recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : democraticschools   44

Henry Readhead, England - YouTube
"A. S. Neil’s grandson, and belongs to Summerhill’s present management
Life in Summerhill – a school that is a legend
How to create a warm supportive community, in a place that allows freedom for the individual."
summerhill  asneill  henryreadhead  2017  education  democratic  democracy  democraticschools  schools  unschooling  deschooling  learning  community 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Why are Democratic Schools Growing so Fast in France? | Alliance for Self-Directed Education
"There are several things about France which make it the right place for this movement to emerge.

France has one of the most outdated education systems within the Western World, and people are getting seriously fed up with it. Most people may think this about their own country, but believe me, France is far behind all of them. So-called “alternative schools” represent a tiny portion in French education, such that more than 99% of French kids are more or less doing the same standard thing, be it in public or private schools. Despite government efforts to reform the system, it seems like things are rather going backward than forward. At this stage, people are generally fed up with the system, and the media (even mass media) regularly and generously bashes conventional schooling. A general feeling of frustration and resentment over their own past is motivating parents to look for alternatives, and some of them are open to explore seemingly radical ones.

Freedom of education and freedom of enterprise are so sacred that independent schools are highly protected. The French don’t kid about their famous “liberté, égalité” motto. It’s truly there, in the Constitution and the Law. Contrarily to Germany and Spain, for example, homeschooling is allowed. (Sure, academic inspection doesn’t always make it easy for parents, but it’s allowed). Opening a private school requires a simple declaration, and the academic inspection is only supposed to make sure the school is safe and clean, that it allows students to socialize and develop their personalities, that secularism is respected, and that there are sufficient means for them to get some basic education, all of which are easy to show for a democratic school. Up to now, our 17 democratic schools, seven of which are based on the Sudbury concept, were easily able to open and run, and we have encountered no major hurdles with authorities.

It seems like France usually takes more time than other countries to change (women’s voting rights, for example), but when it changes, it’s sudden, and it’s real. Indeed, France has already shown its ability to initiate radical, pioneering change, with the whole country moving as one. This aspect makes us a good candidate to reach a Tipping Point in our education system."
france  democraticschools  democracy  schools  deschooling  unschooling  sfsh  2017  education  homeschool  raminfarhangi  sudburyschools  alternative  tippingpoint  change  schooling  freedom  democratic 
may 2017 by robertogreco
What Self-Directed Learning Can Look Like for Underprivileged Children in Asia | MindShift | KQED News
"Unlike at Summerhill, children at Moo Baan Dek have work responsibilities (such as working in the center’s rice fields), but these are freely chosen, and there is a lot of discretion in how they are carried out (e.g., children are encouraged to listen to their bodies if they need a break). Children also collaborate with houseparents on menus and shopping, learning about home economics in the process.

“Once they trust the adults, the adults can help them to do something,” one of the founders, Rajani Dongchai, told Gribble. But after developing this bond, the adults step back so the children can learn to believe in the inherent value of the activities, rather than simply obeying their elders. They step in only when children appear to need help, and then offer it with compassion.

Many of Moo Baan Dek’s students have gone on to higher education and gainful work in occupations that run the gamut from hospital staff to auto mechanics and sales."



"Street Children Apply Themselves to Have an “Education for Life”

Children who work and/or live on New Delhi’s streets struggle to survive, picking up small jobs such as collecting rags, carrying bags, or selling food, while coping with police beatings, predatory adults, and motorists that don’t even brake for them, reflecting their extremely low status in that society.

Social worker Rita Panicker was dismayed that most organizations trying to help these children treated them merely as passive recipients of charity and offered them conventional lessons that did little to help them overcome their specific challenges, instead of empowering them with “education for life.” To offer an alternative, she started the Butterflies program in 1989; its name evokes her desire to help these eight- to 15-year-old children develop wings to fly in freedom wherever they chose.

Its core guiding principle is children’s participation. So the Butterflies educators began by spending weeks on the streets, getting to know the children who wanted to talk, asking them what they wanted to do, and in what areas they wanted help. The program’s distinguishing operating elements include a Children’s Council with decision-making power (which extends to the ability to dismiss staff) and a requirement that the children pay a modest fee for services. The educators relate to the children as friends and colleagues and are affectionately called Elder Brother and Elder Sister.

Most of the children have never even held a pencil when they begin interacting with the program, but Gribble notes that literacy should not be confused with education. In some senses, these children are already highly educated and mature, because they manage to survive on their own and handle complicated, real-life situations on a regular basis. Therefore the Butterflies curriculum “can’t be childish,” he says. Moreover, he explains in “Lifelines,” although the program is accredited through the equivalent of eighth grade, and the children have opportunities to learn subjects such as math, science, Hindi and English, “formal education is not the priority. The priority is to make each child feel trusted, secure and precious. Only then can formal learning take place.”

Educators meet the children at popular contact points around the city (such as the railway station) at mutually agreed times. They offer activities that help the children analyze and question and find things out for themselves. They also bring tin trunks with materials such as exercise books, discussion-provoking cards, and games. The children decide how much, or whether, to engage, and can work on whatever they choose. Anyone is welcome to join in, and some 1,500 children have taken up the offer. Older street children often lead the activities, with the staff remaining in the background, offering assistance as needed.

Many choose to study because no one is requiring them to, Gribble says. He observed children working together “enthusiastically and seriously,” he writes, with a “dignity and purposefulness that perhaps is in part a result of not suffering the humiliation of being obliged to accept charity. … It is moving almost to the point of tears to see a twelve-year-old boy totally committing himself to sounding out letters or practising basic addition.”

The educators also cover subjects that “touch the children emotionally, because those are the subjects that children really want to talk and write about,” Gribble explains. For instance, they may present realistic case studies (e.g., a runaway girl confides that she’s been sexually abused, but the police don’t want to file a report) and ask the children to demonstrate possible responses through dramatic arts.

Success isn’t measured in test scores or the attainment of formal qualifications. It’s considered success if the children trust the adults; learn to read and write (about 60 percent of the children who participate for six months learn to read and write within that time); accomplish personal projects; or go on to high school and find sustaining work. It is also considered success if they become aware of their rights and develop skills that enable them to protect themselves from being cheated and to negotiate for better wages."
asia  education  learning  children  self-directed  self-directedlearning  davidgribble  thailand  bankok  sumerhill  democratic  democracy  democraticschools  streetchildren  nedelhi  moobaandek  lubavangelova  howwelearn  unschooling  deschooling  schools  ritapaniker  butterflies  india 
may 2015 by robertogreco
This Teen Wants to Abolish School as We Know It | VICE United States
"Q: You seem to be going in a more radical direction. I take it you’re not going to quote [New York Times columnist] Tom Friedman in the second book then?
A: That’s definitely not going to happen. I didn’t read much about capitalism or neoliberalism. I didn’t know as much back then. That’s something I find particularly interesting because I see that many young politically minded people who support the Democratic Party gain their knowledge on issues by reading the opinion pages of the New York Times and Washington Post, which espouse militaristic, neoliberal nonsense. And that's what I did for some time. So I didn’t understand the structural, institutional problems as I do now.

