recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : diet   32

“The Workplace Is Killing People and Nobody Cares” | Stanford Graduate School of Business
"A new book examines the massive health care toll today’s work culture exacts on employees.

Jeffrey Pfeffer has an ambitious aspiration for his latest book. “I want this to be the Silent Spring of workplace health,” says Pfeffer, a professor of organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business. “We are harming both company performance and individual well-being, and this needs to be the clarion call for us to stop. There is too much damage being done.”

Dying for a Paycheck, published by HarperBusiness and released on March 20, maps a range of ills in the modern workplace — from the disappearance of good health insurance to the psychological effects of long hours and work-family conflict — and how these are killing people.

Pfeffer recently sat for an interview with Insights. The following has been edited for length and clarity."
psychology  mentalhwalth  work  labor  economics  health  healthcare  2018  jeffreypfeffer  food  eating  diet  culture  society  nuriachinchilla  socialpollution  social  humans  human  employment  corporatism  latecapitalism  mindfulness  well-being 
april 2018 by robertogreco
You Can’t Trust What You Read About Nutrition | FiveThirtyEight
"Our foray into nutrition science demonstrated that studies examining how foods influence health are inherently fraught. To show you why, we’re going to take you behind the scenes to see how these studies are done. The first thing you need to know is that nutrition researchers are studying an incredibly difficult problem, because, short of locking people in a room and carefully measuring out all their meals, it’s hard to know exactly what people eat. So nearly all nutrition studies rely on measures of food consumption that require people to remember and report what they ate. The most common of these are food diaries, recall surveys and the food frequency questionnaire, or FFQ.

Several versions of the FFQ exist, but they all use a similar technique: Ask people how often they eat particular foods and what serving size they usually consume. But it’s not always easy to remember everything you ate, even what you ate yesterday. People are prone to underreport what they consume, and they may not fess up to eating certain foods or may miscalculate their serving sizes.

“The bottom line here is that doing dietary assessment is difficult,” said Torin Block, CEO of NutritionQuest, a company that conducts FFQs and was founded by his mother, Gladys Block, a pioneer in the field who began developing food frequency questionnaires at the National Cancer Institute. “You can’t get away from it — there’s error involved.” Still, there’s a pecking order in terms of completeness, he said. Food diaries rank high and so do 24-hour food recalls, in which an administrator sits the subject down for a guided interview to catalog everything eaten in the past 24 hours. But, Block said, “you really need to do multiple administrations to get an assessment of someone’s usual long-term dietary intake.” For study purposes, researchers are not usually interested just in what people ate yesterday or the day before, but in what they eat regularly. Studies that use 24-hour recalls tend to under- or overestimate nutrients people don’t eat every day, since they record only a small and perhaps unrepresentative snapshot."
nutrition  food  health  statistics  2016  christineaschwanden  diet  correlation 
january 2016 by robertogreco
40 years of a changing American diet, in one massive chart - Vox
"You don't eat the way your parents did. You can probably see that by just glancing at a cookbook from the 1960s or '70s. (So much Jell-O. So much canned food.) But you can quantify those differences more precisely using data from the USDA. Below, in one giant chart, we have compiled how Americans' eating patterns have changed over a generation.

The data shows the change in per capita availability since 1972 of a wide variety of foods that the USDA tracks. (The farthest back that many foods go is 1970, though some go farther; we made it around 40 years, though for select groups indicated on the chart, the data doesn't quite cover that whole period.) This available data doesn't show exact consumption levels — rather, it shows the total supply divided by the number of Americans. However, it does give a good sense of how Americans' eating patterns are changing over time.

What it shows is that we've really cut back on a lot of canned, frozen, and dried produce in favor of fresh produce. And while that may sound great for our health, the one food whose availability has grown the most is also terrible for us: high-fructose corn syrup."
food  diet  us  eating  charts  2015  usda 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Lisa Ma - Human Invasives Interaction on Vimeo
[also here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-VADQ-NG4E ]

[See also:

“Designer Lisa Ma wants us to eat grey squirrels”
http://www.wired.co.uk/magazine/archive/2014/01/play/pests-on-a-plate

http://www.lisama.co.uk/

“The future of activism isn’t loud. There’s a world of innovation in the field of activism that we are wasting away.”

