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David Adams on Twitter: "The more power the left gains, the more vociferously will entrenched interests fight back. We better have a lot more in our arsenal than sarcasm and call-outs. Twitter is exactly the wrong place to prepare."
"The more power the left gains, the more vociferously will entrenched interests fight back. We better have a lot more in our arsenal than sarcasm and call-outs. Twitter is exactly the wrong place to prepare.

A few accounts miraculously navigate this poisoned discursive terrain adroitly. @BlackSocialists comes immediately to mind. They do Twitter "wrong" and it's wonderful to see.

That sort of patient, clear, drama- and hyperbole-free presentation is something to learn from. Stick to the principles, stick to the material analysis, dodge around the feints and discursive traps of the opposition.

These are skills we have to put real effort into learning, but then, they don't call it a fight or a struggle because it comes automatically, right? These rhetorical skills are part of our basic training.

Going for the sick own, the oh-snap fireworks, is about your own personal brand, your lil ego, & that, folks, is commodification in action. Socialism isn't about you-as-atomized-individual. It's about us, building understanding, seeing above the spectacle, gaining power together."
davidadams  twitter  socialism  activism  education  ego  personalbranding  solidarity  collectivism  bsa  blacksocialistsofamerica  socialmedia  individualism  howto  organizing  resistance  struggle  sarcasm  callouts  training  opposition 
november 2018 by robertogreco
26 | Black Mountain College — Do Not Touch
"We're going back to school and learning about an arts college in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina. For 24 years the college attracted famous teachers and produced students who would go on to achieve their own fame. I have two guests speaking to me about Black Mountain - Kate Averett from the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center and Professor Eva Diaz from Pratt Institute."
bmc  2018  blackmountaincollege  bauhaus  annialbers  johndewey  art  arts  education  highered  highereducation  alternative  experimental  unschooling  deschooling  democracy  horizontality  evadiaz  kateaverett  history  arthistory  pedagogy  lcproject  openstudioproject  form  exploration  liberalarts  roberrauschenberg  willemdekooning  abstractexpressionism  howwework  discipline  self  identity  johncage  mercecunningham  self-directedlearning  self-directed  learning  howwelearn  howweteach  teaching  vision  cognition  expressionism  expression  music  dance  buckminsterfuller  technique  chance  happenings  anarchism  ego  spontaneity  unknown  improvisation  radicalism  transilience  northcarolina  transience  hippies  communes  integration  jacoblawrence  almastonewilliams  outsiders  refugees  inclusion  inclusivity  openness  gender  rayjohnson  elainedekooining  karenkarnes  dorothearockburn  hazellarsenarcher  blackmountaincollegemuseum  susanweil  maryparkswashington  josefalbers  charlesolson  poetry  johnandrewrice 
october 2018 by robertogreco
M.I.A. and the Defense of Nuance | Affidavit
"Cancelling people is exhilarating, especially when it’s done by marginalized folks, those who so often experience the world through white supremacy—sometimes as a soft and subtle barrage, other times through vicious and terrifying means. The ability to dictate someone’s fate, when you’ve long been in the shadows, is a kind of victory. Like saying “Fuck You” from underneath the very heavy sole of a very old shoe. But while outrage culture has its merits, nuance has evaporated. So often it involves reducing someone to their mistakes, their greatest hits collection of fuck-ups.

In her song “Best Life,” Cardi B raps:

“That’s when they came for me on Twitter with the backlash/ "#CardiBIsSoProblematic" is the hashtag/ I can't believe they wanna see me lose that bad...”

This is her response to being cancelled for a now-infamous Twitter thread detailing her colorism, orientalism, and transphobia. Most recently, after her song “Girls” with Rita Ora was also deemed problematic, she made a statement: “I know I have use words before that I wasn’t aware that they are offensive to the LGBT community. I apologize for that. Not everybody knows the correct ‘terms’ to use. I learned and I stopped using it.”

Cardi brings up something that I keep coming back to: How accessibility to political language is a certain kind of privilege. What I believe Maya is trying to say is that American issues have become global. What she lacks the language to say is: how do we also care about the many millions of people around the world who are dying, right now? Why does American news, American trauma, American death, always take center-stage?

There are things we need to agree on, like the permutations of white supremacy, but are we, societally, equipped for social media being our judge, jury and executioner? I started to realize that the schadenfreude of cancelling was its own beast. It erases people of their humanity, of their ability to learn from experience.

This brings up the politics of disposability. How helpful is distilling someone into an immovable misstep, seeing them not as a person but as interloper who fucked up, and therefore deserves no redemption? How helpful is to interrogate a conversation, but not continue it? Is telling someone to die, and sending them death threats, or telling them they’re stupid or cancelled the way to do it? Who, and what, are we willing to lose in the fire?

M.I.A. and Cardi are similarly unwilling to conform to polite expectation. They both know that relatability is part of their charm. They are attractive women who speak their mind. This, in essence, is privilege, too—which then requires responsibility. The difference is that Cardi apologized."



"“Is Beyoncé or Kendrick Lamar going to say Muslim Lives Matter? Or Syrian Lives Matter? Or this kid in Pakistan matters?”

In 2016, when Maya made these comments in an ES Magazine interview, I remember being frustrated that she only accentuated the divide between non-black people of color and black folks, partially because so often we (Asians) say dumb shit.

The dumb shit I’m referring to w/r/t Maya is not only her tunnel vision when it comes to the complexity of race (plus the void and difference between black and brown folks’ experience) but also the incapacity—or stunted unwillingness—to further self-reflect on her positioning.