Q: How does having a more holistic view of how schools fit in the institution of capitalism informed your critique of schools? I mean, it seems to be why there’s such a focus on math and science test scores and keeping up with India and China.
A: Even back then, I was very much skeptical of these international comparisons, but I hadn’t understood how it fit into a larger framework and narrative. Now I see that, for example, what’s happening in Chicago and Philadelphia and other cities, there's a neoliberal assault on public education. And I connected the fact that the tenets of capitalism were seeping into the sphere of education. That’s given me a lot more insight into why these so-called “reformers” are making these suggestions.

Q: And actually making things worse, in your view.
A: Much, much worse.

Q: You’re not a reformer. In fact, you say you’re a revolutionary. So let’s say I name you superintendent-for-life. What are the major, structural things you would address right away?
A: A lot of my research and reporting over the last two, three years has looked at many unconventional, alternative schools. In the early 1900s, in Spain, there were a lot of schools known as “Anarchist Free Schools.” Many of them later sprung up in the 1960s and 1970s in the United States. These types of schools basically shun every principle of traditional education. They believe that children are natural learners. They believe that children should be trusted and have a voice. There should be democratic processes within the school itself. There shouldn't be any of these arbitrary features such as grades and tests; that children should just have freedom.

I’ve visited a number of these schools that are outside the framework of traditional education. The problem is that the ones we have today are mainly private schools. They’re not as accessible to low-income kids. But there are a couple of them that are not as radical but are publicly funded. The results have been extraordinary. One of them is a school in Philadelphia called “The Workshop School.” This is a project-based learning school particularly for low-income, minority children."



"Q: Kids who are caught up in this public school system that is stifling their creativity—what advice do you have for them? How do you get through the system without being crushed by it?
A: It’s a question I get a lot from young people. It’s very difficult because, by law, if you’re a certain age you’re forced to attend school. You have no other choice. But the system, as oppressive as it is, there are some loopholes. If your family is affluent enough, you can go to one of these really great free, democratic schools that I mentioned. And there are some school districts, not as many today as there were in the 1970s, which have programs for kids who are failing or who have behavioral issues—it’s funny because these programs are actually so much better than what the other kids have to go through. You could try to graduate early. There’s homeschooling. But it’s very difficult to pursue alternatives within the current confines of the system.

Q: A lot of people say charter schools are an alternative.
A: I don’t support the privatization of education. There are some good charter schools out there, but I’m very wary of them. They often leave out kids with learning disabilities. They expel kids at very high rates. They send out kids who don’t test well. So there’s a lot of discriminatory and just really awful practices that they partake in to maintain a really homogenous population of students who just test well. I live in Woodbury, New York. You’ll never find a charter school trying to make its way into this privileged community. You really only find them in poor black and brown communities.

Q: And you’re suggesting they siphon off the best students and artificially inflate their test scores, because they’re for-profit institutions and that’s the best way to secure more contracts.
A: It’s strings attached, in terms of their funding, for a lot of them. They have to meet certain test scores; it just turns into this ruthless test-preparation factory."
nikhilgoyal  charlesdavis  2014  unschooling  deschooling  education  edreform  reform  schools  policy  compulsory  privatization  democraticschools  freeschools  charterschools 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Life and Work of an Institution of Progressive Higher Education: Towards a History of Black Mountain College, 1933-1949 by Jonathan Fisher | BMCS
"This ambitious new democratic structure for the administration of a college was unique to BMC, and to my knowledge has not been repeated on such a scale since. It would mean that teachers, in addition to their classroom and other responsibilities on campus, would also be taking on administrative tasks like bookkeeping, fundraising, hiring of new faculty and student admissions on a rotating basis. This commitment to a radically more democratic organizational structure for the new Black Mountain College would last until the bitter end, despite a list-ditch effort led by Dreier and Albers to alter it in the late 1940s. This attempt ultimately led to the Board of Fellows voting to remove Dreier, who had been on an extended leave of absence, in 1948. Josef and Anni Albers would leave the following year. But it was this radically democratic structure that would attract some of the world’s most visionary artists and teachers to this tiny town in rural Western North Carolina for more than two decades. It was also this structure which would allow the BMC community to move forward on issues of racial integration in the 1930s and ‘40s—decades before such attempts would be made at larger, more established colleges in the southeastern United States. It was ultimately John Dewey’s principles of progressive education that were at the foundation of these radical organizational structures, which were adopted by BMC’s founders.

During the first five years of Black Mountain College’s existence, things went remarkably smoothly. Of course finding enough money was always a problem. It was the height of the Great Depression in the United States and despite Rice, Dreier and Albers’ best efforts, BMC had never managed to secure more than minimal financial support for their new experimental progressive institution. A budget drawn up by Dreier in the first year of BMC totaled $32,000, with staff salaries totaling less than $2000, excluding Albers’ salary of $1000 annually, which was supported separately by an individual benefactor (Duberman, 1972, p.71). In these early years there were none of the scandals or disputes that would plague the community later on in the ‘30s and ‘40s. Furthermore, the college’s system of governance appeared to be working. And efforts at self-sustainability were taken on unflinchingly. A student-run cooperative store was set up on campus as well as a print shop and a cottage school for the community’s youngest members (ibid.). In addition to their academic work, students engaged in projects ranging from the staffing of the various cooperative enterprises set up on campus, to the manufacture of bookshelves, curtains and other furnishings for campus buildings. These activities helped supplement the goods available to them on the campus they were leasing from a Christian group, which used it for a summer camp for just a few months each year.

Among the highlights of these early years of the college were two visits by John Dewey, who in 1936 began serving officially as a member of BMC’s Advisory Council. Both of Dewey’s visits took place during the 1934-35 school year. It is unclear from the correspondence in the North Carolina Archives whether or not Dewey ever visited the campus again. But these two early visits set a precedent, which caused BMC faculty—especially Rice and Dreier— to request future visits, which always seem never to have quite worked out (e.g. Dreier [to Dewey] April 6, 1938; Dewey [to Dreier] April 13, 1938). In one of the oldest Dewey letters in the BMC General Collection of the North Carolina Archives, which is handwritten on Columbia University Department of Philosophy letterhead, Dewey expresses his regrets at not being able to pay Rice and the others at BMC a visit during the fall of 1936. He writes of postponing his planned visit until the spring, “when I hope to see the countryside and the flowers at their best” (Dewey [to John Rice] October 29, 1936)."



