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robertogreco : datacollection   15

Pigeons track air pollution in London with tiny backpacks
"A small flock of pigeons have been given tiny backpacks to monitor air pollution in London. The project was dreamt up by Plume Labs, a company focused on the environmental problem, and the marketing agency DigitasLBi. The rucksacks are fitted to the birds using small fabric vests, and the sensors inside are able to measure nitrogen dioxide and ozone levels. Only 10 birds are in flight at any one time, so the amount of data being collected is pretty small. However, it's still a creative way of analysing the air that millions breathe in every day in the capital.

If you're interested in tracking the birds' progress, a live map is currently available on the project's microsite [http://www.pigeonairpatrol.com/ ]. Alternatively, you can tweet the @pigeonair account on Twitter for a quick summary of a specific borough or neighborhood. The project is a three-day affair, designed to attract new beta testers for a wearable pollution monitor built by Plume Labs. As such, the new "Pigeon Air Patrol" feels more like a marketing campaign than an evolution in air pollution management. Still, it's neat to know that there are birds in the sky with backpacks -- and maybe, just maybe, there's scope to expand and refine the idea if these experimental test flights take off."
pigeons  multispecies  pollution  birds  london  2016  animals  datacollection  data 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Haunted By Data
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAXLHM-1Psk
https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/haunted-by-data ]

"You're thinking, okay Maciej, your twelve minutes of sophistry and labored analogies have convinced me that my entire professional life is a lie. What should I do about it?

I hope to make you believe data collection is a trade-off. It hurts the people whose data you collect, but it also hurts your ability to think clearly. Make sure that it's worth it!

I'm not claiming that the sponsors of this conference are selling you a bill of goods. I'm just heavily implying it.

Here's what I want you do specifically:

Don't collect it!

If you can get away with it, just don't collect it! Just like you don't worry about getting mugged if you don't have any money, your problems with data disappear if you stop collecting it.

Switch from the hoarder's mentality of 'keep everything in case it comes in handy' to a minimalist approach of collecting only what you need.

Your marketing team will love you. They can go tell your users you care about privacy!

If you have to collect it, don't store it!

Instead of stocks and data mining, think in terms of sampling and flows. "Sampling and flows" even sounds cooler. It sounds like hip-hop!

You can get a lot of mileage out of ephemeral data. There's an added benefit that people will be willing to share things with you they wouldn't otherwise share, as long as they can believe you won't store it. All kinds of interesting applications come into play.

If you have to store it, don't keep it!

Certainly don't keep it forever. Don't sell it to Acxiom! Don't put it in Amazon glacier and forget it.

I believe there should be a law that limits behavioral data collection to 90 days, not because I want to ruin Christmas for your children, but because I think it will give us all better data while clawing back some semblance of privacy.

Finally, don't be surprised. The current model of total surveillance and permanent storage is not tenable.

If we keep it up, we'll have our own version of Three Mile Island, some widely-publicized failure that galvanizes popular opinion against the technology.

At that point people who are angry, mistrustful, and may not understand a thing about computers will regulate your industry into the ground. You'll be left like those poor saps who work in the nuclear plants, who have to fill out a form in triplicate anytime they want to sharpen a pencil.

You don't want that. Even I don't want that.

We can have that radiant future but it will require self-control, circumspection, and much more concern for safety that we've been willing to show.

It's time for us all to take a deep breath and pull off those radium underpants.

Thank you very much for your time, and please enjoy the rest of your big data conference."
maciejceglowski  data  privacy  surveillance  bigdata  2015  storage  radioactivity  datacollection  maciejcegłowski 
october 2015 by robertogreco
San Jose Museum of Art: Covert Operations: Investigating the Known Unknowns
"Part 1: June 30, 2015 through January 10, 2016
Part 2: August 29, 2015 through January 10, 2016

The world is a very different place after 9/11. Surveillance, security, data collection, and privacy have become everyday concerns. Covert Operations is the first survey of a generation of artists who respond to the uncertainties of the post-9/11 world. They employ the tools of democracy to bear witness to attacks on liberty and the abuse of power: constitutional ideals, open government, safety, and civil rights are primary values here. They unearth, collect, and explore previously covert information, using legal procedures as well as resources such as the Freedom of Information Act, government archives, field research, and insider connections. In thirty-five powerful works, international artists push our idea of art beyond conventional thinking.

