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robertogreco : dropbox   45

ZotFile - Advanced PDF management for Zotero
"Zotfile is a Zotero plugin to manage your attachments: automatically rename, move, and attach PDFs (or other files) to Zotero items, sync PDFs from your Zotero library to your (mobile) PDF reader (e.g. an iPad, Android tablet, etc.) and extract annotations from PDF files."
tools  pdf  onlinetoolkit  dropbox  zotero  annotation  android  ipad  ios  srg 
11 weeks ago by robertogreco
AMB 1
"An automatic mood board creator. Add images to a Dropbox folder and view them on the web instantly. Designed for unobstructed inspiration."

[via: https://www.are.na/block/736425 ]
webdev  dropbox  design  moodboards  online  onlinetoolkit  internet 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Hover States / Small Victories
"A charming little one-pager for a Dropbox-based site builder. The physical design references work well in communicating the simplicity of the tool itself."
webdev  via:tealtan  dropbox  webdesign 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Blot is the easiest way to blog
"Blot creates a folder in your Dropbox
and publishes files you put inside.

[Blot demo video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k2NQNj9-LE ]

Blot turns images, text, markdown and HTML files into posts. Use your favourite app to write your blog posts.

There are no ads and no third-party tracking. You pay a small annual fee and that's it.

Blot is fast, reliable and hosts blogs with thousands of posts without issue.

✓ Hosting included
✓ Five beautiful themes
✓ Use a custom domain
✓ Create a theme
✓ Markdown support
✓ RSS feed & sitemap
✓ Code highlighting
✓ Math typesetting
✓ Disqus comments
✓ Analytics integrations
✓ Search engine
✓ Draft previews

Sign up for $20 a year and start your blog now.

FAQs
Why does Blot cost money?
I have to cover the cost of running Blot somehow.

Can Blot access all the files in my Dropbox?
No, Blot can only access the folder containing your blog posts.

Will my blog use up my Dropbox bandwidth?
No, Blot fetches a copy of each blog post and hosts it on Blot's servers.

See more on the help page [https://blot.im/help ]. Don't hesitate to contact me [https://blot.im/contact ] with any questions.

Themes
Blot comes with five themes. You can also create your own from scratch.

[screenshots]

Dashboard
Your blog comes with a dashboard for customizing your blog. This is how it looks:

[screenshots]"

[via: https://twitter.com/johnpavlus/status/668227772368580608 ]
blot  webdev  web  blogging  dropbox  markdown  onlinetoolkit  hosting  webdesign  davidmerfield 
november 2015 by robertogreco
The Terror of the Archive | Hazlitt
"The digitally inflected individual is often not quite an individual, not quite alone. Our past selves seem to be suspended around us like ghostly, shimmering holograms, versions of who we were lingering like memories made manifest in digital, diaphanous bodies. For me, many of those past selves are people I would like to put behind me—that same person who idly signed up for Ashley Madison is someone who hurt others by being careless and self-involved. Now, over a decade on, I’m left wondering to what extent that avatar of my past still stands for or defines me—of the statute of limitations on past wrongs. Though we’ve always been an accumulation of our past acts, now that digital can splay out our many, often contradictory selves in such an obvious fashion, judging who we are has become more fraught and complicated than ever. How, I wonder, do we ethically evaluate ourselves when the conflation of past and present has made things so murky?

*

Sometimes, I aimlessly trawl through old and present email accounts, and it turns out I am often inadvertently mining for awfulness. In one instance—in a Hotmail account I named after my love for The Simpsons—I find myself angrily and thoughtlessly shoving off a woman’s renewed affection because I am, I tell her, “sick of this.” I reassure myself that I am not that person anymore—that I now have the awareness and the humility to not react that way. Most days, looking at how I’ve grown since then, I almost believe this is true.

Yet, to be human is to constantly make mistakes and, as a result, we often hurt others, if not through our acts then certainly our inaction. There is for each of us, if we are honest, a steady stream of things we could have done differently or better: could have stopped to offer a hand; could have asked why that person on the subway was crying; could have been kinder, better, could have taken that leap. But, we say, we are only who we are.

