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robertogreco : edwardtufte   22

Book design inspired by Edward Tufte - LaTeX Template on Overleaf
"Edward Tufte is a pioneer in the field of data visualization, and his works inspired the creation of two LaTeX classes for books and handouts.

Here we present the excellent sample book produced by the The Tufte-LaTeX Developers pre-loaded into Overleaf (formerly writeLaTeX) for you to use as a starting point for your own work.

Simply click the button above to use Overleaf to create and edit your article - there's nothing to install and no sign up required. When you're finished, use our integrated publish to figshare option to publish your work freely online.

Click here if you'd like to try the corresponding Tufte handout design on Overleaf.

PS: If you're new to LaTeX, our free online LaTeX course covers all the steps you need to get you started."

[via: https://twitter.com/overleaf/status/763811869022756866 via @djacobs]
bookdesign  latex  books  edwardtufte  overleaf  templates 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Against Infographics - Art Journal Open
"When design is excellent, graphics reveal data, writes the infographics guru Edward Tufte.1 Good information graphics allow the reader to see relationships not apparent in data without visual form. In principle, such graphics do not impose interpretations but, by showing relationships, make interpretations possible. In Tufte’s oft-quoted phrase: “Good design is clear thinking made visual.”2 Things become considerably more difficult, however, if, pace Tufte, your analytic goal is to complicate rather than to simplify, to open multiple avenues of inquiry, and, most important, to challenge the stability of underlying data, in fact or in principle.

All of these complexities are probed intensely in Depictions, an ongoing print series by the Dutch artist Gert Jan Kocken (b. 1971). Depictions consists of room-size maps of European cities during the Second World War—Rome, Vienna, Munich, and Berlin along the north-south axis of fascism; London, Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Łódź, Warsaw, and Stalingrad along the east-west corridor of conflict—each built up in layers from dozens of source maps unearthed in archives. Kocken’s three-by-four meter Depictions of Berlin, 1933–1945 (2010), for example, is constructed from 104 historical maps, which the artist scanned, georectified, layered into a single digital image, and rendered as a C-print. The resulting composite is a welter of information representing the breakneck change, contradictory claims, and massive data production of the Second World War.

Visually, Kocken’s Depictions are both familiar and strange. Anyone who knows Berlin, particularly the internal borders drawn in 1945 and ossified in the Berlin Wall that remain central to the city’s identity, will easily recognize the terrain of Depictions of Berlin. But other cartographic ghosts visible in the work are invisible on the ground. In Kocken’s map, along with the outlines of the wall, we see the process of ethnic cleansing as registered in contemporary reports, the footprint of Germania, the megacity with which Hitler intended to replace Berlin, and the view from Allied bombers. At once, the Depictions series draws on the data-rich tradition of monumental history painting, as seen, for example, in Albrecht Altdorfer’s The Battle of Alexander at Issus (1529), and on the defocalizing, allover paintings of Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, and other artists working in the 1940s and 1950s. Kocken’s Depictions are simultaneously narrative and aleatory."



"For infographic purposes, there are a number of more obvious ways to deal with historical maps than Kocken’s approach. In the first place, we have the computer interface. Clearly, this is a resource available to Kocken, as his maps all pass through digital mediation on their way to their final printed form. One can easily imagine, for example, a mapping application that allows users to pick and choose among the 104 maps that constitute Kocken’s Depictions of Berlin, selecting display options such as color, opacity, and so forth. And, indeed, many such engines exist. Moreover, with the right approach, even Kocken’s print artifact could be rendered more legible. Kocken chose a different angle, allowing competing stories to conflict visually as well as epistemologically. In places, this conflict produces illegibility not unlike what we find in the dark regions of the Ypres map; in other places, coherences and transparencies are themselves a surprise.

In an age of infographics, we tend to forget that infographics age and the foreignness of old graphics matters to our understanding of them. Kocken’s Depictions show us that information graphics are always historical and conveying their opacity is as much a part of the historical project as is translating them into a contemporary visual language."
via:shannon_mattern  ambiguity  cartography  epistemology  complexity  art  maps  mapping  gertjankocken  danielrosenberg  2016  edwardtufte  visualization  infographics  berlin  amsterdam  rotterdam 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Tufte CSS
"Tufte CSS provides tools to style web articles using the ideas demonstrated by Edward Tufte’s books and handouts. Tufte’s style is known for its simplicity, extensive use of sidenotes, tight integration of graphics with text, and carefully chosen typography.

