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Japanese Dictionary for iPhone, iPad, Android | iThinkdiff.net
[see also: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/japanese-dictionary-translator/id504762414 ]

"Bilingual dictionary translate words and phrases from English to Japanese and Japanese to English. Over 156,000 English and 194,000 Japanese words in an offline dictionary, with offline pronunciation of English words and online pronunciation of English & Japanese words. Includes single player and multi-player vocabulary training games.

Key Features:
—————————————
• Translate individual words, phrases, or whole sentences
• Scan English text in image by pointing your device camera to search in dictionary
• Cross search feature. Touch a word for a while for the menu [Copy | Define | Search | Pronunciation]
• Bookmark and Recent History for instant recall
• Multiple games to help students improve their English or Japanese vocabulary
• Online & Offline Pronunciation for English & Japanese text
• Flash Card & Word of the Day for vocabulary learning
• Phrase Book

Detailed Description
—————————————
Designed for students, professionals and travelers using any iOS device, including iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. Japanese Dictionary will automatically optimize itself for both Universal displays and Retina displays to ensure text is easy to read.

Users can customize the font for both English and Japanese to ensure the text is readable. Definitions include Wiktionary word information, including historical uses of the word and synonyms to help students find the most appropriate word for any sentence.

Users can copy and paste translations into any other app or send the translation directly by SMS text message—plus the translation can be sent to Twitter as a tweet, Facebook as a status update, or LinkedIn as a network update.

The optional Word Of The Day uses a notification to send students a random most useful English word and definition to help the student expand his or her vocabulary.

Flash card, multiple choice, and word guess games test students on their existing vocabulary and help them quickly learn new words.

Additional online games and feedback encourage study. Word Fight Multiplayer pits two students against each other online to see who has learned the most. Achievements and Leaderboard track the most advanced users, rewarding students for effective study."
ios  dictionaries  japanese  srg 
november 2018 by robertogreco
‎imiwa? on the App Store
"This application is a multilingual Japanese dictionary that does not require an internet connection.

Imiwa? was created using the amazing JMdict files from the Electronic Dictionary Research and Development Group based on the work of Jim Breen on the EDICT project.

While some definitions are available in 4 languages (English, French, Russian and German), only the English translation is guaranteed for all entries in the JMDict dictionary. Initiate a search in any of those 4 languages, in Japanese or in romaji and imiwa? will do the rest.

imiwa? Also includes a rich database of kanji (KanjiDic), examples (from tatoeba.org) and conjugations as well as tools suitable for beginners.

Use the Traditional Chinese character recognition keyboard included in the iOS system for drawing kanji on screen."
ios  japanese  dictionaries  srg 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Japanese
"Lost in translation?
Not anymore.
Japanese is the ultimate study companion for any Japanese learner. Discover the language, learn the grammar and master it with flashcards."

[See also: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/japanese/id290664053 ]
japanese  dictionaries  ios  srg  android 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Jisho.org: Japanese Dictionary
"Jisho is a powerful Japanese-English dictionary. It lets you find words, kanji, example sentences and more quickly and easily.

Enter any Japanese text or English word in the search box and Jisho will search a myriad of data for you.

Here’s a few example searches to give you a taste of what Jisho can do.

• Great English search: house
• Text reading assistance: 昨日すき焼きを食べました
• Inflection information: 走った
• Multi word search: 日 sunlight
• JLPT N3 adjectives: #jlpt-n3 #adjective
• Grade 1 jōyō kanji: #grade:1 #kanji
• Common words that end with 家: #word #common ?*家
• Convert Japanese years: 昭和52
• Convert Japanese numbers: 4778万

There are more examples and explanations on the search options page."
japanese  srg  dictionaries 
november 2018 by robertogreco
How Red Is Dragon’s Blood? | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian
"Color dictionaries were designed to give people around the world a common vocabulary to describe the colors of everything from rocks and flowers to stars, birds, and postage stamps. They afforded scientists and naturalists a means of descriptive biological precision that could be easily shared—so naturalists in Kalamazoo and Germany could communicate effectively about a family of birds found in both places in related (but different) forms. They typically consisted of a set of color swatches, each assigned a name (usually rendered in several languages, to facilitate international use), an identifying number, and an often-lyrical description of the color (“the color of the blood of a freshly killed rabbit,” or “mummy brown.”)

Other important color dictionaries were published at the start of the 20th century when Ridgway published his work—some of them strange and wonderful. The French Society of Chrysanthemists, for instance, created a two-volume set of swatches and names in 1905 for their own botanical uses. Holly Green was described as “the ordinary color of the foliage of the common holly, viewed from 1 to 2 meters away, and without considering reflections.” And despite the fact that the work was meant for international consumption, its soul remained French. “Sky Blue,” for example, was described as “The color reminiscent of pure sky, in summer (in the climate of Paris).”

But Ridgway’s work stood out. Shy, retiring, and nerdy in the extreme, he was an astonishingly talented identifier and user of colors. This gift was key in a field where distinguishing among subspecies of birds with slight color variations was essential to understanding the mechanisms of evolution, speciation, and other scientific aspects of the natural world. Ridgway wrote a short color dictionary in 1886, just as he finished work on a groundbreaking set of rules and guidelines for naming birds. He worked quietly on his color project for decades, until 1912, when he self-published a work with 1,115 named colors: Color Standards and Color Nomenclature.

