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robertogreco : dna   36

Pink Chicken Project
"Pink Chicken Project suggests using a “Gene Drive” to change the colour of the entire species Gallus Gallus Domesticus to pink.

Being the world's most common bird, the bones of the 60 billion chickens that are killed every year leave a distinct trace in the rock strata (the earth's crust), a marker for the new geological age - the Anthropocene.

To re-occupy this identifier of our age, the project suggests genetically modifying a chicken with pink bones and feathers, using a gene from the insect cochineal to produce a pigment that will be fossilized when combined with the calcium of the bone.

Spreading this gene with the recently invented Gene Drive technique, the species could be permanently altered, on a global scale, in just a few years.

Thereby modifying the future fossil record, colouring the geological trace of humankind, pink!

Pink, is a symbolic color, an opposition to the current global power dynamics, that enable and aggravate the anthropocentric violence forced upon the non-human world.

The pink chicken DNA also carries an encoded message, that calls for an ecological discourse that must include issues of social justice, in order to achieve the radical restructuring of society needed to break the death grip of the sixth extinction.

Lying somewhere between utopia and dystopia, the project attempts to redirect focus to the underlying ethical and political issues;

What future do we really want, and why?

And can we stay humble in facing what is unknowable?"
chicken  animals  multispecies  morethanhuman  2018  dna  genetics  color  anthropocene 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Cops are asking Ancestry.com and 23andMe for their customers’ DNA | Fusion
"When companies like Ancestry.com and 23andMe first invited people to send in their DNA for genealogy tracing and medical diagnostic tests, privacy advocates warned about the creation of giant genetic databases that might one day be used against participants by law enforcement. DNA, after all, can be a key to solving crimes. It “has serious information about you and your family,” genetic privacy advocate Jeremy Gruber told me back in 2010 when such services were just getting popular.

Now, five years later, when 23andMe and Ancestry both have over a million customers, those warnings are looking prescient. “Your relative’s DNA could turn you into a suspect,” warns Wired, writing about a case from earlier this year, in which New Orleans filmmaker Michael Usry became a suspect in an unsolved murder case after cops did a familial genetic search using semen collected in 1996. The cops searched an Ancestry.com database and got a familial match to a saliva sample Usry’s father had given years earlier. Usry was ultimately determined to be innocent and the Electronic Frontier Foundation called it a “wild goose chase” that demonstrated “the very real threats to privacy and civil liberties posed by law enforcement access to private genetic databases.”

The FBI maintains a national genetic database with samples from convicts and arrestees, but this was the most public example of cops turning to private genetic databases to find a suspect. But it’s not the only time it’s happened, and it means that people who submitted genetic samples for reasons of health, curiosity, or to advance science could now end up in a genetic line-up of criminal suspects.

Both Ancestry.com and 23andMe stipulate in their privacy policies that they will turn information over to law enforcement if served with a court order. 23andMe says it’s received a couple of requests from both state law enforcement and the FBI, but that it has “successfully resisted them.”

23andMe’s first privacy officer Kate Black, who joined the company in February, says 23andMe plans to launch a transparency report, like those published by Google, Facebook and Twitter, within the next month or so. The report, she says, will reveal how many government requests for information the company has received, and presumably, how many it complies with. (Update: The company released the report a week later.)

“In the event we are required by law to make a disclosure, we will notify the affected customer through the contact information provided to us, unless doing so would violate the law or a court order,” said Black by email.

Ancestry.com would not say specifically how many requests it’s gotten from law enforcement. It wanted to clarify that in the Usry case, the particular database searched was a publicly available one that Ancestry has since taken offline with a message about the site being “used for purposes other than that which it was intended.” Police came to Ancestry.com with a warrant to get the name that matched the DNA.

“On occasion when required by law to do so, and in this instance we were, we have cooperated with law enforcement and the courts to provide only the specific information requested but we don’t comment on the specifics of cases,” said a spokesperson.

