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robertogreco : decay   34

Opinion | The Lessons of a Hideous Forest - The New York Times
"My God, I breathed. It was suddenly, momentarily beautiful. From a coyote’s-eye view, you could see what the trees were up to: Growth, failure, decay and the drip of acid water through the gravel were mixing a dirt out of the detritus. This hideous forest, I suddenly realized, was there to repair the damage done, and not at our bidding. Its intent was not to look good. Its intent was to stay alive, year by year, century by century, until at last it had recycled even the nylon stocking.

We know how long it takes most kinds of leavings to decay. Organic material goes quickly: cardboard in three months, wood in up to three years, a pair of wool socks in up to five. A plastic shopping bag may take 20 years; a plastic cup, 50. Major industrial materials will be there for much longer: An aluminum can is with us for 200 years, a glass bottle for 500, a plastic bottle for 700, and a Styrofoam container for a millennium.

A fallen willow tree sprouting new growth.

The forest does not know this. It does not think. It just acts. Because it is so good at sprouting, resprouting, reiterating, and repeating the entire process, it can keep up the living and dying for as long as it takes, even if that is a thousand years. The trees are not conscious. They are something better. They are present.

My colleague Laura met the genie of Fresh Kills one sodden afternoon among the garbage. It was not the only plastic doll’s head we had seen there, but this one was different. The cropped gray fusilli of its hair had become the matrix for a crew cut of living, growing moss. A sort of real-life Chia Pet. Well beyond the imagination of its makers — and almost in spite of them — the doll was coming to life. No human strategy of command and control had made it so, but rather the insistence of the wild.

We think of woodlands as places of beauty and repose. We are accustomed to judge a picturesque woodland as a good one and an ugly wood as bad. When Mount St. Helens exploded in 1980, there were endless plans to make it better. Instead, the rangers and scientists mainly stood back and watched. A new forest is slowly emerging. We need to change our thinking: Ask not just what these landscapes look like, but also what they are doing. Fresh Kills Landfill taught me that they may be places of struggle and healing as well, particularly when they come to restore what people have deranged."
forests  trees  nature  statenisland  nyc  anthropocene  resilience  plants  via:aworkinglibrary  2019  multispecies  morethanhuman  garbage  healing  williambryantlogan  damonwinter  mountsainthelens  restoration  growth  failure  decay  life  time  woodlands 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library on Vimeo
[parts of the video (from the introduction): "1. Libraries existed to copy data. Libraries as warehouses was a recent idea and not a very good one 2. The online world used to be considered rhizomatic but recent events have proven that it is actually quite arboretic and precarious. 3. A method of sharing files using hard drives is slow, but it is extremely resilient. This reversalism is a radical tactic agains draconian proprietarianism. 4. There are forces and trends that are working against portable libraries."]

[Book is here:
http://networkcultures.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NN07_complete.pdf
http://networkcultures.org/blog/publication/no-07-radical-tactics-of-the-offline-library-henry-warwick/ ]

"The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library is based on the book "Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries"
By Henry Warwick

The Personal Portable Library in its most simple form is a hard drive or USB stick containing a large collection of e-books, curated and archived by an individual user. The flourishing of the offline digital library is a response to the fact that truly private sharing of knowledge in the online realm is increasingly made impossible. While P2P sharing sites and online libraries with downloadable e-books are precarious, people are naturally led to an atavistic and reversalist workaround. The radical tactics of the offline: abandoning the online for more secure offline transfer. Taking inspiration from ancient libraries as copying centers and Sneakernet, Henry Warwick describes the future of the library as digital and offline. Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries traces the history of the library and the importance of the Personal Portable Library in sharing knowledge and resisting proprietarian forces.

