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robertogreco : daringfireball   24

Stay small or go big?
"You see, they kept it small, just one spot, just a few tables. There'd be a line around the corner by 10 am. You see, they made a choice. Anthony and Gail made a choice to stay on Baronne Street and keep their hands on what they were serving. They cooked, everyday they cooked, until they could cook no more.

But there's also another way to approach your business:

The other choice is that you can build something big but keep it the way that you wanna keep it. Take those ideas and try to execute them to the highest level. You got a lotta people around you, right? You're the captain of the ship. Or what I should say is that you're the ship. And all these people that look up to you and wanna be around you, they're living in the ship. And they're saying, "Oh, the ship is doing good. Oh, the ship is going to some interesting places. Oh, this ship isn't going down just like all the other fucking ships I've been on." …"
leadership  directing  making  restaurants  blogging  sustainability  growth  business  johngruber  daringfireball  scaling  slow  small  anthonybourdain  treme  emerillagasse  2012  kottke  jasonkottke 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Welcome To The New Internet: Simple Design, Short Names, No Ads
"So this is one, if not the, vision for the future of the internet, and a lot of people are dedicated to making it catch on. It's an internet where every blog is Daring Fireball, where every post looks like Instapaper, where every discussion is led by its rightful leaders, and where ads are considered no better than spam. It's barren but design-forward, and, at least at the moment, kind of elitist. It's not clear how it'll make money. Maybe it won't! Maybe that's part of the idea.

But in any case, it's starting to take shape."

[via: http://www.theawl.com/2012/08/the-pretty-new-web-and-the-future-of-native-advertising ]
design  internet  web  advertising  ads  daringfireball  spam  aesthetics  2012  app.net  branch  instapaper  svbtle  medium  johnherrman 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Pretty New Web and the Future of “Native” Advertising | The Awl
"Web publishing tools" were first about easy customization, from Blogger to Livejournal, with the last big monster being Tumblr. (Though the funny thing about Tumblr is, for all the time tweens put in to tweaking their "themes," nobody really reads their sites except by the internal "dashboard." So really, Tumblr was the genius publishing tool that transitioned us into "apps.") After Twitter, that's all really over. Twitter is for sure an "app" not a "website" or a "publishing tool"—it's not something you make "look like you." You don't bring Twitter to you and make it yours, you go to it.

Now one beloved troll, I mean, VISIONARY (totally same difference, no?), is calling for the end of web pages. …

The hot word in advertising right now is "native." If I hear "native" one more time this week, oof, I swear. As with all terms in advertising, it's a word that doesn't make much sense on its face."
reading  instapaper  dashboard  daringfireball  spam  ads  income  money  business  content  feeds  pages  stockandflow  flow  branch  svbtle  medium  2012  anildash  choiresicha  tumblr  twitter  nativeadvertising 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Millsin' About
[on Evening Edition http://evening-edition.com/ ]

"In other words: stay at your “hyper-connected pieces of glass” (awful, stupid phrase) for long enough to entertain this dick’s attempt to fix journalism with a fucking newsletter on the web (and then to follow him on TWITTER, FAST WEB STYLE), but then step away and go get some artisanal whatever in your cool shirt, you jerk.

What kind of myopia could make this seem interesting? What I hate most about this tech scene: the cronyism. If Yahoo launched this, it would be LOL City, but because it’s a twat Gruber likes (part of the Twat x Twat network of Twatcasting or whatever), we have to pretend this is real?"
twatcasting  cronyism  yahoo  design  muledesign  daringfireball  johngruber  2012  millsbaker  eveningedition 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Celebrity – Marco.org
"In addition to inspiring me to be a better writer and inadvertently killing my conference-presentation confidence for a year, this famous little 2009 SXSW session leveled my juvenile notion of celebrity. After the talk, since I wasn’t allowed to leave, I was introduced to many more great people famous for their blog, software, humor, or music,3 and it went similarly well with all of them.

Among people who are well-known to subsets of internet geeks, nobody’s walking around with entourages or bodyguards…At the end of the day you still go outside and nobody knows who you are.”

…It turns out that we’re all just regular people who like similar things and are in the same little circle of interest.