As NYU law professor Erin Murphy told the New Orleans Advocate regarding the Usry case, gathering DNA information is “a series of totally reasonable steps by law enforcement.” If you’re a cop trying to solve a crime, and you have DNA at your disposal, you’re going to want to use it to further your investigation. But the fact that your signing up for 23andMe or Ancestry.com means that you and all of your current and future family members could become genetic criminal suspects is not something most users probably have in mind when trying to find out where their ancestors came from.

“It has this really Orwellian state feeling to it,” Murphy said to the Advocate.

If the idea of investigators poking through your DNA freaks you out, both Ancestry.com and 23andMe have options to delete your information with the sites. 23andMe says it will delete information within 30 days upon request."
23andme  dna  police  privacy  lawenforcement  ancestry.com  kashmirhill 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Supreme Court Says Police Can Take DNA Samples - NYTimes.com
"In dissent, Justice Scalia wrote that identification was not the point of the testing. Mr. King’s identity was thoroughly established before the DNA testing, Justice Scalia said, as officials had his full name, race, sex, height, weight, date of birth and address.

Nor was there a serious dispute about the purpose of the Maryland law under review, he wrote. The law said one purpose of the testing was “as part of an official investigation into a crime.”

Chief Justice Roberts, in staying the state court decision while the Supreme Court considered the case, acknowledged that the law “provides a valuable tool for investigating unsolved crimes and thereby helping to remove violent offenders from the general population.”

The law authorized testing for purposes of identification, Justice Scalia wrote, but only for missing people and human remains.

“Solving crimes is a noble objective,” Justice Scalia concluded, “but it occupies a lower place in the American pantheon of noble objectives than the protection of our people from suspicionless law enforcement searches. The Fourth Amendment must prevail.”"
antoninscalia  scotus  supremecourt  2013  identity  privacy  police  dna 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Creepy or Cool? Portraits Derived From the DNA in Hair and Gum Found in Public Places | Collage of Arts and Sciences
"The 30-year-old PhD student, studying electronic arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, extracts DNA from each piece of evidence she collects and enters this data into a computer program, which churns out a model of the face of the person who left the hair, fingernail, cigarette or gum behind.

It gets creepier.

From those facial models, she then produces actual sculptures using a 3D printer. When she shows the series, called “Stranger Visions,” she hangs the life-sized portraits, like life masks, on gallery walls. Oftentimes, beside a portrait, is a Victorian-style wooden box with various compartments holding the original sample, data about it and a photograph of where it was found."
dna  art  science  biology  diy  heatherdewey-hagborg  humans  genetics  portraits  faces  evidence 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Design for the New Normal (Revisited) | superflux
"I was invited to talk at the NEXT Conference in Berlin by Peter Bihr, as he felt that a talk I gave last year would fit well with the conference's theme Here Be Dragons: "We fret about data, who is collecting it and why. We fret about privacy and security. We worry and fear disruption, which changes business models and renders old business to ashes. Some would have us walk away, steer clear of these risks. They’re dangerous, we don’t know what the consequences will be. Maintain the status quo, don’t change too much.Here and now is safe. Over there, in the future? Well, there be dragons."

This sounded like a good platform to expand upon the 'Design for the New Normal' presentation I gave earlier, especially as its an area Jon and I are thinking about in the context of various ongoing projects. So here it is, once again an accelerated slideshow (70 slides!) where I followed up on some of the stories to see what happened to them in the last six months, and developed some of the ideas further. This continues to be a work-in-progress that Superflux is developing as part of our current projects. "

