walls, and to imagine how they can effect change in the world. These are schools that are transforming the roles of students and teachers and putting more faith in the ingenuity of our children. These are schools that see critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity as the bedrock of a good education and the key to success after graduation. And these are schools that are dramatically improving outcomes for children of all backgrounds; schools where practically every student graduates and goes on to finish college.

Beyond Measure fills a void that too many other education stories have left empty – a positive picture of what’s innovative and possible in American education when communities decide they are ready for change."

[see also: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/890507170/beyond-measure ]

[and: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/beyond-measure-revolution-starts-now-mark-phillips ]
education  change  learning  schools  2015  film  documentary  beyondmeasure  racetonowhere  vickiabeles  hightechhigh  howweteach  kenrobinson  danielpink  lindadarling-hammond  alisongopnik  yongzhao  caroldweck  children  competition  unschooling  deschooling 
january 2015 by robertogreco
My First Post on Family and Tribe | Best of Rob's Old Radio Posts
"Friday, March 28, 2003
I have been working on a research proposal to study the family and had this aha at least an aha for me today. Does the family exist anymore? So here are my musings

——————————————————————————————————————-

If we really look at the data for North America (WASPS) the family as we think of it is already dead! What I mean by the “family” is a two parent unit with at least one grandparent so that there are three generations involved all providing value to each other as a social unit in a rough world. We think that this is the family and I suspect that we think that we should hold this up as a model. Little knowing of course that for more than 4 million years we raised our children and did our work in a small 30-5 person unit that combined work and society called a tribe. Little knowing that all primates except us still use this arrangement. My aha was maybe that .our search for June Cleaver is getting in the way of the fact that June is dead and was never a good model anyway I wonder if looking for June obscures a possible return to the tribe and the deinstitutionalization at last of our western society?

What are the remnants of June today? What is the reality today? Most WASP families ( Most immigrant families still adhere to the larger extended model – by the way look at how much better their kids are doing at school) have only one parent – female (why are boys in trouble?) Very few have a grandparent in the mix and most grandparents are often not even in the same city. Elderly parents are also increasingly institutionalized. I fear that our society is becoming a society of one who interacts only with institutions and not with real people.

Children our greatest asset have become for most of us a huge economic drain. In their younger years they go to expensive daycare, they demand fashion and toys and have a closer connection to TV than to any other influence. As teens they need even more economic support: on PEI every teen has to have a car. If they go onto university the drain is even greater. Then after a few years on their own they often return home – sometime as single parents – and seek to be looked after all over again!!!! When do our children grow into adults? No wonder our wasp birthrate is below replacement. That itself is a sign of a powerful set of forces.

Tell that I am exaggerating. What do the stats tell us?

So long as we assume that the June Cleaver Family is alive, we think that we can and should go back to it. We feel guilt but we know that we cannot go back. So long as I feel that I should be somehow living my grandparent’s life, I am stuck. Here is the aspiration aspect - We want to strive for a better social unit. We can see a new model in business – the Wal-Mart response model. Can we see the new family emerging????? It must be but so long as we think that the old family is it, we won’t be able to see the new one.

Be assured that a new unit is emerging and will emerge. If we can describe it, it will become real for many people very quickly – they will aspirationally jump to a model that works. The prize is a big one for us as people, for business and for our nation.

This may then end the idea that we are only a disconnected individual whose only relationships are at work, whose children are in daycare and whose parents are in a home and whose protector is the state. For I sense that it is our growing dependence on institutions that has played a major role in why the 1950’s family has collapsed – it may also be worth studying these trends as well. It is surely important to know why we have come to this.

Putnam blames work and TV. He sees TV as a relationship blocker and as a community influence that drives a world of things over relationships and a world of passivity over exploration. I include for blame our school system where we teach the institutional Cartesian model as the main curriculum and where we deny all that we know about primate learning process. Kids who don’t fit are drugged. (30%?) I blame Daycare where we rely on a few strangers to park our small children at the most important learning period of their lives. Most of all we need to ask ourselves about the pull of the workplace out of the home where work has replaced most other relationships and has broken the bond of parent child and in many cases between spouses. Why have we put away all other relationships for those at work?