We joke about the horror of having our Google searches publicized, or our Twitter DMs revealed, but in truth, we know the mere existence of such a digital database makes it likely that something will emerge from the murky space in which digital functions as a canvas for our fantasies or guilt.

That is how we justify ourselves. Our sense of who we are is subject to a kind of recency bias, and a confirmation bias, too—a selection of memories from the recent past that conform to the fantasy of the self as we wish it to be. Yet the slow accretion of selective acts that forms our self-image is also largely an illusion—a convenient curation of happenings that flatters our ego, our desire to believe we are slowly getting better. As it turns out, grace and forgiveness aren’t the purview of some supernatural being, but temporality—the simple erasure of thought and feeling that comes from the forward passage of time."



"The line between evasiveness and forgiveness, cowardice and grace, is thin, often difficult to locate, but absolutely vital. It seems, though, that our ethical structures may slowly be slipping out of step with our subjectivities. If we have abandoned the clean but totalitarian simplicity of Kant’s categorical imperative, instead embracing that postmodern cliché of a fluid morality, we still cling to the idea that the self being morally judged is a singular ethical entity, either good or bad. It’s common on social media, for example, for someone to be dismissed permanently for one transgression—some comedian or actor who is good at race but bad at gender (or vice versa) to be moved from the accepted pile to the trash heap. If our concept of morality is fluid, our idea of moral judgment is not similarly so.

That notion of self assumes morality is accretive and cumulative: that we can get better over time, but nevertheless remain a sum of the things we’ve done. Obviously, for the Bill Cosbys or Jian Ghomeshis or Jared Fogles of the world, this is fine. In those cases, it is the repetition of heinous, predatory behaviour over time that makes forgiveness almost impossible—the fact that there is no distance between past and present is precisely the point. For most of us, though, that simple idea of identity assumes that selves are singular, totalized things, coherent entities with neat boundaries and linear histories that arrived here in the present as complete. Even if that ever were true, what digitality helps lay bare is that who we are is actually a multiplicity, a conglomeration of acts, often contradictory, that slips backward and forward and sideways through time incessantly."



"Is the difficulty of digitality for our ethics, then, not the multiplicity of the person judged, but our Janus-faced relation to the icebergs of our psyches—the fact that our various avatars are actually interfaces for our subconscious, exploratory mechanisms for what we cannot admit to others or ourselves?

Freud said that we endlessly repeat past hurts, forever re-enacting the same patterns in a futile attempt to patch the un-healable wound. This, more than anything, is the terror of the personal, digital archive: not that it reveals some awful act from the past, some old self that no longer stands for us, but that it reminds us that who we are is in fact a repetition, a cycle, a circular relation of multiple selves to multiple injuries. It’s the self as a bundle of trauma, forever acting out the same tropes in the hopes that we might one day change.

What I would like to tell you is that I am a better man now than when, years ago, I tried my best to hide from the world and myself. In many ways that is true. Yet, all those years ago, what dragged me out of my depressive spiral was meeting someone—a beautiful, kind, warm person with whom, a decade later, I would repeat similar mistakes. I was callous again: took her for granted, pushed her away when I wanted to, and couldn’t take responsibility for either my or her emotions. Now, when a piece of the past pushes its way through the ether to remind me of who I was or am, I can try to push it down—but in a quiet moment, I might be struck by the terror that some darker, more cowardly part of me is still too close for comfort, still there inside me. The hologram of my past self, its face a distorted, shadowy reflection of me with large, dark eyes, is my mirror, my muse. And any judgment of my character depends not on whether I, in some simple sense, am still that person, but whether I—whether we, multiple and overlapped—can reckon with, can meet and return the gaze of the ghosts of our past."
navneetalang  archives  internet  memory  grace  forgiveness  circulation  change  past  present  mistakes  ashleymadison  twitter  email  privacy  facebook  socialmedia  dropbox  google  secrets  instagram  self  ethics  morality  judgement  identity 
september 2015 by robertogreco
The Internet of Things You Don’t Really Need - The Atlantic
"We already chose to forego a future of unconnected software. All of your devices talk constantly to servers, and your data lives in the Cloud because there’s increasingly no other choice. Eventually, we won’t have unconnected things, either. We’ve made that choice too, we just don’t know it yet. For the moment, you can still buy toasters and refrigerators and thermostats that don’t talk to the Internet, but try to find a new television that doesn’t do so. All new TVs are smart TVs, asking you to agree to murky terms and conditions in the process of connecting to Netflix or Hulu. Soon enough, everything will be like Nest. If the last decade was one of making software require connectivity, the next will be one of making everything else require it. Why? For Silicon Valley, the answer is clear: to turn every industry into the computer industry. To make things talk to the computers in giant, secured, air-conditioned warehouses owned by (or hoping to be owned by) a handful of big technology companies.