"Ultimately Dewey remained committed to his position on the Advisory council until the late 40s. A final lengthy unsent hand-written letter from Dreier addressed to Dewey provides a grim picture of the final days of Dreier’s involvement in college affairs (Dreier [unsent letter to John Dewey] 1947, July). Duberman has described in less sympathetic terms Dreier and Albers’ ploy to wrest control of BMC from the faculty and hand it over to a new Board of Trustees. At the root of Dreier’s decision, as usual, was a concern for the financial stability of the college. Black Mountain had never been officially accredited by the State of North Carolina, and student enrollment was too unreliable (Duberman p.484-5). But this was just one of many problems facing BMC in the late 40s. Dreier despairs in his unsent letter at the difficulty of finding good teachers who are also capable and willing college administrators:
Our program, a pretty real thing to [Albers] and me, was not much more than words to most new [faculty] members with one or two notable exceptions… One way of looking at the present difficulty is to say that we simply haven’t been able to get the staff we need. If we could get an adequate team that could pull together, then I think we could raise the money we need (Dreier [unsent letter to Dewey] 1947, July).

So, Dreier’s concerns are both immediate and practical, but no less frustrating for their immediacy or practicality. He is trying to escape a catch-22 of money and talent. But also, more tellingly, Dreier writes:
Another way of looking at our trouble is that our program has become unclear, conviction has sagged… Hardly anybody sees what’s wrong, but gradually the whole thing is sagging toward breaking (ibid.).

Dreier’s pain and frustration are palpable here. The emotion of this letter is even intensified by the fact that he decided not to send it to his mentor, Dewey. But this unsent letter to Dewey shows the philosophers’ influence as a guiding voice for Dreier, Albers and other faculty at BMC in the 1940s. Dreier, in writing this letter seems to be implicitly asking himself, “what would Dewey do?” not because John Dewey was some all-knowing being, capable of rescuing Black Mountain College from dire financial straits, but because Dewey’s pragmatist method of evaluating experience and taking action had been the basis for everything he had helped create at BMC over the course of the previous 15 years.

The changes in administrative structure that Dreier alludes to in his final unsent letter to Dewey, which he and Albers attempted to implement as a last-ditch effort at financial solvency for BMC, ultimately failed to stick. The ensuing crisis ended in Dreier and Albers being forced to leave. Ironically, strict adherence to the Deweyan progressive educational principle of professional autonomy, which was at the core of Rice’s idea for Black Mountain College, and which Dreier resigned from Rollins in support of, was the same issue that brought Dreier and Albers careers at BMC to an end when they switched sides. In other words, the same philosophical inclination that justified the founding of BMC in 1933 remained and kept BMC on its own radical trajectory in the late 40s, even when figures like Dreier and Albers stepped in to try to change the way the college was organized. So, on the one hand, Albers and Dreier failed at prolonging the life of BMC. But, on the other hand, even in this final failure on Dreier and Albers’s part— in their capitulation to the mainstream bureaucratic structure of higher education, the creation of a non-faculty Board of Trustees which would have had hiring and firing power for BMC— illustrates that the college retained that uniquely Deweyan pragmatist orientation and progressivism. When the community became aware of the changes that Dreier and Albers had gotten underway, they acted democratically to kick Dreier and Albers out!"
bmc  blackmountaincollege  education  progressive  progressiveeducation  johnndewey  johnandrewsrice  josefalbers  theodoredreier  democracy  tcsnmy  progressivism  compromise  annialbers  pragmatism  democratic  democraticschools  unschooling  deschooling  experience  complexity  cv  lcproject  openstudioproject 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Open School | The Future is Open
"We are a group of people starting a democratic school in Orange County, California. The school will be committed to learner led education that respects, trusts, and empowers students to pursue their interests, optimize their potential as human beings, and allow their true selves to emerge."
democraticschools  sudburyschools  orangecounty  schools  education  freeschools  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Sudbury Valley School: Is Alternative Education Right for My Kids? | New Republic
"Tuition this year is $8,200 for the first child per family, less for additional children—very low by private-school standards, and less than most public schools spend on each pupil. There is no financial aid, although there is a fund to help enrolled students whose families encounter hardship. The school is open-admission, no tests or grades required. Students may enroll at the school until whatever age they like, at which point they may petition for a high school diploma. To get it, they have to explain, orally or in writing, how they are prepared for adulthood.

In a 2004 study of 119 alumni who had attended the school for at least three years, over 80 percent had gone to college or university. Others became entrepreneurs, chefs, carpenters, artists, etc. The school is filled with books, most students have laptops, there is Wi-Fi. But students can roam outside and play, or tinker on the piano, or draw. Everyone learns to read, eventually, although I met a couple of students who confessed that, while they could write by hand, they did not know cursive. They may do and study whatever they like. They may learn by building robots, or making up role-playing games with elaborate rules, or by serving on the budget committee, or by participating in the school administration, or in countless other ways. The current head of the school—the actual head of school, elected by the community—is an 18-year-old girl.

The Sudbury Valley School is a dangerous place to visit, as I did earlier this month. It upends your views about what school is for, why it has to cost as much as it does, and whether our current model makes any sense at all. But what's most amazing about the school, a claim the founders make which was backed up by my brief observations, my conversations with students, and the written recollections of alumni, is that the school has taken the angst out of education. Students like going there, and they like their teachers. Because they are never made to take a class they don’t like, they don’t rue learning. They don’t hate homework because they don’t have homework. School causes no fights with their parents.

In short, Sudbury Valley students relate to their work the same way that adults who love their jobs—many artists, writers, chefs; the very fortunate doctors and lawyers and teachers—relate to work: They chose it, so they like it. Perhaps that's because students at Sudbury are, in fact, treated as full adults. They have equal votes in making budget decisions, administering the school, making and enforcing discipline. There are currently about 35 Sudbury-model schools, in 15 states and six foreign countries, and one thing they have in common is their stance against age discrimination. They say that all ages are equal, and they mean it. "



"My visit and meetings with students, my subsequent weeks of reflecting on the Sudbury model, my chats with two founders still on staff, and reading several books that the school has published, including an absorbing collection of essays by alumni—all this has not yet made a full convert out of me. But it has reawakened a huge set of questions that I thought I had put comfortably to bed, like tenure, the importance of discipline, and even the permissibility of smoking on campus—which Sudbury Valley allows, although very few students partake. Above all I find myself scrutinizing even the smallest commitment to a canon of knowledge, some basic facts that I still would argue are valuable for citizenship.