[Video: http://nextberlin.eu/2013/07/design-for-the-new-normal-3/ ]
anabjain  2013  drones  weapons  manufacturing  3dprinting  bioengineering  droneproject  biotechnology  biotech  biobricks  songhojun  ossi  zemaraielali  empowerment  technology  technologicalempowerment  raspberrypi  hackerspaces  makerspaces  diy  biology  diybio  shapeways  replicators  tobiasrevell  globalvillageconstructionset  marcinjakubowski  crowdsourcing  cryptocurrencies  openideo  ideo  wickedproblems  darpa  innovation  india  afghanistan  jugaad  jugaadwarfare  warfare  war  syria  bitcoins  blackmarket  freicoin  litecoin  dna  dnadreams  bregtjevanderhaak  bgi  genomics  23andme  annewojcicki  genetics  scottsmith  superdensity  googleglass  chaos  complexity  uncertainty  thenewnormal  superflux  opensource  patents  subversion  design  jonardern  ux  marketing  venkateshrao  normalityfield  strangenow  syntheticbiology  healthcare  healthinsurance  insurance  law  economics  ip  arnoldmann  dynamicgenetics  insects  liamyoung  eleanorsaitta  shingtatchung  algorithms  superstition  bahavior  numerology  dunne&raby  augerloizeau  bionicrequiem  ericschmidt  privacy  adamharvey  makeu 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Harvard cracks DNA storage, crams 700 terabytes of data into a single gram | ExtremeTech
"A bioengineer and geneticist at Harvard’s Wyss Institute have successfully stored 5.5 petabits of data — around 700 terabytes — in a single gram of DNA, smashing the previous DNA data density record by a thousand times.

The work, carried out by George Church and Sri Kosuri, basically treats DNA as just another digital storage device. Instead of binary data being encoded as magnetic regions on a hard drive platter, strands of DNA that store 96 bits are synthesized, with each of the bases (TGAC) representing a binary value (T and G = 1, A and C = 0).

To read the data stored in DNA, you simply sequence it — just as if you were sequencing the human genome — and convert each of the TGAC bases back into binary. To aid with sequencing, each strand of DNA has a 19-bit address block at the start (the red bits in the image below) — so a whole vat of DNA can be sequenced out of order, and then sorted into usable data using the addresses…"
chemistry  biology  sequencing  srikosuri  georgechurch  memory  2012  datastorage  science  storage  dna 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Book written in DNA code | Science | The Guardian
"Scientists have for the first time used DNA to encode the contents of a book. At 53,000 words, and including 11 images and a computer program, it is the largest amount of data yet stored artificially using the genetic material.

The researchers claim that the cost of DNA coding is dropping so quickly that within five to 10 years it could be cheaper to store information using this method than in conventional digital devices.

Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA – the chemical that stores genetic instructions in almost all known organisms – has an impressive data capacity. One gram can store up to 455bn gigabytes: the contents of more than 100bn DVDs, making it the ultimate in compact storage media."
technology  2012  science  coding  ebooks  bbooks  dna  storage  books 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Creepy Creepy World of Creepy Twins » TimeBlimp
In this article, we explore some of the more fascinating science about twins.  And by fascinating I mean CREEPY.  If you happen to be a twin, please don’t be offended by this article and destroy me with your laser eyes or melt my brain within my skull from thousands of miles away.  And if you aren’t a twin, you’ll soon come to realize that you PROBABLY USED TO BE A TWIN.  Let’s get started.
twins  science  biology  development  dna  via:coldbrain 
june 2012 by robertogreco
E. chromi on Vimeo
"E. chromi is a collaboration between designers and scientists in the new field of synthetic biology. In 2009, seven Cambridge University undergraduates spent the summer genetically engineering bacteria to secrete a variety of coloured pigments, visible to the naked eye. They designed standardised sequences of DNA, known as BioBricks, and inserted them into E. coli bacteria.

Each BioBrick part contains genes selected from existing organisms spanning the living kingdoms, enabling the bacteria to produce a colour: red, yellow, green, blue, brown or violet. By combining these with other BioBricks, bacteria could be programmed to do useful things, such as indicate whether drinking water is safe by turning red if they sense a toxin. E. chromi won the Grand Prize at the 2009 International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition (iGEM)."
echromi  2009  biobricks  dna  genetics  geneticengineering  bacteria  syntheticbiology 
march 2012 by robertogreco
You Can't Fuck the System If You've Never Met One by Casey A. Gollan
"Part of the reason systems are hard to see is because they're an abstraction. They don't really exist until you articulate them.

And any two things don't make a system, even where there are strong correlations. Towns with more trees have lower divorce rates, for example, but you'd be hard-pressed to go anywhere with that.

However, if you can manage to divine the secret connections and interdependencies between things, it's like putting on glasses for the first time. Your headache goes away and you can focus on how you want to change things.