But at what cost? What improvements to our lives do we not get because we focused on “smart” things? Writing in The Baffler last year, David Graeber asked where the flying cars, force fields, teleportation pods, space colonies, and all the other dreams of the recent past’s future have gone. His answer: Technological development was re-focused so that it wouldn’t threaten existing seats of power and authority. The Internet of Things exists to build a market around new data about your toasting and grilling and refrigeration habits, while duping you into thinking smart devices are making your lives better than you could have made them otherwise, with materials other than computers. Innovation and disruption are foils meant to distract you from the fact that the present is remarkably similar to the past, with you working even harder for it.

But it sure feels like it makes things easier, doesn’t it? The automated bike locks and thermostats all doing your bidding so you can finally be free to get things done. But what will you do, exactly, once you can monitor your propane tank level from the comfort of the toilet or the garage or the liquor store? Check your Gmail, probably, or type into a Google Doc on your smartphone, maybe. Or perhaps, if you’re really lucky, tap some ideas into Evernote for your Internet of Things startup’s crowdfunding campaign. “It’s gonna be huge,” you’ll tell your cookout guests as you saw into a freshly grilled steak in the cool comfort of your Nest-controlled dining room. “This is the future.”"
2015  ianbogost  iot  internetofthings  design  davidgraeber  labor  siliconvalley  technology  power  authority  innovation  disruption  work  future  past  present  marketing  propaganda  google  cloud  cloudcomputing  computers  code  googledocs  ubicomp  ubiquitouscomputing  everyware  adamgreenfield  amazon  dropbox  kickstarter 
june 2015 by robertogreco
iOS Continuity | dirtystylus
"I’ve been doing a lot of daily writing in Day One, mostly as a form of exercise. Today I started a post on the iPad and realized that the photo I wanted to use was only on my iPhone (it hadn’t synced to Dropbox yet). So I picked up the phone and finished the post there. I think that’s pretty cool, and it says something about how I expect my tools to be immediately in sync and transparently so.

I’m enjoying Day One, but boy do I wish I could adjust the leading in the editor (as well as the rendered posts). The lines are too tightly packed, and it just irks me every time I start to write."
continuity  ios  ipad  iphone  markllobrera  2015  writing  dayone  dropbox  syncing 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Small Victories
"Small Victories is a simple way to make a website out of the contents of a Dropbox folder.

What the hell would I use that for?

You could make a blog, share images, make yourself a portfolio — it's kind of like a scrapbook."
webdev  dropbox  hosting  css  html  webdesign  via:ableparris 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Syncthing
"Syncthing replaces proprietary sync and cloud services with something open, trustworthy and decentralized. Your data is your data alone and you deserve to choose where it is stored, if it is shared with some third party and how it's transmitted over the Internet."

[via: https://ind.ie/blog/focus/ ]
sync  syncing  syncthing  dropbox  data  cloud  tools  onlinetoolkit  mac  osx  windows  linux  open  opensource  android 
january 2015 by robertogreco
The Fall of Collaboration, The Rise of Cooperation
"Time to Retire Collaboration

The term "collaboration" has been so stretched by its use in dozens of very different apps and disciplines that we should retire the term, and a bunch of the tired thinking that is bound up with it. What does it mean, anyway? "Working together." So let’s just call them "work tools," and if we want to focus on the technology side, "work tech."

Consider the old school notions of business process, where the entire chain of work activities is mapped out by experts looking across many disciplines, with all the rules baked in, and everyone must be taught how to perform their roles and what degree of flex is allowed within the painted lines: that notion is being fractured. Things are changing too fast to devise a collection of end-to-end, top-down, totally designed business processes. Besides, anything that can be programmed is being handed off to algorithms, and the rest is left to humans to invent. Today, people are not blindly following rote instructions, but instead they reapply general principles to specific situations: they are not blindly stamping out license plates, or following a script.

