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We, Who Are Web Designers — Jon Tan 陳
"I’m self-actualised, without the stamp of approval from any guild, curriculum authority, or academic institution. I’m web taught. Colleague taught. Empirically taught. Tempered by over fifteen years of failed experiments on late nights with misbehaving browsers. I learnt how to create venues because none existed. I learnt what music to play for the people I wanted at the event, and how to keep them entertained when they arrived. I empathised, failed, re-empathised, and did it again. I make sites that work. That’s my certificate. That’s my validation."
posteducation  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  certification  pln  authority  curriculum  curriculumisdead  problemsolving  2011  design  webdesign  webdev  empathy  learningbydoing  web  making  makers  make  do  autodidacts  jontan 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Praxis (process) - Wikipedia
"In her The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt argues that Western philosophy too often has focused on the contemplative life (vita contemplativa) and has neglected the active life (vita activa). This has led humanity to frequently miss much of the everyday relevance of philosophical ideas to real life.[2] [3] Arendt calls “praxis” the highest and most important level of the active life.[4] Thus, she argues that more philosophers need to engage in everyday political action or praxis, which she sees as the true realization of human freedom.[5] According to Arendt, our capacity to analyze ideas, wrestle with them, and engage in active praxis is what makes us uniquely human."
education  learning  teaching  psychology  praxis  experientiallearning  reflection  action  doing  tcsnmy  lcproject  hannaharendt  kierkegaard  heidegger  kant  aristotle  plato  staugustine  marxism  karlmarx  antoniolabriola  iteration  iterative  do  practice  socialwork  theory 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Put This On • Sometimes people ask me about how I created my...
"Sometimes people ask me about how I created my little media empire. This is how.

Ira spent 20 years working at NPR before he started This American Life. Twenty years making mistakes, learning from them, thinking about what he’d do with his own show. When he started This Life, NPR turned him down. After 20 years. Told him to do it on his own. So he went out and won some fucking Peabodys.

The day Ira told me he enjoyed a particular episode of my stupid comedy podcast that I didn’t even know he’d every heard of much less listened to was one of the proudest days of my life. For serious.

And speaking of serious: SERIOUSLY, MAKE YOUR THING."
creativity  work  inspiration  tips  howto  iraglass  jessethorn  putthison  persistence  mistakes  learning  perseverance  hardwork  glvo  lcproject  volume  process  2011  making  doing  justdo  do  taste  potential  practice  deadlines  discipline  self-discipline  thisamericanlife 
april 2011 by robertogreco
How To Steal Like An Artist (And 9 Other Things Nobody Told Me) - Austin Kleon
"All advice is autobiographical.

It’s one of my theories that when people give you advice, they’re really just talking to themselves in the past. This list is me talking to a previous version of myself.

Your mileage may vary…

1. Steal like an artist… 2. Don’t wait until you know who you are to start making things…  3. Write the book you want to read… 4. Use your hands… 5. Side projects and hobbies are important… 6. The secret: do good work and put it where people can see it… 7. Geography is no longer our master… 8. Be nice. The world is a small town… 9. Be boring. It’s the only way to get work done… 10. Creativity is subtraction…"
glvo  howto  wisdom  austinkleon  design  creativity  writing  work  howwework  calendars  routine  life  kindness  invention  make  making  do  doing  geography  location  boring  boringness  sharing  cv  projects  sideprojects  hobbies  manual  starting  via:steelemaley 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Be Somebody or Do Something
"Here's a curious paradox: the more you insist on sticking to a straight-&-narrow path defined by your own evolving principles, rather than the expedient one defined by current situation, the more you'll have to twist & turn in the real world. The straight path in your head turns into spaghetti in the real world.

On the other hand, the more your path through the real world seems like a straight road, defined by something like a "standard" career path/script, the more you'll have to twist & turn philosophically to justify your life to yourself. Every step that a true Golden Boy careerist takes, is marred by deep philosophical compromises. You sell your soul one career move at a time.