"Lisa Ma socializes activism. Combining ethnographic research and speculative design, Lisa Ma creates platforms of engagement from surprising insights and processes that deeply resonate with the global technological community.

Placing herself as a critical explorer, Lisa Ma has built, for the city of Ghent - a political culture of consuming the invasive species that the vegetarian town would otherwise pay to poison; for a joystick factory in Shenzhen - coined the scheme of Farmification to save the worker community through technology innovation; for London Heathrow Airport - gather opposing communities between planning historians, activists to construct heritage tours of the surrounding villages under threat from the airport expansion. Through sweet storytelling of unlikely events, Lisa Ma bridges organisations with communities and through everyday clashes of values between what we do and what we believe in to make us think deeper about the future.

Lisa Ma holds a MA in Design Interactions at Royal College of Art in London and BA from Central Saint Martins. She worked as a designer/strategist with Pentagram and Deutsche Telekom's Creation Centre before making collaboration projects with Ted Global in Edinburgh, Kanvas TV in Belgium and Broadway with Arts Council."]
lisama  invasivespecies  animals  multispecies  geese  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations  belgium  gent  diversity  vegetarianism  vegetarians  birds  food  diet  activism  speculativedesign  farmification  bioluddism  squirrels 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Africa tops the best food in the world league – By Richard Dowden | African Arguments
"If you said the words “Africa” and “food” and asked most people in the western world what the connection was, I would bet my Sunday lunch that many people would say: “None. They don’t have any. They’re all starving.”

So the news in The Lancet this week that Africans have the best diets in the world is wonderful and spectacularly ironic. According to the researchers, out of the top ten best national diets in the world only one is not African, Israel. And not a single African country is in the bottom ten. However, there are four European countries at the bottom of the table. Is there any other development in the world where Africans sweep the board? A few years ago Africans were reported to be the most contented and optimistic people in the world. I hope that is still true.

Top of the healthy eating league table was Chad, a country often associated with drought, followed by Sierra Leone, Mali, Gambia, Uganda, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Senegal and Somalia. I can remember seeing starving people, children with Kwashiokor and distended bellies in four of them but in each case the cause was war. Drought can impoverish and force people to move but very rarely does it directly kill.

The research has been carried out for The Lancet Global Health journal by researchers using national data from almost 90 per cent of the world’s population. They analysed people’s diets between 1990 and 2010 by taking 17 food groups, including healthy ones: fruit and veg and fish as well as junk food (saturated fats and processed meat). Then they questioned people about which of these they ate and how much.

Chad, a country often associated with drought, comes top, followed by Sierra Leone, Mali, Gambia, Uganda, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Senegal and Somalia. They are a mix of countries with large dryland areas and others with heavy rainfall and fruit-rich rainforests.

In arid Somalia for example the people traditionally drink lots of camel’s milk which is very low in fat and good for you. But they also breakfast on flash-fried, almost-raw liver. Yes I’ve tried it. Yuk!

I once watched a camel being slaughtered for lunch. A man simply lopped its head off with an axe and then chopped it up with a machete. It was then cooked and we sat around the carcass eating lumps of meat with our fingers although it was so tough as to be almost inedible. Strangely the staple diet of many Somalis these days is spaghetti. And they eat it in the way I always wanted to but was never allowed to as a child – with fingers from a communal bowl, head back, open mouth and sucking and slurping the tails.

The cuisine I know best is Ugandan where, in the south, the word Matooke – banana – means food. They say if a Muganda has not eaten Matooke, he or she has not eaten. Twice a day they tuck into mashed banana steamed in banana leaves. It is usually eaten with groundnut sauce. Delicious.

There is also an array of Ugandan green vegetables and fruits that just fall out of uncultivated trees. No wonder some inhabitants have a reputation for being laid back, even lazy?

But Ugandans too have peculiar dietary habits. I was teaching a class in school one hot, sleepy afternoon when one of the pupils suddenly shouted and pointed out of the window. Millions of flying grasshoppers, Ensennene, had arrived and swarmed around the school. The class emptied despite my shouts of “Sit down! Stay here!” But I noticed that most of the students were carrying plastic bags. They knew this was the time of year when grasshoppers would hatch and swarm. They were on their hands and knees in no time chasing the clumsy hoppers and flyers and, tearing off their legs and wings to pop them into the plastic bags to be deep fried for dinner.