The book is filled with color swatches with names like “Dragons-blood Red,” which makes me think of blood dripping from a sword; or “Light Paris Green,” which seems like a holiday; or “Light Squill Blue,” which somehow sounds like a cross between “squash” and “quill” and “thrill,” though a squill is in fact a coastal Mediterranean plant."
color  history  2014  dictionaries 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Sideways Dictionary
"Sideways dictionary — it's like a dictionary, but using analogies instead of definitions. Use it as a tool for finding and sharing helpful analogies to explain technology. Because if everyone understands technology better, we can make technology work better for everyone."
technology  language  dictionary  tech  reference  dictionaries 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Describing Words - Find Adjectives to Describe Things
"This tool helps you find adjectives for things that you're trying to describe. Also check out ReverseDictionary.org and RelatedWords.org."
dictionaries  onlinetoolkit  writing  reference  adjectives  words  english  via:tealtan  classideas 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Time Traveler by Merriam-Webster: Search Words by First Known Use Date
"When was a word first used in print? You may be surprised! Enter a date below to see the words first recorded on that year. To learn more about First Known Use dates, click here."
timelines  classideas  dictionaries  words  language  english  neologisms  2017 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Asemic writing - Wikipedia
[See also: https://twitter.com/jbushnell/status/877535553671090176

Lyn Hejinian: "In responding to the Dubravka Djuric's question about the origins of my interest in writing, I said that it as the materiality of writing that first drew me to it, the prospect of working with 'the typewriter and the dictionary.'"
https://twitter.com/jbushnell/status/877535553671090176

[See also:
"Definition Not Found: The last refuge from #content might just be asemic writing" by Rahel Aima
http://reallifemag.com/definition-not-found/

"Asemic writing might be better understood not as illegible but as ‘post-literate’"



"Within the sphere of green anarchist thought there is a current that bills itself as primitivist, with all the condescending fetishism that “primitive” invokes. Avowedly anti-technology, the anti-civilizationist critique of capitalism extends beyond the environmental degradation and forms of domination of contemporary production to rail against the concept of civilization itself. The sphere of alienation is extended beyond labor; as theorist John Zerzan lays out in Running on Emptiness, it is the regime of symbolic thought that is believed to most deeply distance us from our authentic selves, which are arbitrarily defined as the way we once existed as hunter-gatherers. Art, music, mathematics, literature, speech: any mode of representation is highly suspect. It’s the paleo diet, but for culture. Zerzan’s vision for the “future primitive” would have us living in a silent, pre-pastoralist utopia where we exist wordlessly amongst the trees — beyond art and agriculture and beyond semiotics, or perhaps more aptly, before and unsullied by it. While Zerzan’s concepts seem attractive as a thought exercise, they are unconvincingly and rather petulantly argued. Who would want to do away with the back catalogue of some of the only good things to come out of the morass of humanity as we know it? Perversely, a reading of these texts makes me wonder about the possibility of an asemic writing made not by humans, but by bots and other algorithms.

In 2011, So Kanno and Takahiro Yamaguchi created the Senseless Drawing Bot, a kinetic drawing machine that is Jean Tinguely-meets-Mars rover. It pairs a motorized skateboard with an arduino, and a long-short double pendulum that induces an element of chaos, to spray graffiti on the wall. There’s a lot of empty swinging and swaggering, a louche calisthenics. It makes a mark only when its randomized wobbles pass a certain pre-coded threshold, when it’s sure all eyes are on it, and then its gestures are fast, flashy, and nonchalant, as if drawn from immense, tumescent muscle memory. It’s all big words and it’s trying hard to flex; if ever a bot has seemed like a blustery fuckboy, this is it. The outcome is surprisingly great, a dense accumulation of multicolored freneticism, neat on the bottom and looping wildly on top like an overgrown hedge. Unlike the aforementioned Tag Clouds, it points to a machinic tagging that does not mandoline work into strict taxonomies, is unreadable by human viewers, and does not — yet — appear to be machine readable, either, as well as the delightful paradox of generative bots which are programmed by people, yet also enjoy their own agency.

In the realm of graphic notation, Emma Winston’s @GraphicScoreBot tweets out an image resembling a graphic score every hour. Each tweet features an outlined white rectangle, usually with stave lines, and often with a bass or treble clef and dynamic markings, so it’s clear we are to read this as music. Except, instead of conventional note forms, its markup includes an array of colorful geometric shapes, squiggles, and dashes. Circles of varying sizes and transparencies especially make the images feel like musical infographics (to me, they seem to suggest duration; others might see in them chords or orchestra stabs). There are semantic ruptures: the bot will, at random, tweet out cards from Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt’s Oblique Strategies, entreaties like “Trust in the you of now,” “A very small object. Its center,” and “Slow preparation, fast execution.” Less bombastic are the double-spaced “B E G I N” and “E N D” that pepper the scores, which Winston suggests can be taken as start and end points or altogether ignored. Though the scores are generally sparse, occasional plaintive adverbs and phrases like “sadly,” “casually,” and “as if tired” make suggestions as to mood. Cameos by Italian terms like con moto (with movement), andante (at a walking pace), and quasi niente (fade away to nothing) make the scores feel somehow more official. If the “post-literate” leads us to interrogate what we consider to be writing, this bot’s relative adherence to notational convention, more Fauvism than De Stijl, does the same for the musical score.