If you are driven by your own principles, you'll generally search desperately for a calling, and when you find one, it will consume your life. You'll be driven to actually produce, create or destroy. You'll want to do something that brings the world more into conformity with your own principles…"
careerism  careers  principles  cv  besomebody  dosomething  do  doing  vision  purpose  learning  adaptability  conformity  unschooling  deschooling  education  racetonowhere  well-being  philosophy  meaning  tcsnmy  truth  truth-seeking  identity  measurement  progress  life  wisdom  johnboyd 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » You’d Be Right To Wonder
"What I learned through that was the importance of making things — but it’s not just the made-thing but the making-of-the-thing, if you follow. In the *making you’re also doing a kind of thinking. Making is part of the “conversation” — it’s part of the yammering, but with a good dose of hammering. If you’re not also making — you’re sort of, well..basically you’re not doing much at all. You’ve only done a *rough sketch of an idea if you’ve only talked about it and didn’t do the iteration through making, then back to thinking and through again to talking and discussing and sharing all the degrees of *material — idea, discussions, conversations, make some props, bring those to the discussion, *repeat."
julianbleecker  making  make  doing  do  tcsnmy  lcproject  rapidprototyping  prototyping  iteration  thinking  designfiction  action  actionminded  glvo  cv  reflection  discussion  conversation 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» Lawrence Pearsall Jacks on Work
"A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both."
lawrencepearsalljacks  work  play  recreation  learning  education  unschooling  deschooling  passion  tcsnmy  lcproject  glvo  do  doing  engagement 
january 2011 by robertogreco
My Father’s Teachings Part 1 | The Do Village
"He was difficult to please but always selfless. An old fashioned man whose family responsibilities subsumed all else…taught me that families should break bread & eat together as often as possible…taught me to cook well. To respect food, respect producers & labourers that create it, & be parsimonious with leftovers & waste…taught me that when a task is to be taken on…to plan, prepare, take time to accomplish it well, & do it w/ conviction…taught me how to upcycle…I saw him consume little but consume well. He taught me to consume nothing that that you cannot afford to pay for in cash…to avoid borrowing…taught me to be loyal to family. Family comes first, however difficult that can be at times. Period…his teachings were not overt. He did his stuff, & I watched. He used to say to me when I phoned to discuss cooking something I’d eaten with him, and I was in need of quantities and timings – why do you not watch learn. Learn by watching doing not studying"
parenting  advice  waste  upcycling  borrowing  cv  responsiblity  families  food  doing  do  dolectures  production  planning  preparation  consumption  well-being  learning  unschooling  deschooling 
november 2010 by robertogreco
elearnspace › Questions I’m no Longer Asking
"I’m firmly convinced of the following:

1. Learners should be in control of their own learning. Autonomy is key. Educators can initiate, curate, and guide. But meaningful learning requires learner-driven activity

2. Learners need to experience confusion and chaos in the learning process. Clarifying this chaos is the heart of learning.

3. Openness of content and interaction increases the prospect of the random connections that drive innovation

4. Learning requires time, depth of focus, critical thinking, and reflection. Ingesting new information requires time for digestion. Too many people digitally gorge without digestion time.

5. Learning is network formation. Knowledge is distributed.

6. Creation is vital. Learners have to create artifacts to share with others and to aid in re-centering exploration beyond the artifacts the educator has provided.

7. Making sense of complexity requires social and technological systems. We do the former better than the latter." [Read on...]
georgesiemens  education  connectivism  learning  timewasted  wastedtime  do  doing  autonomy  unschooling  deschooling  theendlessdebate  lcproject  community  networks  student-centered  student-led  messiness  chaos  process  serendipity  criticalthinking  reflection  information  cv  complexity  technology 
november 2010 by robertogreco
metacool: More thoughts on the primacy of doing: Shinya Kimura, Jeep, Corvette, and the cultural zeitgeist of life in 2010
"cultural zeitgeist of life in 2010 America is clearly saying "We need to start thinking with our hands again", & that we need at least to have confidence in our decision making as we seek to create things of intrinsic value…It's not difficult to get to a strong, compelling point of view. That's what design thinking can do for you. But in each of these videos I sense our society expressing a strong yearning for something beyond process, the courage to make decisions and to act. Talking and thinking is easy, shipping is tough…<br />
<br />
Tinkering, hacking, experimenting, they're all ways of experiencing the world which are more apt than not to lead to generative, highly creative outcomes. I firmly believe that kids & young adults who are allowed to hack, break, tear apart, & generally probe the world around them develop an innate sense of courage when it comes time to make a decision to actually do something. I see this all the time at Stanford…"
diegorodriguez  make  making  handson  hands  manufacturing  machines  tinkering  shinyakimura  detroit  gm  jeep  bigthree  spacerace  rockets  nostalgia  thinking  learning  experimenting  experience  facebook  google  apple  hacking  creativity  innovation  2010  jacobbronowski  design  engineering  machining  action  tcsnmy  glvo  lcproject  doing  motivation  do  corvette 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Making Future Magic – a bit about the music – Blog – BERG
"Some of the best bits about working at BERG are how everyone, despite having particular specialist skills, gleefully ignores boundaries, disciplines, labels and predefined processes, and allows themselves space to just run with things when they get excited. Deciding to do the music for the first Making Future Magic film ourselves was one of those moments."
crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  specialization  specialists  generalists  berg  berglondon  do  make  creativity 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Elliot Washor: Making Their Way: Creating a Generation of "Thinkerers"
"Schools can reap the rewards of making if they can resist the "curse of the course;" loosen rigid time structures to promote exploration and smart failures; and, in the evening and on weekends, open their labs, sheds and garages to the community and to makers of all ages and levels of expertise. They will need as well to bring the traditional academic disciplines -- including the increasingly essential arts and design -- into those fab labs and to the making itself. By employing people, objects, places and situations (POPS) to support making, schools will prepare a whole generation of young people to succeed in the challenging careers out there now -- and the ones that will be."
education  tinkering  lcproject  bigpicturelearning  makerfaires  eliotwashor  stem  pedagogy  making  thinking  technology  diy  science  teaching  tcsnmy  make  do  doing  pops  communitycenters  community  sharing  schooldesign  curriculum  projectbasedlearning  engineering  pbl 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Reflections on the valedictorian’s speech « Re-educate
"Erica Goldson can give speeches every day for the rest of her life. I can write blog posts until my fingers fall off. Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talks are indeed powerful. Alfie Kohn’s & Daniel Pink’s books are important & compelling reads. But it all remains a self-indulgent exercise unless someone builds schools—or transforms existing schools—into places that nurture kids’ intrinsic motivation to learn, & allow them to direct their own education & pursue their strengths. At some point, we need to stop talking, stop writing, & [do]…