The library in Alexandria contained about 500,000 scrolls; the Library of Congress, the largest library in the history of civilization, contains about 35 million books. A digital version of it would fit on a 24 TB drive, which can be purchased for about $2000. Obviously, most people don’t need 35 million books. A small local library of 10,000 books could fit on a 64 GB thumb drive the size of a pack of chewing gum and costing perhaps $40. An astounding fact with immense implications. It is trivially simple to start collecting e-books, marshalling them into libraries on hard drives, and then to share the results. And it is much less trivially important. Sharing is caring. Societies where people share, especially ideas, are societies that will naturally flourish."
libraries  henrywarwick  archives  collection  digital  digitalmedia  ebooks  drm  documentary  librarians  alexandriaproject  copying  rhizomes  internet  online  sharing  files  p2p  proprietarianism  sneakernet  history  harddrives  learning  unschooling  property  deschooling  resistance  mesopotamia  egypt  alexandria  copies  decay  resilience  cv  projectideas  libraryofalexandria  books  scrolls  tablets  radicalism  literacy  printing  moveabletype  china  europe  publishing  2014  copyright  capitalism  canon  librarydevelopment  walterbenjamin  portability  andrewtanenbaum  portable  portablelibraries  félixguattari  cloudcomputing  politics  deleuze  deleuze&guattari  web  offline  riaa  greed  openstudioproject  lcproject 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Making art of New York's urban ruins | Miru Kim - YouTube
"At the 2008 EG Conference, artist Miru Kim talks about her work. Kim explores industrial ruins underneath New York and then photographs herself in them, nude -- to bring these massive, dangerous, hidden spaces into sharp focus."
mirukim  nyc  art  body  bodies  rats  animals  subways  photography  mta  cities  urban  urbanism  morethanhuman  multispecies  infrastructure  2008  urbanexploration  exploration  speculativefiction  decay 
may 2018 by robertogreco
A World Without People - The Atlantic
"For a number of reasons, natural and human, people have evacuated or otherwise abandoned many places around the world—large and small, old and new. Gathering images of deserted areas into a single photo essay, one can get a sense of what the world might look like if humans were to suddenly vanish from the planet. Collected here are recent scenes from abandoned construction projects, industrial disaster zones, blighted urban neighborhoods, towns where residents left to escape violence or natural disasters, derelict Olympic venues, ghost towns, and more."
landscape  photography  apocalypse  worldwithoutus  multispecies  riodejaneiro  brasil  brazil  us  nola  neworleans  alabama  germany  belarus  italy  italia  abandonment  china  bankok  thailand  decay  shengshan  athens  greece  lackawanna  pennsylvania  tianjin  russia  cyprus  nicosia  indonesia  maine  syria  namibia  drc  fukushima  congo  philippines  havana  cuba  vallejo  paris  libya  wales  england 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Still Cleaning Up: 30 Years After the Chernobyl Disaster - The Atlantic
"This month marks the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. On April 26, 1986, technicians conducting a test inadvertently caused reactor number four to explode. Several hundred staff and firefighters then tackled a blaze that burned for 10 days and sent a plume of radiation around the world in the worst-ever civil nuclear disaster. More than 50 reactor and emergency workers were killed at the time. Authorities evacuated 120,000 people from the area, including 43,000 from the city of Pripyat. Reuters reports that a huge recently-completed enclosure called the New Safe Confinement—the world's largest land-based moving structure—will be “pulled slowly over the site later this year to create a steel-clad casement to block radiation and allow the remains of the reactor to be dismantled safely.” Gathered below are recent images of the ongoing cleanup work and the ghost towns being reclaimed by nature within the 1,000-square-mile (2,600-square-kilometers) exclusion zone in Ukraine."
2016  rewilding  chernobyl  ukraine  photography  nature  decay  ruins  animals  multispecies 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Pirates and Prodigals on Vimeo
"A conversation between Kester Brewin, Peter Rollins, and Barry Taylor on the tragedy of the pirate and prodigal son archetypes and what this means for the future church. The discussion drew from ideas presented in Kester Brewin’s latest book, Mutiny! Why We Love Pirates, and How They Can Save Us.

The Berry Center for Lifelong Learning and The Inititive for the Church and Contemprary Culture, Fuller Theologcial Seminary

Wednesday, October 24, 2012"
pirates  theology  christianity  religion  belief  2012  radicaltheology  kesterbrewin  peterrollins  barrytaylor  courage  brokenness  honesty  responsibility  otherness  humanism  empathy  perspective  understanding  life  living  death  piracy  slavery  freedom  autonomy  independence  god  liberation  prodigalson  unbelief  decay  zombies 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Matthew Fuller » Questions to Ask a City
[via: https://twitter.com/fdrubio1977/status/472142243910782977

"Reading "Questions to ask a city" by M. Fuller: -How does the city feel to a rat, a human, a bank?"]

"From, Cybermoholla Ensemble & Nicholas Hirsch / Michael Müller, eds, ‘Cybermoholla Hub’, Sternberg Press, NYC, 2012

10
How do things enter and leave, how are they built and how do they decay?
What is modifiable?
How can things be attached on to one another?
Where does idea become infrastructure?
What arranges speeds?
How does the city feel to a rat, a human, a bank?
What is inside and what is outside?
How many gradations of waste are there?
Does sweat taste different according to the work that produced it?
What has an address?

