recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : deathcloack   1

Being and Dying — The problem with watches
As watches, and in the larger sense, clocks move away from being public symbols of time keeping - the clock in the square, in the factory, the office - problems arise when we think about and use them.

With the increased use of flexible working hours, and grey areas between personal and work time - where we check our emails at night and weekends, stay connected to our work through various means - the function of a clock or watch defines itself into new, different ways.

The role of time shifts from a public experience, to a private one.

Just as the public clock was replaced by the personal watch. The personal watch and its time keeping, becomes even more private.

Where once the public clock would determine the time for the town or city, and the personal clock or watch would align itself to that. We now use watches as almost personal timing regulators. The precision of the mobile phone and its ever-present clock relegates the importance of accuracy, to the background, while multi-useability through different contexts comes to the fore.

Even alarm clocks have started to evolve. Mobile apps and advanced alarm systems, along with new research into sleeping patterns, show us a new way to wake up, by linking the alarm time to our own circadian rhythm.

The function of the clock - watch or alarm - has gone from the general – 7am whether you like it or not – to the specific – i’ll wake you up when you are ready.

The development of this technology, and the emerging world of wearable technology, raises a number of new issues.



If I can chart my health, and view time in a different way, how far can this idea go?

The notion of a death clock is a very old one. The first clock-watches, small ornamental clocks made in Germany in the 16th century, were frequently created into unusual shapes - animals, flowers, crosses and skulls. In these cases, they became technological memento mori.

There are some new death clocks that have been designed recently, but despite their technological advances, are essentially the same as those from the 16th century, and reveal the inherent problem in creating a ‘death clock’.



The accepted death clock basically asks the wrong question.

Rather than asking, how long do you have to live? We should be asking, How long do you want to live now?

If we can develop another method to chart our personal time, in a manner which develops a different approach to time keeping, perhaps we have find a solution to the problem of a death clock.

If are to overcome our anxiety about dying, we need to see a clock that tells our own time, from the other side of dying: living.

If we can use technology and the function of a wearable in such a way that it fits inside the vocabulary of modern design, we can assert a different type of health; a holistic health approach where we don’t turn life into a game, or a score to reach, but rather a moment to enjoy, a gentle reminder, ‘I am here right now’."
time  clocks  fabrica  beinganddying  2013  dying  being  sleep  alarmclocks  work  deathcloack  death 
october 2013 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read