Also on Twitter, Darius Kazemi’s @reverseocr tweets out asemicisms more akin to those absentminded doodles, each cryptic scrawl accompanied by a random word, like “subtlety,” four times a day. It’s a study in impenetrable handwriting, only here the writer is not a shrink with a prescription pad but a bot. Without that accompanying word, the marks, while elegantly spare, are unrecognizable as anything but marks. So far, so asemic. Yet the way the bot works is by selecting a word and then trying — badly, endearingly — to draw it out. It keeps drawing, and failing, until an OCR or Optical Character Recognition program (the question of literacy is transposed to the algorithm, here) identifies a character. If that character matches the first letter of the word, “s” in the case of “subtlety,” that character gets drawn and the bot turns its attentions to the second character, “u.” If not, it perseveres until it gets a match, and eventually it manages, through trial and a lot of error, to draw out the whole word; we only see these successes. Of course all of these computational processes happen at lightning speed, but in a 2014 adaptation of the work for a show at Boston’s now-shuttered Find and Form Space Kazemi slows the algorithm down to a human timescale and makes visible the otherwise hidden work performed by the bot. The word here is, appropriately, “labor.” Yet there’s something in @reverseocr’s yearning to be understood — to be read, to be recognized by another — that makes me think it’s a kind of unrequited love. There is a 1973 interview with James Baldwin in the Black Scholar in which he says, in response to a question about the role of political themes in his writing,
The people produce the artist, and it’s true. The artist also produces the people. And that’s a very violent and terrifying act of love. The role of the artist and the role of the lover. If I love you, I have to make you conscious of the things you don’t see. Insofar as that is true, in that effort, I became conscious of the things that I don’t see. And I will not see without you, and vice versa, you will not see without me. No one wants to see more than he sees. You have to be driven to see what you see. The only way you can get through it is to accept that two-way street which I call love. You can call it a poem, you can call it whatever you like. That’s how people grow up. An artist is here not to give you answers but to ask you questions.

Kazemi’s bot expands the field of how we might understand asemic writing. Illegible though its drawings may be to our eyes, it is without doubt trying very, very hard to communicate meaning. Humans are not its intended audience; rather, its visual language, like barcodes or the computer vision markup of Amazon warehouses, is entirely for bots, machines, scripts, and other denizens of the algorithmic world. It’s a robot laughing alone with salad, and its inner life, its own well of lactic acid that it draws from to express itself, is off-limits to us. We, however, are on view to them, from the moment we press our thumbprints into our iPhones in the morning to the moment we touch-type a 2 a.m. text message whose characters are so drunkenly scrambled as to form complete non-words, which an algorithm gently corrects to other words we did or did not mean, so long as they’re legible. Perhaps this is an imposition on our freedoms; perhaps this is that two-way street between us and the algorithms, learning from each other; perhaps this is love."

via: "This @_reallifemag essay on asemic writing by @cnqmdi might be the best unwitting 'take' on Trump, covefefefe, etc."
https://twitter.com/eyywa/status/875099774059507716 ]
writing  asemicwriting  scribbling  randomness  typewriters  dictionaries  howwewrite  materiality  rahelaima  jeremybushnell  lynhejinian  dubravkadjuric  content  joséparla  apophenia  oseneworkekosrof  scat  scatsinging  conlang  language  experession  hélènesmith  medewianta  mirthadermisache  zhangxu  marcogiovenale  timgaze  jimleftwich  dariuskazemi  bots  emmawinston  horse_ebooks  huaisui  cursive  legibility  illegibility  avakofman  covfefe  literacy  postliteracy  ocr 
june 2017 by robertogreco
You’re probably using the wrong dictionary « the jsomers.net blog
"The way I thought you used a dictionary was that you looked up words you’ve never heard of, or whose sense you’re unsure of. You would never look up an ordinary word — like example, or sport, or magic — because all you’ll learn is what it means, and that you already know.

Indeed, if you look up those particular words in the dictionary that comes with your computer — on my Mac, it’s the New Oxford American Dictionary, 3rd Edition — you’ll be rewarded with… well, there won’t be any reward. The entries are pedestrian:

example /igˈzampəl/, n. a thing characteristic of its kind or illustrating a general rule.

sport /spôrt/, n. an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment.

magic /ˈmajik/, n. the power of apparently influencing the course of events by using mysterious or supernatural forces.

Here, words are boiled to their essence. But that essence is dry, functional, almost bureaucratically sapped of color or pop, like high modernist architecture. Which trains you to think of the dictionary as a utility, not a quarry of good things, not a place you’d go to explore and savor.

Worse, the words themselves take on the character of their definitions: they are likewise reduced. A delightful word like “fustian” — delightful because of what it means, because of the way it looks and sounds, because it is unusual in regular speech but not so effete as to be unusable, is described, efficiently, as “pompous or pretentious speech or writing.” Not only is this definition (as we’ll see in a minute) simplistic and basically wrong, it’s just not in the same class, English-wise, as “fustian.” The language is tin-eared and uninspired. It’s criminal: This is the place where all the words live and the writing’s no good.

The New Oxford American dictionary, by the way, is not like singularly bad. Google’s dictionary, the modern Merriam-Webster, the dictionary at dictionary.com: they’re all like this. They’re all a chore to read. There’s no play, no delight in the language. The definitions are these desiccated little husks of technocratic meaningese, as if a word were no more than its coordinates in semantic space."



"A book where you can enter “sport” and end up with “a diversion of the field” — this is in fact the opposite of what I’d known a dictionary to be. This is a book that transmutes plain words into language that’s finer and more vivid and sometimes more rare. No wonder McPhee wrote with it by his side. No wonder he looked up words he knew, versus words he didn’t, in a ratio of “at least ninety-nine to one.”

Unfortunately, he never comes out and says exactly which dictionary he’s getting all this juice out of. But I was desperate to find it. What was this secret book, this dictionary so rich and alive that one of my favorite writers was using it to make heroic improvements to his writing?