I bet that we are going to find that the tribe (a combined social and economic unit) is emerging again. You see this is the idea of Free Agent Nation where up to 50 million North Americans have left the traditional workplace and work for themselves mainly at home and who have set up networks of support for both work and social issues such as their kids and parents. I feel this among many of blogging out there who have built working relationships out of personal relationships. I have been touched at the help that I have received from many of you and I feel good that I can reach out in a way that is not possible in the traditional work place. I sense that blogging will itself create little tribes of co workers who also really care for each other. The more we work at home, the more we interact in a tribal way with our kids. I work with my son – it is my greatest joy. mainly he teaches me.

Daniel Pink I think provides us with a model for finding the new family. Pink himself went around America and discovered this group, saw its common elements and gave it a label. All of us who live like this suddenly understood what we were doing and how to do this better. We have a model and with a model we have power.

His book is having a profound impact as it enables individuals who thought that they were alone to see that theory make up a pattern. I suspect that the new family is located in this group who have healed the breach between work and life and who aspire to a living and not a paycheck. These people reject all institutions as do most of our kids. I wonder if we looked with fresh eyes that we might see that for many of us – a new family based on the tribe is emerging and that it is something that if we talk about more, will become more clear and more helpful"
robertpaterson  2003  families  economics  junecleaver  aging  elderly  children  institutions  society  relationships  interdependence  individualism  daycare  care  emotionallabor  tribes  danielpink 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Reciprocal Needs in the Employment Relation
* Reciprocal Needs in the Employment Relation

We can look at two sides of the management coin: What do the individuals get out of it? And what benefit does the whole system derive from it?

I will disregard any benefits that accrue to managers just by holding the position of managing. Those are just circular logic. Circular logic abounds in discussions of management and hierarchy. For example, consider status reports. It will be said that status reports are necessary so managers know what their employees are working on. It's circular because it treats the existence of hierarchic management as axiomatic, then demands an interaction to serve that hierarchy. In other words, I will not consider interactions that only exist to serve the structure itself.

Let's look first at the needs that an individual has as an employee. From "Drive" we see that an individual is motivated by autonomy, mastery, and purpose\cite{Pink09}. Over the long-term, these positive motivators have the greatest effect. However, they do require security and trust. A developer working on a big, change-the-world project still can't be motivated if they fear layoffs will be coming next month.

Over the short term, an individual also needs to avoid the demotivators. A bad fit in workload, autonomy, rewards, fairness, community, or values\cite{Masl97} will outweigh long-term positives by about three to one.\cite{Amab11}

I will frame these needs in the form of questions to which an individual would like to have answers.

1. "What should I be working on now?"
1. "Do I know how to do it?"
1. "Can I work in a way that I enjoy?"
1. "Am I good at what I do?"
1. "Does my work mean anything?"
1. "Can I get my work done in time?"
1. "Can I get the resources I need to do the work? (Training,
equipment, assistance.)"
1. "Am I making enough money?"
1. "Am I being treated fairly, compared to my peers in the company?"
1. "Am I being treated fairly, compared to my peers in the rest of the
industry?"
1. "How do I fit in here?"
1. "Does anybody care about me?"
1. "Does anybody care about my work?"
1. "Do I agree with my colleagues about the right ways to work, act,
and interact?"
1. "Where am I going?"
1. "Can I get there from here?"

With each of these needs, they are not met by "the company", because "the company" is not a corporeal entity: it cannot talk, think, act, or feel. Rather, each of these needs can be met by interactions with other members of the company. By the same token, if a need goes unmet, it is unmet because some important interaction is not handled.

Some questions also address relations among people. These are not questions a person would ask about themselves, but rather questions a person would ask about how to affect other people in their company:

1. "How can I deliver a hard message to X?"
1. "I believe that X is not meeting their commitments. How can I get that fixed?"
1. "How do I ensure I never work with X again?"
1. "I know that X is creating legal or financial problems. What should I do?"

We will turn now to the reciprocal side of the employment relationship, which is the needs of the system as a whole.

In order to keep functioning, the system has to be able to deal with certain issues. When I say "the system", of course I mean that the individuals in the system need a way to arrive at collectively acceptable decisions and implement those decisions.[fn::Although John Gall would disagree with me. In his view the system has ends of its
own, namely those which cause the system itself to grow.] Unfortunately, there will always be some systemic needs that are not unanimously popular. For example, you can't ask for 100% decision about the need to terminate someone's employment. It may be necessary for the company, and even good for the majority of the people, but it won't be a unanimous decision. Other decisions may involve changing the character of the system by hiring people in new skill sets or service areas or exiting service areas that many of us enjoy.