Many of the artists examine the complicity behind human rights violations or pry into the hidden economy of the United States’ intelligence community and so-called “black sites,” locations of clandestine governmental operations. Covert Operations sheds light on the complicated relationship between freedom and security, individuals and the state, fundamental extremism and democracy. The first phase of Covert Operations, opening June 30, showcases artists’ stylistic use of technology, gaming, and computer-generated imagery. It will include works by Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0, Harun Farocki, and collaborators Anne-Marie Schleiner and Luis Hernandez Galvan. The second phase will open August 29 with works by Ahmed Basiony, Thomas Demand, Hasan Elahi, Jenny Holzer, Trevor Paglen, Taryn Simon, and Kerry Tribe.

Covert Operations: Investigating the Known Unknowns was organized by the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art.

This exhibition is made possible by an Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award. The Exhibition Award program was founded in 1998 to honor Emily Hall Tremaine. It rewards innovation and experimentation among curators by supporting thematic exhibitions that challenge audiences and expand the boundaries of contemporary art. Additional support for the exhibition catalogue was provided by Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation."
sanjose  tosee  2015  art  surveillance  security  data  datacollection  privacy  exhibits  togo  government  democracy  harunfarocki  anne-marieschleiner  luishernandezgalvan  ahmedbasiony  thomasdemand  hasanelahi  jennyholzer  trevorpaglen  tarynsimon  kerrytribe  covertoperations  us  blacksites  liberty  freedom 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Hack Education Weekly Newsletter, No. 101
"Every week, I take all the essays and articles that I’ve bookmarked and sift through them in order to craft this newsletter. I’m always struck by how many weird and ridiculous claims are made about education and technology, both in the “mainstream” and industry press. (I don’t know why this continues to surprise me, and the right response, quite arguably, is to neither link to nor write for [http://www.jessestommel.com/blog/files/dear-chronicle.html ] these publications…)

There’s the continuous clarion call for more data collection, more automation, more engineering, more scientific management, and of course more disruptive innovation. These are the narratives loudly trying to shape the future.
Of course, these narratives are intertwined with power and policies. As Alan Jacobs notes [http://blog.ayjay.org/uncategorized/surveillance-and-care/ ], we confuse surveillance with care. We confuse surveillance with self-knowledge, Rob Horning adds [http://robhorningtni.tumblr.com/post/112618248845/your-permanent-record ]:
I don’t think self-knowledge can be reduced to matters of data possession and retention; it can’t be represented as a substance than someone can have more or less of. Self-knowledge is not a matter of having the most thorough archive of your deeds and the intentions behind them. It is not a quality of memories, or an amount of data. It is not a terrain to which you are entitled to own the most detailed map. Self-knowledge is not a matter of reading your own permanent record.

We confuse individuals’ acts of (self-)documentation with structural change and justice. We confuse the “sharing economy” for the latter as well. According to Evgeny Morozov:
The citizens, who are not yet fully aware of these dilemmas, might eventually realise that the actual choice we are facing today is not between the market and the state, but between politics and non-politics. It’s a choice between a system bereft of any institutional and political imagination – where some permutation of hackers, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists is the default answer to every social problem – and a system, where explicitly political solutions that might question who – citizens, firms, the state – ought to own what, and on what terms, are still part of the conversation.

It doesn’t help that so many of these narratives comes from “a town without history,” as Mike Caulfield observes in “People Have the Star Trek Computer Backwards.”

[See also: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:450933ec9018 ]
audreywatters  alanjacobs  robhorning  evgenymorozov  2015  surveillance  care  education  edtech  mikecaulfield  data  datacollection  management  scientificmanagement  self-knowledge  caring  permanentrecords  permanentrecord  records  justice  socialhustice  hierarchy  patriarchy  siliconvalley  edreform  technosolutionism  politics  policy  control  power  citizenship  civics  legibility  documentation  assessment  accountability  sharingeconomy  jessestommel  innovation  disruption  disruptiveinnovation 
march 2015 by robertogreco
A day in the life of a data mined kid | Marketplace.org
[inforgraphic here: http://www.marketplace.org/content/lc-privacy-infographic ]

"Nearly everything they do at school can be — and often is — recorded and tracked, and parents don't always know what information is being collected, where it’s going, or how it's being used.

