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robertogreco : eadweardmuybridge   7

Nineteenth-Century Disability: Cultures & Contexts | Animal Locomotion
"Image

Four series of photographs, each with between twelve and forty five frames, show people with disabilities, naked, in various stages of locomotion. There is a man on crutches walking, a man with no legs getting on and off a chair, a disabled child crawling, and a woman with an orthopaedic disability walking with the aid of a clothed attendant. Eadweard Muybridge, Animal Locomotion: An Electro-Photographic Investigation of Consecutive Phases of Animal Movements. Courtesy of the Wellcome Library, London under a Creative Commons License (Wellcome Library no. 28116i; Wellcome Library no. 28117i; Wellcome Library no. 28118i; and Wellcome Library no. 28119i).

Introduction

In 1887, Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904), the American photographer, published Animal Locomotion: An Electro-Photographic Investigation of Consecutive Phases of Animal Movement, an eleven-volume collection of photographs of instantaneous or consecutive movement. It features photographs of ‘abnormal movement,’ including: An amputee on crutches, plate 537; A double amputee climbing on to a chair, descending from a chair and moving, plate 538; Deformed child walking on arms and legs, plate 539; A girl with multiple cerebral-spinal sclerosis walking with a nurse, plate 541. Figures were photographed without clothes, allowing for the unobstructed scrutiny of their bodies, and in front of grids, which invited viewers to treat the pictures as scientific studies.

In Animal Locomotion, Muybridge arranged his photographs according to a hierarchy, with male and female nudes presented in the first volumes, followed by draped males and females, then children. Volume 8, which was devoted to the abnormal movements of males, females and children, appeared ahead of photographs of animals, domestic and wild. By arranging the photographs in this way, Muybridge positioned those with disabilities lower than those with ‘healthy’ bodies and just above animals. He also included photographs of athletes, which juxtaposed his photographs of the disabled, in turn reflecting late nineteenth-century conceptions of health and beauty, which proved especially relevant for artists and scientists of the day. Muybridge is considered to be an important figure in the history of photography and cinema."

[via: http://sarahendren.com/reading-notes/muybridge-animal-locomotion/ ]
via:ablerism  eadweardmuybridge  disability  locomotion  photography  motion  humans  disabilities 
august 2017 by robertogreco
On Repeat - Learning - Source: An OpenNews project
"How to use loops to explain anything"



"GIFs in the Future

I am pretty confident that there are many more ways to use GIFs for journalism. And while I’m not sure what sorts of forms GIFs will take in the future, I urge you to think of ways to bring loops into the world of storytelling on the web in a purposeful, insightful, or just plain humorous way. Because who knows what sorts of impossible or magical or transformative experiences we can create—all with the power of loops."
lenagroeger  gifs  journalism  video  looping  visual  history  animation  animatedgifs  eadweardmuybridge  howthingswork  explanation  probability  communication  classideas  repetition  storytelling  exposuretherapy  giphy 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Welcome the Museum of Photographic Arts to the Commons! « Flickr Blog
"The newest addition to the Flickr Commons is the Museum of Photographic Arts. (A good fit for Flickr. Being a museum about photography and all.) In their own words, “Since its founding in 1983, the Museum of Photographic Arts (MoPA) has been devoted to collecting, conserving and exhibiting the entire spectrum of the photographic medium. The Museum’s endeavors consistently address cultural, historical and social issues"

The images already uploaded to their account are all stunning and often dreamy. Highlights from collection include photographs from William Henry Fox Talbot, Eadweard J. Muybridge, Julia Margaret Cameron, Jean-Eugène-Auguste Atget and more. With every photograph they include information about the image and photographer to help you understand a little more about when it was created and how. Of course like every member of the Commons, they invite you to add more information about the photos by commenting and tagging.

Enjoy the collection! It’s a stunner."
sandiego  museums  photography  museumofphotographicarts  commons  eadweardmuybridge  flickr 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Tate Muybridgizer Gallery
"The Muybridgizer is a free iPhone app available for download in the iTunes App Store. The Muybridgizer allows you to record an image sequence with your iPhone camera in the style of Eadweard Muybridge's iconic motion capture experiments. You can browse your captured sequences both as a static grid but also as frame by frame animation; speeding up, slowing down and reversing the direction of motion with swipes of your finger across the screen. Captured sequences can be shared via email or uploaded to the Flickr Muybridgizer Group which then will also appear in the gallery section of this microsite. The app is free for a limited period."
eadweardmuybridge  photography  ios  iphone  applications  tatemodern  art  flickr 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Move: Choreographing You / Amanda Levete | ArchDaily
"The exhibition design was driven by the relationships between choreography and geometry, movement and form. Inspired by the photographic motion studies of the human body of Etienne-Jules Marey and Eadweard Muybridge, we have created a collection of spatial dividers which are defined by a serial transformation of a single material: a sequence of folded oscillations of Dupont Tyvek. The resulting translucent paper-like fabric ribbons, a counterpoint to the brutality of the building, rise and fall with undulating folds which simultaneously define themselves as way finding devices, partitions, suspended ceilings, and portals. These fluid spatial and formal transformations choreograph the movement of the visitor through areas of sculpture, film, archive and performance."
choreography  architecture  sculpture  eadweardmuybridge  etienne-julesmarey  anatomy  human  body  movement  geometry  form  motion  motionstudies  fabric  glvo  bodies 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Muybridge: The Man Who Made Pictures Move : NPR
"Muybridge traveled widely, at a time when travel itself was changing dramatically: from horsepower to iron and steam. As trains cut down the time it took for people to move through space, Muybridge ventured beyond even the new boundaries, rappelling into treacherous crevasses and hauling his equipment to remote Alaskan villages.
eadweardmuybridge  film  animation  animals  biography  photography  travel 
april 2010 by robertogreco
collision detection: 41% of museums don't know how dogs actually walk
"But the fact is quadruped leg-motion isn’t intuitive: When you close your eyes and visualize it, it makes more sense for the legs to alternate steps left and right, much like the screwed-up skeleton above. What we see in our mind’s eye doesn’t match what we actually see in the world around us — so we ignore the evidence in front of our eyes. It’s kind of like how Aristotle maintained that men had more teeth than women because it made more sense to him, and never bothered to actually check inside an actual woman’s mouth."
animals  motion  dogs  glvo  eadweardmuybridge  anatomy  museums  clivethompson  movement  animation  taxidermy  science 
february 2009 by robertogreco

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