9
Are there any certified means to bring about what is longed for but unspoken?
If from the top of the tallest tower can be seen just a little further over the horizon, how much more sunset?
How perfect are the corners of rooms?
Where is the deepest most profound insomnia to be had?
How is it possible to evaporate?
Which came first, sewage or drinking water?
What is the most thoughtful species to eat?
What must be smuggled?
If the ratio of cockroaches to butterflies is to be improved, must slugs work harder?

8
To those in the city who are numb with exhaustion beyond bearing, have you tried special tablets?
Do you, as a city, objectify the most sophisticated knowledge in a physical landscape of extraordinary complexity, power, and splendour at the same time as you bring together social forces capable of the most amazing sociotechnical and political innovation?
Of the names of the city, which are curses?
Are there any observances to be made when moving in or out of a place?
Which words, without intermediary, can be directly exchanged for food?
Who composites disinterest?
What is after all the intersections?
Who eats what is left?

7
What is a given for what?
Is there a difference between the markers of strangeness and those of familiarity?
How many doors do you need to make a floor?
If a photograph is taken, how much darkness can it reveal?
Which buildings design themselves?
Is there one code to translate all others without itself being breakable?
Who is safe?

6
When does a palace become a cupboard?
Who are the connoisseurs of the chaos?
How many rooms are inhabited only by investments?
Is what it looks like the same as what it does?
Which edges are conduits?
Who respects the delicacy of letterboxes?

5
Where is the tongue at home?
Is there an office for the air between walls?
What grows?
What songs are sung by those who cannot else withstand their work?
What is first to collapse?

4
Does the architecture of sleep have a school?
What shriek of joy is that?
Is it reasonable to assume that all documents are forged?
What builds up?

3
What is found by accident?
What jumps scales?
Does the idea of home require medicine?

2
Who files the complaints?
Can you wash your face with a building?

1
At what degree of heterogeneity does the idea of a whole come about?"
cities  matthewfuller  nicholashirsch  michaelmüller  cybermohollaensemble  multispecies  darkmatter  animals  urban  urbanism  landscape  heterogeneity  decay  complexity  power  splendor  technology  place 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Lyndal Osborne: Bowerbird, Life as Art | Art Gallery of Alberta
[See also: http://www.lyndalosborne.com/ ]

"Lyndal Osborne: Bowerbird, Life as Art is a survey exhibition of the work of Edmonton artist Lyndal Osborne. The exhibition traces the almost 40-year career of this nationally renowned artist, starting with early print works from the mid-1970s to the complex, multi-component installations of the present day.

Over the last 40 years, Lyndal Osborne has also developed a remarkable body of large-scale sculpture and installations that have brought her art work to national attention. These sculptural creations are densely woven, deeply layered constructions of natural materials. Through observing, collecting and manipulating material from the world around her, Osborne is able to enhance our understanding of both the natural world and the place in which we live. Consistent in all of Osborne’s work is a fascination with the processes of growth and decay, life and death. Her work speaks of the possibility of infinite transformation, yet, also reminds us of the fragility and impermanence of the world and our place within it.

Lyndal Osborne immigrated to Canada from Australia in 1971 and since that time played a fundamental role in the development and growth of the Alberta art community. She is a strong and active presence in Edmonton, but is also an ongoing contributor to the cultural heritage of Alberta. Osborne was instrumental in establishing both the Printmaking Department at the University of Alberta as well as their Print Study Centre, which opened in 1997. Osborne’s work has been featured in numerous group and solo exhibitions at venues such as: The Rooms (St. Johns, Nfld.), Glenbow Museum (Calgary), the Southern Alberta Art Gallery (Lethbridge); the Kelowna Art Gallery and the Kamloops Art Gallery amongst others; and her print work continues to be included in graphic biennales and exhibitions around the world."

[via: https://twitter.com/adriennepancbc/status/442504603251118081 RTed by @1anhaga]
art  artists  lyndalosborne  2014  alberta  edmonton  glvo  sculpture  installations  materials  growth  decay  life  death 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Cardboard Planetarium — DIY star-gazing for kids! | PingMag : Art, Design, Life – from Japan
[Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/20130828205421/http://pingmag.jp/2013/08/16/cardboard-planetarium/ ]

"The Perseid meteor shower was recently visible in the sky. Did you see it? Finding the right time and place to spot the spectacle was a bit of a pain. In the summer holidays, many people want to see the stars but don’t have the money to go to a proper planetarium. If you are one of these people, did you know you can make a planetarium out of some unconventional materials?