Because of her insolence, I had considered Maya undeserving of my alliance. Her lack of inclusivity and disregard of the complexity of political identity, especially in North America, was abominable. As a woman who had found success within the black mediums of rap and hip-hop, her smug disregard felt brash. It felt lazy.

But, as I watched the documentary on her life, I also began to see her complexity. One thing that strikes me about Maya is her personal perseverance. Her family went through hell to get the U.K. Her father’s political affiliations forced them to flee Sri Lanka. Arular was a revolutionary, and thus deemed a terrorist. He was absent her whole childhood. At one point in the film she describes riding on a bus in Sri Lanka with her mom. When the bus jerks forward, the policemen standing alongside casually sexually assault them in broad daylight. Her mother, Mala, warns Maya to stay silent, lest they both be killed. Her reality—of physical threats, of early loss—is stark. As she recalls the details in her candid, detached drawl, you imagine her grappling with the past like a lucid dream.

Herein lies Maya’s dissonance. She is the first refugee popstar, which allows her to subsume a state of Du Bois’ double consciousness. She is neither this nor that, she is a mixture of both East and West. Her experience seeps into her music like a trance, and these definitions are vital to understanding her.

She is agonized by the realities of war, of being an unwanted immigrant who fled from genocide into the frenzied hells of London, only to be pushed into a mostly-white housing estate system, replete with Nazi skinheads. “A tough life needs a tough language,” Jeanette Winterson writes in Why Be Happy When You Can Be Normal?, her memoir about her abusive stepmother. As I watch the documentary, I wonder, again, if what Maya lacks most is language.

In the current political climate, where Syrian refugees are denied entry into the U.S., and the Muslim Ban, or “Travel Ban,” is an attack on the very notion of being different in America, I began to understand this other part of Maya. How angry she might be for the lack of articulation when it came to refugees, when it’s still very much an issue. She came to music to survive. Art was a way to dislocate from the trauma, to inoculate herself from the past, and provide a new, vivid reality that was both about transcending where she came from, whilst also creating a platform to speak to her roots, to her lineage, to her people.

Tamil is one of the oldest languages in the world. The people that speak it are, right now, being wiped out.

Her understanding of race comes from the victim’s perspective. She not only experienced white supremacy in her work, but was forced out of the country where she was born. Someone like her was never supposed to succeed. But, whether it’s Bill Maher mocking her “cockney accent” as she talks about the Tamil genocide, or the New York Times’ Lynn Hirschberg claiming her agitprop is fake because she dare munch on truffle fries (which were ordered by Hirschberg), Maya has been torn apart by (white) cultural institutions and commentators. You can see how these experiences have made her suspicious in general, but also particularly suspicious of me, a journalist.

Thing is, she’s been burnt by us too—by South Asians. So many of us walked away, attacking her instead of building a dialogue. Her compassion, therefore, is partially suspended. It’s as if she’s decided, vehemently—because she’s deemed herself to not be racist, or anti-black—that the conversation ends. She feels misheard, misrepresented. For her, it’s not about black life mattering or not mattering. It’s about prioritizing human life, about acknowledging human death. But, in America, that gets lost.

You can understand Maya’s perspective without agreeing with her, but I had another question. How do you hold someone you love accountable?

*

The talk itself was many things: awkward, eye-opening, disarming. When I asked about her alleged anti-blackness, she brought up Mark Zuckerberg as evidence that she was set up... by the internet. That her online fans should know that she’s not racist, so that perhaps her one-time friendship with Julian Assange was why she was being attacked online. Her incomprehension that people could be upset by her remarks reflected her naivety about how the internet kills its darlings. Two weeks prior to our meeting, Stephon Clark was murdered, shot twenty times in the back by two police officers. To this she responded: “Yeah, well no-one remembers the kid in Syria who is being shot right now either. Or the kid that’s dying in Somalia.” It made me wonder if she was unwell, not on a Kanye level, but just enough to lack the mechanisms it takes to understand perspective.

Backstage after the talk, she said, “I don’t know why you asked me those questions.” I told her that I thought critique, when done with care, was an empowering act of love. I needed clarity for our community’s sake—many of whom felt isolated by her, a cherished South Asian icon. We need answers from her because we are all trying to grapple with our love and frustration with her.

I don’t want to absolve Maya. What I’m more interested in is how we can say “problematic fave” while acknowledging that we are all problematic to someone. Is there compassion here? Is there space to grow?

*

In They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, Hanif Abdurraqib writes, “There are people we need so much we can’t imagine turning away from them. People we’ve built entire homes inside of ourselves for, that cannot stand empty. People we still find a way to make magic with, even when the lights flicker, and the love runs entirely out.”

In the recent months, I’ve re-examined Maya with sad enthusiasm. The beginning riff of “Bad Girls”: a women in full niqab racing a car through side swept dunes. Without question, it’s an aching kind of visibility, but the tenor is different. Listening to her now it feels weighted, changed.