There is something seductive about the act of rebellion. The adrenaline rush that comes from speaking truth to power can become addictive. But oing the lonely, dangerous work of actually building something new is the stuff that actually makes change. That’s the work that really matters.

My advice…find someone who’s doing work that matters & ask how you can help. We’ve got a lot that needs to get done, & we’re going to need all the help we can get."
ericgoldson  valedictorians  do  make  tcsnmy  lcproject  stevemiranda  schools  education  productivity  learning  self-directedlearning  self-directed  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  pscs  kenrobinson  danielpink  pugetsoundcommunityschool 
august 2010 by robertogreco
scraplab — You’ve Either Shipped or You Haven’t
"You’ve either shipped, or you haven’t. You’ve either poured weeks, months or even years of your life into bringing a product or a service into the world, or you haven’t.

If you have, you’ll know what I’m talking about. You’ll have flicked a switched, cap deploy‘d, or flipped your closed sign to open, and just waited – holding your breath for whatever happens next.

And at that moment everything that’s wrong with it suddenly comes into sharp focus...

So you wear your learning smile, step back a bit, have a think, and work out what to do next.

But whatever you do next, you’ve shipped. You’ve joined the club.

And the next time someone produces an antenna with a weak spot, or a sticky accelerator, you’re more likely to feel their pain, listen to their words and trust their actions than the braying media who have never shipped anything in their lives."
2010  learning  antennas  business  building  creativity  creation  entrepreneurship  apple  shipping  making  life  iphone  failure  experience  critics  culture  delivery  tcsnmy  lcproject  doing  do  make  via:migurski  empathy  startups  cv  controversy  complaints 
july 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - Boing Boing Founder Mark Frauenfelder on DIY, Mistakes, and Unschooling
"Mark Frauenfelder, is editor-in-chief of MAKE magazine, founder of the collaborative weblog Boing Boing, and author of the book Made by Hand: Searching for Meaning in a Throwaway World. He sat down with Reason.tv's Ted Balaker to discuss cigar box guitars, the value of mistakes, and what the Do-It-Yourself movement can teach us about education."

[Seen here too: http://reason.com/blog/2010/07/15/reasontv-boing-boing-founder-m]
markfrauenfelder  unschooling  diy  make  making  risk  risktaking  schools  education  learning  autodidacts  deschooling  do  failure  tcsnmy  lcproject  reason  mistakes  interviews 
july 2010 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » TEDGlobal: Transforming voting, and education
"Emily Pilloton has big idea for small community. She & her design firm, Project H are focused on transforming education in Bertie County, NC...

firm focuses on 6 principles: Design through action. Design with, not for. Design systems, not stuff. Document, share & measure. Start locally and scale globally. Build.

In the spirit of 5th principle – & because she fell in love w/ community – she & Matt now live there...working on 3 projects designed to transform local education system through design.