I did a little sleuthing. It wasn’t so hard with the examples McPhee gives, and Google. He says, for instance, that in three years of research for a book about Alaska he’d forgotten to look up the word Arctic. He said that his dictionary gave him this: “Pertaining to, or situated under, the northern constellation called the Bear.”

And that turned out to be enough to find it."



"Who decided that the American public couldn’t handle “a soft and fitful luster”? I can’t help but think something has been lost. “A soft sparkle from a wet or oily surface” doesn’t just sound worse, it actually describes the phenomenon with less precision. In particular it misses the shimmeriness, the micro movement and action, “the fitful luster,” of, for example, an eye full of tears — which is by the way far more intense and interesting an image than “a wet sidewalk.”

It’s as if someone decided that dictionaries these days had to sound like they were written by a Xerox machine, not a person, certainly not a person with a poet’s ear, a man capable of high and mighty English, who set out to write the secular American equivalent of the King James Bible and pulled it off."

Words worth using
I don’t want you to conclude that it’s just a matter of aesthetics. Yes, Webster’s definitions are prettier. But they are also better. In fact they’re so much better that to use another dictionary is to keep yourself forever at arm’s length from the actual language.

Recall that the New Oxford, for the word “fustian,” gives “pompous or pretentious speech or writing.” I said earlier that that wasn’t even really correct. Here, then, is Webster’s definition: “An inflated style of writing; a kind of writing in which high-sounding words are used, above the dignity of the thoughts or subject; bombast.” Do you see the difference? What makes fustian fustian is not just that the language is pompous — it’s that this pomposity is above the dignity of the thoughts or subject. It’s using fancy language where fancy language isn’t called for.

It’s a subtle difference, but that’s the whole point: English is an awfully subtle instrument. A dictionary that ignores these little shades is dangerous; in fact in those cases it’s worse than useless. It’s misleading, deflating. It divests those words of their worth and purpose.

Take “pathos.” This is one of those words I used to keep looking up because I kept forgetting what it meant — and every time I’d go to the dictionary I would get this terse, limiting definition: “a quality that evokes pity or sadness.” Not much there to grab a hold of. I’d wonder, Is that really all there is to pathos? It had always seemed a grander word than that. But this was the dictionary, and whatever it declared was final.

Final, that is, until I discovered Webster:

pathos /ˈpāˌTHäs/, n. 1. The quality or character of those emotions, traits, or experiences which are personal, and therefore restricted and evanescent; transitory and idiosyncratic dispositions or feelings as distinguished from those which are universal and deep-seated in character; — opposed to ethos.

It continued. 2. That quality or property of anything which touches the feelings or excites emotions and passions, esp., that which awakens tender emotions, such as pity, sorrow, and the like; contagious warmth of feeling, action, or expression; pathetic quality; as, the pathos of a picture, of a poem, or of a cry.

Dear god! How did I not know about this dictionary? How could you even call yourself a dictionary if all you give for “pathos” is “a quality that evokes pity or sadness”? Webster’s definition is so much fuller, so much closer to felt experience.

Notice, too, how much less certain the Webster definition seems about itself, even though it’s more complete — as if to remind you that the word came first, that the word isn’t defined by its definition here, in this humble dictionary, that definitions grasp, tentatively, at words, but that what words really are is this haze and halo of associations and evocations, a little networked cloud of uses and contexts.

What I mean is that with its blunt authority the New Oxford definition of “pathos” — “a quality that evokes pity or sadness” — shuts down the conversation, it shuts down your thinking about the word, while the Webster’s version gets your wheels turning: it seems so much more provisional — “that which awakens tender emotions, such as pity, sorrow, and the like; contagious warmth of feeling, action, or expression; pathetic quality; as, the pathos of a picture, of a poem, or of a cry” — and therefore alive.

Most important, it describes a word worth using: a mere six letters that have come to stand for something huge, for a complex meta-emotion with mythic roots. Such is the power of actual English."



"There’s an amazing thing that happens when you start using the right dictionary. Knowing that it’s there for you, you start looking up more words, including words you already know. And you develop an affection for even those, the plainest most everyday words, because you see them treated with the same respect awarded to the rare ones, the high-sounding ones.

Which is to say you get a feeling about English that Calvin once got with his pet tiger on a day of fresh-fallen snow: “It’s a magical world, Hobbes. Let’s go exploring!”

Appendix: How to start using Webster’s 1913 dictionary on your Mac, iPhone, Android, and Kindle [continues with instructions]"
2014  dictionaries  language  words  english  writing  jamessomers  howto  noahwebster  history  etymology  johnmcphee  howwewrite  merriam-webster  srg  dictionary 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Fantastic Vocab
"a compendium of imaginary words and their uses"
words  vocabulary  english  dictionaries  dictionary 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Anne Curzan: What makes a word "real"? - YouTube
"One could argue that slang words like 'hangry,' 'defriend' and 'adorkable' fill crucial meaning gaps in the English language, even if they don't appear in the dictionary. After all, who actually decides which words make it into those vaulted pages? Language historian Anne Curzan gives a charming look at the humans behind dictionaries, and the choices they make on a constant basis."
annecurzan  language  english  words  classideas  dictionaries  authority  slang  history  2014  via:christaflores  lexicography  lexicographers  dictionary 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Dictionary Stories
"Very short stories composed entirely of example sentences from the New Oxford American Dictionary. A project by Jez Burrows."

"Almost every word you’ll find in the dictionary will be accompanied by an example sentence. These sentences—researched and written by fearless lexicographers—are intended to demonstrate the most probable usage of a word, in order to help you use it correctly.