The future of "process" in this new world of work is a general understanding of how work might be passed around, and which applications might be employed at different parts of a value chain. So the process involves people deciding how to do things after looking at guidelines. This decision making may involve tools cobbled together, through connections managed by infrastructure that may work like IFTTT (If This Then That), a service that supports transferring information from one app's API to another’s. In this way a company has structured the first stage of job applications as a file containing a resume being placed in a specific Dropbox folder, which initiates the creation of a task in Trello, and the automatic placement into the company’s Job Applications task list. What happens downstream of that would be up to the person who pulled that task to work on it. So instead of a big, totally defined and inflexible process we see a loose collection of smaller activities cascading along, with the eventual outcome not ordained by well defined rules, but instead determined by the individual decisions of those doing the work.

This change is already showing up in the most advanced technology firms, where lean approaches to software development have reflected back into thinking about lean organizations in general. For example, Asana’s "leanership" has built an organization of peers, not just a flat hierarchy. And similar changes are going on at Yammer, GitHub, Medium and other leading tech firms. That is where we will see the rise of cooperative work tech at the core of the new way of work."
collaboration  cooperation  hierarchies  hierarchy  horizontality  open  stoweboyd  2014  process  tools  ifttt  dropbox  flexibility  autonomy  yammer  github  medium  asana 
march 2014 by robertogreco
ownCloud.org | Your Cloud, Your Data, Your Way!
"ownCloud provides universal access to your files via the web, your computer or your mobile devices — wherever you are.

It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web."



"ownCloud gives you universal access to your files through a web interface or WebDAV. It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web. Installation has minimal server requirements, doesn’t need special permissions and is quick. ownCloud is extendable via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins.

ownCloud started with a keynote by Frank Karlitschek at Camp KDE’10 where he talked about the need of a self-controlled free and open source cloud."
cloud  dropbox  opensource  php  sync  storage  bookmarks  calendars  onlinetoolkit  rollyourown 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Marquee: Easier, Faster, more Beautiful Publishing
"Marquee is an easy to use, flexible platform that's perfect for telling stories."

[Update 27 June 2013: http://team.marquee.by/introducing-marquee/ ]
blogging  dropbox  markdown  cms  webdev  marquee  webpublishing  webdesign 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Whitelines | Whitelines Link
"Whitelines® Link is a happy combo of physical and digital notes. You could call it a clever scanner-app that in combination with Whitelines® Link paper makes it super easy to capture, save and share your notes."
notetaking  dropbox  evernote  notebooks  via:markllobrera  digital  analog  whitelines 
september 2012 by robertogreco
A Guide to Backing Up Pinboard - Behind Companies
"I’m a huge fan of the Pinboard, a web-based bookmarking service. I never understood web-based booking when it was big and why everyone used it, but as my reading, writing, and speaking has increased, I’ve realized the value of having an everything bucket to toss everything and anything interesting into."
2012  howto  cron  dropbox  ifttt  everythingbuckets  backup  pinboard 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Writing Kit 2.0 · Unitasking at its finest [See also: [See also: http://blog.getwritingkit.com/post/16385401886/writing-kit ]
"Advanced Markdown Text Editor...

Link to Dropbox. Write Markdown-formatted text. Use your favorite TextExpander snippets. Do quick research to find reference materials. Lookup or substitute words from Terminology app. Insert quotes and links into your documents. Upload images to CloudApp. Export your writings as Markdown or HTML files. Send them to Evernote, Facebook, Posterous, Tumblr and Twitter. Or use the generated HTML for your blog post. Your choice.
 
