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robertogreco : drawings   36

Cutaway World
"i have been collecting these types of images for many years. i have many more to scan and will post new ones each day. i can no longer identify the sources, as they are mostly pages torn from books, years ago. these are cutaways. x-rays. dissection. third eyes. stripping away the outer shell. revealing. exposing the inside. —Melody Owen"
tumblrs  diagrams  cutaways  via:tealtan  technical  illustrations  drawings  melodyowen 
august 2015 by robertogreco
“The world is full of objects, more or less... - robertogreco {tumblr}
“The world is full of objects, more or less interesting; I do not wish to add any more.

I prefer, simply, to state the existence of things in terms of time and/or place.

More specifically, the work concerns itself with things whose inter-relationship is beyond direct perceptual experience.

Because the work is beyond direct perceptual experience, awareness of the work depends on a system of documentation.

The documentation takes the form of photographs, maps, drawings and descriptive language.”

—Douglas Huebler
time  place  documentation  cv  douglashuebler  art  experience  perception  awareness  belatedness  things  objects  cataloging  description  observation  photography  maps  mapping  drawing  drawings  systems  archives  noticing  collections  collecting  capturing 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Blessedly Unnecessary | Books and Culture
"Gregory Blackstock is autistic, and because of his extraordinary gifts he is called a "savant" (a problematic word, I feel). Like many autistic people, Blackstock has a passion for order and precision, which shows up in any number of ways. For instance, the autobiography he hand–wrote for his book, Blackstock's Collections, takes the form of a list—"1. MY DATE OF BIRTH … 2. MY PREVIOUS SCHOOLS OF 1950 TO 1964 … 3. MY USUAL CITY NEWSPAPER ROUTE PERIOD"—and in listing his employment history he notes that he began his job at the Washington Athletic Club on September 9, 1975 and retired on January 12, 2001. Though I said that Blackstock worked there for twenty–five years, he prefers to say that it was twenty–five–and–a–third years.

This precision is central to Blackstock's art as well—though I have no idea whether it affects his accordion playing. The book is called Blackstock's Collections because each drawing is just that, a collection of things belonging to a particular category. I find especially intriguing Blackstock's tendency to give his drawings titles that begin with the definite article: "The Knives", "The Dentist's Tools, "The Memorable Vermont Scenes"—as though he aspires to utter completeness, gathering every member of a given set on a single page."



"Most of the "collections" are perfectly comprehensible, even if we suspect that it's not really possible to get all of "The Knives" on one page (Blackstock manages fifty–one of them, a considerable achievement). But Blackstock's passion for taxonomy gets him into some curious corners. Smack in the middle of "The Bells," among cowbells and bicycle bells and doorbells and the Liberty Bell and the bell of Big Ben, there's a diving bell. Not the same kind of thing, you say? But it's a bell, isn't it? I wonder how Blackstock would respond if someone were to point out to him that in his drawing of "The Drums" he omits the eardrum.

One of the few really heterogeneous collections is "The Noisemakers," a highly colorful and (for Blackstock) rather large drawing, forty–four inches tall, which includes not only whistling skyrockets and M–80 firecrackers and chainsaws, but also "thunder–&–rainstorms" and a scowling face accompanied by a speech balloon containing an unusually symmetrical set of signs indicating unprintable words: "##**@@**##!!!" This noisemaker is labeled as "LOUD FILTHY–MOUTH OFFENDER, THE OVEREMOTIONAL DIRTBAG!""



"As Auden also notes, art has now lost that habit of usefulness and does not seem likely to get it back: when we try to unite the useful and the beautiful, he says, we "fail utterly." Though there are some recent developments in industrial design that give one hope, I think Auden is basically correct. It's difficult to imagine a new Piranesi, or an Audubon for the 21st century. We have turned over the task of documenting the world to the various cameras, and for good reason: they perform the task well. But I hope we may occasionally find more Gregory Blackstocks, artists who—unaware that their labors of documentary love are unnecessary—plunge ahead and do their work, thereby reminding us what it means to look, really to look, at the Creation."