These system mechanisms can't be expressed as personal questions, since there is no "I" to voice them. I'll write these as declarations of systemic needs. In order to function and scale, the system needs mechanisms to:

1. Limit expenditures to within available resources.
1. Ensure that all needed tasks get done, not just the fun ones.
1. Incorporate new people as the company grows.
1. Correct problems that could disrupt the system.
1. Reposition within the market.
1. Converge on cultural and community standards."
via:sha  reciprocity  employment  management  relationships  motivation  hierarchy  administration  leadership  autonomy  mastery  danielpink  purpose  security  trust  care  belonging  systems  systemsthinking 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Wired 14.07: What Kind of Genius Are You?
"A new theory suggests that creativity comes in two distinct types – quick and dramatic, or careful and quiet."



"Which leads to the second gap. Consider the word genius. “Since the Renaissance, genius has been associated with virtuosos who are young.

The idea is that you’re born that way – it’s innate and it manifests itself very young,” Galenson says. But that leaves the vocabulary of human possibility incomplete. “Who’s to say that Virginia Woolf or Cézanne didn’t have an innate quality that simply had to be nourished for 40 or 50 years before it bloomed?” The world exalts the young turks – the Larrys and the Sergeys, the Picassos and the Samuelsons. And it should. We need those brash, certain, paradigm-busting youthful conceptualists. We should give them free rein to do bold work and avoid saddling them with rules and bureaucracy.

But we should also leave room for those of us who have, er, avoided peaking too early, whose most innovative days may lie ahead. Nobody would have heard of Jackson Pollock had he died at 31. But the same would be true had Pollock given up at 31. He didn’t. He kept at it. We need to look at that more halting, less certain fellow and perhaps not write him off too early, give him a chance to ride the upward curve of middle age.

Of course, not every unaccomplished 65-year-old is some undiscovered experimental innovator. This is a universal theory of creativity, not a Viagra for sagging baby boomer self-esteem. It’s no justification for laziness or procrastination or indifference. But it might bolster the resolve of the relentlessly curious, the constantly tinkering, the dedicated tortoises undaunted by the blur of the hares. Just ask David Galenson.

Conceptualists

Many geniuses peak early, creating their masterwork at a tender age ...

LITERATURE: The Great Gatsby
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Age 29

PAINTING: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon
Pablo Picasso
Age 26

FILMMAKING: Citizen Kane
Orson Welles
Age 26

ARCHITECTURE: The Vietnam War Memorial
Maya Lin
Age 23

MUSIC: The Marriage of Figaro
Wolfgang Mozart
Age 30

Experimentalists

... while others bloom late, doing their best work after lifelong tinkering.

LITERATURE: Huckleberry Finn
Mark Twain
Age 50

PAINTING: Château Noir
Paul Cézanne
Age 64

FILMMAKING: Vertigo
Alfred Hitchcock
Age 59

ARCHITECTURE: Fallingwater
Frank Lloyd Wright
Age 70

MUSIC: Symphony No. 9
Ludwig van Beethoven
Age 54"
latebloomers  creativity  genius  via:litherland  danielpink  conceptualists  experimentation  experimentalists  persistence  fscottfitzgerald  jacksonpollock  pablopicasso  orsonwelles  mayalin  wolfgangmozart  marktwain  cézanne  alfredhitchcock  franklloydwright  beethoven  davidgaleson 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Drive - by Daniel Pink | Derek Sivers
"Your best approach is to have already established the conditions of a genuinely motivating environment. The baseline rewards must be sufficient. That is, the team’s basic compensation must be adequate and fair - particularly compared with people doing similar work for similar organizations. Your nonprofit must be a congenial place to work. And the people on your team must have autonomy, they must have ample opportunity to pursue mastery, and their daily duties must relate to a larger purpose. If these elements are in place, the best strategy is to provide a sense of urgency and significance - and then get out of the talent’s way.

Any extrinsic reward should be unexpected and offered only after the task is complete. Holding out a prize at the beginning of a project - and offering it as a contingency - will inevitably focus people’s attention on obtaining the reward rather than on attacking the problem."