At temperatures over 35 degrees Celsius, PingMag popped along to an elementary school gymnasium to watch a special kids’ workshop by Art Studio Asahigaoka, a group of art college students, teaching children to build a planetarium… out of cardboard boxes!"

[Another cardboard planetarium: http://astronomypchs.blogspot.com/ ]
pingmag  cardboard  ncmideas  architecture  decay  memory  2013  projectideas  children  astronomy  planetariums  artstudioasahigaoka  japan  diy 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Why Foreigners are Still Attracted to Detroit | PRI's The World
"I asked Murielle if she thinks Detroit is America. The answer: Detroit is as American as it gets."

"“I got driven to this hostel, because I arrived in the middle of the night, by the former mayor of Detroit, Ken Cockrel,” she said. “I was just sitting close to him and found out he was living quite close to the hostel. It’s just [that] people are very helpful.”

I asked her why on her first trip to the United States she is visiting Detroit, and not, say, New York.

“New York, you can go when you’re old, when you are 50 and you can afford it and it will be still the same,” she said. “Detroit, I came now because of a lot of coincidences I heard [about] what was going on here.”"
us  europe  cities  resilience  decay  americandream  2012  tourism  detroit 
june 2012 by robertogreco
The Sunken City — Point Fermin | Los Angeles | NileGuide
"Just to the east of Point Fermin in San Pedro, California, are the remains of a neighborhood that has been sliding into the sea since 1929. This “slump” is attributed to wave action and the presence of bentonite clay here, a material which has a propensity to become very slippery. A broken water main added to this neighborhood’s problems in 1941. What remains today is a bizarre post-apocalyptic landscape consisting of bits of street and sidewalk. This locale is also a tagger’s paradise, the whole place is decorated in spray paint. Sunken City is located on the east side of Point Fermin Park (also see this helpful map). There are some ominous signs to ignore and some fencing to navigate to get into the Sunken City. Above the ruins it seemed pretty safe when we were there, some lady from the neighborhood was walking her dog on a well-established path. Once you start to descend into the destroyed/altered landscape it is best to take care as the steep drop-offs require scrambling…"
losangeles  sanpedro  pointfermin  california  togo  landscape  decay 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Future Archaeologies - we make money not art
"Armin Linke's Future Archaeologies photographs explore how some contemporary places and building structures can be regarded as 'archaeologies of the future', modern artefacts subject to slow-fading decay. This snapshot of a progress that never took the road it was supposed to follow triggers the question: 'How long will it be before our own idea of modernity gets stranded in a dead end?'"
wmmna  future  archaeology  futurearchaeologies  art  design  artifacts  decay  progress 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Keynote: Bruce Sterling (us) on Atemporality | transmediale
"If progress is to go beyond the banal indulgences that give rise to a never-ending array of car shell designs then we need to analyse our present time with regard to its aesthetics and its media. The second conference session is being introduced with Bruce Sterling's Keynote on Atemporality."