"But the Sudbury advocates would also say that even if a given student never picks up on some bit of knowledge that we civilians deem essential, then so what? The tradeoff made at Sudbury is worth it: Every child will have some blind spots—and don’t children in most public schools, and even the best private schools, have blind spots?—but Sudbury children have a radical sense of empowerment and responsibility for their own education."

I find that answer pretty satisfying, in part because I don’t think that public or private education is good at teaching an academic canon of knowledge, anyway. A 2007 poll by the University of Connecticut found that about 20 percent of college students thought that Martin Luther King had something to do with ending slavery. On a personal note, an inspection of my own high school transcript—from a very rigorous, and expensive, high school—forced me to confess that everything that I remember is from classes in subjects I loved: history, English, French, and philosophy. I remember no geometry, trigonometry, or calculus, no chemistry or physics—none—and scant biology. If I had been at a Sudbury school, and spent those lab hours just reading history and novels instead, would I be worse off, or better off?"
sudburyvalleyschool  sudburyschools  education  democraticschools  freeschools  democracy  educations  schools  2014  agediscrimination  ageism  agesegregation  markoppenheimer 
january 2014 by robertogreco
thefarmschool.tv [The Farm School SOLAR CAMPUS]
"We are a K-12 educational resource center.

We serve day students from The Farm community, Summertown, and the surrounding area, including Hohenwald, Leoma, Mt. Pleasant, and Ethridge. We also offer an umbrella program for home-based learners throughout the state of Tennessee. The Farm School is also available as a homeschool resource. At The Farm School we seek to nurture diverse individuals as they work and play towards personal, community and planetary well being.

We are a community school.
Our school is a community of diverse individuals connected by deep relationships; we all learn with and from each other. We invite our community to join us in our school and we spend much of our time learning out in the community.

The Learning Community (TLC) approach begins with three key ideas.

o We are Individuals: Each of us is born one of a kind with unique gifts and special needs and each of us follows our own path through life. These differences make us interesting to each other and enable us to make unique contributions to society.

o We are Social Beings: We are social beings with a natural desire to interact with each other as we each interact with our world. All learning results from these interactions.

o We Can Become Communities: When we are free to express ourselves and are skilled at communicating our differing and potentially conflicting points of view, we can put our gifts together and complete projects as a community that we would be unable to complete as independent individuals.

We use a responsive project-based curriculum.
We learn science, math, technology, social science and communication arts (i.e., languages, music and other art forms) as well as other social, emotional and practical skills as we engage in projects that come from our hearts.

We are an agreement school.
Our school governance is one of our key ongoing projects. We make agreements about how we function as a school (e.g., how we: resolve conflicts, schedule activities and do assessment) during meetings where each of us has an equal voice."

[via: http://instagram.com/p/dfKD2fO9dV/ ]
education  openstudioproject  schools  farmschool  unschooling  lcproject  homeschool  democraticschools  community 
november 2013 by robertogreco
If students designed their own schools... on Vimeo
"The "best small town" in America experiments with self-directed learning at its public high school. A group of students gets to create their own school-within-a-school and they learn only what they want to learn.

Does it work? Charles Tsai finds out by spending a week with the Independent Project."

[Also here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RElUmGI5gLc ]
charlestsai  education  teaching  learning  schools  schooling  2013  democraticschools  democracy  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  cv  tcsnmy  howwelearn  grades  grading  peerassessment  assessment  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  lcproject  openstudioproject  highschool  publicschools 
may 2013 by robertogreco
BEAT SCHOOL - British Pathé
"Narrator states: "England has long been famous for its educational establishments, the freedom of choice of schools and for their political and social toleration. But here's a boarding school where youth is not merely allowed but encouraged to have its fling." Shots of children arriving at school. Some arrive on their own motorbikes, others jump out of a van. The kids wear casual clothes - jeans and leather jackets. A couple of the boys are "rockers" with quiffs and sunglasses, some might be called "beatniks". They go into the school building - this is the progressive Burgess Hill School in Hertfordshire. …"

[Clip here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_1ne8WJUvI ]
unschooling  democraticschools  england  uk  burgesshillschool  hertfordshire  1961  1960s  alternative  education  schools  schooling  learning 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Deep Springs College and the Liberal Arts Ideal
"In order to understand what “is suited to the education of a free person,” we need to first know what freedom amounts to. At the core of Nunn’s conception of freedom is self-governance, for he views freedom and self-government in obedience to law as one and the same. He recognizes that on the face of it this doesn’t make sense. How can obedience be synonymous with freedom?

To understand this it will help to contrast the fee person with the slave. The free person lives in free society with others. Free societies can be small and large, ranging from, for example, the small association of students at Deep Springs, to the state government of Pennsylvania or the government of the United States of America. When people live in society with one another they choose to establish laws governing the conduct of their members, for the maintenance and flourishing of the society as a whole, and they curtail their own rights, for the benefit of the common good.

Slavery, like freedom, requires society. Unlike freedom, which is participation in society, however, slavery is subjugation to it. The slave does not choose to enter into society with others, but is coerced into obeying orders out of fear. Both the slave and the free person recognize and respect the law, but they do so in extremely different ways. The free person wills the law, takes responsibility for it, and has her part in determining it. The slave submits to it and is bound by it in servitude.

At the individual level, Nunn thinks that we find a situation analogous to that of the free person and the slave at the social level. He thinks there are laws governing our right conduct, laws of morality that we can all be aware of through our good common sense. We can rebel against these and instead follow our personal inclinations, desiring our own pleasure and our own gain, at the expense of others. Such intemperance, according to Nunn is the mark of poor self-governance. When we follow our good judgment, will our action in accord with it, and take responsibility for this action, however, then he thinks we govern ourselves well individually.

Now in a free society, the authority of the body politic derives from each individual’s choice to enter into that society. Accordingly, the authority of the society is in part vested in it from each of its members, and in respecting its authority the members are indirectly respecting their own authority over themselves. In this way, when a free person respects the laws of their free society, they are engaged in a further form of self-government."