I learned that in systems analysis — if you'd like to change the world — there is a sweet spot between low and high level thinking. In this space you are not dumbfoundedly adjusting variables…nor are you contemplating the void.

In the same way that systems don't exist until you point them out…"

"This is probably a built up series of misunderstandings. I look forward to revising these ideas."

[Now here: http://caseyagollan.com/systems/
http://caseyagollan.com/systems/read/ ]
color  cooperunion  awareness  systemsawareness  binary  processing  alexandergalloway  nilsaallbarricelli  willwright  pets  superpokepets  superpoke  juliandibbell  dna  simulations  trust  hyper-educated  consulting  genetics  power  richarddawkins  generalizations  capitalism  systemsdesign  relationships  ownership  privacy  identity  cities  socialgovernment  government  thesims  sims  google  politics  facebooks  donatellameadows  sherryturkle  emotions  human  patterns  patternrecognition  systemsthinking  systems  2012  caseygollan  donellameadows 
march 2012 by robertogreco
The Science Behind Why We Love Ice Cream (and Other Things Creamy) - WSJ.com
"A new genetic study shows that people produce strikingly different amounts of amylase, and that the more of the enzyme people have in their mouth the faster they can liquefy starchy foods.

Scientists think this finding could help explain why people experience foods as creamy or slimy, sticky or watery, and that this perception could affect our preference for foods. For the numerous foods that contain starch, including pudding, sauces and even maple syrup, what can feel just right to some people is experienced as too runny or not melting enough for others because they produce different amounts of the enzyme."
food  taste  texture  pickyeaters  psychology  vegetables  icecream  senses  genetics  science  diet  dna 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Sergey Brin’s Search for a Parkinson’s Cure | Magazine
In other words, Brin is proposing to bypass centuries of scientific epistemology in favor of a more Googley kind of science. He wants to collect data first, then hypothesize, and then find the patterns that lead to answers. And he has the money and the algorithms to do it...But, surprisingly, the concept of genetic information as toxic has persisted, possibly because it presumes that people aren’t equipped to learn about themselves...“People were predicting catastrophic reactions,” Green recalls. “Depression, suicide, quitting their jobs, abandoning their families. They were anticipating the worst.” But that isn’t what happened....In other words, given what seems like very bad news, most of us would do what Sergey Brin did: Go over our options, get some advice, and move on with life...Can a model fueled by data sets and computational power compete with the gold standard of research?
sergeybrin  google  23andme  parkinsons  genetics  genomics  datamining  database  data  dna  disease  medicine  future  search  health  innovation  science  research 
july 2010 by robertogreco
How Barcodes and Smartphones Will Rearchitect Information - The Conversation - Harvard Business Review
"These are just three possible implications. One can imagine many, many more. The reason it's so powerful is that any time we create a new tagging architecture that is decentralized and out "at the ends" of the network, we have the ability to unleash the power of self-organization. Given how localized and voluminous information is, any solution for integrating marketplace and marketspace information must be decentralized and self-organizing.
mobile  phones  smartphones  tagging  bargodes  rfid  gps  dna  qrcodes  iphone  ubicomp  spimes 
july 2010 by robertogreco
BioCurious
"Curious about Biology? Come find answers at the new biology collaborative lab space where citizen science moves of the classroom and into the community. Following the successful example of hackerspaces such as Noisebridge, Langdon Labs, Hacker Dojo, and co-working spaces such as the Hub, we're pleased to offer the first Bay Area space dedicated to Non Institutional Biology. Got an idea for a startup? Join the DIY, "garage biology" movement and found a new breed of biotech."

