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robertogreco : desert   16

@debcha en Instagram: “Graham Stevens, "Desert Cloud" (1972) A 10x12x2m tethered solar balloon, the top surface is clear and the bottom black, so sunlight heats…”
"Graham Stevens, "Desert Cloud" (1972) A 10x12x2m tethered solar balloon, the top surface is clear and the bottom black, so sunlight heats the air inside and it rises, providing shade in the heat of the day. At the BSA's "New Inflatables" exhibit."
grahamstevens  1972  inflatables  science  art  heat  desert  inflatable 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Hello World, Episode 10: Searching for the Origins of the Universe in Chile
"Episode 10: With its extreme conditions and geological oddities, Chile is a prime spot for major tech projects."
chile  atacama  observatories  technology  lithium  desert  startups  makerspaces  2016  sanpedrodeatacama  santiago  astronomy  ashleevance 
july 2017 by robertogreco
California's Dying Sea
"In this series, The Desert Sun investigates the crisis of the shrinking Salton Sea, from its worsening dust storms to its disappearing birds. The lake is becoming a toxic dust bowl — nearly 15 years after California lawmakers promised to fix it."
california  2017  saltonsea  desert 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Capitalism Whack-A-Mole | MattBruenig | Politics
"There is no general framework of morality or justice that supports laissez-faire capitalism. This is a problem of course for those who wish to argue on behalf of it. When you talk to such people, a familiar argumentative pattern emerges that I have come to call Capitalism Whack-A-Mole.

Someone playing Capitalism Whack-A-Mole moves seamlessly between three different — and mutually incompatible — frameworks of justification. Those frameworks are desert (each person should get what they produce with their labor), voluntarism (each person should get whatever they come about through voluntary, non-coercive means), and utility (the economic system should be created to maximize well-being). This Capitalism Whack-A-Mole does not need a starting point, but, in my experience, either desert or voluntarism comes first, with utility the back up when the argument turns really bad.

Here is a simulation of one such argument."
capitalism  2014  mattbruenig  inequality  voluntarism  utility  desert  taxes  libertarianism 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Richard Rodriguez: “New Atheism has a distinctly neo-colonial aspect”
"Provocative thinker Richard Rodriguez challenges orthodoxy on religion, liberals and class, Pope Francis and more"



"My qualm, right now, with the political left is that it is so taken over by sexual issues, sexual questions, that we have forgotten the traditional concern of the left was always social class and those at the bottom. And now we’re faced with a pope who is compassionate towards the poor and we want to know his position on abortion. It seems to me that at one point when Pope Francis said, “You know the church has been too preoccupied with those issues, gay marriage and abortion…” at some level the secular left has been too preoccupied with those issues."

Q: You’re saying that the church — it’s not exactly Catholics, it’s the church itself, the Vatican — has been obsessed with these questions at the same time the Anglo-American cultural left has been obsessed with these as well. To the exclusion of other important issues?

Yes, particularly the very poor. And it seems to me what the pope doesn’t say when he says we’ve been too preoccupied with these issues is: why? And that is what really interests me in my description of the relationship of heterosexual women in my life. I think that the problem with women controlling their reproduction and gay men getting married is that we’re not generative, as the Vatican would judge us. And that’s a deep violation of the desert. It’s the whole point of the desert religions, to give birth, you know. And when women are not doing that, or women are choosing to control the process, or men are marrying each other outside the process of birth, then that’s the problem.



"I think that increasingly the left has conceded organized religion to the political right. This has been a catastrophe on the left.

I’m old enough to remember the black Civil Rights movement, which was as I understood it a movement of the left and insofar as it was challenging the orthodoxy of conservatives in the American South. White conservatism. And here was a group of protestant ministers leading processions, which were really religious processions through the small towns and the suburbs of the South. We shall overcome. Well, we have forgotten just how disruptive religion can be to the status quo. How challenging it is to the status quo. I also talk about Cesar Chavez, who is, who was embraced by the political left in his time but he was obviously a challenge to organized labor, the teamsters and to large farmers in the central valley.