"The main difference between my years at Deep Springs and those spent elsewhere perhaps is just this: life there was simpler. It was simpler because it was preparatory. It was about surveying the space of possibilities, laying foundations, and getting one’s bearings. This was mostly an internal process. It was about getting one’s heart in order. And while this process couldn’t happen alone, in isolation, it could happen in a relatively simple, small community of fifty or so people, largely cut off from the mad complexity of life in the real world and of what our future lives in that world would be. The tremendous privilege that Deep Springs students receive is, then, just two years in this simple space in which they can orient themselves and prepare for the complexities of life to come."
deepspringscollege  time  simplicity  education  lcproject  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  learning  liberalarts  llnunn  life  well-being  self-governance  democracy  democraticschools  democratic  alternative  service  servicelearning  selflessness  community  labor  freedom  liberty  society  slavery  authority 
march 2013 by robertogreco
raymond williams and education - 'a slow reach again for control' - the encyclopaedia of informal education
"Raymond Williams was a literary critic, cultural historian, cultural and political theorist, novelist, dramatist, and the virtual inventor of the interdisciplinary field known as 'cultural studies'. Josh Cole explores his little appreciated contribution as an educational thinker."

"as child in Wales, Raymond Williams learned more than just an appreciation for the life of the mind. He also began to see education and politics as deeply intertwined, a lesson that marked him deeply. In the Wales of Williams’ boyhood, formal schooling served as a means of supplanting local cultures with the official culture of the British Empire. Children in Pandy were punished for speaking Welsh in schools, and were taught, above all else, about the glories of ‘English Civilization.’ As he was finishing at King Henry VIII, Raymond Williams’ father and his headmaster colluded to send him to Cambridge University without his consultation. He later recognized that this educational official played a small but important role in the colonizing process, by identifying talented local children and whisking them away to elite English universities, thus neutralizing their potential anti-colonialist tendencies. (Williams 1979: 37)"

"For Raymond Williams, adult education as a means of expanding democracy meant all involved would be educated—including the educators. Anticipating Paulo Freire’s great work Pedagogy of the Oppressed (published in 1968), Williams argued in the early 1960s that the educational process cuts both ways. The adult instructor has much to learn about herself and her discipline from her students. Ideally, through adult education, instructors and students would ‘meet as equals’ in the classroom, and share fully in the process of democratic learning. (This is not to suggest that Raymond Williams assumed that students automatically knew more about a teaching subject than their instructors—his was not an uncritical version of ‘student-centred learning’--rather, he simply took it as given that the instructor is not beyond reproach: the educator “may not know the gaps between academic teaching and actual experience among many people; he may not know when, in the pressure of experience, a new discipline has to be created.” Interaction with adult students could give educators that experience) (Williams 1993: 225)"
raymondwilliams  education  learning  informallearning  colonization  unschooling  deschooling  joshcole  interdisciplinary  culture  politics  lifelonglearning  paulofreire  adulteducation  democracy  democraticlearning  democraticschools  community  communities  lcproject  openstudioproject 
february 2013 by robertogreco
No Teachers, No Class, No Homework; Would You Send Your Kids Here? - Emily Chertoff - The Atlantic
"Many agree that the generation of Americans now in their teens and 20s had some of the most over-supervised and over-structured childhoods in U.S. history. It will be interesting to see whether these trends will continue, or whether these next-generation parents react to their own disciplined upbringings by becoming more hands-off. If they grow to resent the way they were raised, democratic schools may come to look like a pretty appealing option for their own children."
parenting  supervision  education  learning  sudbury  sudburyschools  sudburyvalleyschool  trends  deschooling  unschooling  2012  summerhill  schools  democratic  democraticschools  democraticeducation 
december 2012 by robertogreco
La Educación Prohibida | Un proyecto audiovisual para transformar la educación…
"La Educación Prohibida es una película documental que se propone cuestionar las lógicas de la escolarización moderna y la forma de entender la educación, visibilizando experiencias educativas diferentes, no convencionales que plantean la necesidad de un nuevo paradigma educativo.

La Educación Prohibida es un proyecto realizado por jóvenes que partieron desde la visión del quienes aprenden y se embarcaron en una investigación que cubre 8 países realizando entrevistas a más de 90 educadores de propuestas educativas alternativas. La película fue financiada colectivamente gracias a cientos de coproductores y tiene licencias libres que permiten y alientan su copia y reproducción.

La Educación Prohibida se propone alimentar y disparar un debate reflexión social acerca de las bases que sostienen la escuela, promoviendo el desarrollo de una educación integral centrada en el amor, el respeto, la libertad y el aprendizaje."

[Direct link to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1Y9OqSJKCc ]
tolstoy  democratic  democraticschools  freeschools  escuelaactiva  sudburyschools  sudbury  2012  asneill  summerhill  españa  perú  español  prussia  schooliness  montessori  waldorf  rudolfsteiner  johntaylorgatto  williamkilpatrick  rosaagazzi  agazzisisters  johannheinrichpestalozzi  olvidedecroly  célestinfreinet  olgacossettini  emmipikler  reggioemilia  mariamontessori  ivanillich  paulofreire  schooling  history  schools  parenting  learning  education  progressive  deschooling  unschooling  colombia  ecuador  uruguay  argentina  chile  laeducaciónprohibida  spain 
august 2012 by robertogreco
San Francisco School Takes Experiential Learning to the Next Level - Education - GOOD
"Imagine receiving an electric drill to use at school—and the freedom to learn and explore while building things with it. That’s what happens at Brightworks, a year-old nonprofit private alternative school located in San Francisco’s Mission District.

The school is tiny—just 20 students between 6 and 13 years old—but it's building quite the reputation for its innovative learning philosophy. Brightworks takes its cues from the maker and tinkering movements, which do away with formal classroom instruction in favor of project-based experiential learning.

Students aren’t divided into traditional grade levels, either: The school allows kids to interact naturally across age groups—older students work on more sophisticated projects while younger ones learn primarily through play. And, instead of relying on tests to measure learning, the school's students create portfolios. …"

[Video embedded]
hybridskills  behavior  social  kidcity  learning  confidence  radicalschooling  alternative  radical  projectbasedlearning  mixed-age  smallschools  lcproject  video  sanfrancisco  make  making  learningbydoing  democraticlearning  democraticschools  democraticeducation  deschooling  unschooling  collaboration  schooldesign  schools  cv  education  lizdwyer  assessment  self-directedlearning  2012  brightworks  gevertulley  pbl 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Anarchistic free school - Wikipedia
"An anarchistic free school (also anarchist free school and free skool) is a decentralized network in which skills, information, and knowledge are shared without hierarchy or the institutional environment of formal schooling. Free school students may be adults, children, or both. This organisational structure is distinct from ones used by democratic free schools which permit children's individual initiatives and learning endeavors within the context of a school democracy, and from free education where 'traditional' schooling is made available to pupils without charge."
democracy  history  deschooling  unschooling  grassroots  wikipedia  hierarchy  democraticschools  freeschools  schools  escuelamoderna  franciscoferrer  anarchy  anarchism 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Is Sweden's Classroom-Free School the Future of Learning? - Education - GOOD
"Jannie Jeppesen, the principal of Vittra Telefonplan writes on the school's website that the design is intended to stimulate "children's curiosity and creativity" and offer them opportunities for both collaborative and independent time. Vittra doesn't award traditional grades, either—students are taught in groups according to level—so maximizing diverse teaching and learning situations is a priority.