[See also: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1040581998/biocurious-a-hackerspace-for-biotech-the-community ]
biohacking  biology  diy  dna  science  hackerspaces  hacking  lcproject 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Quantified Self - What I Learned from Tourette's
"6 months ago, I got my 23andMe genetic test results. They showed mostly what I expected: 30% chance of diabetes...All of these things are found in my extended family to some degree.
alexandracarmichael  tourettes  2010  23andme  dna  genetics  health  quantifiedself 
july 2010 by robertogreco
2010 preview: Is this the year that we create life? - life - 21 December 2009 - New Scientist
"Waiting for Synthia - that has been the script for enthusiasts of synthetic life for the past two years, ever since genomics pioneer Craig Venter promised to unveil a living bacterial cell carrying a genome made from scratch in the lab. 2010 is the year for him to deliver.
life  biology  craigventer  dna  microbes  synthetic  syntheticlife 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Nicolas Myers :: Portfolio :: Transgenic Bestiary
"Transgenic Bestiary is a game that envisions the use of animal dna to discover biodiversity, understand taxonomy and create imaginary collections of virtual hybrids."

[via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ludens/3959950591/ ]
nicholasmyers  bestiary  genetics  dna  art  design  taxonomy  science  biology  tcsnmy  biodiversity  imagination  creativity  hybrids  srg  glvo  edg 
september 2009 by robertogreco
DIYbio
"DIYbio is an organization that aims to help make biology a worthwhile pursuit for citizen scientists, amateur biologists, and DIY biological engineers who value openness and safety. This will require mechanisms for amateurs to increase their knowledge and skills, access to a community of experts, the development of a code of ethics, responsible oversight, and leadership on issues that are unique to doing biology outside of traditional professional settings."
diybio  biohacking  biology  education  technology  opensource  diy  howto  biotech  bioart  genetics  genomics  amateur  dna  biotechnology  tcsnmy  projectideas  science  hacking  art  research  bioinformatics  engineering  community 
march 2009 by robertogreco
My Genome, My Self - Steven Pinker Gets to the Bottom of his own Genetic Code - NYTimes.com
"An obvious candidate for the real answer is that we are shaped by our genes in ways that none of us can directly know...Each of us is dealt a unique hand of tastes and aptitudes, like curiosity, ambition, empathy, a thirst for novelty or for security, a comfort level with the social or the mechanical or the abstract. Some opportunities we come across click with our constitutions and set us along a path in life." "So if you are bitten by scientific or personal curiosity and can think in probabilities, by all means enjoy the fruits of personal genomics. But if you want to know whether you are at risk for high cholesterol, have your cholesterol measured; if you want to know whether you are good at math, take a math test. And if you really want to know yourself...consider the suggestion of François LaRochefoucauld: “Our enemies’ opinion of us comes closer to the truth than our own.”"
stevenpinker  genetics  culture  science  psychology  genomics  DNA  self 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Sports May Be Child’s Play, but Genetic Testing Is Not - NYTimes.com
"In this era of genetic testing, DNA is being analyzed to determine predispositions to disease, but experts raise serious questions about marketing it as a first step in finding a child’s sports niche, which some parents consider the road to a college scholarship or a career as a professional athlete.
technology  sports  genetics  parenting  athletes  dna 
december 2008 by robertogreco
David Byrne Journal: 11.23.08: Planet of the Neanderthals
"So then what happens if we bring Mr. Smarty Pants back to life? If he were joined by some of his mates, wouldn’t they eventually realize that they were smarter than us? Would they bide their time, hiding their agenda, and ultimately sabotage our world, taking charge of our pathetic unintelligent mobs? Cornelius may indeed have been smarter than Charlton Heston; those movies might not be as far-fetched as we thought."
neanderthals  davidbyrne  genetics  dna  intelligence  evolution  darwin  genes  naturalselection  charlesdarwin 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Seed: How We Evolve
"since the turn of the millennium, genomics has undergone a revolution. With the completion of such landmark studies as the Human Genome Project and the publication of HapMap, scientists finally have access to the particles of evolution. They can inspect vast stretches of DNA from people of all ethnicities, and the colossal amount of information suddenly available has spurred a revision of the old static picture that will render it unrecognizable. Harpending and a host of researchers have discovered in our DNA evidence that culture, far from halting evolution, appears to accelerate it."
human  evolution  science  genetics  anthropology  culture  biology  race  DNA  academia  evolutionarypsychology  psychology  intelligence  society 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Marginal Revolution: Nationalism