So somehow we had decided on the left that religion belongs to Fox Television, or it belongs to some kind of right-wing fanaticism in the Middle East and we have given it up, and it has made us a really empty — that is, it has made the left really empty. I’ll point to one easy instance. Fifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his “I have a dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial. And what America heard was really a sermon. It was as though slavery and Jim Crow could not be described as a simple political narrative; racism was a moral offense, not simply an illegality. And with his vision of a time “when all of God’s children” in America would be free, he described the nation within a religious parable of redemption.

Fifty years later, our technocratic, secular president gave a speech at the Lincoln memorial, honoring the memory of the speech Dr. King had given. And nothing President Obama said can we remember these few weeks later; his words were dwarfed by our memory of the soaring religious oratory of fifty years ago. And what’s happened to us — and I would include myself in the cultural left — what has happened to us is we have almost no language to talk about the dream life of America, to talk about the soul of America, to talk about the mystery of being alive at this point in our lives, this point in our national history. That’s what we’ve lost in giving it to Fox Television.



Q:Where do you find yourself very conservative these days?

I would say even on an issue like affirmative action, for example, I haven’t changed. I think that the hijacking of the integrationists’ dream as it announced itself in the North, where racism was not legalized but it was de facto, the hijacking of that movement to integrate Northern institutions by the middle class and to make middle class ascendancy somehow an advance for the entire population — I think was grotesque. And so you ended up with a black and brown bourgeoisie and you did nothing with those at the bottom, and you also managed to ignore white poverty. What the left has forgotten or ignored is that it is possible to be white and poor in America. The solution to de facto segregation in the late 1960s, as the black Civil Rights movement turned north, was an affirmative action that ignored white poverty altogether. And to make matters worse, Hispanics were named with blacks as the other principal excluded society in America. Conveniently ignored by the liberal agenda was the fact that Hispanics are not a racial group and therefore cannot suffer “racism” as Hispanics. And to turn misunderstanding into a kind of cartoon revolution, it became possible for, say, a white Cuban to be accepted to Yale as a “minority,” but a white kid from Appalachia would never be a minority because, after all, whites were numerically represented in societies of power.



And totally ignores the reality or the fantastic contradictions of the word or concept of Hispanic/Latino. We are posing ourselves as a racial group when in fact we are an ethnic group. The left has no idea. The left says nothing about the obliviousness of our political process to poor whites. The fact that the Civil Rights movement managed to ignore white poverty was the beginning of the end of the Democratic party in the old South. The white poor began to turn to the Republican party, which is where it is now."

[via: http://ayjay.tumblr.com/post/71039097451/you-know-one-of-the-things-about-that-piece-that-i ]
richardrodriguez  atheism  newatheism  catholicism  2013  via:ayjay  religion  politics  conservatism  liberalism  popefrancis  bilingualeducation  civilrights  affirmativeaction  class  society  nature  desert  homophobia  culture  jerryfaldwell  poor  race  ethnicity 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Assembly Required: The Transformative Art of Noah Purifoy | San Bernardino | Artbound | KCET
"On a ten-acre parcel near the perimeter of the Marine Corps Air and Ground Combat Center (half a million acres of chocolate mountains and sand dunes that serve as a simulacrum of the Middle East), Purifoy, one of the founders of the Watts Towers Art Center that rose from the ashes of the 1965 riots, spent the final years of his life creating the monumental "Outdoor Desert Art Museum of Assemblage Sculpture" made from tons of discarded materials. The "Environment" (the nickname a few critics and Purifoy himself sometimes used) is an astonishing feat of the imagination as much as it is a physical one."
desert  california  joshuatree  noahpurifoy  art  artists  2013  mojavedesert  deserts  segregation  environment  rubénmartínez 
may 2013 by robertogreco
BBC News - Arizona: Naming the dead from the desert
"It's the job of a forensics team in Arizona to identify the bodies of migrants found in the desert. Anthropologist Robin Reineke describes how she pieces together the sad jigsaw puzzle of personal attributes and belongings."
robinreineke  science  forensics  2013  border  desert  mexico  us  borders  migration  immigration 
march 2013 by robertogreco
airplane graveyard - a set on Flickr
"between 1997 and 1999, i made several visits to an aircraft scrapyard in the mojave desert. it's an incredible thing to walk right up to these giant machines and see their intricate workings laid bare.