[1] rebuilds computer labs from place designed for “kill & drill”, getting students to take tests. Now it’s a creative, open space for exploration & interaction... [2] educational playground system invites students to learn kinetically... [3] project to teach design within public schools...

While this is a small story – 1 course, 13 students, 1 year – it’s a model for how design could lead education in future & how small communities might use education to transform themselves."
emilypilloton  projecthdesign  northcarolina  ethanzuckerman  2010  design  designthinking  tcsnmy  small  rural  problemsolving  ict  education  schools  openstudio  openstudioproject  do  doing  tinkering  exploring  making  creativity  activism  community  lcproject  systems  action  building  change  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  projecth 
july 2010 by robertogreco
How US Public School almost killed an Entreprenuer | The Do Village ["10 things that were constantly reinforced during my 12 years of public school in America that had to be unlearned as an adult desiring to be an entrepreneur."]
"10 things that were constantly reinforced during my 12 years of public school in America that had to be unlearned as an adult desiring to be an entrepreneur.

1. Fit in instead of be original

2. Follow the rules instead of questioning why they exist

3. Helping others is cheating despite the fact that everything you do as a successful adult is a team effort

4. Have good handwriting instead of teaching me to type

5. Do it because the teacher said so, instead of teaching me to understand why doing it is important

6. Don’t challenge authority instead of teaching me that I deserve respect too

7. Get good grades in all my classes, even though I will never do trigonometry ever in life. (Sine these nuts. lol)

8. Don’t fail instead of teaching me to value trial and error

9. Debating and arguing with friends is a bad thing, instead of encouraging independent thought and self confidence

10. Be a generalist and learn things I hate, instead of developing my genius at things that i like.

More Dumbshit that I still dont understand.

*Getting to school late will be punished by making you stay home for 3 days…WTF

*Memorize stuff that now can be looked up on Google.

*Learn to do calculus by hand, despite being required to purchase a $200 calculator.

*Appearing smart is more important than being effective…. REALLY?

These are all that I can think of now. Feel free to add dumbshit you learned in the comments section."
education  tcsnmy  rules  handwriting  typing  cheating  collaboration  helping  respect  authority  schools  schooliness  backwards  confidence  self-confidence  arguing  debate  generalists  specialists  doing  making  do  via:cervus  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  teaching  learning  entrepreneurship  unlearning  rote  math  mathematics  trialanderror  failure  risk  risktaking  toshare  topost  manifesto  specialization  manifestos  rotelearning 
july 2010 by robertogreco
High School Homebuilders Get More Than An Education : NPR
"The sports teams at Forest Grove High School are called the Vikings. And every year, some students build what they call a "Viking house" in the surrounding neighborhood. It's a real house that the school sells to raise money...
handson  projectbasedlearning  homes  housing  construction  tcsnmy  classideas  via:lukeneff  forestgrove  oregon  practicalknowledge  senseofacheivement  actualtangibleresults  make  making  do  doing  fundraising  homebuilding  shop  carpentry  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Thinking about better mousetraps and the Maker Generation – confused of calcutta
"There’s a new generation out there. There are new problems out there. And in between there’s design. Design of things that will sustain; things that are cheap to build; things you can repair yourself; things that aren’t wasteful in energy or even packaging; things that don’t harm other living creatures. Things that are easy and convenient to use. We’ve spoken a long time about building better mousetraps. The Maker Generation are doing something about it.
jprangaswami  makergeneration  making  doing  sustainability  design  designthinking  mousetraps  generations  problemsolving  timbrown  changebydesign  theonion  books  do 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Carpe Diem
"Carpe Diem helps you do something new everyday. A series of daily do's. The kind of little do's that get our imaginations going, make some memories and get us learning a bit more about ourselves & the world around us.

The tasks come from all over the place, including a few from the lovely folks over at the School of Life. They range from the thought provoking to the spontaneous and light hearted, some even have little rewards to help you on your way and give you a nudge in the right direction. Follow all the daily do's and by the end of the year you'll have done all sorts. From the delights of having a hygge, to partaking in some random acts of kindness, and dabbling in a spot of poetry.

