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robertogreco : edcamp   9

EdCamp Monsanto
"Earlier today, I found out Monsanto - yes, that Monsanto - is sponsoring EdCamp St. Louis. This makes perfect sense for Monsanto, and is part of Monsanto's corporate strategy, but it raises some questions about whether it makes sense for EdCamp.

What does it mean for an organization like EdCamp - that explicitly references a distributed model with respect for local control - when local camps agree to take money from an organization that has made billions destroying local agricuture?

What does it mean for an organization like EdCamp - which is the most visible face of the locally run events - to have local chapters preparing co-branded materials with companies that are, at best, ethically challenged? While this specific instance is about Monsanto, I imagine an EdCamp sponsored by Altria, with the EdCamp logo smoking a cigarette. Or maybe EdCamp Boulder can get sponsorship from a dispensary?

Can an organization like EdCamp claim to be about global connections when local EdCamps can create co-branded sponsor relationships that completely ignore the global connections and misdeeds of sponsors?

Given that EdCamps grew to prominence via small, non-corporate, locally run events, can they retain their authenticity if they are increasingly sponsored and co-branded by large multinational companies? What does it mean for the future of EdCamps if the rhetoric of their events drifts from the sponsorship of their events?

The EdCamp foundation can help by providing publicly accessible sponsorship guidelines. The following two changes would help dispel some of the confusion.

• Clarify that sponsorships should favor local small businesses (potentially defined by numbers of employees, for example, 50 or under) first. If EdCamps are about elevating local voices, that should extend to sponsorships as well. The camps can have a process for handling exceptions that documents if and why an exception to these sponsorships get made.

• Define what sponsors get. Do they get access to attendee contact info? Do they get to display a logo at the event? If they are buying lunch, do they get the chance to pitch and hand out swag during lunch? Right now, these guidelines appear to be nonexistent, which leaves local sponsors exposed to, at the least, cranks on twitter sounding off.

Now that EdCamp has a foundation and some funding, they should fill in this infrastructure. They will be facing some obvious tensions as they attempt to grow EdCamp in a way that doesn't sell out or destroy the locally developed feel that made EdCamps work in the first place."

[via: http://hackeducation.com/2015/12/23/trends-business/ ]
billfitzgerald  edcamp  sponsorship  ethics  2014  money  influence  partnerships  funding  bedfellows  branding 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The Value of Edcamp: Reclaiming Professional Development | Remix Teaching
"By creating a structure and then letting the participants take control, Edcamps become moving and powerful days, as teachers wrestle with ideas big and small, try new tools and stretch their minds to accommodate new perspectives. To give you an idea of the sheer variety, here are my three favorite sessions from the two years that I’ve been organizing and attending Edcamps.

* A session at Edcamp OC (2011), run by students of Rob Greco, about the urban adventure field trips they take as a part of their school’s program, confidently and honestly discussing what they liked and didn’t like about the program, as well as the triumphs and challenges they faced."

[Also here: http://smartblogs.com/education/2012/07/13/edcamp-reclaiming-professional-development/ ]
unconferences  professionaldevelopment  pd  urbanadventures  urbanexploration  edcampoc  edcamp  dancallahan  ego  cv  tcsnmy 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Amazon.com: Mob Rule Learning: Camps, Unconferences, and Trashing the Talking Head eBook: Michelle Boule: Kindle Store
"In response to the increasing failure to successfully instruct through traditional conferences and learning environments, this comprehensive resource offers the first examination of, and guide to, the “unconference” movement. Dissecting the impact of internet “mob rule” on continuing education and training, this book shows how a new breed of digital solutions—including camps, “unconferences,” and peer learning strategies—successfully put the power of knowledge in the hands of learners. In addition to providing a step-by-step approach to planning and leading a successful camp or “unconference,” numerous case studies are presented, as well as interviews and examples of emerging education and training models for organizations, businesses, and community groups of all sizes."

[See also: http://www.worldcat.org/title/mob-rule-learning-camps-unconferences-and-trashing-the-talking-head/oclc/726821067 ]
egalitarian  mobrulelearning  edcamp  presentations  camps  2011  michelleboule  books  hierarchy  unschooling  deschooling  unconferences  education  learning 
february 2012 by robertogreco
The unconference is alive | THATCamp
"the term “unconference” is sometimes used in cases where it’s hard to see what’s so “un” about the conference. I specifically remember deciding not to tweet the otherwise intriguing-sounding “Indigenous Innovation Unconference” when I saw how much they were emphasizing their six eminent speakers and how little they were emphasizing any kind of participant-driven program. Similarly, plenty of events that call themselves unconferences seem to have whole slews of presentations, which strikes me as odd."
egalitarian  hierarchy  unschooling  deschooling  self-organizedlearningenvironment  self-organizedlearning  informality  open  rules  copyleft  mitchjoel  haroldbloom  free  amandafrench  2012  edcamp  thatcamp  unconferences 
february 2012 by robertogreco
geek.teacher » Blog Archive » On #edcampoc
"I sat in some great sessions. Rob Grecco did something awesome: he brought his middle school students from his private, progressive school, & had them do a panel discussion on Student-led Urban Adventures. The students had to plan their itineraries and keep to a strict budget on a weeklong field trip to San Francisco. They were intelligent & insightful, doing a great job of representing their school. Afterwards one of the students, Taylor, came over & introduced himself to me. The students were a class act all the way."

"The standout moment of the whole session [Things That Suck] was when one of Rob’s students participated in our discussion on disciplinary practices. She described the way things are handled at her school and described traditional practices like having students sit in the corner as “ineffective.” Love it."
edcampoc  dancallahan  edcampoc2011  edcamp  tcsnmy  cv  ego  pride  students  education  learning  classtrips  discipline  thingsthatsuck 
january 2011 by robertogreco
EdCampOC 2011 | Organic Learning
"Students & teachers from The Children’s School in San Diego shared how their school, centered around project based learning, allows students to follow their passions in learning. Teachers shared their learning spaces on Tumblr (see sidebar on this blog for other classes) & talked about how their one-to-one program was about learning & not about technology. Students were articulate & open about their learning & had an easy, comfortable relationship with their teachers. Oh, how I wish this could happen in all of our schools. I thought it funny that some were referring to this school as the “hippie school”. I could relate. It was great to see that the students were actively participating in other sessions throughout the day. They truly were cultivating life long learning not only with their words, but with their actions."

"especially liked tweet by Matt Arguello, commenting on one of students from TCS, on discipline…"
janicestearns  tcsnmy  ego  students  edcamp  edcampoc  edcampoc2011  schools  education  teaching  projectbasedlearning  cv  pride  learning  progressive  pbl 
january 2011 by robertogreco
geek.teacher » Blog Archive » What #edcamp has to teach us about PD: A letter to administrators
"Edcamp only exists because we as teachers were compelled to take our professional development into our own hands. You see, we have a problem: most professional development stinks. It’s one of the many running jokes of being a teacher."
via:cervus  teachereducation  edcamp  blog4reform  2010  professionaldevelopment  learning  freedom  autonomy  choice  purpose 
december 2010 by robertogreco

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