[via: http://gaiwan.tumblr.com/post/7206114293 ]
books  drive  danielpink  motivation  extrinsicmotivation  teams  teamwork  autonomy  nonprofit  urgency  significance  talent  work  management  administration  congeniality  howwework  nonprofits 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The purpose of gamification - O'Reilly Radar [Quotes from a comment left by Kathy Sierra. The bookmark points to that comment.]
"Many of us find gamification not offensive to game *developers* but an insult to Actual Games. And, for some of us, an insult to actual people who are the targets of gamification efforts. Not denying that they can often *work* given that slot machines work, quite well, by employing many of the same underlying principles.

If gamification were merely *not that useful* from a long-term, sustainability perspective, many of us would not care. But it risks de-valuing some of the very thing we-society, educators, developers, designers, etc. -- actually care about. In the wrong context, gamification can cause a short-term sugar rush of engagement followed by a crash from which a company's "brand" may not fully recover. Not if they ever care to have sustained engagement based on ACTUAL value…

…read every word of Dan Pink's Drive…[and] for a REAL understanding of the difference between shallow and deep engagement, read "FLOW""
gamification  gaming  kathysierra  via:preoccupations  gabezicherman  motivation  danielpink  flow  sustainability  killmenow  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  falsepromises  dangeroustrends  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Fisch Flip, or why upside down thinking can drive innovation « Re-educate Seattle
"Karl Fisch…upended typical way we think about teaching: videotaped his lectures, uploaded them to YouTube, & assigned them as homework. Then had students do what used to be homework—practice problems—in class where he walks around & gives students one-on-one help.

…Pink explains how Seth Godin proposed a Fisch Flip for book publishing industry: publishers launch new book by releasing cheap paperback, & then introduce pricey hardcover once it catches on.

Or what if movie studio released film on DVD, let word of mouth spread, then invite early adopters to watch it on big screen as communal experience?

…another: one software company has decided to throw huge party for employees on first day on job, rather than waiting for a going-away party on their last day.

This is just a start. The most forward thinking people in business are refusing to accept the rules of the previous generation. They’re challenging every assumption, & sometimes completely flipping the script."
karlfisch  danielpink  stevemiranda  sethgodin  fischflip  andysmallman  pscs  happiness  education  learning  homework  publishing  books  dvd  film  movies  business  gamechanging  pugetsoundcommunityschool 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Reflections on the valedictorian’s speech « Re-educate
"Erica Goldson can give speeches every day for the rest of her life. I can write blog posts until my fingers fall off. Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talks are indeed powerful. Alfie Kohn’s & Daniel Pink’s books are important & compelling reads. But it all remains a self-indulgent exercise unless someone builds schools—or transforms existing schools—into places that nurture kids’ intrinsic motivation to learn, & allow them to direct their own education & pursue their strengths. At some point, we need to stop talking, stop writing, & [do]…

There is something seductive about the act of rebellion. The adrenaline rush that comes from speaking truth to power can become addictive. But oing the lonely, dangerous work of actually building something new is the stuff that actually makes change. That’s the work that really matters.

My advice…find someone who’s doing work that matters & ask how you can help. We’ve got a lot that needs to get done, & we’re going to need all the help we can get."
ericgoldson  valedictorians  do  make  tcsnmy  lcproject  stevemiranda  schools  education  productivity  learning  self-directedlearning  self-directed  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  pscs  kenrobinson  danielpink  pugetsoundcommunityschool 
august 2010 by robertogreco
kung fu grippe: Episode 27: Missionless Statements
"In this special episode, Dan Benjamin talks with two of his heroes, Merlin Mann & Jeff Veen about independence, free thinking, email, productivity, & changing your game."

[There is more here (on shared values, innovation, organizations, management, entreprenuership, change, etc.) than my notes reflect—all worth the listen.]

[Video also at: http://5by5.tv/conversation/27 ]
dunbar  dunbarnumber  groupsize  classsize  productivity  management  administration  tcsnmy  lcproject  jeffreyveen  merlinmann  danbenjamin  email  communication  leadership  problemsolving  technology  enterprise  independence  freethinking  gamechanging  time  small  slow  ambientintimacy  relationships  understanding  efficiency  human  humanconnection  campfire  offhtheshelfsoftware  values  organizations  groups  sharedvalues  culture  failure  innovation  cv  risktaking  risk  freelancing  motivation  danielpink  meaning  autonomy  drive  missionstatement  vision 
july 2010 by robertogreco
My challenge to you: only speak like a human at work - Telegraph ["Companies are talking 'professionalese' to keep customers and colleagues at a distance, when what people crave is openness and honesty, argues Daniel H Pink."]
"Not too long ago, Fried saw a similar, though less calamitous, disaster in a Chicago cafe. A woman had just purchased a large cup of coffee. On the way to sit down, she tripped, and spilled the entire contents all over another customer.