So next time you’re at a geeky conference and have an opportunity to meet someone whose work you admire, just go up and introduce yourself, because they’re just a regular person, they never get “recognized” during the other 360 days each year, & they’ll probably really appreciate it."
marcoarment  celebrity  conferences  writing  merlinmann  adamlisagor  johngruber  instapaper  sxsw  daringfireball  2011  2009  presentations  introverts 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Demoted
"the key line was when Steve Jobs, describing iCloud replacing iTunes as your digital hub, said, “We’re going to demote the PC and the Mac to just be a device.”<br />
<br />
iCloud is the new iTunes. The tethered digital hub is dead; long live the wireless digital hub. Apple sees iCloud as shaping the next ten years the way the iTunes-on-your-Mac/PC digital hub shaped the last ten.<br />
<br />
This is a fundamentally different vision for the coming decade than Google’s. In both cases, your data is in the cloud, and you can access it from anywhere with a network connection. But Google’s vision is about software you run in a web browser. Apple’s is about native apps you run on devices. Apple is as committed to native apps — on the desktop, tablet, and handheld — as it has ever been.<br />
<br />
Google’s frame is the browser window. Apple’s frame is the screen. That’s what we’ll remember about today’s keynote ten years from now."
2011  google  mac  apple  stevejobs  software  icloud  daringfireball  johngruber 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Cutting That Cord
"The announcement many people seem to be waiting for is for Apple to tell iOS users they no longer need iTunes on the Mac or Windows. The announcement I’d like to see is for iOS users to no longer need to pay for MobileMe to wirelessly sync calendars, contacts — and any other small bits of data from apps from the App Store…

And those third-party iOS developers that are depending upon Dropbox…have a far better syncing experience than Apple’s own creative apps.…Google Docs has none of the UI panache, but the syncing is invisible. You just open Google Docs, and there are your files. Doesn’t matter which machine you used to edit or create them, or which machine you’re using now, they’re all just there. That’s part of the overall experience.

That’s where Apple is behind."
apple  cloud  ipad  ios  google  daringfireball  2011  cloudcomputing 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Title Junk
"That’s a good rule of thumb for designing and writing page titles: pick a name (and, for CMS templates, a pattern) that makes sense as the name of a bookmark for that page. Most bookmarking tools — the ones built into web browsers, and bookmarklets for third-party apps — do use the page title as the default bookmark name. Tools that help people tweet links to articles use the page title as the default description. So make titles useful. Write them for humans, not search engine spiders. Putting SEO keywords in the page title (a) doesn’t actually help your page’s rank in search engine indexes, and (b) makes things harder for people trying to tweet a link, bookmark your page, or scan it from a list of currently open windows and tabs in their browser. Trust the Googlebot to figure it out."
seo  web  html  webdesign  johngruber  daringfireball  titles  standards  consistency  usability  bookmarks  bookmarking  del.icio.us  webdev 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Masquerading as Mobile Safari to Get Websites to Serve HTML5 Video to Safari on Mac OS X
"whenever you run into a video player that claims to require Flash Player, invoke the Develop → User Agent → Mobile Safari 3.2.2 — iPad command. This reloads the current page, but with Safari claiming to be Mobile Safari running on the iPad. It does not change the way that Safari renders the page — i.e., it doesn’t make the desktop Safari render pages with zooming or layout differences to mimic the way Mobile Safari renders pages on the iPad. All it does is tell Safari to identify itself as Mobile Safari to the server. The result is that if the server does any sort of user-agent detection to figure out whether to serve video using Flash or HTML5, you’ll get the HTML5 version.