Take part in the tasks every day and your life will change (for the better, more fulfilled sort we hope) and the handy thing is that Carpe Diem Daily comes in app form, so you can get the tasks straight to your phone."
android  collaboration  schooloflife  carpediem  happiness  inspiration  life  nokia  tasks  community  do  doing  creativity  interestingness  observation  daily 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Abby Sunderland: Is she an adult or is she a child? | Education Innovating
"Robert Epstein has developed a test of adultness...found many young people demonstrate more adult attributes than those 2-3 times their age...argues whole notion of ‘adolescence’ is out of touch w/ human nature, & instead an over-restrictive institution created by convergence of labor laws, compulsory schooling, & risk-avoidance culture. We forget how many extraordinary people—Bach, Michelangelo, Napoleon, Franklin, etc—began doing extraordinary things long before they were “adults.” In our world today this spirit still shows itself: Teenagers are the adults in many families...start companies...play professional sports & fight in wars. & often they do it well. We could be getting a lot more from our young people, if we only treated them as adults. The capacity of young people to do great things is a major source of potential growth for this country’s education system. To what extent does traditional school restrict, delay, or squander their capacity & motivation to achieve?"
robertepstein  tcsnmy  adults  adultness  children  teens  youth  society  risk  risktaking  riskaversion  compulsory  education  laborlaws  michelangelo  benjaminfranklin  do  unschooling  deschooling  glvo  trust  responsibility  capacity  motivation  napoleon 
june 2010 by robertogreco
davistudio: Sol Lewitt to Eva Hesse
"Just stop thinking, worrying, looking over your shoulder, wondering, doubting, fearing, hurting...struggling, gasping, confusing, itching, scratching, mumbling, bumbling...stumbling, rumbling, rambling, gambling, tumbling, scumbling, scrambling, hitching, hatchiiing, bitching...searching, perching, besmirching...grinding away at yourself. stop it & just DO...trust & tickle something inside you, your "weird humor." you belong in the most secret part of you. don't worry about cool, make your own uncool...if you fear, make it work for you -- draw & paint your fear & anxiety. & stop worrying about big, deep things such as "to decide on a purpose and way of life..." you must practice being stupid, dumb, unthinking, empty. then you will be able to DO! i have much confidence in you & even though you are tormenting yourself, the work you do is very good. try & do some BAD work. the worst you can think of & see what happens but mainly relax & let everything go to hell."

[via: http://laurenzettler.tumblr.com/post/554920621/learn-to-say-fuck-you-to-the-world-once-in-a ]

[Update 31 January 2013: Links are dead. Try this: http://www.gwarlingo.com/2011/sol-lewitts-advice-to-eva-hesse/ via Caren Litherland]

[Update 12 August 2013: Another location via @datatelling http://magazine.seymourprojects.com/2013/02/s-stimulant-sol-lewitts-advice-to-eva-hesse/ ]
sollewitt  evahesse  do  glvo  motivation  initiative  overthinking  action  actionminded  uncool  cool  fear  risk  risktaking  worry  anxiety  purpose  yearoff  freedom 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Do blog - The University for the 21st Century
"The big question is does our educational system want to learn about the kid¹s in front of them? ... ask them what they are interested in? The reason to ask them is simple: we learn better when we are interested. Now the next big question is can a school learn? adapt? make itself more relevant? change? give education that connects to kids in front of them? ... So that brings to the last big question: Love. We are taught the importance of finding a career but not the importance of finding our love. We have to change education to find out what they are interested in...unlock the floodgates of learning...If you are interested in something, you will be willing to toil away at it."
education  change  reform  gamechanging  relevance  davidhieatt  schools  learning  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  lcproject  do 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Do blog - Enough
[see also the Vonnegut quote at beginning of the post and previous reference to the MUJI quote: http://doblog.tumblr.com/post/167472813/the-future-of-global-consumption ]