The Baganda also eat flying ants and some of the students persuaded me that these were best eaten live straight from the anthill. They took me to a nearby termite mound and hacked into it, picking out the grubs and carefully proffering them to me. I had seen deep fried ant grubs in the market but to this day I am not sure whether the raw ones really are a delicacy or just another opportunity to make a fool of a gullible white man. Once you got over the wriggling sensation on your tongue they didn’t taste too bad.

I noticed that Nigeria is not there in the top ten. No surprise there! Anyone who can drink Nigerian Egusi pepper soup must have a mouth made of cast iron. Ben Okri once took me to dinner at his favourite restaurant and insisted that I drink the soup – “the best Egusi in London,” he said. I agreed but a minute after I took the first sip I was in the toilet mopping the tears streaming from my eyes. My mouth took days to recover. Did you bribe the cook to leave the top off the pepper pot Ben?

Let’s look forward to hearing someone say not that they have dined like a king but they have dined like an African. I look forward to seeing the courses in African cuisine and more African cookbooks lining the bookshop shelves.

Richard Dowden is Director of the Royal African Society."
richarddowden  food  africa  nutrition  uganda  somalia  chad  ivorycoast  senegal  gambia  mali  sierraleone  diet  misconceptions  health  lifestyle  well-being  drought  war 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease - WSJ.com
"Are butter, cheese and steak really bad for you? The dubious science behind the anti-fat crusade"
may2014dl  food  diet  2014  fat  science  saturatedfats  via:anne 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Science Compared Every Diet, and the Winner Is Real Food - James Hamblin - The Atlantic
"A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention."



"I think Bertrand Russell nailed it," Katz told me, "when he said that the whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are so sure, and wise people always have doubts. Something like that."
food  diet  research  wisdom  2014  bertrandrussell  certainty  doubt  uncertainty  eating  health  via:lukeneff 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Feeding 9 Billion | National Geographic
"Where will we find enough food for 9 billion?"

"A Five-Step Plan to Feed the World: It doesn't have to be factory farms versus small, organic ones. There's another way."
food  gobalization  agriculture  farming  2014  classideas  peojectideas  jonathanfoley  foodproduction  us  india  china  global  brazil  brasil  africa  mali  perú  ukraine  uk  ethiopia  bangladesh  efficiency  diet 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Nassim Taleb: my rules for life | Books | The Observer
"Modern life is akin to a chronic stress injury, he says. And the way to combat it is to embrace randomness in all its forms: live true to your principles, don't sell your soul and watch out for the carbohydrates."

"You have to pull back and let the system destroy itself, and then come back. That's Seneca's recommendation. He's the one who says that the sage should let the republic destroy itself."

"The "arguments" are that size, in Taleb's view, matters. Bigger means more complex, means more prone to failure. Or, as he puts it, "fragile". "

""Antifragile" is when something is actually strengthened by the knocks."

"In Taleb's view, small is beautiful."

"[He] claims that a janitor also has that kind of independence. "He can say what he thinks. He doesn't have to fit his ethics to his job. It's not about money.""

"He's also largely an autodidact."

"Between 2004 and 2008 were the worst years of my life. Everybody thought I was an idiot. And I knew that. But at the same time…"
math  teaching  fasting  diet  paleodiet  living  life  seneca  classics  war  thomasfriedman  honor  vindication  deschooling  autonomy  unschooling  anarchism  chaos  randomness  principles  honesty  freedom  academia  banking  money  ethics  socialmisfits  cv  independence  blackswans  failure  probability  antifragility  antifragile  small  fragility  autodidacts  2012  books  nassimtaleb 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Jay Parkinson + MD + MPH = a doctor in NYC (I just finished reading Bonk by Mary Roach.  The...)
"I spent 4 years in medical school and 5 years in residency. I went to Penn State for medical school and St. Vincents in the West Village for Pediatrics and Hopkins for Preventive Medicine. I never once received lectures on sex and sexuality. It’s sad to think that doctors must teach themselves something so important to us all. Speaking of that, here are the other topics that were either skipped over entirely or given a blurb in a lecture throughout my nine years of medical training:

• Behavior change
• Diet and nutrition
• Exercise
• Death and dying
• Communication skills
• The business of healthcare in America (aka, how to run a practice)

These are just off the top of my head. What are the others?"
jayparkinson  medicine  education  medicalschool  lifeskills  behavior  diet  nutrition  exercise  death  dying  communication  business  health  healthcare  comments  preventitivemedicine  prevention  sex  sexuality 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Ideas: Salt, Fish Oil, and the Implications of Optimization
"There is a longstanding argument for reducing the amount of salt modern Americans consume, based on evidence that a high salt diet tends to produce high blood pressure. A recent European statistical study, however, reported just the opposite of what that argument suggests—evidence that lower salt intake was correlated w/ an increased risk of death from heart disease. Similarly, there is evidence that an increased consumption of omega 3 oils reduces risk of heart attacks. But it has recently been reported that it also increases the risk of the more serious form of prostate cancer.

…we ought not to be surprised by results such as the 2 I just discussed. The fact that some change produces a gain in 1 measurable dimension that matters to us is very poor evidence that it produces an overall gain. Before altering behavior or diet, 1 ought to look for evidence of net effects on life expectancy or other reasonably final goals, not merely for desirable effects on one input thereto."
davidfriedman  tradeoffs  health  humans  life  systems  systemsthinking  complexsystems  2011  diet  balance 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Epilepsy’s Big, Fat Miracle - NYTimes.com
"Evelyn, Sam’s twin sister Beatrice and I don’t eat this way. But Sam has epilepsy, and the food he eats is controlling most of his seizures (he used to have as many as 130 a day). The diet, which drastically reduces the amount of carbohydrates he takes in, tricks his body into a starvation state in which it burns fat, and not carbs, for fuel. Remarkably, and for reasons that are still unclear, this process — called ketosis — has an antiepileptic effect. He has been eating this way for almost two years."
epilepsy  fat  keto  ketosis  diet  children  medicine  health 
november 2010 by robertogreco
The Science Behind Why We Love Ice Cream (and Other Things Creamy) - WSJ.com
"A new genetic study shows that people produce strikingly different amounts of amylase, and that the more of the enzyme people have in their mouth the faster they can liquefy starchy foods.

Scientists think this finding could help explain why people experience foods as creamy or slimy, sticky or watery, and that this perception could affect our preference for foods. For the numerous foods that contain starch, including pudding, sauces and even maple syrup, what can feel just right to some people is experienced as too runny or not melting enough for others because they produce different amounts of the enzyme."
food  taste  texture  pickyeaters  psychology  vegetables  icecream  senses  genetics  science  diet  dna 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Maisonneuve | Diseases of Affluence
"Everywhere Western ideas touch down, people get fatter. Urbanization is literally making us sick."
urban  urbanization  anthropology  diet  exercise  health  medicine  westernworld  obesity 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Why Making Dinner Is a Good Idea | Wired Science | Wired.com
"But maybe we’re not just consuming more calories because they’re available at such a low cost. Maybe we’re also consuming more calories because each calorie gives us less pleasure. The lesson of those lever-pressing mice, after all, is that when we don’t work for our food — when it only requires a single press, or a few whirls of the microwave — it tastes much less delicious."
cooking  diet  food  health  science  psychology  jonahlehrer  ikea  ikeaeffect  foodproduction  glvo  obesity 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Proposed 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines | Food Renegade
"Fallon Morell notes that by restricting healthy animal fats in school lunches and diets for pregnant women and growing children, the Guidelines will accelerate the tragic epidemic of learning and behavior disorders. The nutrients found most abundantly in animal fats and organ meats-including choline, cholesterol and arachidonic acid-are critical for the development of the brain and the function of receptors that modulate thinking and behavior. Studies show that choline helps the brain make critical connections and protects against neurotoxins; animal studies suggest that if choline is abundant during developmental years, the individual is protected for life from developmental decline...
nutrition  usda  diet  learning  brain  pregnancy  development  via:cervus  tcsnmy  glvo  guidelines 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Princeton University - A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain
"A Princeton University research team has demonstrated that all sweeteners are not equal when it comes to weight gain: Rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight than those with access to table sugar, even when their overall caloric intake was the same.
cornsyrup  health  medicine  obesity  nutrition  sugar  diet  cooking  science  food 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Y2K, Dot-com Party Sushi, and Vodka Luges - Food Media - - CHOW
"When the ball drops on January 1, we’ll be entering a new decade. Isn’t it funny to think that just 10 years ago we were eating sushi all the time, working at dot-coms, and wearing high-tech-looking shoes with wavy Space Age soles? Imagine if somebody had told us that beards, pickles, and backyard chickens would be cutting-edge, 2010 fashion. CHOW.com busted out the time capsule to investigate more of what we were eating and drinking in 1999, and how it’s changed. Take a look…"