Laconic and aloof, I remind Maya on stage that anti-blackness is not an American issue, it’s universal. Perhaps it’s ego, or shameful anger, but I know she cares. Before she begins to speak I realize that you have to build empathy when someone fails you. That they’re not yours to own. You have to try your best to talk to them, and that it’s never helpful to reduce them to a punchline. I believe in Maya’s possibility to grow. I believe in the possibility of change. Maybe that’s my own naivety, but it’s also my political stance. It’s not about … [more]
mia  fariharóisín  2018  privilege  language  cancelling  marginalization  colorism  transphobia  orientlism  cardib  socialmedia  disposability  whitesupremacy  race  racism  apologies  learning  power  islamophobia  islam  socialjustice  noamchomsky  modelminorities  modelminority  nuance  complexity  perseverance  srilanka  silence  refugees  politics  tamil  victims  compassion  blacklivesmatter  julianassange  yourfaveisproblematic  us  australia  anti-blackness  growth  care  caring  dialog  conversation  listening  ego  shame  anger  change  naivety  howwechange  howwelearn  hanifabdurraqib  visibility  internet  problemematicfaves 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Dan Ariely on Irrationality, Bad Decisions, and the Truth About Lies
"On this episode of the Knowledge Project, I’m joined by the fascinating Dan Ariely. Dan just about does it all. He has delivered 6 TED talks with a combined 20 million views, he’s a multiple New York Times best-selling author, a widely published researcher, and the James B Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University.

For the better part of three decades, Dan has been immersed in researching why humans do some of the silly, irrational things we do. And yes, as much as we’d all like to be exempt, that includes you too.

In this captivating interview, we tackle a lot of interesting topics, including:

• The three types of decisions that control our lives and how understanding our biases can help us make smarter decisions

• How our environment plays a big role in our decision making and the small changes we can make to automatically improve our outcomes

• The “behavioral driven” bathroom scale Dan has been working on to revolutionize weight loss

• Which of our irrational behaviors transfer across cultures and which ones are unique to certain parts of the world (for example, find out which country is the most honest)

• The dishonesty spectrum and why we as humans insist on flirting with the line between “honest” and “dishonest”

• 3 sneaky mental tricks Dan uses to avoid making ego-driven decisions [https://www.fs.blog/smart-decisions/ ]

• “Pluralistic ignorance” [https://www.fs.blog/2013/05/pluralistic-ignorance/ ] and how it dangerously affects our actions and inactions (As a bonus, Dan shares the hilarious way he demonstrates this concept to his students on their first day of class)

• The rule Dan created specifically for people with spinach in their teeth

• The difference between habits, rules and rituals, and why they are critical to shaping us into who we want to be

This was a riveting discussion and one that easily could have gone for hours. If you’ve ever wondered how you’d respond in any of these eye-opening experiments, you have to listen to this interview. If you’re anything like me, you’ll learn something new about yourself, whether you want to or not."
danariely  decisionmaking  decisions  truth  lies  rationality  irrationality  2018  habits  rules  psychology  ritual  rituals  danielkahneman  bias  biases  behavior  honesty  economics  dishonesty  human  humans  ego  evolutionarypsychology  property  capitalism  values  ownership  wealth  care  caretaking  resilience  enron  cheating 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Nadir Nahdi en Instagram: “I travel all over and notice men around the world in crisis. Lost between duty and modernity, desire and responsibility, disempowerment and…”
"I travel all over and notice men around the world in crisis. Lost between duty and modernity, desire and responsibility, disempowerment and ego, lust and chivalry, emotion and power. All building up to one messy implosion. Took this photo and thought it expresses something I can’t."
modernity  duty  masculinity  2018  photography  disempowerment  ego  chivalry  emotion  power  impotence  lust  desire  responsibility  breakdown  transition  economics  work  labor  purpose  men 
april 2018 by robertogreco
100 things that made my year
"3. Discovering and researching unschooling. Roberto Greco’s fantastic Tumblr and Pinboard archives. The work of John Holt, his books How Children Learn and How Children Fail, his 55-year-old journal entry, his thoughts on the true meaning of intelligence and how babies are scientists. John Taylor Gatto’s Dumbing Us Down. Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner’s Teaching As A Subversive Activity. Lori Pickert’s twitter. DH Lawrence on how to educate a child: “Leave him alone.” Manifesto of the idle parent."



"7. Doing my part to destroy that dumb cliché, “The enemy of art is the pram in the hall.” Trying to copy how my 3-year-old son makes art in the studio. His lettering. The way he copies signs. His art. Making masks out of Trader Joe’s bags. Collaborating. Baudelaire’s quote, “Genius is nothing more or less than childhood recaptured at will.” Toddler color theory. Do A Dot Art Markers. Crayola Slick Stix. Mid-century photos of children making art at the MoMA. Paul Klee’s handmade puppets for his son. Darwin’s children doodling on the back of his manuscripts. A fifth-grader’s cure for writer’s block."



"92. The difference between libraries and schools. Visiting the main branch of the Richland Library in Columbia, SC, their amazing children’s room, their new Steal-inspired maker spaces, and revisiting my time as a librarian when speaking at their staff day. Identifying the public library as the American institution I most want to protect and support."
austinkleon  2016  2017  unschooling  deschooling  ego  cv  libraries  schools  education 
january 2017 by robertogreco
PodOmatic | Best Free Podcasts: Techlandia 97 - Unschooling w/ @rogre
"A chat with Roberto Greco about unschooling and other topics. Rob just finished up the year teaching at Hillbrook School in Los Gatos. He has a great take on how learners should learn, and uses this philosophy by unschooling with his own children. Austin Kleon was mentioning Rob on Twitter, so we are hoping that one of my heroes will listen to this episode. Crossing fingers!"
unschooling  cv  podcasts  teaching  davidtheriault  jonsamuelson  2016  ego  amyfadeji  bmc  blackmountincollege  leapbeforeyoulook  edg  srg  glvo  schools  education  progressive  blackmountaincollege 
july 2016 by robertogreco
High modernist subjectivity gives an extraordinary... • see things differently
""High modernist subjectivity gives an extraordinary privilege … to judgement and especially to cognition…. The modern predominance of reading….

