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robertogreco : depthoverbreadth   12

Watering the Roots of Knowledge Through Collaborative Learning - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"These problematic aspects of the model are symptoms of its first major fault, a violation of the wisdom of Confucius: "Tell me, and I will forget; show me, and I will remember; involve me, and I will understand." I have demonstrated this fault directly. One fall at Columbia University, I had the usual 80-student class of bright, ambitious undergraduates fulfilling their science requirement by taking my lecture course on the solar system. Most attended the lectures, and, mostly, they paid attention (I do not use PowerPoint). They worked through long quantitative problem sets, took biweekly quizzes, and performed well on the midterm and final exams. They then went home for Christmas and on to the spring semester.

The following September, I gathered most of them again and administered a test on some of the material we had covered. I gave the same test to my new class before my first lecture. The results were statistically indistinguishable. So much for pouring knowledge from the full container to the empty ones—it leaks out.

The second major fault of the current educational model is that learning is an isolated activity. Yes, we bring a number of students together to form a "class," but then we do everything possible to isolate students from each other: "No talking in class"; "Please leave two seats between each person for this exam"; "Do all your own work." We desocialize learning, separating it from the periods of normal human interaction we call dorm-room bull sessions.

The third misplaced pillar of educational practice is competition and its accompanying correlate, quantitative measurement. Standardized tests proliferate; grade-point averages are calculated to four significant figures. We pretend that these numbers measure learning and use them to award scholarships, sort professional-school applicants, and, sadly, evaluate self-worth. And we are surprised that cheating—the goal of which is to get a higher score—is widespread. If a group of students works together effectively and efficiently to solve a hard problem, in school this is called cheating. In life, as the British educator Sir Ken Robinson notes, it's called collaboration, a valued asset in most real-world settings."



"General education is often thought of as a means to expose students to a broad range of "essential" knowledge and to provide a historical context for the culture in which they live. These are valid, but insufficient, goals. The purpose of general education should be to produce graduates who are skilled in communication, imbued with quantitative reasoning skills, instinctively collaborative, inherently transdisciplinary in their approach to problems, and engaged in their local and global communities—broadly educated individuals with an informed perspective on the problems of the 21st century and the integrative abilities to solve them."
davidhelfand  questuniversity  2013  via:tealtan  education  design  curriculum  academia  highereducation  highered  tcsnmy  cv  teaching  learning  unschooling  blockprograms  collaboration  deschooling  measurement  standardization  standardizedtesting  standards  social  isolation  comparison  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  coloradocollege  flexibility  depth  depthoverbreadth  generalists  generaleducation  adaptability  shrequest1 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Teaching Social Innovation | Austin Center for Design
"“We [need to] teach decidedly unglamorous, small scale tools that allow people to make meaning in as significant ways possible, not only in terms of outcomes, but in terms of process.” That’s precisely the right message for design educators – to emphasize significance in process, rather than object, and focus on small-scale, deep impact. It’s a rejection of an exhausted focus on metrics, scale, and artifacts, and for many of us, it means ignoring the hype of design tourism. I’m positioning the program at AC4D on creating founders who have a sensitive, passionate, and intellectual approach to their work. And I’m thrilled to see more and more programs embracing social innovation, and re-evaluating – and in many cases, massively overhauling – tired design curricula."
jonkolko  design  education  learning  socialinnovation  designeducation  projectbasedlearning  2011  metrics  measurement  success  humanitariandesign  depthoverbreadth  timelines  time  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  ac4d  meaning  meaningfulness  eziomazini  commitment  relationships  tcsnmy  communityengagement  krissdeiglmeier  socialimpact  assessment  tracking  accreditation  credentials  convenience  responsibility  designtourism  entrepreneurship  helenwalters  shrequest1  pbl 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Messiness of “With” | Rush the Iceberg
"Education is not a “I learned from” concept; rather, it is a “I learned with” concept.
“From” is clean.“With” is messy.

“From” is binary.“With” is human.
“From” is instant.“With” takes time.
“From” is passive.“With” is active.
“From” is singular.“With” is together.
“From” is shallow.“With” is deep.
“From” is informative.“With” is transformative.
Do you interact WITH your students the same way you tweet?

Which word describes your pedagogy in the classroom and tweets on Twitter?"
stephendavis  with  and  thisandthat  nuance  teaching  learning  conversation  from  messiness  education  collaboration  collaborative  depthoverbreadth  transformation  behavior  howwework  human  time  slow 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Critical pedagogy - Wikipedia
"Critical pedagogy is a philosophy of education described by Henry Giroux as an "educational movement, guided by passion and principle, to help students develop consciousness of freedom, recognize authoritarian tendencies, and connect knowledge to power and the ability to take constructive action."[1]

Based in Marxist theory, critical pedagogy draws on radical democracy, anarchism, feminism, and other movements that strive for what they describe as social justice. Critical pedagogue Ira Shor defines critical pedagogy as:

"Habits of thought, reading, writing, and speaking which go beneath surface meaning, first impressions, dominant myths, official pronouncements, traditional clichés, received wisdom, and mere opinions, to understand the deep meaning, root causes, social context, ideology, and personal consequences of any action, event, object, process, organization, experience, text, subject matter, policy, mass media, or discourse." (Empowering Education, 129)"
criticalpedagogy  education  pedagogy  criticaleducation  democracy  philosophy  henrygiroux  authoritarianism  authority  freedom  knowledge  teaching  learning  schools  power  control  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  activism  marxism  anarchism  anarchy  feminism  socialjustice  justice  iraschor  habitsofmind  habitsofthought  reading  writing  literacy  depth  tcsnmy  wisdom  personalconsequences  socialcontext  empowerment  process  experience  depthoverbreadth  politics  paulofreire  michaelapple  howardzinn  jonathankozol  johnholt  johntaylorgatto  matthern  foucault  michelfoucault 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Lessons Learned in Stockholm: Thoughts from Head of School — THINK Global School
"Humans balk at a completely unstructured day…we can build a good compromise between unstructured classes & traditional timetable. Ideally, we will be able to sit down w/ students at weekly Sunday meetings & map out week ahead.