[transcript here: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/02/atemporality-for-the-creative-artist/ ]
atemporality  brucesterling  future  history  culture  art  technology  design  philosophy  time  creativity  theory  research  2010  media  community  sciencefiction  scifi  roleplaying  favelachic  informationvisualization  williamgibson  humanities  databases  literature  collaboration  multitemporal  analog  digital  gothichightech  futuritynow  collectiveintelligence  networks  networkculture  postmodernism  failedstates  collapse  narrative  resilience  decay  failure 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Artificial Owl
"Welcome to the Artificial Owl, a site dedicated to provide a selection of the most fascinating abandoned man-made creations. While adding new content to the site, I try to follow as much as possible these simple rules :
urbanexploration  ruins  landscape  retro  design  culture  architecture  art  history  photography  urban  travel  buildings  abandoned  decay 
february 2010 by robertogreco
pensamientos genericos - decay
"Este semestre estaré impartiendo un taller de teoría/diseño urbano con el escritor Bryan Finoki. El tema a tratar es uno que ya tiene tiempo rodando por las facultades de muchas universidades así como en textos académicos en Estados Unidos. Urbanism of Decay, urbanismo decadente, urbanismo en descomposición, urbanismo en deterioro. Bien se puede traducir de estas tres formas, porque al analizar a nuestro paciente vemos que ha ocurrido un deterioro físico, creado una cultura en decadencia y hoy existe como una ciudad en descomposición. Ese es mi diagnostico, que en parte ha sido corroborado por muchos estudiosos sobre el tema, sin embargo lo que me interesa es ver si este paciente sufre como cualquier otro organismo de una decadencia total."
sandiego  detroit  decay  bryanfinoki  architecture  design 
september 2009 by robertogreco
“Off the Deep End: A Look at the Decline of Dubai” Slideshow | Fast Company
"Deserts have a way of reclaiming whatever is built upon them. In the case of Dubai, the global financial implosion has sent that process into overdrive. After six years of frenzied expansion, during which the emirate's population grew at 7% annually and nearly $600 billion went into construction (the world's tallest building! the world's largest shopping mall! the biggest man-made island! an indoor ski resort!), reality has come rushing into view." [via: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/08/dubai-as-detroit/]
dubai  detroit  decay  decline  cities  oil  energy  desert 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Ruins of the Present | Beyond The Beyond
"*We’ve long had a term of art for old buildings that are ruined...“ruins.” *However, we lack a term of art for “ruins” that are actually buildings never completed. Sometimes they’re completed buildings that are never sold...start falling over before they were ever inhabited...*Another version is the abandoned, incomplete high-rise...In Brazil a skeleton framework of this kind is called a “squelette.” *Occasionally squatters move into “squelettes” & bring in some breeze-block, corrugated tin and plastic hoses, transforming squelettes into high-rise favelas. This doesn’t work very well because it’s tough to manage the utilities, especially the water...*It bothers me to use clumsy circumlocutions like “unfinished ruins” or “partially built, yet abandoned structures” or “stillborn highrises” for a phenomenon that is so common and so obvious to billions of urban people, so henceforth I am going to call them “squelettes.” They don’t have to be Brazilian, French, or 80 stories tall, either."
brucesterling  neologisms  language  ruins  squellettes  culture  architecture  crisis  abandoned  abandonment  decay  squatting  unfinished  cutshort  structures  buildings  wabi-sabi 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Next American City » Daily Report » Should We Abandon the “Uncreative Class”?
"Not everyone can afford to move and the poorest are left behind amidst urban blight and neglect. What do we do about the immobile? What do we do with cities that are net losers of the “creative class”? For this so-called creative brand of capitalism, the uncreative are someone else’s problem. As Florida says, “We need to be clear that ultimately, we can’t stop the decline of some places, and that we would be foolish to try.” I would say that this is not at all clear. There is an inherent inhumanity in leaving people and their cities in the dust. Besides, the cost of finding ways to get so-called obsolete classes of workers gainfully employed where they live is looking preferable to the social costs of managing huge ghost cities and permanent spatial inequality."
via:cityofsound  creativeclass  richardflorida  humanity  decline  decay  mobility  urbanism  creativity  urbanplanning  employment  architecture  class  us 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Visual archive - Artificial Owl
"The most fascinating abandoned man-made creations + Their story & location"
urbandecay  art  architecture  history  photography  environment  decay  abandoned  aircraft  graveyard  shipwrecks 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Simon Jenkins: As they did Ozymandias, the dunes will reclaim the soaring folly of Dubai | Comment is free | The Guardian
"Detroit is part of a great country that has shown itself capable of rescuing even its rustbelt municipalities...depends on finding people who will live in a place from which most have fled. Luckily, much of Detroit is of low-rise plot housing that could be transformed...No such option is available to Dubai. It is the ultimate Corbusian city, rigid in format and old-fashioned in conception, based on the grids and set squares of super-planners, and on grand symbolic buildings rather than intimate streets... If it is lucky Dubai will at least be a refuge from the political cataclysms that could engulf countries such as Pakistan, Iran, Iraq and Saudi Arabia. But mostly the dunes will reclaim the place. In centuries to come, tourists will share with Ozymandias the message: "Look on my works ye mighty and despair." With Shelley they will see how, "round the decay /Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare /The lone and level sands stretch far away.""