High [modernism] … furthermore … privileges the cognitive and moral over the aesthetic and the libidinal, the ego over the id, the visual over touch, and discursive over figural communication.

…the individual [is] somehow ‘closed’ instead of open; to be somehow obsessed with self-mastery and self-domination."

Lash, S. & Friedman, J. (Eds.). (1993). Modernity & Identity. Massachusetts: Blackwell, pg. 5"

[See also: http://linguisticcapital.wordpress.com/2011/11/05/modernism-in-the-streets/

"High modernist subjectivity gives an extraordinary privilege, for example, to judgement and especially to cognition. It correspondingly devalues the faculty of perception, so that vision itself is so to speak colonized by cognition. The modern predominance of reading fosters epistemologies of representation, of a visual paradigm in the sphere of art [...]. High modernist subjectivity seems furthermore to privilege the cognitive and moral over the aesthetic and the libidinal, the ego over the id, the visual over touch, and discursive over figural communication. It gives primacy to culture over nature, to the individual over the community, As an ethics of responsibility, high modernist personality and Lebensfürung [life-course] it allows the individual to be somehow ‘closed’ instead of open; to be somehow obsessed with self-mastery and self-domination."

Lash, S. & Friedman, J. (Eds.). (1993). Modernity & Identity. Massachusetts: Blackwell, pg. 5]
modernism  highmodernism  bias  cognition  morality  aesthetics  libidinal  ego  id  visual  senses  touch  discursion  figurative  communication  reading  literacy  gutenbergparenthesis  self-mastery  self-domination  modernity  identity  1993 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Paul Piff: Does money make you mean? | Video on TED.com
"It's amazing what a rigged game of Monopoly can reveal. In this entertaining but sobering talk, social psychologist Paul Piff shares his research into how people behave when they feel wealthy. (Hint: badly.) But while the problem of inequality is a complex and daunting challenge, there's good news too. (Filmed at TEDxMarin.)

Paul Piff studies how social hierarchy, inequality and emotion shape relations between individuals and groups."

[A summary, in GIFs: http://stoweboyd.com/post/74281156067/invisibleeverywhere-tedx-does-money-make-you ]

[Related: "Rich People Just Care Less" http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/05/rich-people-just-care-less/ ]
paulpiff  wealth  privilege  2013  danielgoleman  success  ego  behavior  self-interest  entitlement  compassion  empathy  monopoly  money  research  inequality  emotion  hierarchy  hierarchies  advantage  society  status  greed  morality  cheating  sharing  helpfulness  moralizing  self-importance  ethics  legal  law  effort  pedestrians  achievement  accomplishment  capitalism  socialmobility  growth  trust  lifeexpectancy  health  economics  cooperation  community  egalitarianism  poverty  inequity 
january 2014 by robertogreco
I don’t even have words to describe how cool... - more than 95 theses
"I don’t even have words to describe how cool grecolaborativo is — the Greco family work/play/endeavor — I don’t know what to call it except awesome. This is a characteristic work: a three-dimensional plush figure based on a child’s drawing. See their fabulous Flickr page here and Roberto’s amazing Pinboard page here. (Robin Sloan has rightly called Roberto an “idea sommelier,” one of the cooler things one can be.) 

N.B. Here’s an update on the Greco family project."
ego  grecolaborativo  alanjacobs  glvo  cv  family  2013 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Larry Yang: Buddha is Culture
"None of us can bypass cultural experience. It is part of each human existence and to not be mindful and deeply aware of our cultural characteristics will prevent a deeper experience of interconnection and relatedness, which is critically important to experiencing that which is beyond the ego. We go through our cultural experience; we go through the 10,000 joys and 10,000 sorrows of this lifetime; we cannot go around them. We go deep into the layers of our experience to see what is beyond it. We cannot simply say that it doesn't exist, or isn't important, or isn't the Dharma. All of it is the Dharma."

[via: https://twitter.com/ThisMoiThisMoi/status/401421436864053248 ]
culture  experience  larryyang  buddhism  dharma  2012  existence  humans  realatedness  ego 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Squishy Not Slick - the far-off influences
"My students’ responses to that prompt led me to think quite a bit about what George Saunders suspects about the difference between the person in the field in 1200 and my students today.

I’ve given my students this prompts before, at least a few times. But this is the first batch of students who were willing to admit the importance of their far-off influences – people who are very influential on their lives who live somewhere far away – and even to include those far-off, digitally-connected influences alongside or even before those who they are in contact with regularly.

One girl, who most of her classmates consider to be in the upper echelons of popularity, wrote this: “I guess you could say I’m a lonely person. I don’t hang out with friends all that often. I probably spend the majority of my life surrounding myself with my phone and Netflix….” Another wrote about how one of the most important influences on who she has become is her favorite YouTuber. Another listed four friends and put Tumblr for the fifth. One student wrote about a friend he met through YouTube who has become one of his best friends. He lives in another state and they take turns flying to visit each other in the summer.

I shared with them how interesting I found all of this, and how I too have found these far-off influences to be very important in shaping who I am and what happens in my head. I shared an example with them: how great it has been for me to get to know Rob and his family. I bragged about his idea sommelier skills (and he delivered), but I also told them about how his approach to life and art and school have changed me. 