[See also: http://blog.ayjay.org/uncategorized/collections/ ]
gregoryblackstock  alanjacobs  art  whauden  2007  katebingamanburt  cataloging  taxonomy  sorting  classification  drawing  drawings  inventory  inventories 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Cornelia Hesse Honegger: Chernobyl [and elsewhere]
"Field studies in the nuclear fallout areas from Chernobyl
 
As a scientific illustrator I had worked for Prof. Hans Burla, a geneticist at the Zoological Institute of the University of Zurich. In 1967 he gave me the assignment to draw Drosophila subobscura flies that had been mutated in the laboratory by adding a poison (EMS) to their food. For my own interest I also painted these mutated flies, which were called quasimodo.

In 1985 I painted a housefly, Musca domestica, mutation called aristapedia — mutated by x-rays in the laboratory. The dean of the Zoological Institute gave the mutant flies to me when I asked him for permission to paint them. This work trained me to detect morphological disturbances in Heteroptera true bugs, which live in the wild at the edge of forests and in meadows."

[via: https://twitter.com/anabjain/status/428389515363774464 ]
animals  insects  drawings  corneliahessehonegger  nature  chernobyl  zoology  flies  mutations  science 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The Art of Onfim
"One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of "birchbark documents" (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century.

The birchbark documents of Novgorod are a major source for information about life in Medieval Novgorod because they are not the writings of church theologians or political leaders, but rather, personal messages, IOUs, love letters, shopping lists, and so on. One of the most fascinating items, in my mind, is a collection of children's drawings that have been unearthed.

Children's drawings in the Middle Ages?! Even if such things were created in period, how could they have survived to the present day? After all, finger paints, magic markers, and crayons were not yet in use, paper was far too valuable of a commodity to waste on children, and refrigerator doors were unavailable for the display of Junior's artistic genius. Most of the products of childhood inspiration probably were expressed on the ephemeral canvas of dirt or sand.

But birchbark was a different story. The bark was widely available (although there are indications that excessive use of the medium caused a decline in the local birch population) and easily cultivated. Anyone could use it. When one was finished with the message, it was simply thrown into the mud, where the presence of water and clay created an unusually bacteria-free environment which preserved the documents. So, we have the ideal medium: cheap, easy to come by, and (thanks to unique geology) preserved for hundreds of years.

The drawings from Novgorod that we have found appear to all come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the twelfth century or beginning of the thirteenth century in the city of Novgorod. By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings."

[posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/53472087542/one-of-several-images-from-the-art-of-onfim ]
onfim  art  history  children  drawings  paulwickenden  archaeology  russia 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Inside the Mind of Hans Ulrich Obrist
"The celebrity curator may be a phenomenon on the rise, but before Klaus Biesenbach and Paola Antonelli, there was Hans Ulrich Obrist. Obrist, who’s currently the co-director of exhibitions and programs and director of international programs at London’s Serpentine Gallery, has a list of curatorial accomplishments so long, it’s daunting. He started out small enough, organizing a show in his kitchen in 1991 (he was 23) that included contributions from Christian Boltanski and Fischli & Weiss; in the decades since, he’s curated and co-curated more than 250 exhibitions, including the first Berlin Biennale and the first Manifesta. He’s also known for his ongoing conceptual projects, among them do it, a roving show built around artist-given instructions for viewers, and The Interview Project, for which he’s racked up more than 2,000 hours of conversation so far, with artists, writers, philosophers, scientists, and others.

It turns out he’s also been taking notes the whole time — making diagrams and sketches, scribbling down ideas and keywords. And when artist Paul Chan, who’s also the founder and publisher of Badlands Unlimited, found out that these copious notes and drawings existed, he knew he wanted to release them.

“I wanted to publish them because I’m surprised they exist, still,” Chan told Hyperallergic over email. “Badland’s publishing program is mindlessly simple: we publish things that no one knew existed. The poems of Yvonne Rainer, speeches on democracy by Saddam Hussein, afternoon interviews of Marcel Duchamp, and now this. I didn’t know he made them. Did you?”

The resulting book, Think Like Clouds, premieres at the New York Art Book Fair, where Badlands has also mounted a small exhibition of the some of the artworks — or whatever you might call them. “I don’t know if these drawings are important,” Chan said. “I don’t even know if they are in fact drawings. This is to me their appeal.”