The idea was cribbed in whole from Tufte-LATEX and R Markdown’s Tufte Handout format. This page was in fact originally an adaptation of the Tufte Handout Example PDF. I give hearty thanks to all the people who have contributed to those projects.

If you see anything that Tufte CSS could improve, we welcome your contribution in the form of an issue or pull request on the GitHub project: tufte-css. Please note the contribution guidelines."
via:ayjay  css  design  html  typography  edwardtufte  webdev  webdesign 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Medicalskeptic on Twitter: "On numbers being gamed, people can't keep their own score - @EdwardTufte http://t.co/Ps9j1NoBIP Read this carefully and often"
"On numbers being gamed, people can't keep their own score - @EdwardTufte Read this carefully and often":

"People and institutions cannot keep their own score accurately. Metrics soon become targets and then pitches, and are thereby gamed, corrupted, misreported, fudged.

Examples: premature revenue recognition, Libor rates, beating the quarterly forecast by a single penny, terrorist attacks prevented, Weapons of Mass Destruction, number of Twitter followers, all body counts (crowd sizes, civilians blown up).

Sometimes called the Principal of Lake Wobegone, where all children are above average."
edwardtufte  gamification  numbers  metrics  quantification  cheating  accuracy  scorekeeping  liborrates  2014 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Inge Druckrey: Teaching to See on Vimeo
Directed and edited by Andrei Severny. Produced by Edward Tufte.

"If you do one thing today, watch this 40-minute crash course in Design Thinking."
FastCompany [ fastcodesign.com/1670615/a-40-minute-crash-course-in-design-thinking ]

"A great story beautifully told."
Ken Carbone, Designer, Chief Creative Director, Carbone Smolan Agency

“This [film] is about patient and dedicated teaching, about learning to look and visualize in order to design, about the importance of drawing. It is one designer’s personal experience of issues that face all designers, expressed with sympathy and encouragement, and illustrated with examples of Inge [Druckrey]’s own work and that of grateful generations of her students. There are simple phrases that give insights into complex matters, for example that letterforms are ‘memories of motion.’ Above all, it is characteristic of Inge that in this examination of basic principles the word “beautiful” is used several times.”
Matthew Carter, type designer, MacArthur Fellow

“This film is absolutely beautiful. I'm so impressed with it and learned so much in such a compact piece. I feel like it picked up where Helvetica left off with the subtle principles of typographical balance and some early history stemming from the human hand. Your wonderful teaching approach comes through loud and clear and stands as an inspiration and model for others including myself. This is fantastic.”
Luke Geissbuhler, Cinematographer of Helvetica and other films

"A great documentation of the visual values we hold dear."
Roger Remington, Vignelli Distinguished Professor of Design, RIT

"A fine, insightful and educational documentary. It captures Inge’s work as a designer and educator, her thinking and her SEEING, in a wonderful and most perfect way. Truly Inspirational!"
Hans-Ulrich Allemann, Designer/Educator
art  video  teaching  graphicdesign  design  yale  ingedruckrey  2012  via:johnpavlus  seeing  noticing  arteducation  education  andreiseverny  edwardtufte  film  visual  herbertmatter  photography  understanding 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Edward Tufte Wants You to See Better : NPR
"Data scientist Edward Tufte (dubbed the "Galileo of graphics" by BusinessWeek) pioneered the field of data visualization. Tufte discusses what he calls "forever knowledge," and his latest projects: sculpting Richard Feynman's diagrams, and helping people "see without words.""
books  knowledge  knowing  2013  curiosity  seeing  art  data  interviews  learning  science  datavisualization  richardfeynman  edwardtufte  diagrams  foreverknowledge 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Brute Force Architecture and its Discontents - etc
"More so than cardboard or other model making materials, blue foam erases the signature of its creator allowing for an easier ‘apples to apples’ comparison. The anonymizing uniformity of the cut surfaces and alien blueness of the foam itself allowed multiple workers to prepare options in parallel without the differences of personal craft becoming an element of distraction during moments of evaluation. The cumulative effect means that a table covered in foam models all produced by different individuals can be assessed for their ideas rather than the quirks of who made them or how they were created. What’s on display are the ideas themselves, without any distracting metadata or decoration. This is the model making equivalent of Edward Tufte’s quest to eliminate chartjunk."
bryanboyer  thermalpaper  smlxl  flatness  hierarchy  computation  computing  alanturing  ideation  oma  mvrdv  rex  big  howwework  thinking  making  bruteforcearchitecture  2012  zahahadid  collaboration  chartjunk  edwardtufte  process  remkoolhaas  architecture  design  horizontality  horizontalidad 
june 2012 by robertogreco
The Greatness of College Lectures (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"you need to learn ways of thinking. These are what lectures, at their best, can provide. They show you how the speakers think about problems, how they feel about them, and, in doing so, provide a more fleshed-out notion than writing ever could."
lectures  presentations  thinking  edwardtufte  scottmccloud  aaronswartz  2006  larrylessig  education  learning  writing  speaking  via:Preoccupations  openminded  mindchanges  mindchanging 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Edward Tufte forum: Touchscreens have no hand
"So instead let us give more time for doing physical things in the real world and less time for staring at (and touching) the glowing flat rectangle.