All the stories collected here are written entirely using example sentences from the New Oxford American Dictionary, with nothing added except some punctuation to piece them together. The words that spawned each sentence are underlined.

Dictionary Stories is a project by Jez Burrows, a designer and illustrator and human man living in San Francisco, CA. You can yell at him on Twitter, or berate him over email. "
language  words  dictionaries  stories  storytelling  jezburrows  via:robinsloan  usage  english  dictionary 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Mx: what’s it like to be gender neutral? - Telegraph
"Following news that the Oxford English Dictionary is considering including the word ‘Mx’, here’s why people want to use the gender neutral honorific"
gender  honorifics  language  words  titles  2015  dictionaries  dictionary 
may 2015 by robertogreco
The word-hoard: Robert Macfarlane on rewilding our language of landscape | Books | The Guardian
"For decades the leading nature writer has been collecting unusual words for landscapes and natural phenomena – from aquabob to zawn. It’s a lexicon we need to cherish in an age when a junior dictionary finds room for ‘broadband’ but has no place for ‘bluebell’"



"Eight years ago, in the coastal township of Shawbost on the Outer Hebridean island of Lewis, I was given an extraordinary document. It was entitled “Some Lewis Moorland Terms: A Peat Glossary”, and it listed Gaelic words and phrases for aspects of the tawny moorland that fills Lewis’s interior. Reading the glossary, I was amazed by the compressive elegance of its lexis, and its capacity for fine discrimination: a caochan, for instance, is “a slender moor-stream obscured by vegetation such that it is virtually hidden from sight”, while a feadan is “a small stream running from a moorland loch”, and a fèith is “a fine vein-like watercourse running through peat, often dry in the summer”. Other terms were striking for their visual poetry: rionnach maoim means “the shadows cast on the moorland by clouds moving across the sky on a bright and windy day”; èit refers to “the practice of placing quartz stones in streams so that they sparkle in moonlight and thereby attract salmon to them in the late summer and autumn”, and teine biorach is “the flame or will-o’-the-wisp that runs on top of heather when the moor burns during the summer”.

The “Peat Glossary” set my head a-whirr with wonder-words. It ran to several pages and more than 120 terms – and as that modest “Some” in its title acknowledged, it was incomplete. “There’s so much language to be added to it,” one of its compilers, Anne Campbell, told me. “It represents only three villages’ worth of words. I have a friend from South Uist who said her grandmother would add dozens to it. Every village in the upper islands would have its different phrases to contribute.” I thought of Norman MacCaig’s great Hebridean poem “By the Graveyard, Luskentyre”, where he imagines creating a dictionary out of the language of Donnie, a lobster fisherman from the Isle of Harris. It would be an impossible book, MacCaig concluded:

A volume thick as the height of the Clisham,

A volume big as the whole of Harris,

A volume beyond the wit of scholars.

The same summer I was on Lewis, a new edition of the Oxford Junior Dictionary was published. A sharp-eyed reader noticed that there had been a culling of words concerning nature. Under pressure, Oxford University Press revealed a list of the entries it no longer felt to be relevant to a modern-day childhood. The deletions included acorn, adder, ash, beech, bluebell, buttercup, catkin, conker, cowslip, cygnet, dandelion, fern, hazel, heather, heron, ivy, kingfisher, lark, mistletoe, nectar, newt, otter, pasture and willow. The words taking their places in the new edition included attachment, block-graph, blog, broadband, bullet-point, celebrity, chatroom, committee, cut-and-paste, MP3 player and voice-mail. As I had been entranced by the language preserved in the prose‑poem of the “Peat Glossary”, so I was dismayed by the language that had fallen (been pushed) from the dictionary. For blackberry, read Blackberry.



I have long been fascinated by the relations of language and landscape – by the power of strong style and single words to shape our senses of place. And it has become a habit, while travelling in Britain and Ireland, to note down place words as I encounter them: terms for particular aspects of terrain, elements, light and creaturely life, or resonant place names. I’ve scribbled these words in the backs of notebooks, or jotted them down on scraps of paper. Usually, I’ve gleaned them singly from conversations, maps or books. Now and then I’ve hit buried treasure in the form of vernacular word-lists or remarkable people – troves that have held gleaming handfuls of coinages, like the Lewisian “Peat Glossary”.

Not long after returning from Lewis, and spurred on by the Oxford deletions, I resolved to put my word-collecting on a more active footing, and to build up my own glossaries of place words. It seemed to me then that although we have fabulous compendia of flora, fauna and insects (Richard Mabey’s Flora Britannica and Mark Cocker’s Birds Britannica chief among them), we lack a Terra Britannica, as it were: a gathering of terms for the land and its weathers – terms used by crofters, fishermen, farmers, sailors, scientists, miners, climbers, soldiers, shepherds, poets, walkers and unrecorded others for whom particularised ways of describing place have been vital to everyday practice and perception. It seemed, too, that it might be worth assembling some of this terrifically fine-grained vocabulary – and releasing it back into imaginative circulation, as a way to rewild our language. I wanted to answer Norman MacCaig’s entreaty in his Luskentyre poem: “Scholars, I plead with you, / Where are your dictionaries of the wind … ?”"

[via: http://caterina.net/2015/02/27/bluebells-and-buttercups/ ]
robertmacfarlane  2015  language  glossaries  dictionaries  childhood  words  english  nature  landscape  lexicon  flora  fauna  insects  rewilding  taxonomy  dictionary 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows
"The Upper Midwest’s third-largest compendium of the outer spatters of the emotional palette. Its mission is to harpoon, bag and tag wild sorrows, then release them back into the subconscious.