Badlands sent us six of Obrist’s sketches specifically related to his curatorial practice:"
hansulrichobrist  notes  notetaking  doodling  drawing  drawings  scribbles 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Why Basketball Won’t Leave Phil Jackson Alone - NYTimes.com
"Jackson’s life is organized around stark polarities. On one hand, he preaches a Zen acceptance of reality as it is. On the other, he is a man with very strong ideas about the way things should be — or as his opponents have often put it, he can be a bit of a whiner. (Non-Lakers fans will detect a certain radioactive irony in Jackson’s frequent complaints about referees.) As a player, Jackson was an unglamorous nonstar, and the triangle is designed to help that kind of role player flourish. And yet he’s never won an N.B.A. championship without superstars. His two homes, Montana and L.A., are complete opposites: anti-ego Buddhist reclusion versus the fame-drenched ego-circus of what is arguably the most scrutinized franchise in sports. He likes to portray himself as an anti-establishment loner, and yet he’s become deeply entangled in the Lakers organization, in part because of his relationship with Jeanie Buss and in part because the team has not been able to establish an identity since Jackson left; it seems as if every plot twist in the franchise’s ongoing soap opera somehow involves him. In his books, Jackson’s declarations of egolessness sometimes emanate strong whiffs of ego: “In that split-second all the pieces came together,” he writes in “Sacred Hoops,” “and my role as leader was just as it should be: invisible.” If this is invisibility, it is a highly visible form of it. These paradoxes — Jackson’s apparent ability to sit, happily, at opposite poles at the same time — are what make him one of the most mesmerizing personalities in sports.

Of the many plays that Phil Jackson diagramed for me, the one I couldn’t stop thinking about was something called the Drake Shuffle. The scheme was invented in the 1950s by a coach in Oklahoma, to be used by teams that lack a dominant scoring threat — no Wilt Chamberlain or Shaquille O’Neal or Michael Jordan to dump the ball to and get out of the way. Jackson described it to me as a “continuous offensive system,” which means that — unlike many plays, which have a definite endpoint or morph into something else when they get too much pressure — the Drake Shuffle never stops. You could run it, theoretically, forever. All five players move in coordinated motion, taking turns with and without the ball, until they’ve exhausted an elaborate cycle of screens and cuts and passes — at which point the play doesn’t end but starts all over again, with each participant now playing a different role within the same cycle. Everyone on the floor keeps moving, probing, trading off.

The Drake Shuffle sits at the center of a particularly Jacksonian nexus of ideas. It’s a scale-model democracy, a metaphor for the life cycle, a parable of the Buddhist idea of rebirth, one of the Lakota Sioux’s sacred hoops. Jackson’s career itself, with its endings and renewals, its retirements and unretirements, seems like a kind of existential Drake Shuffle, played out over 45 years. He’s gone from player to coach to retiree to whatever it is he’s doing now: cooking, writing, gardening, hiding, self-promoting, advising weary pilgrims from his sacred mountaintop, tantalizing struggling teams, driving endless Internet rumors. He’s in, he’s out, he has the ball, he doesn’t have the ball, he’s moving, he’s moving, he’s moving."

[via: http://randallszott.org/2013/05/24/john-cage-as-a-basketball-coach-phil-jacksons-artistry/ ]
[see also (sketches): http://6thfloor.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/16/the-rembrandt-of-basketball/ ]
sports  basketball  movement  philjackson  2013  visibility  invisibility  flow  drakeshuffle  coaching  cv  offense  continuity  continuous  buddhism  samanderson  drawings  diagrams  flagfootball 
may 2013 by robertogreco
ELLEN GROSSMAN Drawings and Sculpture
"ELLEN GROSSMAN These drawings and sculptures are a response to topographic maps, satellite photos, scanning electron microscope images, astronomy and the unfolding of intertwined relationships.

They emphasize the sensuous aspects of water currents, land masses and the wind made visible.

Much of my sculpture developed from an attraction to moiré patterns created by the overlay of two or more grids that are slightly askew."