... Meets Awesome Researching Tools

Use the power of 1300+ site-specific search engines to find the materials you need. Enable Ad blocking and Text-only mode to enjoy a reading experience without visual clutters. Access your bookmarks on Delicious, Pinboard and Zootool. Browse your Instapaper unread items. Queue interesting links to view them later. Send content to OmniFocus, Things and The Hit List. Writing Kit is built for researching and looking up stuff."
research  wordprocessing  tumblr  posterous  cloudapp  html  zootool  omnifocus  del.icio.us  evernote  pinboard  dropbox  texteditor  markdown  writing  applications  ipad 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Calepin
"Calepin reads Markdown-formatted, plain-text files stored in your Dropbox and converts them into blog posts for you. You can publish, edit, re-edit, and delete posts just by editing these files and then re-publishing your blog. Calepin does the work of converting these plain-text files into a useable blog, and even generates an Atom feed to allow people to subscribe to your blog in their favourite feed-reader, leaving your free to concentrate on writing.

By combining a service you already have with a syntax that’s easy to learn, Calepin is the easiest way to self-publish online."

[See also: http://jokull.calepin.co/calepin-guide.html AND [via] http://twitter.com/calepinapp/status/161382375832551424 AND "Moving to Calepin [from Tumblr]" http://aadm.calepin.co/moving-to-calepin.html ]
tumblr  onlinetoolkit  tools  web  calepin  writing  publishing  blogging  dropbox  markdown 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Obsessions: No-Code Sites — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers
"So in this case, to make the website run, an image is dropped onto a specific folder which Hazel watches to get filenames ready for the web. The app then copies it to the Dropbox folder, which then shoots it off to the Dropbox servers, which then syncs with a webserver folder. Everything’s then presented by Stacey, which you’ll remember is devised to operate without much coding."
howto  via:maxfenton  nocodesites  no-codesites  dropbox  portfolios  code  stacey  tutorials 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Dropbox - Nebulous Notes - The text editor that's simple enough to replace "Notes", but powerful enough for coders and authors. - Simplify your life
"Nebulous Notes is the innovative text editor that is simple enough to replace your "Notes" application, but powerful enough for coding and authoring. Stop emailing your notes one-by-one to "save" them. As seen on LifeHacker.com! "This is quite possibly the best tool for any writer, blogger, or journalist that needs to get work done on-the-go" - AppAdvice.com. Nebulous Notes connects with your Dropbox account to let you create, edit, and save text files."
nebulousnotes  ios  iphone  applications  notetaking  texteditor  dropbox 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Dropbox - Elements - Elements is a beautiful, versatile text editor for your iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. - Simplify your life
"Elements is a beautiful, versatile text editor for iOS. Elements allows you to view, edit and share plain text documents on your iPad, iPhone or iPod touch. All of your data is stored on your personal Dropbox account so that its accessible from any device you have. Whether you're a freelance writer wanting to write your next article, a student with a book report due or professional on-the-go who needs access to their notes wherever they are, Elements can work for you."<br />
<br />
[Has the Gruber endorsement: http://daringfireball.net/linked/2010/08/17/elements ]
elements  dropbox  applications  ios  iphone  texteditor  notetaking 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Dropbox - PlainText - Dropbox text editing for iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch. - Simplify your life
"For editing text on your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch. PlainText is a simple text editor with an uncomplicated, paper-like user interface. Unlike the default Notes app, PlainText allows you to create and organize your documents in folders and sync everything with Dropbox.com."
applications  free  ios  text  texteditor  dropbox  plaintext  iphone 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Droptext Lets You Edit Dropbox Files On iPhone And iPad -- AppAdvice
"If you’re an avid Dropbox-using iDevice owner, then you simply must check out Droptext: an iOS application that allows users to edit Dropbox files on their iPhone or iPad.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with Dropbox (http://dropbox.com), the site is a service that provides online backup and file sync for free. By downloading Dropbox on your computer (Windows, Linux, and Mac supported), users are effectively given an area into which they may “drop” files they wish to be made available online through Dropbox.

Files can then be retrieved by logging into the user’s Dropbox account, either online or through the official Dropbox app – which is free, but somewhat limited in the fact that it is a read-only application. This might have hindered users somewhat in the past, until now.