Here’s what she said: “I’m so sorry. I’m so, so sorry.”

“If someone is really, truly sorry,” says Fried, “that’s how they respond.” ...

So try an experiment. For the next seven days, go monolingual and speak only human at work. Don’t say anything to your boss, your staff, your teammate, your supplier or your customer that you wouldn’t say to your spouse or your friend.

It might startle people at first. But I suspect that they’ll reply in the same vernacular – and you might start actually understanding each other and getting something done.

However, if I’m mistaken – and this test flops – I apologise in advance for any inconvenience caused."
via:lukeneff  bullshit  customerservice  human  leadership  language  learning  business  service  work  writing  wording  tcsnmy  apologies  2010  relationships  danielpink 
july 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - RSA Animate - Drive
"Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us... This lively RSA Animate, adapted from Dan Pink's talk at the RSA, illustrates the hidden truths behind what really motivates us at home and in the workplace."
rsa  autonomy  designthinking  drive  economics  engagement  motivation  psychology  danielpink  rewards  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  understanding  conceptualunderstanding  self-directedlearning  self-direction  hr  wikipedia  linux  problemsolving  criticalthinking  work  learning  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  lcproject 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Motivating Students to Get Behind the Counter
"The clarifying metaphor that strikes me, however, is that autonomy, mastery, and purpose — which are really the core ingredients of generative thinking — can be made available to students if we can get our young people out of the single-file line that has formed in front of the counter and motivate them to grab an apron and explore what’s behind the counter."
teaching  learning  autonomy  motivation  danielpink  carriezuberbuhlerkennedy  mastery  purpose  inquiry  relevance  tcsnmy  generativethinking  thinking  unschooling  deschooling  independent  caroldweck  flow  intrinsicmotivation  inquiry-basedlearning  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  choices  studentdirected  student-led  student-centered  assessment  grades  grading  effort  risktaking 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Education for Well-being » The Perfect Storm
"The total control that schools exert over task, technique, team and time ends up creating a compliant individual, ill-equipped to step into non-routine, creative tasks which require exploration, self-direction and leadership. Having had few opportunities for self-selected, authentic inquiry, these passive learners enter the work force without the skills needed for figuring things out, for dealing with ambiguity, for managing their own learning. Their learning experiences—routine tasks in highly controlled environments with specific instructions—are exactly the kind of tasks that are easily exported, commoditized, and turned into algorithms for machines to perform."
danielpink  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  control  schools  schooling  pedagogy  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  management  administration  leadership  teaching  learning  routine  self-directed  self-directedlearning  autodidacts  autonomy  lcproject  creativity  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Puget Sound Community School: PSCS spotlighted in Dan Pink's new book | Facebook
"Puget Sound Community School. Like Sudbury and Big Picture, this tiny independent school in Seattle gives its students a radical dose of autonomy, turning the 'one-size-fits-all' approach of conventional schools on its head. Each student has an advisor who acts as her personal coach, helping her come up with her own learning goals. "School" consists of a mixture of class time and self-created independent study projects, along with community service devised by the students. Since youngsters are often away from campus, they gain a clear sense that their learning has a real world purpose. And rather than chase after grades, they receive frequent, informal feedback from advisers, teachers, and peers. For more information, go to www.pscs.org."
danielpink  pugetsoundcommunityschool  pscs  progressive  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  tcsnmy  grades  grading  assessment  evaluation  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  drive  sudburyschools  bigpictureschools  autonomy 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Motivation « Re-educate
"Instead of discussing raising standards, we should be arguing the relative merits of imposing standards...Dan Pink...argues persuasively that there are 3 elements to true motivation: autonomy, mastery, & purpose. By imposing standards on kids, we’re undermining their feelings of autonomy; they’re being forced to play our game by our rules...less likely that they’ll achieve true mastery, because the standards we’ve imposed represent a minimum. Once they reach the minimum standard of competence, their work is done. & it’s hard to imagine how kids could find authentic purpose in filling in answers to a standardized test. Instead, they become cynical, viewing school as a series of banal tasks that must be endured...in 15 years of working with teenagers, I’ve never met a kid who didn’t agree that learning how to read is a good thing. Imposing standards—trying to force kids to learn to read—could be doing more harm than good. Instead, we might re-examine how we motivate students."