the black and white images were shot on a blistering august day, the temperature well over 110˚. kodak tri-x pan with a red #25 filter.

color was shot on fuji velvia with a circular pola filter."
flickr  graveyard  mojave  desert  mojavedesert  aircraft  tovisit  togo 
december 2010 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG Expedition to the Geoglyphs of Nowhere - Eventbrite
"In the desert 100 miles northeast of Los Angeles is a suburb abandoned in advance of itself: the unfinished extension of a place called California City. Visible from above now as a series of badly paved streets carved into the dust and gravel, the outer edges of California City are like some peculiarly American response to the Nazca Lines. The uninhabited street plan has become an abstract geoglyph—unintentional land art visible from airplanes—not a thriving community at all.
architecture  california  suburbs  bldgblog  desert  abandoned  mojave  todo  californiacity 
february 2010 by robertogreco
.: Jackrabbit Homestead :.
"JACKRABBIT HOMESTEAD is a forthcoming book and web-based multimedia presentation featuring a downloadable car audio tour exploring the cultural legacy of the Small Tract Act in Southern California's Morongo Basin region near Joshua Tree National Park. Stories from this underrepresented regional history are told through the voices of local residents, historians, and area artists—many of whom reside in reclaimed historic cabins and use the structures as inspiration for their creative work."
art  culture  architecture  losangeles  photography  california  desert  memory  economics  history  books  geography  travel  landscape  journalism  tourism  law  place  land  cabins 
december 2009 by robertogreco
“Off the Deep End: A Look at the Decline of Dubai” Slideshow | Fast Company
"Deserts have a way of reclaiming whatever is built upon them. In the case of Dubai, the global financial implosion has sent that process into overdrive. After six years of frenzied expansion, during which the emirate's population grew at 7% annually and nearly $600 billion went into construction (the world's tallest building! the world's largest shopping mall! the biggest man-made island! an indoor ski resort!), reality has come rushing into view." [via: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/08/dubai-as-detroit/]
dubai  detroit  decay  decline  cities  oil  energy  desert 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Ry Cooder’s American West - NYTimes.com
"El Mirage Dry Lake sounds like a place one step away from nonexistence, but it’s about 100 miles north of Los Angeles, out among the Joshua trees. It’s not far from Edwards Air Force Base, in the Mojave’s military-paranormal sector, where secretive government installations lie low among the jackrabbits — a land of spy planes, space aliens, off-road vehicles, sturdy reptiles and people with freaky desert habits, like racing vintage hot rods on dry lakebeds.

It is, in other words, a critical stop on Ry’s California trail.

Ry Cooder — the rock and blues guitarist, roots musician, record producer, songwriter and composer — is a son of Santa Monica who has spent nearly 40 years exploring all corners of the musical planet, like a sharp-eared extraterrestrial on a lifelong voyage of discovery."
via:javierarbona  west  us  music  culture  space  travel  tourism  military  landscape  extopia  utopia  utopian  nytimes  races  california  drugs  economics  elmiragedrylake  mojave  desert  rycooder 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Aviation Warehouse - Aviation Related Props - Adelanto, California
"Our Props Include: * Mock-Ups of All Makes & Models of Airplanes * Mock-Ups of Helicopters * Cockpits * Crashed Planes * Airplane Parts * An Aviation Library * Anything and Everything That Is Aviation Related"

[see photos here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lostamerica/sets/72157594233060737/ ]
california  desert  losangeles  airplanes  history 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Fifty Percent Chance Lake Mead Will Be Dry By 2021, Models Show | Wired Science from Wired.com
"Based on models constructed from the analysis of historical records from the Federal Bureau of Land Reclamation, the researchers, Tim Barnett and David Pierce, say there is a ten percent chance the reservoir will be dry in 2014, and a 50 percent chance n
water  southwest  california  lakemead  resources  us  desert  rivers  losangeles  future 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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