I can only hope that their experiences with their far-off influences are as quality and formative as mine have been."
lukeneff  georgesaunders  influence  ego  geography  web  internet  history  2013 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Tupperwolf - An History of the Cloudless Atlas
"I’m writing this in a single pass. If I went back I would think of people I’m obviously leaving out. Pretty much everyone I know had something kind or useful to say to me about this project. But I think you see my point here – this project worked out well not because of anything special I did, but because I was surrounded by supportive and brilliant people. I think that if more people were as lucky in their friends as I am, we would see a lot more cool work in the world.

So. I’ve seen people say some really flattering things about me in comments over the last week. They are kind, but they’re mostly based on misunderstandings of the facts. If you’re tempted to celebrate me personally for this highly collaborative work, may I ask that you direct your attention instead to noticing people around you who could use a hand on some little project."
charlieloyd  humility  collaboration  2013  mapbox  cloudlessatlas  ego  glvo  wdg  srg  noticing  support  help  friends  howwelearn  howwework  kindness 
may 2013 by robertogreco
David Foster Wallace on 'The Nature of Fun' | Books | The Guardian
"The smart thing to say, I think, is that the way out of this bind is to work your way somehow back to your original motivation: fun. And, if you can find your way back to the fun, you will find that the hideously unfortunate double bind of the late vain period turns out really to have been good luck for you. Because the fun you work back to has been transfigured by the unpleasantness of vanity and fear, an unpleasantness you're now so anxious to avoid that the fun you rediscover is a way fuller and more large-hearted kind of fun. It has something to do with Work as Play. Or with the discovery that disciplined fun is more fun than impulsive or hedonistic fun. Or with figuring out that not all paradoxes have to be paralysing. Under fun's new administration, writing fiction becomes a way to go deep inside yourself and illuminate precisely the stuff you don't want to see or let anyone else see, and this stuff usually turns out (paradoxically) to be precisely the stuff all writers and…"
ego  writers  readers  audience  psychology  howwewrite  fiction  authenticity  2012  fun  writing  creativity  creativewriting  davidfosterwallace 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Why we should leave our fingerprints for the future. - Do Lectures
"Robin [Sloan] tells us how and why he writes. And how to get the most out of what you do."

"Lightness of inspiration [TCS example, collecting for unknown future needs]
Lightness of motion [walking when stuck, solvitur ambulando, lightness of the mind and body]
Lightness of digital [enabling a start]
Lightness of dependency [this AND that, not this OR that]
Lightness of heart [because dwelling on death can lead to depression]"

"Time is the ultimate body shop."

"When you are light you are best able to answer the deepest and darkest questions."

"Since death alone is certain and the time of death uncertain, what should I do?"
mindbody  motion  ephemeral  ephemerality  dolectures  doing  making  fingerprintsforthefuture  ambition  purpose  time  whywedowhatwedo  why  craigmod  ebooks  digital  friction  resistence  collectingforunknownfutureneeds  future  collecting  observation  noticing  howwework  meaningmaking  happiness  and  thisandthat  haiku  2011  normalheights  mrpenumbra  living  buddhism  death  life  meaning  lloydalexander  reading  howwewrite  cv  ego  tcsnmy7  tcsnmy  italocalvino  walking  small  slow  lightness  creativity  writing  fingerprints  robinsloan 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Value of Edcamp: Reclaiming Professional Development | Remix Teaching
"By creating a structure and then letting the participants take control, Edcamps become moving and powerful days, as teachers wrestle with ideas big and small, try new tools and stretch their minds to accommodate new perspectives. To give you an idea of the sheer variety, here are my three favorite sessions from the two years that I’ve been organizing and attending Edcamps.

* A session at Edcamp OC (2011), run by students of Rob Greco, about the urban adventure field trips they take as a part of their school’s program, confidently and honestly discussing what they liked and didn’t like about the program, as well as the triumphs and challenges they faced."

[Also here: http://smartblogs.com/education/2012/07/13/edcamp-reclaiming-professional-development/ ]
unconferences  professionaldevelopment  pd  urbanadventures  urbanexploration  edcampoc  edcamp  dancallahan  ego  cv  tcsnmy 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Moving Day | ListServe Meta
"Since the email from the nice people at The Listserve caught
me on the morning of moving day, I’m filling this email with
fragments from journals I found during the move, flipping
through them at random and typing out what I find interesting
until I hit the word limit:

…I am most impressed by those who can find the signal in the
noise. People like David Foster Wallace, W.H. Auden, Amy
Hempel, Rob Greco, my sister, Matthew Weiner, Sherlock
Holmes, Deron Bauman, Al Swearengen, Frank Chimero, Ira
Glass, Noah Dennis, Patrick Rothfuss, Ze Frank…

Book idea: How to Look at People…

Matt Thomas: “To live in Iowa — and to stay sane
– requires the cultivation of a vast inner geography.”
– yes, exactly, that’s how I survived, isn’t it?…

“I like trees because they seem more resigned to the way
they have to live than other things do.” – Willa Cather,
O Pioneers!…

careworn = best adjective"
thoughts  commonplacebooks  noticing  observation  adjectives  trees  notetaking  notebooks  friends  2012  thelistserve  willacather  mattthomas  patternrecognition  patterns  cv  careworn  ego  lukeneff 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Getting away - some space over here
"I got to spend some time with the students of The Children’s School in La Jolla, in particular the 8th grade. They have an interesting thing going. 7 kids, two teachers, one classroom. Rob (@rogre) and Carwai (@carwaiseto) support their student colleagues in collectively maintaining a progressive ”classroom” and the 8th Grade Studio feels more like a family than a classroom.