Yes, each of these definitions is completely made up. Give feedback, tell me about your day, or suggest ideas for obscure sorrows:

JOHN KOENIG is a freelance graphic designer who currently lives in St. Paul, Minnesota. His writing has been acclaimed by New York Magazine, Washington Post Express, John Green, Jason Kottke and the guys from Radiolab."
humor  language  words  sorrows  via:vruba  emotions  dictionary  johnkoenig  via:jenlowe  dictionaries 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Reading the dictionary - Joi Ito's Web [See also the comments.]
"My sister calls me an "interest driven learner."…code for "short attention span" or "not a good long term planner" or something like that. I can't imagine being able to read the dictionary from cover to cover…don't think most people could…

Although reading the dictionary & the encyclopedia from cover to cover may seem a bit extreme, it often feels like that's what we're asking kids to do who go through formal education…

I love videos of professors, amateurs & instructors putting their courseware online…great resource for interest driven learners like me. However, I wonder whether we should be structuring the future of learning as online universities where you are asked to do the equivalent of reading the encyclopedia from cover to cover online. Shouldn't we be looking at the Internet as an amazing network enabling "The Power of Pull" & be empowering kids to learn through building things together rather than assessing their ability to complete courses & produce the right "answers"?"
networkedlearning  motivation  2012  lcrpoject  interestdriven  dictionaries  encyclopedias  teaching  web  online  education  deschooling  unschooling  learning  joiito  dictionary 
april 2012 by robertogreco
YouTube - The KidDictionary V2 :More Words Parents Need To Describe Their Kids -- www.TheKidDictionary.com
"If youre a parent or a teacher or someone whos ever around kids or someone who used to be a kid, then youre likely well aware that a kids primary mission is to complicate the lives of grownups. One way they achieve this mission is to exhibit traits and behaviors that there are no words to describe. The KidDictionary seeks to supplement your vocabulary with brand new humorous words to help you describe your humorous kids. Watch the video looking inside The KidDictionary and youre on your way to being better able to talk about your children. Talking TO your children remains a challenge were yet to figure out. Enjoy!"
neologisms  parenting  humor  words  dictionary  classideas  via:rushtheiceberg  dictionaries 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Best Language Tools for Geeks
"No matter your command of the English language, we all have trouble defining, pronouncing, or even remembering certain words, which makes writing tough. Here are some of the best tools to help you out.

We talked about online language tools for nerds a couple years ago, and today we're revisiting it with newer and better options. This list isn't exhaustive, but it's some of our favorite tools we've found—and even make use of on a daily basis—to help in our writing."
dictionary  language  lifehacker  reference  classideas  english  vocabulary  tools  research  wolframalpha  search  definitions  wordsearch  pronunciation  phrases  spelling  grammar  thesaurus  dictionaries  definition  words  via:robinsloan 
november 2010 by robertogreco
The words David Foster Wallace circled in his dictionary. - - Slate Magazine
"Below you'll find the complete list of words that David Foster Wallace circled in his American Heritage Dictionary. Many thanks to the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas-Austin for providing us with the list. (To learn more about the Ransom Center's Wallace archive, click here.)

Most words are hyperlinked to the American Heritage definition (available online via Yahoo). In a few cases, we couldn't find the definition on Yahoo, so we just left those words in bold."
words  english  davidfosterwallace  dictionaries  definitions  dictionary 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Is digital numbing, or augmenting?
"A couple of blog posts this last week, by garethk and madebymany, have been responding to a discussion on the role digital plays when it comes to serendipity. The interesting thing is that both sides of the discussion are right; they are just discussing two different kinds of “digital”, the one based in the technology era and the one growing out of the human era."
serendipity  erinmckean  adamgreenfield  dictionaries  cities  discovery  technology  dictionary 
september 2009 by robertogreco
N.Y. Times mines its data to identify words that readers find abstruse » Nieman Journalism Lab
"If The New York Times ever strikes you as an abstruse glut of antediluvian perorations, if the newspaper’s profligacy of neologisms and shibboleths ever set off apoplectic paroxysms in you, if it all seems a bit recondite, here’s a reason to be sanguine: The Times has great data on the words that send readers in search of a dictionary."
nytimes  words  language  english  writing  linguistics  dictionary  vocabulary  datamining  journalism  dictionaries 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Wordnik
"Wordnik wants to be a place for all the words, and everything known about them.
wordnik  online  dictionaries  thesaurus  lexicography  linguistics  vocabulary  etymology  words  english  language  languages  dictionary  reference  pronunciation  writing 
june 2009 by robertogreco
textually.org: Dictionary.com. Impressive.
"The free Dictionary.com app delivers world-class reference content from Dictionary.com and Thesaurus.com including more than 275,000 definitions and 80,000 synonyms, which are accessible through the app, with no Internet connection needed.

The app also features audio pronunciations, similarly spelled words and Dictionary.com’s popular Word of the Day"
applications  iphone  dictionaries  language  tools  words  csiap  ios  dictionary 
april 2009 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Magazine | The man who reads dictionaries [I need to think about how these quotes settle with "Seeing is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees"]
""Knowing what to call something makes me more aware of that thing. For instance, it's not terribly useful for me to know that [the sound of] leaves rustled by the trees is a psithurism. "I don't want to walk down the street with my girlfriend saying: 'Listen, there's a psithurism.' But knowing it means I pay more attention to it." Similarly, knowing that "undisonant" is the adjective to describe the sound of crashing waves and that "apricity" is the warmth of the winter sun brings these things more often to mind."

