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robertogreco : darknet   4

Briar - Darknet Messenger Releases Beta, Passes Security Audit
"After extensive private beta tests, the first public beta of Briar was released today. Briar is a secure messaging app for Android.

Unlike other popular apps, Briar does not require servers to work. It connects users directly using a peer-to-peer network. This makes it resistant to censorship and allows it to work even without internet access.

The app encrypts all data end-to-end and also hides metadata about who is communicating. This is the next step in the evolution of secure messaging. No communication ever enters the public internet. Everything is sent via the Tor anonymity network or local networks.

With today's beta release, the Briar team also publishes the results of an independent security audit (PDF). It was performed by Cure53 who are known for their audits of SecureDrop, Cryptocat and Dovecot. Six testers took a total of thirteen days to look for flaws in Briar's cryptographic protocols and code. In their report, they state "the quality and readability of the app’s source code was rather exceptional" and highlight "a good understanding of vulnerability patterns and threats". All the issues found by the audit have been addressed in this beta release. The report concludes that Briar "is able to offer a good level of privacy and security. In other words, the Briar secure messenger can be recommended for use."

Briar's development team is looking for feedback on today's beta release. You can submit your feedback anonymously through the app or publicly in the project's issue tracker. Before the final release, changes to the peer-to-peer protocol are expected, so users will not be able to migrate their accounts to the final version. For security reasons, their accounts and data will expire with the beta."
android  messaging  applications  security  darknet  2017 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Walled Gardens & Escape Routes | Kneeling Bus
"Slack and Snapchat are two of the platforms that best embody the current technological moment, the fastest recent gainers in Silicon Valley’s constant campaign to build apps we put on our home screens and not only use constantly but freely give our locations, identities, relationships, and precious attention. One of those products is for work and one is for play; both reflect values and aesthetics that, if not new, at least differ in clear ways from those of email, Facebook, and Twitter—the avatars of comparable moments in the recent past.

Recently I compared Twitter to a shrinking city—slowly bleeding users and struggling to produce revenue but a kind of home to many, infrastructure worth preserving, a commons. Now that Pokemon Go has mapped the digital universe onto meatspace more literally, I’ll follow suit and extend that same “city” metaphor to the rest of the internet.

I’m kidding about the Pokemon part (only not really), but the internet has nearly completed one major stage of its life, evolving from a mechanism for sharing webpages between computers into a series of variously porous platforms that are owned or about to be owned by massive companies who have divided up the available digital real estate and found (or failed to find) distinct revenue-generating schemes within each platform’s confines, optimizing life inside to extract revenue (or failing to do so). The app is a manifestation of this maturing structure, each app a gateway to one of these walled gardens and a point of contact with a single company’s business model—far from the messy chaos of the earlier web. So much urban space has been similarly carved up.

If Twitter is a shrinking city, then Slack or Snapchat are exploding fringe suburbs at the height of a housing bubble, laying miles of cul-de-sac and water pipe in advance of the frantic growth that will soon fill in all the space. The problem with my spatial metaphor here is that neither Slack nor Snapchat feels like a “city” in its structure, while Twitter and Facebook do by comparison. I never thought I’d say this, but Twitter and Instagram are legible (if decentralized): follower counts, likes, or retweets signal a loosely quantifiable importance, the linear feed is easy enough to follow, and everything is basically open by default (private accounts go against the grain of Twitter). Traditional social media by now has become a set of tools for attaining a global if personally-tailored perspective on current events and culture.

Slack and Snapchat are quite different, streams of ephemeral and illegible content. Both intentionally restrict your perspective to the immediate here and now. We don’t navigate them so much as we surf them. They’re less rationally-organized, mapped cities than the postmodern spaces that fascinated Frederic Jameson and Reyner Banham: Bonaventure Hotels or freeway cloverleafs, with their own semantic systems—Deleuzian smooth space. Nobody knows one’s position within these universes, just the context their immediate environment affords. Facebook, by comparison, feels like a high modernist panopticon where everyone sees and knows a bit too much.

Like cities, digital platforms have populations that ebb and flow. The history of urbanization is a story of slow, large-scale, irreversible migrations. It’s hard to relocate human settlements. The redistributions of the digital era happen more rapidly but are less absolute: If you have 16 waking hours of daily attention to give, you don’t need to shift it all from Facebook to Snapchat but whatever you do shift can move instantly.