The open nature of the campus and the unusual furniture arrangements reflect the school's philosophy that "children play and learn on the basis of their needs, curiosity, and inclination." That's true for kids all over the world, so let's hope educators in other countries begin to pay attention."

[Not sure what the program is, waiting to read more. Previously: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665867/school-without-walls-fosters-a-free-wheeling-theory-of-learning ]
2012  classrooms  schools  children  design  unschooling  deschooling  democraticschools  freeschools  architecture  schooldesign  sweden  learning  education  classroom 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Marlboro College
"Marlboro College in Vermont is known for its self-directed approach to liberal arts education. Students work with faculty advisors to design an individualized curriculum. Each student is responsible for creating a final project that demonstrates the capacity for clear writing and critical thought developed through his or her studies."

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlboro_College ]
education  highered  democraticschools  democratic  marlborocollege  self-directedlearning  self-directed  universities  colleges  vermont 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Can Antioch College Return From the Dead Again? - NYTimes.com
"…the college’s first president, Horace Mann, the Massachusetts-born education reformer, instilled a spirit of moral resolve that has lingered ever since. At the 1859 commencement, just weeks before he died, Mann exhorted that year’s Antioch graduates: “I beseech you to treasure up in your hearts these my parting words. Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity…

Yet Antioch College has been on shaky financial ground for its entire existence. Four times — in 1863, 1881, 1919 and 2008 — it has had to close. Next month, it will reopen again…

…in the summer of 2008 they joined six or so Antioch professors in founding a sort of Antioch College in exile called the Nonstop Liberal Arts Institute.

The core of what we need to deliver, I’d argue, is intimacy: quality teaching from quality teachers you get to form a deep relationship with."
antiochcollege  horacemann  2011  precarity  democraticschools  education  highereducation  liberalarts  nonstopliberalartsinstitute  nonstopliberalarts  highered  learning  relationships  humanism  humanity  purpose  activism  ohio  2008 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Finding the Courage to Work for Change « Cooperative Catalyst
"I make a decent, middle-class salary as a college professor, healthcare costs are reasonable (in part because I don’t have children), and there is a pension plan for my future (assuming it does not go bankrupt!). While I do live rather frugally and have a good start on my own retirement savings, I just can’t seem to muster up the courage of potentially stepping away from all that. What if I quit my job to start a school and it goes kaput?"<br />
<br />
[Some good comments with pointers to other posts.]
entrepreneurship  socialentrepreneurship  startups  fear  security  aero  education  unschooling  deschooling  risktaking  honesty  kristanmorrison  alternativeeducation  teaching  cv  democraticschools  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Quote of the Day :: IDEA ["Compulsory Mis-Education by Paul Goodman…quote…remarkably summarizes IDEA's goals."]
"Thus at present, facing a a confusing state of automated technology, excessive urbanization, & entirely new patterns of work & leisure, the best educational brains ought to be devoting themselves to *various* means of educating & paths of growing up, appropriate to various talents, conditions, & careers. We should be experimenting / different kinds of school, no school at all, the real city as school, farm schools, practical apprenticeships, guided travel, work camps, little theatres & local newspapers, & community service. Many others…Probably more than anything, we need a community, & community spirit, in which many adults who know something, & not only professional teachers, pay attention to the young."

…I recognize…experimentation Goodman is referring to.

Big Picture Learning
Democratic/SudVal/Free schools
Unschooling groups and families
Unschooling Adventures Group
Place-based education
Online Education
Specialized schools"
paulgoodman  education  unschooling  deschooling  variety  alternative  alternativeeducation  zulekairvin  bigpictureschools  onlinelearning  democraticschools  sudburyschools  freeschools  place-basededucation  situatedlearning  cityasclassroom  community  servicelearning  apprenticeships  guidedtravel  farmschools  diversity  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  experimentation  choice  place-basedlearning  place-based  place-basedpedagogy 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Anarchy Culture (Berlin) « Kaoru Tozaki Wang
"I’m in East Berlin till the 26th and have lots to update. Having tons of fun here. An amazing culture has arisen after the infamous fall of the Berlin wall. After its fall the city was abandoned, anarchy ensued and a new culture blossomed. Lots of creatives here doing their own thing. Yes, I’ve met my fair share of “entrepre-tenders”(another term I’ve heard is ego-preneur) but still- it’s bubbling with creativity. After shooting 3 months at the democratic school “Brooklyn Free School” (some would call it edu-punk), Berlin is sorta perfect."
kaorutozakiwang  berlin  eastberlin  brooklynfreeschool  creativity  entrepreneurship  edupunk  anarchism  anarchy  culture  freedom  unschooling  tabularasa  blankslates  reinvention  deschooling  entrepre-tenders  eog-preneurs  innovation  democraticschools  democracy  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Learning Generalist: Social Media in Learning and Social Learning are just not the same thing
"…true social learning has a few important characteristics…this is where the 'new' social learning is different from old…non-negotiable criteria to dub any learning as social:

1. Democratic: To me the classic example of social interaction is gossip at a watercooler. Gossip emerges from the ground up…doesn't need someone to lead…crowd decides the agenda…the conversation…Learning is truly social when individuals can decide what they want to learn & how they wish to collaborate on it.

2. Autonomous: …it moves by itself & is not controlled by a facilitator…facilitator can help make the flow of the interaction smoother, but in no way does the facilitator become responsible for the direction of these interactions…

3. Embedded: …it's about life in general…not a separate exercise…'just in time' learning.

4. Emergent: …structure emerges from the natural interactions of a participating group. A big problem w/ enterprise social learning is the desire to structure before you start…"
education  sociallearning  networkedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  cv  learning  learningnetworks  deschooling  unschooling  emergent  emergentcurriculum  autonomy  hierarchy  wirearchy  social  democratic  democraticschools  grassroots  embedded  reallife  meaningmaking  engagement  justintime  justinintimelearning  2011  sumeetmoghe  structure 
july 2011 by robertogreco
espacio a
"espacio a es una comunidad de aprendizaje natural, integral, democrática y de amor para niños y jóvenes de edades 4-18 localizada en el Viejo San Juan, Puerto Rico.