[See also: http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article4878295.ece ]
words  language  english  observation  via:blackbeltjones  dictionary  dictionaries  oed  books  culture  definitions  meaning 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Ammon Shea left with onomatomania after reading Oxford dictionary from A to Z - Times Online
"By any sane reckoning Ammon Shea is a vocabularian – one who pays too much attention to words. In a single, gruelling year, the sometime furniture removal man, busker and gondolier from New York has read the entire 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary from cover to cover. He has returned from his adventure in the far reaches of the English language with a rich harvest of obscure and forgotten words to share: indispensable gems such as “deipnophobia” (fear of dinner parties) or “apricity” (the warmth of the sun in winter). In return he suffered back pain, problems with his sight and constant headaches. As his book, Reading the Oxford English Dictionary, makes clear, Mr Shea’s feat failed to make him a better person, improve his conversation or make him appear more intelligent. Rather it turned him into a mafflard (a stuttering or blundering fool), bedevilled by onomatomania (vexation at having difficulty in finding the right word)."

[See also the list of words at the end of the article and http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7654511.stm ]
books  writing  words  reading  linguistics  dictionary  vocabulary  oed  definitions  via:russelldavies  dictionaries 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Redefine the dictionary - wordia
"We’re a team of language enthusiasts and general word nuts who have joined forces to create a new kind of dictionary - a democratic ‘visual dictionary’. A place where anyone with a video, webcam or mobile phone can define the words that matter to them in their life.
language  dictionary  encyclopedia  crowdsourcing  video  definitions  thesaurus  reference  learning  classideas  dictionaries 
september 2008 by robertogreco
OneLook Dictionary Search
"Find words and phrases that start with/end with, have a meaning related to, words related to, related to the concept, contain the word, Find phrases that spell out an acronym + reverse dictionary"
dictionaries  language  search  reference  words  phrases  onlinetoolkit  linguistics  writing  generator  brainstorming  thesaurus  names  dictionary  naming 
june 2008 by robertogreco
italki - Language Exchange and Learning Community
"italki.com is where you can find everything you need to learn a language. italki is a social network and an online resource for learning foreign languages."
learning  education  languages  language  english  spanish  italian  japanese  portuguese  french  chinese  dictionary  community  collaboration  foreignlanguage  students  teaching  onlinetoolkit  reference  resources  dictionaries 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Online Etymology Dictionary
" The dates beside a word indicate the earliest year for which there is a surviving written record of that word (in English, unless otherwise indicated). This should be taken as approximate, especially before about 1700, since a word may have been used in
etymology  dictionary  reference  english  language  words  linguistics  writing  dictionaries 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Edit Mac OS X's custom spelling dictionary - The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW)
"Mac OS X's built-in spell checking abilities are fantastic, but what if you need to edit the custom list of words you've been building, or you want to nail a few birds with one stone by adding a collection of words in one fell swoop?"
mac  osx  spelling  dictionary  hacks  tips  howto  dictionaries 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Edit Firefox’s Spelling Dictionary · cavemonkey50.com
"Firefox allows you to easily add words to dictionary, but lacks a user interface for removing words...problem since “Add to dictionary” button is directly under corrected words, providing easy access for adding misspelled words to dictionary."
firefox  spelling  dictionary  software  hacks  howto  tips  dictionaries 
may 2008 by robertogreco
tuBabel.com (beta) - español confuso. contagioso. divertido.
"Es el diccionario social de regionalismos latinos más completo del mundo. Llegará a ser el más completo porque nunca se termina de definir... cada persona puede agregar nuevas palabras, definiciones adicionales en palabras existentes o comentarios...
spanish  español  language  latinos  reference  slang  dictionary  jerga  culture  regional  dictionaries 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Absurd Entries in the OED: An Introduction To Ammon Shea : OUPblog
"Absurd Entries...certain class of definition...rarer than mistakes,more fun to read...moments when OED does something so inexplicable you have to close the book & check cover to make sure that it is indeed the same book that you thought."
oed  humor  dictionary  lexicography  language  english  definitions  literature  words  writing  dictionaries 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Visual dictionary
"to learn by way of image with thematic, clear and precise pages, with concise and rigorous texts, bilingual, the InfoVisual will become a academic resource. Different from an encyclopedia or from a traditional online dictionaries, thesauri and glossaries
dictionary  language  visualization  visual  diagrams  graphics  medical  encyclopedias  anatomy  biology  dictionaries 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Human Brain Cloud: Play
"a massively multiplayer word association "game" or experiment ... or something. The idea is that given a word, a player types in the first thing that comes to mind and the results are combined into a giant network."
collectiveintelligence  crowdsourcing  words  game  play  gaming  language  english  games  data  collaboration  collective  meaning  brainstorming  semantics  semiotics  semanticweb  languages  linguistics  hivemind  multiplayer  wordplay  visualization  thesaurus  mmog  mindmapping  mindmap  dictionary  folksonomy  dictionaries 
november 2007 by robertogreco
lingro: multilingual dictionary and language learning site
"Enter website to make all words on page clickable for definiions/translations. Each word you translate is saved in personal word history...create lists of vocabulary you'd like to learn from your word history...play games to review your vocabulary"
dictionary  language  learning  tools  reading  onlinetoolkit  foreign  vocabulary  translation  snsih  english  español  german  italian  polish  french  reference  pronunciation  collaborative  community  creativecommons  languages  foreignlanguage  flashcards  dictionaries 
november 2007 by robertogreco