[Via a search having watched: http://gothamist.com/2012/12/05/video_adorable_old_lady_asks_subway.php#photo-1via https://twitter.com/austinkleon/status/276358290592653313 ]

[Shared here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/37368380844/resurgence-25-x-39-in-metallic-gel-pen-on-blue AND http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/37368712718/subsequent-hills-detail-25-x-39-aluminum-gel ]
satelliteimages  nyc  drawing  drawings  microscopy  mapping  maps  sculpture  artists  art  ellengrossman 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Fellini’s Book of Dreams | Exhibitions Presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
"The Book of Dreams created by Federico Fellini…notebooks are filled with unique writings and colorful drawings documenting the great Italian director’s dreams. Fellini began the notebooks in the 1960s and continued adding to them until 1990, three years before his death at the age of 73.

A 12-time Oscar nominee (four nominations for directing, eight for writing) and a 1992 Honorary Award recipient, Fellini directed four films that won Oscars® in the Foreign Language Film category: “La Strada” (1956), “Nights of Cabiria” (1957), “8½” (1963) and “Amarcord” (1974). He was widely known for exploring facets of his subconscious through his art; by actively embracing his dream life, he gave himself the opportunity to explore themes that later played out in his films, including eroticism, religion, terror and love."

[See also: http://books.google.com/books?id=MMzRPQAACAAJ ]
dreams  exhibitions  drawings  fellini 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Why video games are indeed Art - Our far-flung correspondents
"A beautifully designed videogame invokes wonder as the fine arts do, only in a uniquely kinetic way. Because the videogame must move, it cannot offer the lapidary balance of composition that we value in painting; on the other hand, because it can move, it is a way to experience architecture, and more than that to create it, in a way which photographs or drawings can never compete. If architecture is frozen music, then a videogame is liquid architecture."
videogames  art  rogerebert  architecture  music  movement  photography  drawings  kinetic  wonder  composition 
april 2011 by robertogreco
LIBESKIND’S MACHINES « LEBBEUS WOODS
"Their use of analogy to inform the field of architecture is a potent tool for exploring much-needed new ideas of space and its human purposes than are afforded by the ordinary design process based on history and accepted building typologies. In the past, architects such as Mies found architectural inspiration in works of art (see the post Art to Architecture), while Le Corbusier produced his own paintings and sculptures to work out complex aesthetic problems in his architecture. Libeskind’s machines are in this tradition, though the problems are different. More architects today could benefit from such an analogous method, if they set for themselves problems not already solved. This method, like the machines themselves, opens architecture to a wide range of knowledge coming from different fields of thought and work, which is sorely needed in a time such as the present, characterized by increasing diversity in the human situation."

[via http://twitter.com/javierest/status/22408866350 AND http://greg.org/archive/2010/08/28/do_daniel_libeskinds_awesome_machines_mean_i_have_to_stop_hating_his_work.html ]
architecture  design  machines  robots  sculpture  daniellibeskind  lebbeuswoods  interdisciplinary  diversity  human  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  problemsolving  2009  reading  writing  memory  drawings  history  1979  architecture-as-text  text  post-structuralism  process  fabrication  knowledge 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Jonathan Harris . Sep 1, 2009
"Childhood drawings from 1989, labeled (in Mom's handwriting) "Favorite stuffed animals", photographed with matching subjects 20 years later. Clockwise from bottom left: "Fish", with matching fish; "Dog", with matching dog; "Bear", with matching bear; and "Bunny", with matching bunny mysteriously absent. Something terrible must have happened to Bunny."
drawings  children  plush  glvo  jonathanharris 
august 2010 by robertogreco
DavidByrne.com - Tree Drawings / Arboretum
"Drawing/diagrams in the form of trees, which both elucidate & obsfucate roots of contemporary phenomena & terminology. Sort of like borrowing evolutionary tree format & applying it to other, often incompatible, things. In doing so a kind of humorous disjointed scientism of mind heaves into view.