"What do you get when you plot the genetic fingerprints of more than 1000 Europeans on a grid? An image that looks surprisingly like a map of Europe. The findings reveal that our DNA contains a sort of global positioning system, which researchers can use to pinpoint where in the world both we and our relatives came from...."
genetics  maps  mapping  demographics  europe  DNA 
september 2008 by robertogreco
The Quantified Self: First Personal Genome User Group - "what I have learned by messing around in personal quantified genomics in the last six months:
"far less known about proven genetic diseases that I thought...Sequencing is not just about health...Your DNA can reveal much about your deep genetic past...I have been surprised at how fast & eager users have been to share their genetic data"
dna  kevinkelly  genome  23andme  genetics  sequencing  privacy  data  information  health  personalinformatics 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Atlas of the Human Journey - The Genographic Project
"seeking to chart new knowledge about the migratory history of the human species by using sophisticated laboratory and computer analysis of DNA contributed by hundreds of thousands of people from around the world. In this unprecedented and real-time resea
history  genetics  maps  evolution  science  human  dna  timelines  storytelling  migration  anthropology  paleontology  humans  ethnography  environment  mapping  visualization  prehistoric  ancienthistory 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Hacking Life: This Weekend, Start Building a New Life Form
"In few years, weekend hacking project will involve bits of DNA & PCR machine instead of soldering iron or glue. With help of Open Wetware Project, & Registry of Standard Biological Parts Wiki, you too can become amateur synthetic biologist.
biology  hacking  future  howto  dna  science  biotechnology 
march 2008 by robertogreco
"Junk" RNA May Have Played Role in Vertebrate Evolution: Scientific American
"New study says tiny snippets of RNA co-evolved with vertebrates, likely accounting for the new organisms' complexity"
DNA  evolution  genes  rna  biology 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Scientists Build First Man-Made Genome; Synthetic Life Comes Next
"With the new ability to sequence a genome, scientists can begin to custom-design organisms, essentially creating biological robots that can produce from scratch chemicals humans can use. Biofuels like ethanol, for example."
genetics  DNA  science  life  biotechnology  robots  coding  cloning  biology 
january 2008 by robertogreco
collision detection: DNA as seen through the eyes of a coder
"Just as the mechanics of DNA are a useful metaphor to help understand how computer viruses work, the mechanics of computer programming are a useful metaphor to help understand how DNA works."
coding  science  dna  biotechnology  programming 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Humans Evolving More Rapidly Than Ever, Say Scientists | Wired Science from Wired.com
"The findings, published today by a team of U.S. anthropologists in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, overturn the theory that modern life's relative ease has slowed or even stopped human adaptation."
anthropology  biology  DNA  culture  evolution  future  genetics  history  human  science 
december 2007 by robertogreco
23AndMe Will Decode Your DNA for $1,000. Welcome to the Age of Genomics
"advent of retail genomics will make once-rare experience commonplace. Simply spitting into a vial...We will not live according to what has happened to us, but according to what our own specific genetic risks predispose us toward.
genomics  genetics  law  personal  dna  science  health 
november 2007 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Europe | France approves migrant DNA tests
"France's Senate has approved a controversial law allowing voluntary DNA tests for would-be immigrants seeking to join family in France."
immigration  france  policy  politics  migration  law  dna  genetics 
october 2007 by robertogreco
New DNA kits unlock pet pedigrees | csmonitor.com
"Curious dog owners can now determine their mutt's ancestry."
dogs  genetics  dna  ancestry  science  biology  services  animals 
july 2007 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: $10 DNA replicator
"A pocket-sized device that runs on two AA batteries and copies DNA as accurately as expensive lab equipment has been developed by researchers in the US."
dna  biology  science  technology  replicator  health  poor  poverty  world  international 
may 2007 by robertogreco
The Genographic Project - Human Migration, Population Genetics, Maps, DNA
"The National Geographic Society, IBM, geneticist Spencer Wells, and the Waitt Family Foundation have launched the Genographic Project, a five-year effort to understand the human journey—where we came from and how we got to where we live today. This unp
education  biology  anthropology  evolution  history  nature  science  genetics  genealogy  DNA  earth 
february 2006 by robertogreco

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