dubai  recession  detroit  architecture  economics  cities  finance  crisis  ruins  decay 
march 2009 by robertogreco
FT.com / Weekend / Reportage - The travails of Detroit
"Instead, Michiganders, despite being self-deprecating to a fault, make a point their countrymen won’t want to hear: Detroit is no longer the nation’s worst-case scenario, but on its leading edge, the proverbial canary in the coal mine. “It’s like the rest of the country is getting to where Detroit has been,” said Peter De Lorenzo, who writes the acerbic and very funny Autoextremist.com blog. That means that smug mock-horror is no longer the appropriate reaction to the frozen corpse. Instead, get ready for a shock of recognition."
detroit  urban  urbanplanning  decay  politics  economics  cities  health  crisis  collapse  us  future  dystopia  autoindustry 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Sweet Juniper! - Follow Up: Jane Cooper School
"Everywhere I bring that dog in Detroit, older black people approach me and say in a Southern drawl, "He's a birddog, huh?" We get to talking and it turns out that decades ago they moved up here from rural North Carolina or someplace like that. They tell me stories of hunting birds back there with tick-coated dogs like mine, and they tell of how they moved up to Detroit because of the promise of a good job with a good wage and then they inevitably tell me how many years they worked on the line before they were laid off. Sometimes they even have children who've moved to Charlotte or Atlanta for jobs. All we need to do is look around us to know where their story will end: someplace not so different from where it began, in a quasi-rural landscape of poverty and hopelessness, where birddogs trill at the stacatto of a pheasant's wings echoing off the ruins."
detroit  cycles  poverty  urbanprairie  decay  urbandecay 
november 2008 by robertogreco
3quarksdaily - On the hysteria of partial disorder: A short rant
"Accepting a certain kind of disorder and natural decay are paramount to good design, particularly in architecture, and it is the concern of an ever-decreasing number of designers. It leads to the kind of buildings that age with grace and evolve with time—not those whose illusion is so easily shattered. It’s sad to see that such obvious and accurate criticisms such as Tati’s, articulated fifty years ago, have fallen on such deaf ears."
architecture  design  modernism  beausage  decay  perfectionism  wabi-sabi 
october 2008 by robertogreco
sevensixfive: Invasive Species
"This project takes the detritus from the constant construction and destruction of Baltimore's built environment into the park to form new patterns and structures embedded in the ground like reverse archaeology"
art  architecture  installation  urban  geometry  decay  baltimore  landscape  ecotopia  environment  visualization  cities  urbanism  urbandecay  glvo  invasivespecies  fredscharmen 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Land+Living: Detroit. Demolition. Disneyland.
"The DDD Project targets the most visible abandoned homes, those visible to suburbanites who commute into Detroit and witness the burned out and forsaken neighborhoods. Two of the first nine houses painted by DDD have since been torn down by the City. There is something of the project that recalls Gordon Matta-Clark's (1, 2) "building cut" pieces; transforming deserted buildings with a simple gesture.
detroit  streetart  architecture  matta-clark  planning  urbanism  urban  nature  landscape  public  urbanprairie  cities  ruins  decay  art  activism  gordonmatta-clark 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Jeffrey Zeldman Presents : What happened here
"This is the death of something but it is the birth of something more. We take everything with us, all our experiences (until age robs us of them one by one, and even then, they are somewhere—during the worst of my mother’s Alzheimer’s, she reacted,
decay  life  moving  memory  identity 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Sweet Juniper! - It will rise from the ashes [on the photos of the abandoned Detroit Public Schools Book Depository]
"Can decay be something more than sentimental? Can it ever be beautiful? Can it just be respected for what it is, and not further corrupted by our emotions? And what is it that draws us to ruination? Why do some of us find it so compelling?"
urbandecay  detroit  education  books  government  history  photography  urbanism  urban  urbanexploration  urbanprairie  decay  architecture  archaeology  dystopia  exploration  schools  publishing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Sweet Juniper! - The knowledge of what happened, and what will
"The reaction I have received to my photos of the current state of the Detroit Public Schools book depository/Roosevelt Warehouse...felt compelled to find out what actually happened before I laid the blame at their feet."
urbandecay  detroit  education  books  government  history  photography  urbanism  urban  urbanexploration  decay  art  libraries  schools  politics 
june 2008 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: The mathematics of preservation and the future of urban ruins
"So the question becomes: at what point do we preserve something not for its historical value but for its topological interest? If a bridge, or a highway overpass, becomes functionally obsolete, is it still subject to the rules of architectural preservati
aesthetics  archaeology  architecture  art  decay  highways  history  topology  math  urban  design 
april 2008 by robertogreco
palimpsest: Definition and Much More from Answers.com
"a manuscript written on a surface from which an earlier text has been partly or wholly erased. Palimpsests were common in the Middle Ages before paper became available, because of the high cost of parchment and vellum. In a figurative sense, the term is sometimes applied to a literary work that has more than one ‘layer’ or level of meaning."
words  definitions  beausage  recycling  art  age  history  illustration  time  decay  archaeology  memory  remnants  wabi-sabi  palimpsest 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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