standardizedtesting  standards  progressive  education  deschooling  compulsory  motivation  danielpink  cynicism  lcproject  tcsnmy  mastery  purpose  reading  autonomy  self-directedlearning 
january 2010 by robertogreco
3quarksdaily: Innovative thoughts: Educating our way into the future
"There seems to be a fundamental disconnect between the skills that are increasingly being valued in the workplace and beyond and how we are educating our children from kindergarten up. Why is this? And what will it take to realign our education system to teach to the whole child and to cultivate the whole mind? I don’t claim to have an answer to this question, but I do know that it’s a valid question and one that needs to be addressed quickly and forcefully if we want our children to compete and be successful in this new world and economy. I just know that I am grateful that my children love going to school each day and are getting an education that encourages independent thought, emphasizes critical thinking and problem solving. I just wish that this kind of education was available to every child and I don’t know how we hope to continue to be at the forefront of innovation if it isn’t."
tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  progressive  education  schools  schooling  society  parenting  parentblogs  danielpink  designthinking  curriculum  standardizedtesting  future  innovation 
november 2009 by robertogreco
School's Out: Get ready for the new age of individualized education - Reason Magazine
"The Homogenizing Hopper...The Home-Schooling Revolution...Free Agent Teaching...The End of High School...A renaissance of apprenticeships...A flowering of teenage entrepreneurship...A greater diversity of academic courses...A boom of national service...A backlash against standards...The Unschooling of Adults...The devaluation of degrees...Older students...Free agent teaching...Big trouble for elite colleges...Learning groupies"
danielpink  education  learning  2001  freedom  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooling  tcsnmy  autodidactism  future  homeschool  reform  curriculum  motivation  choice  change  gamechanging  freelance  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  freelancing  colleges  universities  economics  history  demographics  work  careers  entrepreneurship  apprenticeships  lcproject  standards  testing  alternative  autodidacticism  autodidacts 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Reaching those that don't care about grades - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog
"Here's what both Pink and Kohn both tell me as an educator. If you want permanent, long-term learning or behavioral change, you won't do it with M&Ms, a special event for doing well on a test, or even saying "good job." In fact we've all known lots of kids who were plenty smart but just didn't give a damn about what little letters appeared on their report cards...Many kids, possibly a growing percentage, will only be reached through the heart, not the head. Only when they care about the topic and understand its relevance, interest and meaning to them or those they care about, will they engage...Unfortunately Arne Duncan or Barrak Obama don't understand this. At all. I'm guessing they were both "good" students for whom it was all about scores and stars."
teaching  learning  danielpink  motivation  arneduncan  barackobama  education  pedagogy  grading  grades  incentives  assessment  rewards  alfiekohn  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Dan Pink on the surprising science of motivation | Video on TED.com
"Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don't: Traditional rewards aren't always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories -- and maybe, a way forward."
danielpink  google  motivation  psychology  rewards  autonomy  management  leadership  innovation  work  education  science  economics  incentives  purpose  creativity  business  meetings  productivity  mastery  tcsnmy  grading  grades  behavior 
august 2009 by robertogreco
The Worst Book of the 21st Century - a review - Education Blog
"As I attend my 2nd conference in 2 weeks where keynote speaker is Daniel Pink, I feel duty bound to share my thoughts on why his popular pop-business book, "A Whole New Mind," may be the worst book of the 21st Century."
books  education  leadership  learning  danielpink  thomasfriedman  malcolmgladwell 
march 2008 by robertogreco
IALA: What We Teach: Questioning the Conventional
"massive disconnect between how we teach math and science and how mathematicians and scientists work....NOT the logical, left-brain symbols associated with their work... fuzzier. Intuition. Visualization. Sensation. Anthropomorphizing. Metaphors."
math  science  teaching  work  howwework  schools  universities  colleges  learning  education  lcproject  convention  curiosity  alankay  danielpink  rogerschank  kathysierra  computers  programming  music  change  reform  curriculum  methods 
july 2007 by robertogreco

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