Published by McSweeney's...Straight from sketchbook, smudges & all, plus a 4-foot foldout guide. It’s an eclectic blend of faux science, automatic writing, satire, & an attempt to find connections where none were thought to exist—a sort of self-therapy, allowing the hand to say what the voice cannot. Irrational logic, it’s sometimes called. The application of logical scientific rigor * form to basically irrational premises. To proceed, carefully & deliberately, from nonsense, with a straight face, often arriving at a new kind of sense. The world keeps opening up, unfolding, & just when we expect it to be closed—to be a sealed, sensible box—it shows us something completely surprising."

[via: http://bobulate.com/post/849400482/blood-sweat-and-felt-markers ]
davidbyrne  information  design  visualization  infographics  culture  books  diagrams  art  maps  mcsweeneys  sensemaking  logic  diagramming  order  ordering  terminology  scientismofmind  fauxscience  automaticwriting  satire  connections  forcedconnections  irrationallogic  drawings 
july 2010 by robertogreco
A Journey Round My Skull: Joao Guimaraes Rosa, Third Bank of the River, Flaps
"No actual credit is given for these images. The flap says "Front of jacket illustration by David Holzman, flaps adapted from the Brazilian edition." I haven't been able to find a scan of the 1962 Brazilian edition, but here is one from the 70s, and I assume its illustrations come from the '62 (first) edition:"

[See also: http://ajourneyroundmyskull.blogspot.com/2008/03/joo-guimares-rosa.html AND http://ajourneyroundmyskull.blogspot.com/2008/01/devil-to-pay-in-backlands.html ]
guimarãesrosa  books  drawings  illustrations  pimeirasestórias  joãoguimarãesrosa 
july 2010 by robertogreco
as-built on the pitch – mammoth // building nothing out of something
"Just in time for the World Cup, English architect-turned-artist David Marsh has executed a fantastic series of drawings based on England’s (sole) World Cup finals appearance, their 4-2 victory over West Germany in 1966. Using archival footage played back at quarter- and half-speed in combination with a coordinate system derived from the markings on the pitch, Marsh traced the movements of each of the twenty-two players involved in the game (substitutions were not allowed in the World Cup until 1970) onto sheets of trace."
sports  football  occer  worldcup  diagrams  graphics  infographics  drawings  data 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Marc Ngui | Drawing - Art
"These drawings are a methodical interpretation of the first two chapters of A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schzophrenia (Wikipedia link) by Gilles Delueze and Felix Guattari, translated by Brian Massumi, University of Minnesota Press, 1987.

The drawings were created as a means of understanding the ideas being presented in the book.

Each drawing is labeled by chapter and paragraph.

Marc sent these diagrams to Brian Massumi, the translator of A Thousand Plateaus into English, who is currently one of the editors of Inflexions, the online journal for research-creation. The first volume of the journal includes some of these diagrams in the Tangents section.

Click on any image to pull up a much larger drawing.

