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robertogreco : datavis   6

Cuisine Ingredients | FlowingData
"Looking for the ingredients that make food taste different around the world."
food  ingredients  visualization  dataviz  datavis  data  recipes 
september 2018 by robertogreco
In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters - NYTimes.com
"A study finds the odds of rising to another income level are notably low in certain cities, like Atlanta and Charlotte, and much higher in New York and Boston."
data  economics  datavis  datavisualization  mobility  incomemobility  socialmobility  us  class  race  geography  cities  segregation 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Visualising Data » Discussion: Is data visualisation gender blind?
"My first rule of being a woman in tech is don’t talk about women in tech, but I’m very bad at following rules, and I’m so happy to see Andy tackling this issue, so here I go (again).

For me, the “women in tech” issue is more usefully understood as the intersection of two greater problems: the women in public problem, and the diversity in tech problem.

I think “women in tech” is the safe discussion of diversity, and leaves out: race, class, more. So I want to quickly get a little unsafe with you: if you think women are underrepresented in tech, look around for people of color. I do this when I feel lonely at conferences; it’s a good practice in perspective.

There is invisible diversity that is almost never discussed. For instance, class. How lucky we are if we have the resources to be at a conference in the first place, to buy these shiny objects we make our work on. How many interested talented people have no hope of being able to attend, of having the tools we take for granted."
class  race  tech  datavis  visualization  computing  gender  technology  diversity  2012  jenlowe 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Inuit Genealogy « fevered imaginings
"Currently working on a research project related to Canadian and Greenland Inuit with R0gMedia in Berlin. The diagram above is a genealogical diagram made in the mid 1950s by anthropologist Jean Malaurie, the first of its kind. It’s a hand made radial drawing, Malaurie has a whole series of them in his apartment in Paris, along with his extensive personal archive of research materials including photos, films, notebooks, drawings. While the broader aims of the project are to find an institution willing to host the collection, I’m trying to make an digital artefact out of this diagram that could bring the information alive and demonstrate how historical anthropological materials can be made relevant and contextualised for present and future generations. DIS2012 published a paper on this project for a workshop about slow technology. Slow technology DIS2012 [http://johnfass.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/slow-technology-dis2012.pdf ]"
interfacedesign  interactiondesign  datavis  datavisualization  jeanmalaurie  johnfass  hci  via:charlieloyd  slowtechnology  technology  genealogy  inuit 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Mapmaker, Artist, or Programmer? - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities
"Ultimately, almost everything I have been making tries to take the dim, distant glimpse of the real world that we can see through data and magnify some aspect of it in an attempt to understand something about the structure of cities," he says. "I don't know if that comes through at all in the actual products, but it is what they are all building toward."

The 39-year-old Fischer, who lives in Oakland, developed his cartographic interest while at the University of Chicago, when he came across the windy city's 1937 local transportation plan. (It was a "clearly insane plan" to replace the transit system with a massive freeway network, he recalls.) Until a few weeks ago Fischer worked as a programmer at Google, gathering the data that guides his projects in his spare time.
twitter  flickr  exploratorium  chicago  sanfrancisco  transportation  dataviz  transit  bigdata  urbanism  urban  discovery  geolocation  geotagging  ericjaffe  cities  google  datavisualization  datavis  data  interviews  2012  mapping  maps  ericfischer 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Paper Machines | metaLAB (at) Harvard
"I have had the good fortune to work at metaLAB this summer on an open-source tool for text analysis and visualization in the digital humanities. This effort, funded through the Google Summer of Code, is taking place under the tutelage of metaLAB’s own Matthew Battles and the historian and Harvard Junior Fellow Jo Guldi, who will be joining Brown University’s faculty in the fall.

Jo’s project is one of remarkable scope: to chart the history of land reform across the globe, making use of texts and archival data spanning more than a century. The spatial, temporal, and intellectual diffusion of land reform can already be traced in outline, thanks in large part to the scholars and archivists of prior generations who have assembled numerous bibliographies, archives, monographs and glossaries in their attempts to come to grips with the myriad outputs of “paper machines”: colonial administrations, government ministries, NGOs, utopian social movements, academic institutions, and other producers of texts dealing with land and its (re)distribution. But to look both more broadly at and more deeply into the data we have, to find the subtle patterns at unfathomable scales that are the digital humanities’ raison d’être, it is necessary to build new tools that can leverage the best extant algorithms in service of our human powers of perception and intuition."
papermachines  data  global  landreform  history  digitalhumanities  datavis  chrisjohnson-roberson  matthewbattles  metalab  joguldi  summerofcode 
july 2012 by robertogreco

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