[via: http://www.hereandnow.org/2010/01/rundown-11/ ]
food  trends  00s  2000s  lists  diy  frugality  simplicity  affordability  organics  drink  fish  seafood  sustainability  local  farmersmarkets  restaurants  starbucks  independent  pop-uprestaurants  beer  wine  smoking  diet 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Killer Carbs: Scientist Finds Key To Overeating As We Age
""The more carbs and sugars you eat, the more your appetite-control cells are damaged, and potentially you consume more," Dr Andrews said.
health  brain  hunger  nutrition  appetite  overeating  obesity  sugar  science  diet  carbs  weight 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Nassim Nicholas Taleb: the prophet of boom and doom
"When this man said the world’s economy was heading for disaster, he was scorned. Now traders, economists, even Nasa, are clamouring to hear him speak"
economics  risk  nassimtaleb  blackswans  via:blackbeltjones  sociology  interviews  religion  belief  health  diet  exercise  math  statistics  predictions  science  probability 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Do food miles matter? | ES&T Online News
"The benefits of eating locally grown food may not extend to curbing global warming, according to a comprehensive study of greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. food." via: http://www.marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2008/06/the-carbon-foot.html
food  environment  energy  globalwarming  locavore  footprint  global  diet  emissions  sustainability  local  green  meat  nutrition  transport  transportation 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Futurist Ray Kurzweil Pulls Out All the Stops (and Pills) to Live to Witness the Singularity
"Artificial intelligence will render biological humans obsolete, he says, but will not make human consciousness irrelevant. Kurzweil argues the singularity won't destroy us -- it will immortalize us."
raykurzweil  future  health  healthcare  singularity  technology  diet  cosmology  aging 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Just Desserts: Artificial Sweeteners Linked to Weight Gain: Scientific American
"New research indicates that saccharin and other sugar substitutes may not be such a sweet deal for weight watchers"
diet  food  health  nutrition  research  science  medicine 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Pop quiz, hotshot. There's a bomb on a bus. Once the... (kottke.org)
"Surprisingly, researchers have found a correlation between diet soda consumption and metabolic syndrome...and a different study that links diet soda consumption and obesity."
health  food  diet  dietsoda  kottke  medicine 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Wired News - Scientists Explain Chocolate Cravings
"A small study links the type of bacteria living in people's digestive system to a desire for chocolate...That may be the case for other foods, too."
food  health  diet  chocolate  human  bacteria  biology 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Keep Your Food, Change Your Plate: The New Science of Eating on Wired Science
"Brian Wansink is no new-age diet doctor. He's the Director of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell, where a funhouse of one-way mirrors helps him spy into the hidden psychology behind Americans' prodigious food intake."
diet  eating  food  nutrition  psychology  research  habits  health  multitasking 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Study: Food in McDonald's wrapper tastes better to kids - CNN.com
"Even carrots, milk and apple juice tasted better to the kids when they were wrapped in the familiar packaging of the Golden Arches."
ads  advertising  branding  children  diet  health  food  marketing  mcdonalds  nutrition  packaging  psychology 
august 2007 by robertogreco
What the World Eats | Photo Essays | TIME
"What's on family dinner tables in fifteen different homes around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet""
comparison  cooking  travel  world  food  culture  health  global  photography  classideas  sustainability  storytelling  statistics  diet  eating  socialstudies  society  visualization  groceries  consumerism  consumption  economics 
june 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read