The story begins at the bus stop.

Your child swipes his ID card and climbs on the bus. The card may contain an RFID or radio frequency identification chip, which lets the school know when he gets on and off the bus. In some school districts, parents will get text alerts, letting them know their child arrived safely to school. The bus technology is presented as a way to keep children safer.

“The data collection begins even before he steps into the school,” says Khaliah Barnes, director of the Student Privacy Project at the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

And, says Barnes, in some schools it just keeps on going. RFID chips let schools track kids on school grounds. Administrators could know if a child leaves the building, or if he visits the school counselor.

“The issue is that this reveals specifically sensitive information,” says Barnes.

Location information is just one small part of a child’s data file.

In the classroom, teachers gather data on routine things like attendance, tardiness, test scores and grades. The kinds of records that used to be kept on paper.

In most states, the data are fed into a giant database, known as a “statewide longitudinal data system.” Different states collect different elements of personal student data. (You can look up your state here.)

In the last decade, the federal government has handed states more than $600 million to help them create these databases. The idea, says Stephen Balkam, head of the Family Online Safety Institute, is that “if we could keep track of our kids from kindergarten to 12th grade we'd have a much greater handle on what's working, what's not working, what needs to be added to the curriculum.”

The government isn’t the only one trying to figure out what’s working by investing in and gobbling up data about your kid.

Sales of educational technology software for kids in kindergarten through high school reached nearly $8 billion last year, according to the Software and Information Industry Association.

One of the biggest players is the field is Knewton. It analyzes student data that it collects by keeping track of nearly every click and keystroke your child makes during digital lessons.

Jose Ferreira is Knewton’s CEO. In a video posted by the Department of Education, he says “We literally know everything about what you know and how you learn best, everything.”

Knewton claims to gather millions of data points on millions of children each day. Ferreira calls education “the world’s most data-mineable industry by far.”

“We have five orders of magnitude more data about you than Google has,” he says in the video. “We literally have more data about our students than any company has about anybody else about anything, and it’s not even close.”

Five orders of magnitude more data than Google is a whole lot of data."
via:audreywatters  2014  education  data  datamining  children  schools  policy  privacy  control  software  datacollection 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Coop Himmelb(l)au's Jammer Coat hides the wearer from Google
"Austrian architecture studio Coop Himmelb(l)au has created a quilted spotty cloak designed to protect the wearer from unwanted data collection."

[Also of interest: Martijn Van Strien's Dystopian Brutalist Outerwear is "a kind of trend forecast" https://vimeo.com/85146536 ]
coophimmelblau  datacollection  data  privacy  martijnvanstrien  wearable  wearables  clothing  google 
june 2014 by robertogreco
The Problem with “Personalization”
"What are the repercussions of radically “personalizing” education through computers? What do we gain? What do we lose?

There’s a very powerful strain of American individualism — and California exceptionalism — that permeates technology: an emphasis on personal responsibility, self-management, autonomy. All that sounds great when and if you frame new technologies in terms of self-directed learning.

But how do we reconcile that individualism with the social and political and community development that schools are also supposed to support? How do we address these strains of individualism and increasingly libertarianism as they permeate the classroom?

What do we do about the communal goals of education, for example — to produce good citizens, if nothing else — if we become maniacally focused on personal goals of education instead? What happens to meaningful moments to collaborate? What happens to discussion? What happens to debate? What happens to the idea that we must work through ideas together — not just in the classroom, but as part of our work and civic responsibilities?

And who gets the “personalized” education delivered through them via adaptive technology? And who gets the “personalization” that we hope a student-centered, progressive education would offer?

This image from a PBS documentary about Rocketship Education haunts me.

The chain of charter schools boasts personalization — “Rocketship uses the most adaptive and personalized programs available, and continues to push Silicon Valley vendors and others to create even more adaptive learning tools,” its website boasts.

So the problem with personalization via adaptive software isn’t simply that “it doesn’t work.” It’s that it might work — work to obliterate meaningful and powerful opportunities for civics, for connection, for community. Work to obliterate agency for students. And work not so much to accelerate learning, but to accelerate educational inequalities."