This trick makes video work in Safari on Mac OS X — with no Flash — from Flickr, Vimeo embeds, TED, MSNBC, and probably any other site that offers video that works on the iPad. This doesn’t work for all video, but it should work for any video that works on the iPad."
macosx  osx  safari  howto  html5  video  mac  browsers  flash  hacks  daringfireball  browser 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Visiting dConstruct 2010 | Coldbrain.
"That kinda sums up the past few years of my life. I’ve been collecting all these new interests and passions and obsessions and trying to get myself beyond ‘advanced beginner’ in all of them. It’s taking time, because being a generalist means soaking up so much information from so many areas. It’s exhausting, and I wish I had this mindset 5 or 10 years ago, so I could be that much further down the line. I have to remind myself that it is as much about the journey, though."
matthewculnane  dconstruct  2010  generalists  brendandawes  tomcoates  merlinmann  davidmccandless  samanthawarren  johngruber  daringfireball  hannahdonovan  jamesbridle  nerds  learning  process  journey  journeynotdestination  constellationalthinking  timcarmody 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Creep Executive Officer
"More and more, I get the feeling that if there’s a rift between the old “Don’t be evil” Google and the new “Let’s do whatever we want” Google, that it’s a rift between Schmidt and Larry/Sergey — if not personally, then at least culturally within the company. On the one side, the Larry/Sergey Google that makes amazing cool things — the search engine, Gmail, Android. On the other, the Schmidt Google that, in its efforts to serve ads as efficiently as possible, no longer seems concerned with the traditional Western concept of personal privacy.<br />
<br />
A lot of people seem surprised by Google’s alliance with Verizon on mobile network neutrality. That stance doesn’t fit with my view of the Larry/Sergey Google. But it fits my idea of the Schmidt Google like a glove."
ericschmidt  daringfireball  google  privacy  internet  netneutrality  2010  culture  management  johngruber 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: 4
"That FaceTime goes through Phone app, rather than dedicated FaceTime app, makes me wonder what Apple will do if I’m right that this year’s upcoming new iPod Touches will be FaceTime-capable....
2010  apple  daringfireball  iphone  ipodtouch  tcsnmy  cameras  flip  photography  facetime  video  johngruber  displays  typography  teaching  helvetica  iphone4  ios4  design 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Tynt, the Copy/Paste Jerks
"All of this nonsense — the attribution appended to copied text, the inline search results popovers — is from a company named Tynt, which bills itself as “The copy/paste company”.
daringfireball  usability  seo  spam  copypaste  attribution  javascript  webdev  publishing  wastingourtime  copyright  chrome  ads  internet  web  advertising  webdesign 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Coldbrain. (Stock, flow, generalists and specialists)
"Generalists...produce content that covers range of topics...necessarily scattershot, & people will dip in & out when content matches their own interests. But if you find a generalist whose interests match your own, it’s all gold. That’s rare.

I see good & bad examples of both approaches every day, & I bet you do too.
There’s a 3rd way, & I rather like it. It’s about producing flow relating to a range of your interests, & saving your stock for things you passionately care about...about being consistently interesting, but caring enough about your audience to spend time digging deeper into topics to create last content. It’s about treating your readers as a diverse bunch of broadly educated people, interested in reading intelligent content & commentary.

Gruber, Kottke, Merlin & so many other people that I love all do this. It’s incredibly obvious in hindsight, but until today, I hadn’t quite appreciated the subtle reasons why I like them so much. Something for us to aspire to."
matthewculnane  snarkmarket  stockandflow  robinsloan  generalists  passion  cv  writing  interesting  interestingness  curation  interested  kottke  daringfireball  merlinmann  specialists  specialization  interestedness 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: The Kids Are All Right
"He’s 13 years old and he has created (with the help of his friend, 14-year-old designer Louis Harboe) and is selling an iPad app in the same store where companies like EA, Google, and even Apple itself distribute iPad apps. His app is ready to go on the first day the product is available. Not a fake app. Not a junior app. A real honest-to-god iPad app. Imagine a 13-year-old in 1978 who could produce and sell his own Atari 2600 cartridges.

Somehow I don’t think young Mr. Kaplan sees the iPad as hurting his sense of wonder or entrepreneurism.

...