U.S. Knitting > Japanese-English Dictionary for iPhone
"It's a free online Japanese-English dictionary optimized for the iPhone and the iPhone Touch. You can search it in both Japanese and English."
japan  japanese  language  iphone  ipod  dictionary  dictionaries 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Play Scrabulous online for free - at Scrabulous
"Scrabulous is the coolest word game and you can play it online here for free! Besides classic Scrabulous, you can also play the game over emails, in blitz mode, or just practice with the computer."
scrabble  games  browser  dictionary  free  multiplayer  online  fun  glvo  dictionaries  browsers 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Scrabulous dictionary - SOWPODS / TWL - lookup words in the online dictionaries
"We have implemented the online Scrabulous dictionary search feature so that players can see if a particular word exists or not. You can search for words in the SOWPODS dictionary and the TWL dictionary, the most popular ones used for Scrabulous. A list o
dictionary  scrabble  games  glvo  words  language  dictionaries 
november 2007 by robertogreco
An On-Line Color Thesaurus
"Color names are a powerful means of selecting and communicating colors. There are a variety of color vocabularies and dictionaries available but there has been less work in capturing the similiarities and differences in color naming. This post is a tool
color  design  graphics  reference  dictionary  language  dictionaries 
november 2007 by robertogreco
AskOxford: Ask the Experts
"We have built a database of some of the questions sent in to the Oxford Word and Language Service team, so it is likely that if your question is a fairly broad one on grammar, usage, or words then it will be answered here. Simply choose a category and th
english  language  grammar  reference  semantics  spelling  symbols  dictionary  usage  words  writing  linguistics  dictionaries 
october 2007 by robertogreco
globeandmail.com: Bye-bye (or is it byebye?) to 16,000 silly hyphens
"The editors of the dictionary have decided, in an awesome display of ruthless language modification, that the conventions of hyphenation were arbitrary and needed simplification...most of the hyphenated words [are now] one word"
dictionary  writing  publishing  english  language  words  grammar  dictionaries 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Lost in Translation
"What happens when an English phrase is translated (by computer) back and forth between 5 different languages?"
communication  dictionary  english  language  translation  linguistics  dictionaries 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Color + Design Blog / 32+ Common Color Names for Easy Reference by COLOURlovers
"we took the color names that are used most often and best guessed the appropriate colors based on web standards and common usage."
color  css  design  words  names  lists  graphics  html  facts  dictionary  webdesign  web  tools  resources  data  naming  dictionaries  webdev 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Etymologic: the toughest etymology (word origin) game on the Web
"10 randomly selected etymology (word origin) or word definition puzzles to solve"
dictionary  english  words  games  fun  vocabulary  language  linguistics  phrases  etymology  dictionaries 
may 2007 by robertogreco
The Rosetta Project
"The Rosetta Project is a global collaboration of language specialists and native speakers building a publicly accessible online archive of ALL documented human languages."
ethnography  linguistics  language  data  dictionary  encyclopedia  libraries  society  world  international  history  globalization  collaboration  community  reference  resources  archives  archive  anthropology  museums  global  future  futurism  database  culture  dictionaries 
january 2007 by robertogreco
Sentient Developments: Must-know terms for the 21st Century intellectual: Redux
"There are terms from computer science, cosmology, neuroscience, environmentalism, sociology, biotechnology, philosophy, astrobiology, political science, and many other fields."
concepts  ecology  futurism  ideas  jargon  philosophy  science  scifi  society  sociology  technology  trends  words  education  reference  future  biology  dictionary  identity  lists  language  sousveillance  terms  theory  world  ethics  ai  intelligence  dictionaries 
january 2007 by robertogreco
Sentient Developments: Must know terms for today's intelligentsia
"Today's intelligentsia, in order to qualify for such a designation, must have the requisite vocabulary with which to address valid social concerns and effectively assess the future."
concepts  ecology  futurism  ideas  jargon  philosophy  science  scifi  society  sociology  technology  trends  words  education  reference  future  biology  dictionary  identity  lists  language  sousveillance  terms  theory  world  ethics  ai  intelligence  dictionaries 
january 2007 by robertogreco
OneLook Reverse Dictionary
"OneLook's reverse dictionary lets you describe a concept and get back a list of words and phrases related to that concept. Your description can be a few words, a sentence, a question, or even just a single word. Just type it into the box above and hit th
dictionary  english  words  language  writing  reference  dictionaries 
november 2006 by robertogreco
parole!
"parole is a dynamic dictionary of the contemporary city, or at least this was the intention when it was launched in June 2000 in occasion of the 7th International Exhibition of Architecture at the Biennale in Venice, Italy."
architecture  urbanism  urban  cities  concepts  culture  dictionary  europe  photography  language  dictionaries 
september 2006 by robertogreco
The Visual Dictionary - a visual exploration of words in the real world.
"The Visual Dictionary is a collection of words in the real world. Photographs of signage, graffiti, advertising, tattoos, you name it, we're trying to catalogue it."
art  collaborative  dictionary  english  reference  photography  graffiti  design  flickr  language  words  typography  typeface  galleries  dictionaries 
august 2006 by robertogreco
DS gets wordplay, Japanese-English dictionary - Joystiq
"Kanji Sonomama Rakubiki Jiten was released for the DS in Japan today, bringing an affordable electronic Japanese-English dictionary to the masses."
nintendo  ds  nintendods  language  japan  english  dictionary  dictionaries 
april 2006 by robertogreco
AskOxford: Frequently Asked Questions
"We have built a database of some of the questions sent in to the Oxford Word and Language Service team, so it is likely that if your question is a fairly broad one on grammar, usage, or words then it will be answered here. Simply choose a category and th
language  reference  dictionary  words  english  grammar  dictionaries 
march 2006 by robertogreco

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