Unlike its older, cheaper, more official brother, Droptext isn’t free – but it’s not expensive, either…"
dropbox  ios  iphone  applications  text  texteditor 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Setup: Frank Chimero
"I’d like a more flexible, faster all-in-one inbox for my digital detritus. For some reason, DevonThink, Yojimbo, & Evernote aren’t cutting it for me. Tumblr is close, but not quite it. I’d like something that successfully handles images in tandem w/ text, because that’s how my brain works. I have this dream of having a management interface very similar to a hybrid of LittleSnapper & Yojimbo, & then a “serendipity engine” application for iPad. It’d be a bit like Flipboard where things are served up at random from your collection for browsing. That’s the flaw of all of these things, in my mind: they encourage you to get things in, but aren’t optimized for revisiting it in a way that lacks linearity or classification. If you’re looking to make constellations of content, I think the way your collection is presented back to you matters. I guess what I’m asking for is a digital rendition of the commonplace book, & serious rethinking of what advantages digital could provide…"
frankchimero  hardware  software  thesetup  tools  howwework  commonplacebooks  dropbox  devonthink  yojimbo  evernote  macbookair  photoshop  illustrator  muji  notebooks  tumblr  serendipity  discovery  iphone  kindle  lumixgf1  appletv  netflix  texteditor  gmail  instapaper  simplenote  rdio  itunes  reeder  2011  usesthis 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Elements - Dropbox Powered Text Editor for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes App Store
"Elements is a beautiful, versatile text editor for iOS. Elements allows you to view, edit and share plain text documents on your iPad, iPhone or iPod touch. All of your data is stored in a folder on your personal Dropbox account so that it's accessible from any device you have.

Whether you're a freelance writer wanting to write your next article, a student with a book report due or professional on-the-go who needs access to their notes wherever they are, Elements can work for you."
elements  dropbox  iphone  ios  applications  wordprocessing  writing  text  texteditor 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Elements - Dropbox Powered Text Editor for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes App Store
"Elements is a beautiful, versatile text editor for iOS. Elements allows you to view, edit and share plain text documents on your iPad, iPhone or iPod touch. All of your data is stored in a folder on your personal Dropbox account so that it's accessible from any device you have.

Whether you're a freelance writer wanting to write your next article, a student with a book report due or professional on-the-go who needs access to their notes wherever they are, Elements can work for you."
elements  dropbox  iphone  ios  applications  wordprocessing  writing  text  texteditor 
march 2011 by robertogreco
ge.tt | gett sharing
"With ge.tt you can share any number of files, no matter how large, within seconds. Click on select files. Share the files with your friends. Move on - because you've simply got better things to do."
alternative  collaboration  cloud  dropbox  sharing  filesharing 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Instapaper Inventor Links Inattentive Reading to Information Obesity | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"“People love information,” Arment said. “Right now in our society, we have an obesity epidemic. Because for the first time in history, we have access to food whenever we want, we don’t know how to control ourselves. I think we have the exact same problem with information.”…

Instapaper, like Twitter, also shows the continuing versatility and relevance of text in a multimedia age: “It’s a very flexible and pliable medium. You can skim or search. You can copy and paste. You can read at your own speed. It’s simple and cheap to produce and store and share. That’s what gives it its power. Even when you bring media into a high-computing era, you can still do a lot more and more easily with text than you can with video or audio or software.”
attention  information  instapaper  timcarmody  text  marcoarment  twitter  infooverload  reading  email  dropbox  storage  synchronization 
october 2010 by robertogreco
AirDropper lets people put files into your Dropbox ... without signing up for Dropbox
"Given my fondness for Dropbox, I can't believe I didn't find out about AirDropper before today. It solves one of the biggest problems with Dropbox: getting files from friends or clients who don't want to sign up for Dropbox. AirDropper lets you send the stubborn, Dropboxless target a link that they can use to upload files directly into your Dropbox. There's no separate account signup, and nothing to download."
dropbox  sharing  productivity  tips  onlinetoolkit  via:hrheingold 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Elements — Dropbox powered text editor for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch from Second Gear
"Elements is a beautiful, versatile text editor for iOS. Elements allows you to view, edit and share plain text documents on your iPad, iPhone or iPod touch. All of your data is stored on your personal Dropbox account so that its accessible from any device you have.