Many of these drawings were part of a group art show called Quantal Strife. Click to jump to the bottom of the page for more information and photos of the exhibit."
design  art  visualization  schizophrenia  drawings  illustration  rhizome  literature  philosophy  books  culture  deleuze  guattari  gillesdeleuze  félixguattari 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The Blueprints, reference image database, with more than 37000 blueprints, templates, 3/4/5-views and drawings
"Cars (11661), Motorcycles (1765), Trucks (2087), Buses (417), Ships (6584), Trains (588), WW1 Airplanes (358), WW2 Airplanes (1968), Modern Airplanes (4919), Tanks (3455), Weapons (405), Science Fiction (1947), Humans (116), Phones (517), Miscelaeneous (249)"
blueprints  database  3d  archive  drawings  illustration  graphicdesign  graphics  reference  architecture  art  drawing  design  blender  vector  lightwave  cg  stock  models  images  free  via:kottke 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Kunst-Formen der Natur, by Ernst Haeckel - a set on Flickr
"Kunst-Formen der Natur (Art Forms in Nature), by Ernst Haeckel, 1898. This is a wonderful book, in the public domain, which features all sorts of illustrations of the natural world. If you're doing some research for organic shapes, this book is a nice place to start.
design  art  culture  science  graphics  biology  drawings  nature  ernsthaeckel  illustration 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Museum Syndicate: Works of Art By Artist Richard Feynman
"well known for his interesting & amusing lectures. However, not many know that he was also an artist, working under the pseudonym Ofey. Most of his work bears the Ofey signature and his primary area was drawing. He was also an avid bongo player."
richardfeynman  drawings  art  physics 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Yeondoo Jung
children's drawings recreated in photos
photography  art  drawing  glvo  kids  illustration  childhood  children  drawings  dreams 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Mythical 16th-century disease critters ::: Pink Tentacle
"Long ago in Japan, human illness commonly believed to be work of tiny malevolent creatures inside body. Harikikigaki, book of medical knowledge written in 1568 by now-unknown resident of Osaka, introduces 63 of creepy-crawlies, describes how to fight the
medicine  history  japan  illustration  myth  mythology  folklore  glvo  disease  monsters  drawings 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Houseplans.com, The best house plans, home plans and floor plans collections to buy at the best prices
"largest online collection featuring 27,512 plans. Search by design features and explore our collections and architectural styles. We can customize any house plan and our Instant Cost-to-Build Reports can help you budget your home building project. Our we
drawings  homes  housing  architecture  design 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The Morning News - The Laptop Club
"project shows how far concepts behind virtual world have penetrated real life. Even with little exposure to computers, children have absorbed ideas about shopping online, interacting socially, even media convergence"
children  glvo  drawing  design  computers  laptops  notebooks  technology  imagination  learning  kids  keyboard  interface  culture  humor  illustration  literacy  education  elementary  drawings  ux  usability  computing  popculture  prototyping 
november 2007 by robertogreco
POGO - Royal Philips
"POGO investigates this possibility, intertwining physical and virtual media in the process of inventing stories. There are 4 major components to the POGO environment: real-world story elements, virtual elements, triggering tools, creation tools"
children  storytelling  stories  digital  creative  imagination  technology  invention  toys  drawings  median  lcproject  collections  photography 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Historical Anatomies on the Web: Browse Titles
"Images have been selected from the following anatomical atlases in the National Library of Medicine's collection. Each atlas is linked to a brief Author & Title Description, which offers an historical discussion of the work, its author, the artists, and
human  anatomy  science  glvo  images  visual  books  drawings  diagrams  libraries  graphics  history  medicine  archives  biology  body  collections  bodies 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Dream Anatomy: A National Library of Medicine Exhibit
"Dream Anatomy (October 9, 2002 to July 31, 2003) was mainly drawn from the National Library of Medicine's extensive historical collections. The Library's resources for historical scholarship in medicine and related sciences are among the richest of any i
anatomy  anthropology  art  body  glvo  history  human  illustration  diagrams  drawings  collections  evolution  graphics  design  museums  science  bodies 
september 2007 by robertogreco
A kid's-eye view of laptop design | Tech news blog - CNET News.com
"A group of kids from one of our local elementary schools has formed a "mini-laptop club." They don't use electronic machines. Instead, these first-, second- and third-graders draw their own laptops on construction paper and pretend to e-mail each other."
children  glvo  drawing  design  computers  laptops  notebooks  technology  imagination  learning  kids  keyboard  interface  culture  humor  illustration  literacy  education  elementary  drawings  ux  usability  computing  popculture  prototyping 
september 2007 by robertogreco
The Napkin Drawings - a photoset on Flickr
"A series of drawings and quotes on napkins put in my daughters' lunches for jr. high and high school every day over a 5 year period."
parenting  illustration  children  flickr  schools  storytelling  drawings 
may 2007 by robertogreco
The Ward-O-Matic
"Ava Thursday" daughter and father collaborations
children  drawings  art  illustration  glvo  collaboration  collaborative 
march 2007 by robertogreco
YEONDOOJUNG
posed photos based on children's drawings
art  children  drawings  korea  photography  glvo  artists 
march 2007 by robertogreco
Architectradure: Cati Vaucelle's - Interaction Design and Children
"Jabberstamp, the first tool that allows children to synthesize their drawings and voices...children create drawings, collages or paintings on normal paper...press a special rubber stamp onto the page to record sounds into their drawings...touch the marks
children  interaction  audio  sound  drawings  art  design  technology  interactive  cativaucelle 
february 2007 by robertogreco

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