El programa balancea la libertad y responsabilidad académica, social y personal proveyéndoles las herramientas que necesitan para que se desarrollen como seres íntegros, compasivos, pro-activos e inter-dependientes, capaces de ser efectivos en su entorno social.

Espacio A se organizó en el 2007 como una entidad sin fines de lucro y en respuesta a una creciente preocupación por los problemas educativos que surgen a raíz del cambio de la Era industrial a la Era de la Información."

[See also: http://www.educationrevolution.org/week1.html ]
sanjuan  puertorico  schools  democraticschools  democracy  learning  lcproject  education  unschooling  deschooling  espacioa 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Hope Survey
"Background: Research shows students engagement & motivation decreases as they progress through secondary school. This disengagement & lack of motivation is a key concern for educators. In searching for an explanation for this decline, educational researchers have examined the nature of school environment & determined school environments can exert influences on student motivations & engagement through their support or lack of support for students’ developmental needs. These needs include autonomy, belongingness & competence (measured by goal orientation).

"Purpose: The Hope Survey is a unique tool, which enables schools to assess their school environment through the eyes of their students by measuring student perceptions of autonomy, belongingness & goal orientations as well as their resulting engagement in learning & disposition twd achievement. The Hope Survey can diagnose whether a school culture has the components that encourage higher levels of engagement in learning."
via:steelemaley  thehopesurvey  schools  education  assessment  engagement  autonomy  democracy  democraticschools  belonging  measurement  surveys  students  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  shrequest1 
july 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: The art of seeing (Part III) Visiting Delphi
"…we must help students find their own work/study environments, rather than organize that for them. That we must help them discover what creates "privacy" for themselves, rather than enforce group silence…help students learn to construct their own scheduling systems…

When I say I want our students to be creators, not consumers, I mean it. I want to "graduate" students who are capable of creating their own workplaces, their own learning habits, and most importantly, their own solutions to their problems and the problems of our world…

We must create environments which support creation of the new. If our school design remains "the shelf" - rooms lined up according to age and/or pre-determined topic... If our school schedule remains "the shelf" - time lined up by topic and pre-determined function... If our assessment measures what we expect rather than what might be imagined... we are failing to see the future and we are - very literally - blinding our students."
irasocol  2011  education  future  unschooling  deschooling  democraticschools  democracy  innovation  problemsolving  elibroad  arneduncan  billgates  statusquo  wealth  privilege  learning  self-directedlearning  self-directed  technology  lcproject  schools  schooling  schooldesign  kinect  open  openness 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Yaacov Hecht - Wikipedia
"Yaacov Hecht born 1958 in Hadera…Israeli educator & worldwide pioneer of democratic education.

As a dyslexic youth, Hecht encountered many challenges in the public education system which led him to develop his strengths through sports & youth leadership. During his university studies, & following several years of experience in youth movements & visit to Summerhill School, Hecht created core group which in 1987 founded the Democratic School of Hadera…first alternative school in the world named a “Democratic School”…served as its principal for the first ten years…

Today the Institute for Democratic Education (IDE) also operates the Incubator for Entrepreneurship in Democratic Education, coordinates the regional program: “The City as a Democratic Learning System” in more than 20 residential areas; heads the Academic Department of Democratic Education at Hakibbutzim College in Tel Aviv, and supports the establishment of institutes for democratic education in several countries…"
yaacovhech  democraticschools  democraticeducation  learning  unschooling  deschooling  israel  ide  lcproject  tcsnmy  pedagogy  teaching  dyslexia 
june 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - The Old Future of Ed Reform - Final
"This is the final version of my video for Dr. Wesch's Digital Ethnography course at Kansas State University. It addresses the current on-the-cusp-of-revolution state of education today, how education reform movements aren't really anything new, and how previous efforts have failed. It also raises the question of whether the latest revolutionary-minded ferment will pan-out this time around..."
michaelwesch  education  future  progressive  failure  johndewey  revolution  reform  schoolreform  1960s  neilpostman  paulofreire  johnholt  freeschools  schoolwithoutwalls  ivanillich  charlesweingartner  openschools  democraticschools  change  movements  1970s  traditionalschools  2011  utopia  utopianthinking  backtobasics  holisticapproach  holistic  economics  technology  flexibility  whatsoldisnew  whatsoldisnewagain 
june 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - Sudbury Valley School - Focus and Intensity
"This video is a glimpse into the life of our school. Enter a world of young people who are exuberant about their lives, and are fully in control of their education. We hope you will enjoy their spirit, their focus, and above all their intensity in pursuing their passions."
sudburyschools  sudburyvalleyschool  education  unschooling  deschooling  learning  democratic  democraticschools  democracy  tcsnmy  schools  lcproject  2011  play  videogames  games 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Redefining School, Success | DMLcentral
"We’re a district InnovationLab in Loveland, Colorado, where students have crafted, and just completed year one, of a four-year plan of disruption to redefine school. Based on findings that learning at its best is voluntary, per passion/choice, and self-directed, we are working towards community as school.

After our experience this past year, we are thinking: …"

[See also: http://www.slideshare.net/monk51295/city-as-floorplan AND http://labconnections.blogspot.com/p/what-is-detox.html AND http://labconnections.blogspot.com/ ]
monikahardy  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  lcproject  change  gamechanging  connectedlearning  trust  teaching  schools  pedagogy  detox  mindset  community  communitycenters  success  democracy  democratic  democraticschools  empowerment  toshare 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Adventures in Free Schooling
"Adventures in Free Schooling was started for several reasons: to have a dialogue about democratic, alternative, creative, and popular education and critical pedagogy; to share resources on teaching and learning that is geared towards anti-oppression and liberation; to discuss the history of schools and their impact on our society; to explore current models and experiments in alternative education, teaching, and learning; and more.The discussions and topics found here have a heavy focus on history and the relation between workplace democracy and learning-place democracy. This blog is also dedicated to education that is focused on fighting societal injustices and creating liberation through learning and teaching. Last, but not least, Adventures in Free Schooling is a space that’s purpose is to create new and innovative ideas for alternative learning places and critical teaching methods."
freeschools  free  schools  education  democracy  democraticschools  learning  unschooling  deschooling  brianvanslyke  liberation  freedom  teaching  alternativeeducation  alternative  society  lcproject  history  workplace  opression  anti-opression  colonization  pedagogy 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Bellwether School
"At The Bellwether School we view education from a holistic perspective, which means, first, that we are concerned with the whole child—emotional, social, physical, moral, spiritual, artistic and creative as well as intellectual dimensions of their development—and second, that every child’s life is connected to wider contexts of experience—peers, family, community, culture, and the natural world. The goal of holistic education to facilitate a child in developing all aspects of themselves, to reach their full learning potential. Like all progressive educators, we see children as natural learners and honor that principle. We recognize that children already come to the classroom with many gifts; their multiple intelligences and languages, full potential, uniqueness, and natural curiosity. We strive to design a learning environment and to use teaching practices that support children’s characteristic ways of exploring, discovering, and constructing their knowledge of the world…"
bellwhetherschool  vermont  education  schools  progressive  intrinsicmotivation  learning  children  educationalphilosophy  philosophy  constructivism  community  burlington  williston  lcproject  wholechild  unschooling  deschooling  democraticschools  democracy  tcsnmy 
may 2011 by robertogreco
A learning mash-up.
"We need them….dedicated and passionate teachers and learners who see learning as a design that the learner moves, shapes and feeds forward as positive action in our world….educational communities need them, those with social imagination….experts, yes experts."