Plant a plant, walk the dogs, read a real book, go to the opera. Or hammer glowing hot metal in a blacksmith shop."
edwardtufte  making  doing  tangible  touch  touchscreen  2011  bretvictor  hands  living  screens  interface  interactiondesign  glowingrectangles 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Twitter sparklines
"I've been seeing a few mini bar charts (aka sparklines) pop up on Twitter in the past few days. Like this one: [image]

Last year Alex Kerin built an Excel-to-Twitter sparkline generator that uses Unicode block elements for the tiny charts and now media outlets like the WSJ are using it to publish data to Twitter: [images]

Anil Dash has a nice post on how the WSJ came to use Kerin's idea. Here are a few more favorites "sparktweets" (1, 2, 3, 4, 5): [images]"
information  visualization  sparklines  edwardtufte  kottke  twitter  data  wsj  tools 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Luke's Commonplace Book ["Particularly disturbing is the introduction of the PowerPoint into schools."]
"Particularly disturbing is the introduction of the PowerPoint into schools. Instead of writing reports using sentences, children learn how to decorate client pitches and infomercials, which is better than encouraging children to smoke. Student PP exercises (as seen in teacher guides and in student work posted on the internet) typically shows 5 to 20 words and a piece of clip art on each slide in a presentation consisting of 3 to 6 slides - a total of perhaps 80 words (20 seconds of silent reading) for a week of work. Rather than being trained as mini-bureaucrats in the pitch culture, students would be better off if schools closed down on PP days and everyone went to the Exploratorium. Or wrote an illustrated essay explaining something." —Edward Tufte
edwardtufte  lukeneff  powerpoint  edtech  teaching  schools  learning  writing  experience  wastedtime  pitchculture  classideas  missedopportunities 
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Feynman-Tufte Principle: A visual display of data should be simple enough to fit on the side of a van - Scientific American
"Feynman diagrams are the embodiment of what Tufte teaches about analytical design: "Good displays of data help to reveal knowledge relevant to understanding mechanism, process and dynamics, cause and effect." We see the unthinkable and think the unseeabl
richardfeynman  edwardtufte  infographics  symbols  design  communication  display  physics  data  information  michaelshermer 
may 2008 by robertogreco
graphpaper.com - Edward Tufte’s iPhone
"he is thinking about the iPhone’s UI as a graphic design challenge, not as a component in a larger lifestyle-based user experience....From all of this, I am not getting a strong feeling that Tufte is up to speed on how we do things on the Internets the
edwardtufte  gui  information  ui  usability  ux  visualization  zoom  design  data  iphone  mobile  phones  chistopherfahey 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Ask E.T.: Interface design and the iPhone
"platform elegantly solves design problem of small screens by greatly intensifying the information resolution of each displayed page...video shows some of resolution-enhancing methods of iPhone, along with few places for improvements in resolution."
edwardtufte  iphone  interface  design  video 
january 2008 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » The Red Dot
"Information Design and I'm pretty sure it is the mathematical skill most lacking in our high school graduates."..."The following is one of the most scary-awesome information designs I've seen in a month...It concerns poker"
infodesign  information  infographics  learning  math  education  schools  curriculum  literacy  statistics  edwardtufte  cheating  data  graphics  charts  danmeyer 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Edward Tufte: Ask E.T. forum
Mapped Pictures, a draft chapter from Beautiful Evidence, Edward Tufte's forthcoming book
art  design  information  edwardtufte 
november 2004 by robertogreco

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