"On a macro level re-gearing machine that is modern economy to a more sustainable model requires many changes, not the least of which is the valuation of the cost of resource depletion, in investment models - “valuing the externalities,” so that appropriate & honest comparisons can be made between, for example, the cost of clean energy & cost of dirty fossil energy. However it is also a reality that as consumers we simply must re-consider the concept of enough. This is tremendously difficult in a world in which we are all exposed to the constant mantra that growth is the only way out of the hole. The retail figures are up they cry, and the markets start to settle and the cycle begins again. But we’re munching relentlessly through the world’s finite resources at the very same time…… Until we are really in tune with the concept of enough (and I confess that I probably find this more difficult than many), I’m not sure a truly sustainable model is an option in the developed world."
economics  consumption  postconsumerism  growth  do  vonnegut  josephheller  sustainability  resources  behavior  kurtvonnegut 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Threadless: The Do-First Work Ethic on Vimeo
"Jeffrey Kalmikoff and Jake Nickell, co-founders of Threadless, talk about how they transformed a fun side project into a multimillion dollar company."
threadless  diy  make  do  doing  do-first  glvo  tcsnmy  learning  failure  iteration  jeffreykalmikoff  jakenicjkell 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Do blog - We used to gather around a fire to listen to...
"why are stories so important?...over time we have become comfortable with this way of getting information. We like the format. It works for us. We know how to decipher them. Indeed stories are how we used to learn but will also be very much how we learn in the future. In its simplest form they pass knowledge on. They explain things we don’t fully understand. They inspire us. With each great story comes life’s important lessons. About their determination, about what drove them, about trying to find a better way of doing something, about the struggles they met along the way. Stories are also important because they are about doing things. Stories need verbs. It’s the verb in the stories that gives it the action. The ‘Do’ bit. & importantly, people don’t forget stories, especially when told brilliantly. But they often forget facts, even if told in unique way. These stories in terms of learning are important; they show us the way. They demonstrate what is possible. They give us hope."
stories  verbs  action  do  doing  storytelling  learning  tcsnmy  ted  information 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Ping - At TechShops, Do-It-Yourselfers Get to Use Expensive Tools - NYTimes.com
"Then they will direct their disposable income and free time toward making things — stuff like chairs, toys and, say, synthetic diamonds. They will do this because the tools needed to make really cool things have become cheaper and because humans feel good when they make really cool things.
techshop  hackerspaces  markhatch  lcproject  tinkering  make  do  making  invention  us 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Palomar5
"Palomar5 is a network-organisation experimenting with new environments for creating positive innovations, and empowering individuals to create and realize new ideas. The topics and projects encompass the imaginations and talents of our community – and beyond -, ranging from global free internet, to giant artistic displays, from deep philosophical exploration, to hands on play and experimentation. Trust, love and respect, built upon common experience is the glue that bonds our community. Palomar 5 is looking for collaborators that can benefit from our collective output and participate in the creation of new experiences, exploring the space between living rooms and corporations, professional and amateur, reality and utopia."
berlin  change  collaboration  collective  entrepreneurship  conferences  coworking  germany  technology  network  initiatives  ideas  creativity  culture  design  do  innovation  community  tcsnmy 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Do Flick Book
Beautiful booklet documentation of the Do Lectures event.
do  doing  dolectures  glvo  magainzes  books  beauty  flickbook  tcsnmy  projectideas 
march 2010 by robertogreco
elearnspace › Lack of Sympathy
"Before universities existed, most people learned by apprenticeship. As Harold points out, before WWII universities apprenticed elites; priests, doctor, scholars, teachers, etc. . .. The mode of learning was still an apprenticeship model and most elite education ended with a very specific apprenticeship practice like a dissertation or medical residency, or for the wealthy, an initiation into “the club”. But educational theory ignored the way things worked and stressed knowledge over doing, knowledge that was represented by a degree.

Many people are now finding out that a degree correlated with higher incomes, but did not necessarily cause them. Knowledge alone proves to be no covering, the emperor has no clothes. We may not be blacksmiths or leather tanners, but evolution has not changed us that much and we still learn in much the same way as we always have, by watching other people do things. I think education would be better off if it focused on doing instead of knowing."
education  knowledge  apprenticeships  history  learning  degrees  credentials  doing  do  deschooling  unschooling  colleges  universities 
february 2010 by robertogreco
user research friday (tecznotes)
"Flickr's ability to successfully respond with this kind of deft flexibility to a crisis is a result of a caring, trusting relationship between site & users. This relationship seems to extend to all areas of the site...

The negative way of phrasing my argument is that it's hard to test everything, and doubly hard to test new things. Some stuff you just have to push out into the world and see what happens.

The positive way of phrasing my argument is that for the astonishing and the novel, you're better off pushing your ideas into the real world early, and testing with the reactions of real people who aren't self-consciously test subjects. Start small, listen carefully to your users, and grow in the direction where they want to take you. Give yourself room to fail, and understand that the trust of your fellow travelers is an important part of the equation.

The doubly-positive way of phrasing my argument is Just Effing Do It."
community  flickr  innovation  stamen  tcsnmy  usertesting  userresearch  research  small  testing  michalmigurski  twitter  walkingpapers  maps  mapping  trust  lcproject  care  do  doing  iteration  honesty  aaronstraupcope 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Praxis (process) - Wikipedia
"Praxis is used by educators to describe a recurring passage through a cyclical process of experiential learning, such as the cycle described and popularised by David A. Kolb.[1]

Paulo Freire defines praxis in Pedagogy of the Oppressed as "reflection and action upon the world in order to transform it." Through praxis, oppressed people can acquire a critical awareness of their own condition, and, with their allies, struggle for liberation.[2]

In the BBC television documentary "New Order: Play At Home", Factory Records owner Tony Wilson describes praxis as "doing something, and then only afterwards, finding out why you did it"."