[Thomas is too kind — flattered to be mentioned amongst the likes of Dennis Littky, Dougald Hine, and Leigh Blackall.]
thomassteele-maley  leighblackall  dennislittky  dougaldhine  ego  cv  collegeunbound  ivanillich  unschooling  deschooling  learning  teaching  education  democraticschools  democracy  schools  tcsnmy  openstudio  student-centered  self-directedlearning  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  studentdirected  students  tcsnmy7  tcsnmy8  modeling  criticaleducation 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Welcome to Kornerstone School - a public tuition-free school servings grades 8-12 in the Kimberly, WI Area School District
"A community based school emphasizing the process of service and exploratory learning for each student. KS serves students in grades 8-12 and will center on Project Based Learning and Service Learning.

If your child craves exploration, is inquisitive, or is a problem solver, then he or she will benefit from their journey at Kornerstone School."
via:steelemaley  kornerstoneschool  education  democraticschools  projectbasedlearning  learning  unschooling  deschooling  teaching  tcsnmy  lcproject  student-centered  studentdirected  student-led  self-directedlearning  autodidacts  self-directed  wisconsin  constructivism  pbl  charterschools 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Transitions | teach4aliving
"After the interview, a nun pulled me into the hall and said, “You have to be careful about how you share your enthusiasm. It scares some people.” I’m so grateful for her pointing out one of my character flaws in such a gentle way. I know now what she means…

I asked him a direct question, “How do I avoid founders syndrome?” A lot of people who are at the ground floor of starting new schools don’t last. This is a huge concern of mine. I’m a strong willed person who can also be down right pouty when I don’t get my way. I want to be one of 5 Lead Teachers. I don’t want to be the quasi-administrator of the school because that will kill many of the democratic teacher led initiatives. Jamie’s response was a verbal backhand to my face. He said, “You have to remember who the school belongs to. It belongs to them out there (pointing to his students), and they allow me to teach here. I’m lucky enough to work for them…Give away power at every opportunity.” Servant leadership in action."
enthusiasm  transitions  founderssyndrome  michaelmccabe  teaching  schools  cv  tcsnmy  characterflaws  scaringpeople  leadership  administration  lcproject  democracy  democraticschools  2011 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Why old-school teaching fails new Canada - thestar.com
"At Arcola elementary in Regina, the main question asked by the staff was: “What will be good for our demographics?” Since they have the highest percentage of single families in Regina, they decided what they needed was, first, a sense of family and then, individualized instruction because the kids are at such different levels that one teacher per classroom isn't enough. So they concocted a program of team teaching, three or four teachers per expanded class. Some teachers resisted at first. Now you'd have to pry it out of their grip.

These schools have been designated community schools, and with that comes the extra funding needed for what they do. But the community's own voice is at the centre. As a result, you don't just end up giving the community what someone thinks it needs; you start changing the nature of the community and its schools."

[Let me repeat: "the community's own voice is at the centre […] you don't just end up giving the community what someone thinks it needs"]
teaching  reform  schools  education  democracy  lcproject  democraticschools  leadership  management  tcsnmy  administration  livingthroughtheopposite  thewayitshouldbedone  progressive  advicepeopleiknowshouldfollow  learning  community  communities 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Independence Day: Developing Self-Directed Learning Projects - NYTimes.com
"What would schools look like if students developed their own curriculum? How would education and the experience of being in school differ for students if they had more power to direct their learning? In this lesson, students consider an experiment in public education in which a small group of high school students planned and executed a model for their own learning. They then develop and implement their own self-directed projects and reflect on the results." [See also: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/opinion/15engel.html AND http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTmH1wS2NJY ]
pedagogy  education  learning  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  independentproject  schools  studentdirected  self-directed  self-directedlearning  projectbasedlearning  projects  curriculum  lifeskills  standards  collaboration  problemsolving  criticalthinking  self-regulation  leadership  individualization  theindependentproject  freedom  independence  cv  freeschools  democraticschools  autodidacts  autodidactism  student-led  autodidacticism  pbl 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Let Kids Rule the School - NYTimes.com
"Schools everywhere could initiate an Independent Project. All it takes are serious, committed students and a supportive faculty. These projects might not be exactly alike: students might apportion their time differently, or add another discipline to the mix. But if the Independent Project students are any indication, participants will end up more accomplished, more engaged and more knowledgeable than they would have been taking regular courses.

We have tried making the school day longer and blanketing students with standardized tests. But perhaps children don’t need another reform imposed on them. Instead, they need to be the authors of their own education."

[See also: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/21/independence-day-developing-self-directed-learning-projects/ AND http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTmH1wS2NJY ]
education  innovation  change  tcsnmy  lcproject  democratic  schools  unschooling  deschooling  howwework  choice  collaboration  curriculum  emergentcurriculum  studentdirected  cv  democraticschools  freeschools  independentproject  plp  inquiry-basedlearning  learning  freedom  independence  responsibility  theindependentproject  self-directed  self-directedlearning  autodidacts  autodidactism  student-led  autodidacticism 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Institute for Democratic Education in America | IDEA
"IDEA, Institute for Democratic Education in America, is an emerging national nonprofit organization whose mission is to ensure that all young people can participate meaningfully in their education and gain the tools to build a just, democratic, and sustainable world."
democratic  education  organizations  school  unschooling  deschooling  schools  tcsnmy  criticaleducation  democraticschools  lcproject 
june 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - Make Your Voice Heard: Discover Democratic Education
"In a society based on democracy, participation, and engagement, shouldn't education be democratic, participatory, and engaging? How can young people be creative, curious, and collaborative learners when their schooling boxes them in with testing and standardization? What does a more empowering, democratic education look like?
lcproject  education  learning  tcsnmy  democratic  schools  unschooling  deschooling  self-directedlearning  participatory  videos  democraticschools 
june 2010 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read