[Accompanies: "What Should School Leaders Know About Adaptive Learning?" https://modernlearners.com/what-should-school-leaders-know-about-adaptive-learning/ ]

[See also: http://thesprouts.org/blog/rendering-learners-legible ]
rocketshipschools  audreywatters  education  personalization  bigdata  legibility  autonomy  personallearning  learning  schools  policy  adaptivelearningtechnology  data  datacollection  adaptivelearning  adaptivetechnology 
june 2014 by robertogreco
I Just Wanna Hold Your Hand
"By interacting with one another people are able to transform their environment through play."

"Two metal hands are mounted to the wall. When two or more individuals complete the circuit they provoke audio-visual responses.

The level of interactivity is determined by the flow of electricity through the individuals

The interaction can be tailored per installation; the core tool is the Arduino, and in this case we’ve experimented with Processing projections to activate blank city walls. storefronts, or pavement.

This design allows for expansion as well as meaningful data collection.

Also, we just like making people hold hands."
arduino  processing  games  play  touch  contact  humancontact  circuits  datacollection 
january 2013 by robertogreco
TrafficCOM
"Now you can easily gather and share traffic count data for automobiles and bicycles"
urbanism  urban  datacollection  trafficcom  data  cars  biking  bikes  classideas  sensors  traffic 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Eyeo2012 - Jonathan Harris on Vimeo
"Jonathan talks about some major turning points in his life — things he used to believe that he no longer believes, painful moments that ended up being doorways into something else, highs and lows, and other ways in which life’s topography determines one's art. He relates all this against the backdrop of a desire to humanize the Web and evolve the art of storytelling, touching on insights and principles picked up along the way."
travel  change  painting  landscape  art  web  stories  narrative  datacollection  data  visualization  datavisualization  storytelling  bhutan  life  owls  meaningmaking  meaning  experience  jonathanharris  2012  eyeo2012  eyeo  tools  toolmaking  facebook  twitter  carljung  software  behavior  cowbird  purpose  healers  dealers 
july 2012 by robertogreco
#beyondthetextbook – Considering Inputs | Bud the Teacher
"* …we need APIs that’ll help us pull our data out of the tools we use & put it into the tools that we use so that we can build dashboards of useful data
* input information, not output information – but maybe some of both – descriptive tools – not prescriptive ones this is important & I need to write about it
* inputs rather than outputs; experiences rather than tests
* describing the learning by the institution – not so much on the student"

"…how teachers and students can meaningfully share annotations via their texts…what tools could provide this sort of input information easily… How could they make my data available to me in more useful ways? What sorts of infrastructures would need to exist for that data to be useful in a dashboard for learning?"

"…much of assessment [at Brightworks] is done by the staff & about the experiences they’ve created…there’s less emphasis on what each individual student learned. The students themselves are focused on what they’ve learned…"
datacollection  datamanagement  dashboardforlearning  dml2012  assessment  curriculum  schools  gevertulley  brightworks  data  learning  teaching  tools  api  2012  budhunt 
march 2012 by robertogreco
A Mobile Sensor for Air Pollution | Design for Good | Big Think
"There is increasing concern about pollution levels in the world's most ubiquitous and essential substance – air – and a new pilot project from Intel is aiming to address it via the developed world's second most ubiquitous thing: The mobile device. The Common Sense Project has developed a prototype for a new handheld mobile device equipped with an air quality sensor that helps communities record and analyze environmental data in order to become more engaged in civic matters of environmental policy and regulation."
commonsenseproject  sensors  mobile  phones  data  datacollection  environment  sustainability  airquality 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Common Sense — Mobile sensing for community action
"We are developing mobile sensing technologies that help communities gather and analyze environmental data. We hope that this hardware and software will empower everyday citizens to learn more about their environment and influence environmental regulations and policy.

We have developed various research prototypes, which are being used in studies such as a deployment on street sweepers in San Francisco and a deployment of a handheld device in West Oakland. Right now we are focusing our efforts on air quality sensing. Our hope is that our research prototypes will demonstrate the utility of embedding environmental sensors in commercial commodity devices such as mobile phones."
mobile  sensing  community  technology  sensors  environment  crowdsourcing  sustainability  policy  data  datacollection  sanfrancisco  oakland  bayarea  phones 
december 2010 by robertogreco

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