If you could go back and show my 10-year-old self an iPad — millions of colors, video, photographs, gorgeous typography, a touchscreen interface, networking (wirelessly!) — and offered to let me write web apps for it in exchange for my agreeing never to touch an Apple II again, I’m pretty sure I know what the answer would be."
daringfireball  culture  computers  tcsnmy  coding  programming  hacking  children  teens  ipad  teaching 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Yes. Another Backup Lecture. | 43 Folders
"The Holy Trinity... Seriously: * If it’s not automated, it’s not a real backup. * If it’s not redundant, it’s not a real backup. * If it’s not regularly rotated off-site, it’s not a real backup."
merlinmann  apple  macosx  mac  osx  howto  diskwarrior  daringfireball  backup  harddrive 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: An Ode to DiskWarrior, SuperDuper, and Dropbox
"However, I find terrific value in SuperDuper’s model. SuperDuper creates a bootable clone of your startup drive. With Time Machine, if your startup drive goes kaput, you’ve got to go through a lengthy restore process (and, in the case of hardware failure on the kaput drive, you need an extra bootable volume to restore to). With SuperDuper, you just plug in the clone, reboot, and you’re back up."
superduper  diskwarrior  dropbox  backup  macosx  mac  timemachine  harddrive  utilities  daringfireball  hardware  recovery  osx 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball Linked List: Hulu May Come to iPad as Paid Subscription Service
"This sort of nonsense gets to the bottom of what’s wrong with these entertainment executives’ outlook on the world. They want to define everything by arbitrary device types — this is a “TV”, that is a “computer”, this other thing is a “mobile device” — and then sell/distribute the same content to different device types separately and with no spillage. But it’s all bullshit in the digital world. It’s all just ones and zeroes and pixels. To these TV executives it makes sense to block Boxee from supporting Hulu because Boxee is for “TVs” and Hulu is only intended for “computers”. Now they’re stuck trying to figure out which arbitrary slot the iPad fits into."
hulu  boxee  ipad  computers  daringfireball  johngruber  tv  television  content  entertainment  2010  mobiledevices 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball Linked List: 'The Gadget Disappears'
"Love this line from the New York Times’s David Carr on the Charlie Rose show, regarding the iPad:
One thing you have to understand about this gadget is that the gadget disappears pretty quickly. You’re looking into pure software.

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that Carr is a business reporter, not a tech reporter. He sees the forest, not the trees. But this is really astute. I’ve been using a Nexus One Android phone for the last few weeks, and Carr’s quote summarizes the fundamental difference between Android and iPhone OS. On the iPhone, once you’re in an app, everything happens on-screen, with touch. Everything. You go outside the screen to the home button to leave the app or the sleep button to turn off the device. On Android, many things happens on screen with touch, but many other things don’t, and you’re often leaving the screen for the hardware Back, Menu, and Home buttons, and text selection and editing requires the use of the fiddly trackball. An Android gadget never disappears."
daringfireball  johngruber  ipad  invisibletechnology  iphone  interface  ui  touchscreen  buttons  apple  android  davidcarr  design 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: PastryKit
"After installing the User Guide app to your home screen and launching it from there, there’s really very little to suggest that it isn’t a native iPhone application. No MobileSafari address bar at the top, no MobileSafari toolbar at the bottom. Scrolling is fast and has momentum. It even works perfectly offline, because the contents of the user guide are stored locally in a database using HTML5."
javascript  webapp  daringfireball  webdev  programming  development  iphone  mobile  html5  pastrykit  applications  scrolling  ios  webdesign 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Copying the Wrong Thing
"What drives some people nuts about 37signals is that their products are not for everyone. But they’ll be the first ones to agree with that. Rather than trying to build things that work OK for everyone, they’re building things that work really well for some people. And how often does building something “for everyone” actually work out, anyway? The closest anyone has ever come, I think, is Google’s web search. Good luck trying to duplicate that sort of success. The key ingredient I see in successful apps, Mac or web — and, really, in creative commercial endeavors of any kind — is that the creators are building something they themselves love. That’s what you should copy."
37signals  daringfireball  software  design  creativity  development  tcsnmy  authenticity 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: That He Not Busy Being Born Is Busy Dying
"Traditions are comforting. But comfort, I think, tends not to breed innovation. It can be hard to tell whether you’re staying the course because it’s the right direction, or because you’ve dug yourself into a deep rut."
apple  stevejobs  change  innovation  traditions  daringfireball  johngruber  tradition  strategy  gamechanging 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: The iPhone 3G
"If I could travel back 20 years and show my then 15-year-old self just one thing the future of today, it would be the iPhone. It is our flying cars. Star Trek-style wireless long-distance voice communicator. The content of every major newspaper and magazine in the world. An encyclopedia. Video games. TV. Etc.
daringfireball  iphone3g  iphone  reviews  trends  future  apple  hardware  technology  mobile  software 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: There's Nothing There
"“A logo is less important than the product it signifies; what it represents is more important than what it looks like.” This holds true not just for logo marks specifically, but also in the broader, more abstract sense of brands in general. No brand is better or stronger than the products and experiences it represents. A good brand is strong because it is true, not because it is clever." Led to this: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/50802877/branding-and-authenticity-and-schools
daringfireball  branding  logos  façades  missionstatements  schools  administration  management  authenticity  product  leadership  business  organizations  marketing 
september 2008 by robertogreco

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