I really like this model of education. Let the kids lead the way, make their own learning, and find out for themselves. Adults are just guides. When we don’t insist on handing everything to the children and allow mistakes to be made we let them become explorers and problem solvers with the interpersonal and critical thinking skills."
lcproject  teaching  progressive  criticalthinking  experience  learning  education  unschooling  carwaiseto  ego  2012  tcsnmy8  tcsnmy  mattarguello  glvo 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Week 57: The cold equations | Urbanscale
"sometimes it’s hard to see past one’s ideological blinders, to say nothing of one’s own ego and ambition."

"otsukaresama deshita, which is the customary way of thanking Japanese colleagues for a collective effort; ironically enough, I hated having these compulsory and merely performative-feeling ritual greetings expected of me when I actually lived and worked in Japan, but have come to miss having a handy figure of speech to acknowledge consciousness of the debt one owes to one’s coworkers and their diligence"
blinders  perspective  ideology  ego  ambition  lessonslearned  coworkers  collectivism  collectiveefforts  gratitude  otsukaresamadeshita  urbanscale  2012  adamgreenfield 
february 2012 by robertogreco
More lingo « Snarkmarket
"In the context of formless/definite/interactive, this also deserves a mention: Brian Eno says the right word for “interactive” is… “unfinished.” Artful blockquoting, as usual, by Rob Greco."
snarkmarket  robinsloan  ego  brianeno  unfinished  interactive  cv  2011  remkoolhaas  brucemau  culture  work 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Between the By-Road and the Main Road: Being in the Middle: Learning Walks
"So imagine a commitment to learning that involved making regular learning walks with high school students as a normal part of the "school" day. Now, these learning walks should not be confused with walking tours, which are designed based on planned outcomes. One walks to point X in order to see object or artifact Y. The points are predetermined, hierarchical in design.

Instead, learning walks are rhizomatic. They are inherently about being in the middle of things and coming to learn what could not been predetermined. Learning walks are part of the "curriculum" for instructional seminar (which I described here)."

[My comments cross-posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/7182110515/walking-and-learning ]
maryannreilly  comments  walking  walkshops  adamgreenfield  flaneur  psychogeography  derive  dérive  education  learning  schools  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  noticing  observation  seeing  2011  rhizomaticlearning  johnseelybrown  douglasthomas  unguided  self-directedlearning  serendipity  johnberger  willself  rebeccasolnit  sistercorita  maps  mapping  photography  alanfletcher  lawrenceweschler  kerismith  exploration  exploring  johnstilgoe  noticings  rjdj  ios  situationist  situatedlearning  situated  hototoki  serendipitor  flow  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  experience  control  ego  cv  coritakent 
july 2011 by robertogreco
For Dewey, Bellow, and Sweetness: The Story of the Chicago Comma - storify.com
"The University of Oxford no longer uses the "Oxford" or serial Comma in its own publications. Even though the serial comma is still recommended by Oxford University Press, we feel that the time has come for the torch to be passed to a new city on a new continent. We say: let the so-called Oxford Comma become hereafter known as the Chicago Comma."
timcarmody  danielsinker  oxford  oxfordcomma  punctuation  chicago  2011  manualofstyle  writing  style  ego  humor  appropriation  renaming  classideas  storify  commas  howwewrite  parentheses  quotationmarks  dumbquotes  serialcomma  language  communication  johndewey  saulbellow  styleguides 
june 2011 by robertogreco
For Dewey, Bellow, and Sweetness: The Story of the Chicago Comma - storify.com
"The University of Oxford no longer uses the "Oxford" or serial Comma in its own publications. Even though the serial comma is still recommended by Oxford University Press, we feel that the time has come for the torch to be passed to a new city on a new continent. We say: let the so-called Oxford Comma become hereafter known as the Chicago Comma."
timcarmody  danielsinker  oxford  oxfordcomma  punctuation  chicago  2011  manualofstyle  writing  style  ego  humor  appropriation  renaming  classideas  storify  commas  howwewrite  parentheses  quotationmarks  dumbquotes  serialcomma  language  communication  comments  styleguides 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Unschooling Media: Participatory Practices among Progressive Homeschoolers [.pdf]
Just reencountered Vanessa Bertozzi's 2006 thesis through a post by Sandra Dodd, commented by David Friedman: http://unschooling.blogspot.com/2011/06/unschooling-media-participatory.html

"On the flipside of the technology debate, I experienced a moment of great academic pleasure when I received an email from Rob, an unschooling dad in California. He explained that he’d come across my links tagged “unschooling” in del.icio.us and he was curious about my research. We then went on to have a very fruitful interview."
vanessabertozzi  unschooling  homeschool  networking  del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  2006  lizettegreco  glvo  education  learning  networkedlearning  participatory  participatoryculture  grassroots  ego  cv  filetype:pdf  media:document 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Competitive Swim Team Loses In City Funding Game | KPBS.org
[Sophia quoted in radio piece on the CSDS (City of San Diego Swim) Blue Team by Katie Orr]

"Twelve-year-old Sophia Greco has been swimming since she was little and has made her way up through the recreational levels. She doesn’t plan to stop any time soon.