Whether you're a freelance writer wanting to write your next article, a student with a book report due or professional on-the-go who needs access to their notes wherever they are, Elements can work for you." [via: http://daringfireball.net/linked/2010/08/17/elements ]
ipad  iphone  applications  texteditor  dropbox  elements  writing  software  ios 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Paperworks / Padworks | the human network
"We know that children learn by exploration – that’s the foundation of Constructivism – but we forget that we ourselves also learn by exploration. The joy we feel when we play with our new toy is the feeling a child has when he confronts a box of LEGOs, or new video game – it’s the joy of exploration, the joy of learning. That joy is foundational to us. If we didn’t love learning, we wouldn’t be running things around here. We’d still be in the trees."
education  future  ipad  paper  sharing  technology  web  markpesce  gmail  google  cloudcomputing  computing  play  constructivism  twitter  facebook  dropbox  paperless  learning  unschooling  deschooling  2010  schools  tcsnmy  curriculum  wikipedia  cloud  lego 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Elements: Dropbox Based Text Editor for iPad and iPhone
"Ever since I bought my iPad I’ve wanted to be able to actually…rite articles with it. First came Evernote, but I ditched for Simplenote. I was an avid Simplenote user on iPhone, & when iPad version came out I immediately made switch. Simplenote is a very popular app, & it’s no surprise to see it used by many professionals out there. It’s simple, reliable & fast.

Then there’s Dropbox, cloud-based storage solution everyone loves & would like to see implemented by default on Mac OS X. Dropbox allows you store and edit files no matter what device you’re on, so what’s stopping developers from creating note-taking applications based on it? That’s exactly what Second Gear are doing with their new iPad and iPhone app, Elements.

Elements is a Dropbox based text editor. It allows you to edit, view and share plain text documents on your iPhone and iPad (and iPod Touch), have the documents auto-saved every 60 seconds or stored offline for future synchronization. Plus, it looks great."
2010  dropbox  ipad  iphone  simplenote  evenote  applications  elements  writing  productivity  ios 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Future Perfect » 10 Tips for International Relocation [The whole list & comments are worth the read. Some of the items quoted contain further details.]
"China is now the fifth country I’ll feel comfortable calling home...each time the process of relocating has become a little easier. Whilst each of the moves was under very different circumstances, life stages the following tips picked up on the way might help smooth your next relocation:

1. You don’t need a job or apartment lined up to make the leap. Sure it might mean sofa-surfing or taking career diversions – these are the tangents that reveal & shape the new you.

2. International relocation is the ultimate excuse to have a brutal clear-out...

3. Heart first, then wallet: first figure out where you want to go, the logistics & money to make it happen will stretch & contract to your budget.

4. Never apply for a single entry visa when multiple entry is an option. Any additional cost is easily outweighed by the flexibility it provides...

6. Keep a digital scan of all your important documents...

7. Backup your most important stuff to the cloud..."
janchipchase  international  howto  housing  moving  global  life  jobs  work  travel  tips  relocation  yearoff  cv  migration  logistics  advice  glvo  documents  dropbox  amazons3  s3  transmit  banking  shipping  purging  travellight 
august 2010 by robertogreco
New Work Flow with Tech - Practical Theory
"I've always just carried my laptop to and from school every day, but with the launch of the iPad, I thought it might be time for a change. The laptop is good enough, but there were starting to be too many times when I wanted more screen real estate, and I found myself really envying my wife's big honking desktop, but the big issue was really that I didn't want files in two places. My laptop was organized to the point where it was pretty much hardwired to my brain. (My knapsack is like that too, but even it is wearing out... some might argue, so's my brain.) With the summer hitting, and with a realization that carrying my laptop and my iPad to and from school every day was really counter-productive, I made the leap."
chrislehmann  ipad  computing  workflow  newutilitybelt  onlinetoolkit  dropbox  mobileme  evernote  googleapps  googledocs  cloud  productibity  portability  iwork  productivity 
august 2010 by robertogreco
16 iPhone Apps for "On The Road" Creatives - Walk in the park, look at the sky.
"Like many my iPhone is hardly ever used as "a phone". It's a magical little box that can be transformed into a million different uses. Here's some of my selections that I find essential when out and about. Evernote... PicPosterous... Dropbox... JotNot... Photoshop.com Mobile... Mill Colour... addLib... Brushes... WhatTheFont... Doc2... Ftp on the go... Elena... Creative Review Annual 2010... McSweeney's... Instapaper... This American Life
iphone  applications  mobile  creativity  onlinetoolkit  productivity  utility  thenewutilitybelt  instapaper  millcolour  addLib  bushes  thisamericanlife  photoshop  evernote  picposterous  posterous  dropbox  jotnot  whatthefont  doc2  ftponthego  ftp  elena  mcsweeneys  ios 
may 2010 by robertogreco
The new utility belt « Snarkmarket
"While we’re out scour­ing San Diego that after­noon, our allies leap into action. Fin­ished images are appear­ing in real-time. Every few min­utes I’ll check the Drop­box app on my iPhone, see some­thing new, announce it to the group, and every­one will gather around the tiny screen and ooh and ahh...This is the new utility belt: Twitter...Google Docs...Dropbox...So if these are the tools, what are the skills? Jane McGo­ni­gal has already fig­ured this out. She calls them the ten col­lab­o­ra­tion super­pow­ers. And in par­tic­u­lar, I think the first three are key:

* Mob­ba­bil­ity: the abil­ity to do real-time work in very large groups; a tal­ent for coor­di­nat­ing with many peo­ple simultaneously.
* Coop­er­a­tion radar: the abil­ity to sense, almost intu­itively, who would make the best col­lab­o­ra­tors on a par­tic­u­lar task.
* Ping quo­tient: mea­sures your respon­sive­ness to other people’s requests for engagement."
snarkmarket  dropbox  googledocs  twitter  socialnetworking  crowdsourcing  collaboration  robinsloan  storytelling  socialnetworks  technology  tools  onlinetoolkit  writing  thenewutilitybelt  tcsnmy  cv  shelldrake  tcsnmy7  sandiego  journalism  normalheights  alexismadrigal 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: An Ode to DiskWarrior, SuperDuper, and Dropbox
"However, I find terrific value in SuperDuper’s model. SuperDuper creates a bootable clone of your startup drive. With Time Machine, if your startup drive goes kaput, you’ve got to go through a lengthy restore process (and, in the case of hardware failure on the kaput drive, you need an extra bootable volume to restore to). With SuperDuper, you just plug in the clone, reboot, and you’re back up."
superduper  diskwarrior  dropbox  backup  macosx  mac  timemachine  harddrive  utilities  daringfireball  hardware  recovery  osx 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Wired’s 20 Favorite iPhone Apps of 2009 | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"The Wired staff has chosen its 20 favorite apps, broken into separate categories: productivity, games, hobbies, and travel and outdoors. These are apps we deemed exceptional either for their innovation, elegant design, usefulness or a combination of all these qualities.: BeeJiveIM, Dropbox, instapaper, Tweetie 2, Canabalt, Doodle Jump, Flight Control, Spider: The Secret of Bryce Manor, TowerMadness, Words With Friends, Convert, Postman, Red Laser, RunKeeper, TaxiMagic, KCRW, Best Camera, Bloom, CameraBag, Eucalyptus"
games  iphone  applications  productivity  2009  lists  ebooks  cameras  photography  gaming  instapaper  dropbox  kcrw  music  twitter  tweetie  ios 
december 2009 by robertogreco
CollyLogic: Why I use Dropbox, and how it enables killer scrapbooking
"I think the chaps in the office reckon I’m on some sort of commission from Dropbox, so evangelical have I become about the web-based storage system recently. Well, I’m certainly not, nor has anyone asked me to write about it here today. I simply wanted to share with you why it has radically improved my efficiency, helped me manage files across two Macs, and also how I use it for killer “scrapbooking”." See also: http://hicksdesign.co.uk/journal/dropbox-leap-sitting-in-a-tree
sharing  content  dropbox  sync  organization  filesharing  scrapbooking  onlinetoolkit  iphone  applications  mac  osx  via:preoccupations  ios 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Drop.io: Simple Private Exchange
"enables you to create simple private exchange points called "drops." The service has no email signup and no "accounts." Each drop is private, and only as accessible as you choose to deliberately make it. Create multiple drops, add any type of media, and
webapps  sharing  filesharing  storage  tools  web2.0  onlinetoolkit  free  collaborative  messages  exchange  mobile  podcasting  dropbox  applications  record  video  audio 
april 2008 by robertogreco

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