…schools will do better managing tech if admin sets clear objectives for tech program but then creates conditions for healthy, intelligent experimenting by faculty & students…internal crowd-sourcing is fastest way to develop set of best practices to fit school’s mission…iPhone = single most important tool we’ve used this term…

Less is more. We overbooked museum tours, lectures & adventures at start of term. Better–much better–to go to same gallery 3 times & work closely w/ docent than go to 3 different exhibits. Better–much better–to study 3 paintings closely than whole galleries worth superficially. In future, we want to collaborate w/ museums, galleries, universities, exhibitions & so on that are willing to develop deep & tightly focused projects."
iphone  ipad  teaching  learning  technology  simplicity  slow  slowness  lessismore  tgs  thinkglobalschool  bradovenell-carter  lcproject  blockschedules  scheduling  tcsnmy  schools  travel  structure  textbooks  textbookfree  meaning  focus  depthoverbreadth  cv 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Want smarter kids? Make them study something - one thing - for a long time.
"His idea goes like this: Assign each student a single, specific topic, which he or she will study over and over again, from every possible angle, from early elementary school through high school. Egan, a professor of education at Canada's Simon Fraser University, hopes that by the time such students finish high school, they will be world-class experts on their topics - as well as more effective citizens and better people.

"People who know nothing in depth commonly assume that their opinions are the same kind of thing as knowledge," Egan writes in his forthcoming book "Learning In Depth: A Simple Innovation That Can Transform Schooling," which will be available in January. He also contends that "a central feature of becoming a moral person is to learn to become engaged with something outside the self.""
kieranegan  learning  education  schools  teaching  specialization  expertise  depthoverbreadth  depth  specialists 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Lecture Method vs. Peer Instruction « Zero-Knowledge Proofs
"# Students who have recently learned something are better at explaining it to other students than teacher who learned & mastered it years ago. It is difficult for a teacher who has mastery of a concept to be aware of conceptual difficulties of beginning learner.

# Give students more responsibility for gathering info & make it our job to help them w/ assimilation.

# You can’t learn Physics by watching someone else solve problems...wouldn’t learn to pay piano by watching someone else...If you want to learn problem solving, you have to do problems.

# Better understanding leads to better problem solving...converse...not necessarily true. Better problem solving does not necessarily indicate better understanding.

# Education is no longer about info transfer.

# in his original methods he covered a lot, but the students didn’t retain much so coverage was basically meaningless. In his new method, he has relaxed the coverage a little bit, but increased the comprehension enormously."
wcydwt  teaching  education  depthoverbreadth  via:lukeneff  lectures  peerinstruction  tcsnmy  doing  conceptualunderstanding  understanding  math  physics  learning  information  problemsolving  criticalthinking 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Holyrood Magazine: Finnish lessons
"Finland bucks a number of global education trends. Not least of these is the shift towards central control and accountability. Indeed the term ‘accountability’ is not even within the Finnish vocabulary, Sahlberg says. Contrary to the increasing checks and inspections common in many countries – not least south of the border where a teacher ‘MOT’ is being introduced – Finnish teachers enjoy a high level of professional autonomy. There is no national inspectorate and no external teacher assessment. ... come to Finland and ask about accountability in the context of education people will be puzzled because they don’t know what you’re talking about ... Pupils start compulsory education at seven and follow a broad cross-curricular approach during the primary years. ...Finland has always accepted the fact that teachers are the most important element in fulfilling all these dreams [of being a top performing education system] and there have been no mistakes in this understanding"
finland  education  accountability  local  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  schools  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  depthoverbreadth  autonomy  leadership  policy  administration  management 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Will Depth Replace Breadth in Schools? - Class Struggle - Jay Mathews on Education
"[A] surprising study — certain to be a hot topic in teacher lounges and education schools — is providing new data that suggest educators should spend much more time on a few issues and let some topics slide. Based on a sample of 8,310 undergraduates, the national study says that students who spend at least a month on just one topic in a high school science course get better grades in a freshman college course in that subject than students whose high school courses were more balanced.
education  depthoverbreadth  depth  breadth  learning  testing  assessment  schools  curriculum  science  research  teaching  tcsnmy 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball Linked List: Sitzfleisch
"Tying together yesterday’s link to Brent Simmons’s advice for would-be indie developers (“You need to wear out that chair and then buy a new one and then wear out that one”) and the previous link to Malcolm Gladwell’s conclusion that it is perseverance and above all else extraordinary amounts of practice that separates the great from the not-great, is the wonderful German word sitzfleisch: The ability to endure or carry on with an activity."
perseverance  johngruber  coding  malcolmgladwell  greatness  success  tcsnmy  depth  endurance  german  words  language  depthoverbreadth 
november 2008 by robertogreco

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