[via: http://generalpraxis.blogspot.com/]
praxis  paulofreire  pedagogy  experientiallearning  cycles  learning  education  davidkolb  reflection  transformation  liberation  play  do  doing 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Recession’s Emerging Credo - Do More, Buy Less - NYTimes.com
"Quietly but noticeably over the past year, Americans have rejiggered their lives to elevate experiences over things. Because of the Great Recession, a recent New York Times/CBS News poll has found, nearly half of Americans said they were spending less time buying nonessentials, and more than half are spending less money in stores and online.
greatrecession  experience  simplicity  slow  do  doing  glvo  economics  families  time  balance  postmaterialism  postconsumerism 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Do blog - Ten Do’s and Don’ts for speakers
"1. Do tell your story. It will inspire others more than you will ever know. 2. Do inspire yourself too. Don’t do the talk you always do. Leave your comfort zone. 3. Do tell us of your struggles as well as your successes. Failure is often a better teacher than success. 4. Don’t read it. You know your story off by heart, so let it come from the heart. You will touch more people that way. 5. Do tell us your dreams, your passions, what you stand for, your crazy new idea or your brave new thinking. We need to know what drives you. 6. Do entertain. We cover some serious subjects but that doesn’t mean we have to be serious. Entertainment is good. People learn a lot while laughing. 7. Do disagree. Debate is important. You don’t have to agree with other speakers. 8. Don’t steal other speakers time. It’s a 25 minute talk. 9. Do give the best talk that you have ever done. 10. Do stay around. The food, the beer, the music and the fire-side conversation all go to make The Do lectures so special."
do  speaking  presentations  storytelling  disagreement  debate  failure  success  advice 
february 2010 by robertogreco
running to stand still « Higher Edison
"Sylvia’s session was built around the notion of bricolage—playful experimentation, conversation with materials at hand, hands-on improv, fondness for the found, passion, tinkering with intent, what-have-you with what-you-have—as an alternate lens on knowledge construction. It’s remix culture in full flower, and it stands in direct counterpoint to traditional analytical problem-solving. Given generous amounts of space, time, at-hand materials, and low or no evaluation pressure, learners will figure things out and make meaning.

Is “curriculum” a restrictive construct that inhibits natural passion-based learning, a lockstep model demanding rigid adherence?

Or do the constructed boundaries of a curriculum serve as a guide-path for learning, a constraint [2] that, by focusing attention, sparks a creative response?

In other words, does curriculum keep us on track, or keep us from the constructive, creative process of getting lost?"
sylviamartinez  curriculum  learning  constructivism  shellyblake-pock  education  unschooling  deschooling  leaning  tcsnmy  tinkering  iteration  curiosity  play  experimentation  make  do  passion  knowledge  remixculture  remix  culture  improvisation  remixing 
february 2010 by robertogreco
russell davies: lyddle end again
"Some slow projects won't leave you alone. You might not have done anything about them for ages but your attention keeps catching on something related in the world, nagging you, reminding you that there's something that needs completing."
slow  glvo  russelldavies  lyddleend2050  projects  do  make 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Meet Bruce Mau. He wants to redesign the world
"Early in his career, Mau began to consider the idea that everything a business does matters; that every action communicates a message to the world and also has consequences on some level...saw...compartmentalised thinking as standard practice in business, & felt that it allowed industry to wreak havoc on the world...Study. Use the necessity of production as an excuse to study. Mau has always believed that a design studio should be a place of study & that designing should be an exercise in lifelong learning. Mau recommends making your own design studio, wherever it may be, into an environment that encourages learning. Surround yourself with ideas; stock the place with books. Just don't spend too much time arranging the bookshelf...new iterations of Massive Change idea...network of schools, or "centres for massive change"...franchise concept of massive change to universities or companies, enabling them to set up their own design/innovation labs using Mau's methodologies"
brucemau  bmd  iwb  lifelonglearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  learning  bookfuturism  design  gamechanging  manifestos  innovation  optimism  future  schooldesign  growth  massivechange  change  society  glvo  diy  tinkering  making  do  doing  openstudioproject 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Nested: My Letter to Tavi
"I'm raising my daughter, Penelope, and I am constantly wondering how do we (my husband Ben and I) raise a daughter like you. I don't care if she hates math and doesn't do well in school or whatever as long as she has a passion. That's not saying I think you do poorly in school -- it's just the traditional measure of success for a kid. I just want her to be passionate about something and put all her love into it..."
menatrott  fashion  deschooling  passion  tcsnmy  glvo  learning  doing  do  children  parenting  schools  schooling  unschooling 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Faking It as a Productivity Tip - ProfHacker.com
"Faking it is a crucial way to get anything accomplished. Many abstracts for conferences or proposals for books or sabbaticals or anything else are written before the project described therein is finished, or sometimes even started. You build a constituency for a new course in part by positing its existence, and then trusting that a successful iteration of it will lead to even more interested students. Al Filreis gave an excellent example of this on Twitter the other day: “In the late 90s univ’s had big plans for ‘distance learning’ but it all fell through (not enough $). Now it simply happens.” It happens through getting out there and doing the work–even if, or perhaps especially when, you’re not 100% sure of what you’re doing."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/3698 ]