"I used to be on Silver, and now it’s Blue," she said. "It’s a level up and it’s kind of more competitive, when you want to start getting dedicated to swimming.""
family  glvo  srg  swimming  sandiego  2011  funding  money  civics  activism  ego  proudpapa 
june 2011 by robertogreco
CC Monday - 6/6/2011 [San Diego City Council Meetings Archived Videos]
Lizette, Sophia, & Enzo at City Council Meeting (just past the 1:49:00 mark) regarding the CSDS (City of San Diego Swim) Blue Team.

Index here: http://granicus.sandiego.gov/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3
glvo  srg  lmg  edg  sandiego  ego  swimming  civics  family  activism  proudpapa 
june 2011 by robertogreco
If I could keep just three - Noteworthy and Not
"I’ve been almost completely off line for the last three weeks. It’s a long story but I am now drinking coffee and connected at my local Kroger. Ah, the 21st century.<br />
<br />
I am sitting overloaded with interestingness in my reader feeds. I recalled a past comment from Matt Thompson about the pain of clicking mark as read when you firmly  realize you will never catch up on your reading. Just let it go!<br />
<br />
I have pondered over this coffee on the fantasty of keeping just three feeds for my connection source. They would be:<br />
<br />
Tim O’Reilly’s Twitter feed, 50 Watts, Snarkmarket, and the third would be Roberto Greco at Delicious<br />
<br />
The focus of these thought artists is enriching and enlightening and they would provide long reaching tentacles to the rest of the universe."
ego  bettyannsloan  del.icio.us  infooverload  mattthompson  snarkmarket  timoreilly  markalleread  rss  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Twitter / @Francis Barton: In my dream last night I w ...
"In my dream last night I was explaining in depth to work colleagues who @rogre is, and why his delicious.com links are so good."
francisbarton  ego  rogre  del.icio.us  connections  dreams  internet  web  cv 
may 2011 by robertogreco
A learning mash-up.
"We need them….dedicated and passionate teachers and learners who see learning as a design that the learner moves, shapes and feeds forward as positive action in our world….educational communities need them, those with social imagination….experts, yes experts."

[Thomas is too kind — flattered to be mentioned amongst the likes of Dennis Littky, Dougald Hine, and Leigh Blackall.]
thomassteele-maley  leighblackall  dennislittky  dougaldhine  ego  cv  collegeunbound  ivanillich  unschooling  deschooling  learning  teaching  education  democraticschools  democracy  schools  tcsnmy  openstudio  student-centered  self-directedlearning  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  studentdirected  students  tcsnmy7  tcsnmy8  modeling  criticaleducation 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Rush the Iceberg » Rigid Inconsistency
"I thought these teachers are for creativity, diversity, and tolerance. I thought they were for students to be able to create their own meaning through assimilating new experiences into their bank of previous experiences.

Why do these teachers tell others what they should be doing in their classrooms? Their students’ reality is not my students’ reality.

There is variety in nature – some for good, some for bad. There is nuance in nature. Is their nuance in their classroom? Is their nuance in their tweets? Is their nuance in their blog posts?

I admire and learn from humble teachers that readily admit they do not have the magic unicorn glitter that will bring true learning to their students. What they do have, however, is creativity, diversity, and tolerance that transcends issues of grading, pedagogy, and technology."
stephendavis  ego  cv  teaching  nuance  diversity  certainty  uncertainty  inconsistency  rigidity  mywayorthehighway  humility  ambiguity  purpose  twitter  blogs  blogging  pontificating  technology  platitudes  thereisroomforall  allsorts  2011 
april 2011 by robertogreco
To Create, To Design
"…right to question these new “reforms” & their ability to succeed…points at “the revolution failed” are right…use of Dewey as an example is illustrative of issues here. Dewey, Francis Parker, L. Thomas Hopkins et al. faced a backlash from an American society bent on order & standardization. Though their reform was brilliant & on the mark in many ways, school in 20th century was an institution based on order and control just as it is today. Today as in the 20th century, linear schedules, corporate curricula, & the extra-curricularization of energy & interests still combine to hold firm what has been at the expense of what is. The School structure & its meanings are the issues of today just as they where a century ago…

We must reflect presently on the “reform” engines of today motoring through schools & quietly accepting the structures imposed in what amounts to seeing learners & their communities as commodities & economies of scale, vs dynamic realities of human possibility…"
thomassteele-maley  reform  education  schools  community  johndewey  thomashopkins  francisparker  wavesofthesame  unschooling  deschooling  workingwithinthesystem  revolution  standardization  control  corporateculture  corporatism  corporatization  curriculum  change  gamechanging  2011  we'vebeenherebefore  isitdiferentthistime  ego  cv  society  humanpotential  ivanillich  michaelwesch  newlearningecologies  networks  olpc  learningmeshes  michaelapple  jamesbeane  deborahmeier 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Seven Habits of Highly Connected People ~ Stephen's Web
1. Be Reactive: …some time listening and getting the lay of the land. Then, your forays into creating content should be as reactions to other people's points of view…It's about connecting…

2. Go With The Flow:  When connecting online, it is more important to find the places to which you can add value rather than pursue a particular goal/objective…

3. Connection Comes First:  If you don't have enough time for reading email, writing blog posts, or posting to discussion lists, ask yourself what other activities you are doing that are cutting in to your time…

4. Share: The way to function in a connected world is to share without thinking about what you will get in return…

5. RTFM: "Read The Fine Manual"…means… people should make the effort to learn for themselves before seeking instruction from others…