The forces that propel migrations from city to city to suburb and back to city were frequently economic (if not political). Most apps and websites cost nothing to inhabit and yield little economic opportunity for their users. If large groups are not abandoning Twitter or Facebook for anything to do with money, what are they looking for?"



"If we’ve learned anything from recent technology, we can expect Slack and Snapchat to reveal their own serious flaws over time as users accumulate, behaviors solidify, and opportunists learn to exploit their structure. Right now most of the world is still trying to understand what they are. When the time comes—and hopefully we’ll recognize it early enough—we can break camp and go looking for our next temporary outpost."
walledgadens  web  online  internet  2016  snapchat  slack  darknet  darkweb  instagram  twitter  legibility  drewaustin  fredericjameon  reynerbanham  email  venkateshrao  benbashe  identity  communication  openweb  facebook  texting  sms  flowlaminar 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Beautiful Interfaces
"Beautiful Interfaces Deepweb/Darknet – P2P Gallery, is a project focus in create file-sharing networks to show and support media art as a data outside of the conventional WWW. Created in 2013 by Miyö Van Stenis was part of the first edition of The Wrong - New Digital Art Biennale as an official pavilion called Beautiful Interfaces: The Deep in the Void, an Deepweb file-sharing exhibition.

BI The privacy paradox

Beautiful Interfaces: The privacy paradox explores the concept of privacy versus self-exposure, through a platform that allows distribution and creates content in a more independent and anonymous way. In the era of algorithm prediction, all our online actions have a digital trace, used by companies and governments to predict our behaviors. The artists in the exhibition comment on dichotomous situations between the private and the public.

This new edition of Beautiful Interfaces is a decentralized network to show and distribute new media art - a web island accessible via a private network from hacked wifi routers, which are not connected to the Internet. Each router has a private network, allowing visitors to connect from their own devices, cell phones or ipads, in order to view the exhibition.

Beautiful Interfaces: The privacy paradox is powered by Occupy.here

Occupy.here developed by Dan Phiffer in 2011, it’s a custom OpenWRT, free, anonymous and uncensored resource for share media information in the virtual space. For more information visit http://occupyhere.org "

[see also:
https://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/offline-wireless-network-art-show

"Beautiful Interfaces: The Privacy Paradox is the very first offline wireless network-based group show. Displayed by five private networks powered by hacked routers emitting straight from the New York city-based multidisciplinary workspace and art gallery REVERSE, the exhibition showcases digital works by Jennifer Lyn Morone, Heather Dewey-Hagborg, LaTurbo Avedon, Annie Rose Malamet and Carla Gannis that you can view using your favorite mobile electronic devices—smartphones, tablets, etc.—starting from April 14th.

Beautiful Interfaces questions personal data’s safety in the Internet Age. As we reach a tipping point; the one when there are no boundaries anymore between private and public, the artists, and curators Helena Acosta and Miyö Van Stenis, team up to explore privacy issues online. By creating an anonymous data-sharing platform, they explore and critique corporate and government influence and surveillance, and warn us about how web-based algorithms are used to take advantage of our online behaviors and browsing habits—and how it seems like it's just the beginning, regarding the ever-growing use and efficiency of facial recognition tools.

Bring your device to REVERSE from April 14 to May 15, 2016 to safely enjoy a few network-based eye candies. As part of the CreativeTech Week New York 2016, a panel discussion called "Post Privacy: is privacy becoming a thing of the past?" will also accompany the exhibition, with participation from the creator of occupy.here, Dan Phiffer, curator Lior Zalmanzon, and the artists Carla Gannis and Jennifer Lyn Morone."]
occupy.here  danphiffer  darknet  deepweb  jenniferlynmorone  heatherdewey-hagborg  laturboavedon  annierosemalamet  carlagannis 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Dark Social: We Have the Whole History of the Web Wrong - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic
"tl;dr version

1. The sharing you see on sites like Facebook and Twitter is the tip of the 'social' iceberg. We are impressed by its scale because it's easy to measure.

2. But most sharing is done via dark social means like email and IM that are difficult to measure.

3. According to new data on many media sites, 69% of social referrals came from dark social. 20% came from Facebook.

4. Facebook and Twitter do shift the paradigm from private sharing to public publishing. They structure, archive, and monetize your publications."
icq  usenet  online  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  joshschwartz  theunseenmass  theunseen  darknet  stumbleupon  digg  ycombinator  reddit  twitter  facebook  im  email  sharing  social  history  web  socialmedia  2012  alexismadrigal  sarkmatter  darksocial 
october 2012 by robertogreco

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