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Q&A: Craig Mod on making writing more mobile-friendly and where digital publishing is headed » Nieman Journalism Lab
[See also: https://medium.com/p/4c78e6883ec0
http://pando.com/2013/07/17/craig-mods-new-publishing-platform-hi-maps-writers-to-place/
https://hi.co/moments/q4oi5i68 ]

"Mod: One of the great benefits of the web is everything can have a unique address that is accessible as a net connection, effectively. There’s something incredible powerful about that. So, to build an iOS app-only, Android app-only ecosystem feels like, to me, you’re leaving on the floor 80 percent of the magic of what the Internet brings to publishing.

So one of the core precepts of this project was certainly to be very open on the web — accessible anywhere, from any device. When you start from that place, it just makes sense to first and foremost optimize for the web experience and then kind of work your way back.

One of the reasons I think Safari on the iPhone, the Chrome browser, any of these things, aren’t as good as they could be for running applications is because five years ago, or whenever the App Store opened, we sort of abandoned the web in a way."



"Mod: When we started, it was far more focused on the mapping piece. I remember one of the stakes in the ground that we had a year ago was “every page must have a map.” You quickly realize that maps are not that interesting. It’s this fallacy, that maps are inherently interesting objects.

I love maps. I love old maps, I love printed maps, I love navigating cities with strange maps. I love all of that. But I think we tend to conflate maps as context vs. content. And a lot of products that use maps and feature maps treat it as content, and most of the time a map is not a very interesting thing. We just need it quickly, for a little bit of context, and then have it go away."



"You can look at a tool like Hi and go, “Well, why am I putting my writing into this other space that I don’t own?” Whereas with WordPress you can download it, can host your own WordPress site, and yada, yada, yada. But one of the advantages of placing it into this pre-existing space is you get the community. So that’s been fun."



"Mod: I think it depends on the kind of writing that you’re doing and what your goals as a writer are. As isolated as writers tend to be, there are so many workshopping groups. And I think there is a natural tendency as a writer to need to get out of your isolation chamber and get some feedback and have human contact and discuss things out in the open. So I think there’s a tremendous benefit to that.But obviously not all kinds of writing should be done in this way, it goes without saying.

But I think there are certain kinds that — why not do the experiment of trying them? And travel writing, I think, fits really naturally within this space. One of the things going on with Hi that we haven’t really talked a lot about is the topics. Anybody can add a moment, they can invent a topic, they can add to existing topics — they can do whatever they want. Topics are meant to be a response to undiscoverability and impossibility to navigate — the nature of hashtags."
web  craigmod  interviews  2014  hi  hitotoki  maps  mapping  context  content  applications  open  accessibility  publishing  community  openweb  internet  howwewrite  discoverability  search  editing  feednack  workinginpublic  writing  simplenote  instagram  iphone  mobile  mobilephones  cellphones  html5  webapps  hi.co  epublishing  blogging  blogs  digitalpublishing  ios 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Beyond the “smart city” | Urbanscale
"These are not the “smart cities” IBM, Oracle and Cisco want to deploy — or, more properly, to sell to municipal bodies the world over. They require neither greenfield sites nor the patronage of a paternalist government. These are simply the cities we already live in, and love, endowed with all the new capabilities and potentials an emerging technology can offer. If this is to be a century of networked cities, as the consultants and thinktanks keep telling us it will be, we passionately believe that any such thing not merely can, but must, be built on a foundation of respect, empathy and care. This, anyway, is the effort to which we’ve devoted ourselves at Urbanscale. We hope you’ll join us."
cities  technology  urban  urbanscale  adamgreenfield  urbanism  networkedurbanism  smartcities  internet  empathy  accessibility  networkculture  connectivity  identity  discovery  discoverability  linux  design  opensource  data  publicobjects  open  cityasplatform 
february 2011 by robertogreco

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