[now at: http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/faking-it-as-a-productivity-tip/22762 ]
productivity  cv  doing  do  sabbaticals  diggingin  tcsnmy  iteration  making  thinking  process  academia  learning  learningbydoing  gtd  autodidacts  unschooling  faking  fakingit  michaelchabon  kiostark  brepettis  nobodyknowswhatthey'redoing 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Saul Griffith: The 21st Century's Benjamin Franklin | The Stimulist
"Griffith undoubtedly could have gone to work for a think tank, but as he stated in an interview with CNN, he’d rather work for Squid, which he calls a “do-tank.” ... But above all, Franklin and Griffith share a sense that they do not have to focus in a single area to make a big difference. As Jessie Scanlon wrote in Business Week, "While most scientists go deep but narrow, focusing on one subject or problem, Griffith is ecumenical, following his curiosity and his conscience wherever they take him, and then digging deep into the issues that grab him.""
saulgriffith  tinkering  do  science  problemsolving  breadth  depth  benjaminfranklin  history  makingadifference  making  doing  tcsnmy  lcproject  glvo  via:preoccupations 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Scope (Schulze & Webb) [Slide 43 is his "100 hours challenge"]
"Design, culture, scale, space, superpowers. Key concepts: design and contributing to culture; ourselves as individuals and the big picture; taking action." From slide 43: "put aside 100 hours over this summer...Now for the next two days, go to talks and start conversations with people you don’t know, and choose what to spend your 100 hours on. I guarantee that everyone in this room can produce something or has some special skill, and maybe they’re not even aware of it. Ask them what theirs is, find out, because you’ll get ideas about what to learn yourself, and decide what to spend your 100 hours on. Do that for me. Because when you contribute, when you participate in culture, when you’re no longer solving problems, but inventing culture itself, that is when life starts getting interesting."

[video here: http://video.reboot.dk/video/486775/matt-webb-scope ]
mattwebb  design  culture  glvo  cv  schulzeandwebb  superpowers  imagination  creativity  tcsnmy  make  do  diy  definitions  books  wholeearthcatalog  stewartbrand  brunomunari  macro  bigpicture  generalists  risk  macroscope  ideas  thinking  designthinking  jackschulze  change  gamechanging  invention  futurism  reinvention  perspective  johnthackara  iterative  victorpapanek  informallearning  learning  zefrank  cognitivesurplus  plp  berg  berglondon 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Bre Pettis | I Make Things - Bre Pettis Blog - The Cult of Done Manifesto
"1. There are three states of being. Not knowing, action and completion.
2. Accept that everything is a draft. It helps to get it done.
3. There is no editing stage.
4. Pretending you know what you're doing is almost the same as knowing what you are doing, so just accept that you know what you're doing even if you don't and do it.
5. Banish procrastination. If you wait more than a week to get an idea done, abandon it.
6. The point of being done is not to finish but to get other things done.
7. Once you're done you can throw it away.
8. Laugh at perfection. It's boring and keeps you from being done.
9. People without dirty hands are wrong. Doing something makes you right.
10. Failure counts as done. So do mistakes.
11. Destruction is a variant of done.
12. If you have an idea and publish it on the internet, that counts as a ghost of done.
13. Done is the engine of more."
brepettis  procrastination  make  do  manifestos  gtd  writing  tinkering  tcsnmy  philosophy  motivation  inspiration  design  development  research  work  howto  productivity  efficiency  life  cultofdone 
march 2009 by robertogreco

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