6. Cooperate: …online communications are much more voluntary than offline communications…successful online connectors recognize this.…know the protocols…

7. Be Yourself…"

[via: http://steelemaley.posterous.com/greco ]
collaboration  socialnetworking  connectivism  education  stephendownes  ego  howto  advice  connectivity  online  internet  etiquette  netiquette  learning  2008  flow  cooperation  sharing  rtfm  self  identity 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » Finns Looking Forward
"At any rate, from Robert Greco’s most excellent Delicious feed I snagged this link to “Oivallus-A Project on Future Education.” Here we have some Finns, already basking in all of their educational excellence glory, trying to figure out what teaching and learning are going to look like in a “networked economy.” (What a concept.) Not that there is anything earth shattering here, but the idea that Finnish Industries, the European Union, and The Finnish National Board of Education are seeking to “explore and outline progressive operating and learning environments” shows they’re not just resting on their laurels. And the outlines they’re sketching also show that they’re not just thinking about doing what they currently do better. They get that things are changing."

"Why aren’t more of us here in the States not seeing these trends and their impact on education more clearly?…Somehow, we have to get this party started…more on that in a couple of days."
finland  change  gamechanging  oivallus  willrichardson  ego  cv  del.icio.us  education  policy  future  lcproject  networkedeconomy  networkculture  networkedlearning  learning  progress 
january 2011 by robertogreco
aalbright.tumblr : There’s no doubt about it—I love the...
A meandering, evocative post from one member of the inaugural NMY gang. Two choice quotes:

"If NMY has taught me anything, though, it has taught me to ask questions, to put scrutiny to everything and to just plain think about the world I live in—to realize that things are never quite as they seem."

"For a long time, I held the belief that anything other than “hard work” was a waste of time and money. But what happens to you when you trim all the fat off of your steak and never spend a relaxed afternoon in an art museum?

Your morale goes down. Life gets boring. You get fatigued. And in the long run, you’re probably less creative and productive than if you just got outside every now and again. What I am realizing is that just as much as we need to hunker down and get stuff done, we need to also take pause."
anthonyalbright  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  cv  teaching  learning  pride  life  pause  ego  wisdom  beauty  joy  pleasure  balance  observation  noticing  attention 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Bouvet Island is “the most remote... - Noteworthy and Not
"I felt I was on the ship the first time I glanced at this evocative scene  and, so, set off on an exploration.

The photo was taken at sunrise at an eight miles distance on the 1898 German Valdivia expedition w/ Carl Chun and water colored by F. Winter.  Can you see that the center of the island is the ice-filled crater of an inactive volcano? The expedition did not land.

The Wikipedia entry reads like flash fiction. This chunk of rock and ice has many stories, an unused Internet country code top-level domain (.bv) and a path to this little bit of humor.

I wish I had never read a history textbook."
history  imagination  bettyannsloan  wikipedia  exploration  reading  education  textbooks  unschooling  deschooling  ego 
january 2011 by robertogreco
geek.teacher » Blog Archive » On #edcampoc
"I sat in some great sessions. Rob Grecco did something awesome: he brought his middle school students from his private, progressive school, & had them do a panel discussion on Student-led Urban Adventures. The students had to plan their itineraries and keep to a strict budget on a weeklong field trip to San Francisco. They were intelligent & insightful, doing a great job of representing their school. Afterwards one of the students, Taylor, came over & introduced himself to me. The students were a class act all the way."

"The standout moment of the whole session [Things That Suck] was when one of Rob’s students participated in our discussion on disciplinary practices. She described the way things are handled at her school and described traditional practices like having students sit in the corner as “ineffective.” Love it."
edcampoc  dancallahan  edcampoc2011  edcamp  tcsnmy  cv  ego  pride  students  education  learning  classtrips  discipline  thingsthatsuck 
january 2011 by robertogreco
EdCampOC 2011 | Organic Learning
"Students & teachers from The Children’s School in San Diego shared how their school, centered around project based learning, allows students to follow their passions in learning. Teachers shared their learning spaces on Tumblr (see sidebar on this blog for other classes) & talked about how their one-to-one program was about learning & not about technology. Students were articulate & open about their learning & had an easy, comfortable relationship with their teachers. Oh, how I wish this could happen in all of our schools. I thought it funny that some were referring to this school as the “hippie school”. I could relate. It was great to see that the students were actively participating in other sessions throughout the day. They truly were cultivating life long learning not only with their words, but with their actions."

"especially liked tweet by Matt Arguello, commenting on one of students from TCS, on discipline…"
janicestearns  tcsnmy  ego  students  edcamp  edcampoc  edcampoc2011  schools  education  teaching  projectbasedlearning  cv  pride  learning  progressive  pbl 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Luke's Commonplace Book | A convergence that needed documentation: Ayjay...
"A convergence that needed documentation: Ayjay posted a poem from Andrew Hudgins called “Praying Drunk,” which included this line: “… At night / deer drift from the dark woods and eat my garden. / They’re like enormous rats on stilts except, / of course, they’re beautiful.” A few days earlier Rob Greco posted a link to di liu’s animal regulation series, which had the above picture of an abnormally large deer, which makes deer look very much “like enormous rats on stilts except, / of course, they’re beautiful.”"
lukeneff  alanjacobs  animals  convergence  andrewhudgins  ego  deer  diliu  poetry  art  photography 
december 2010 by robertogreco
I am Thankful for Roberto Greco | Rush the Iceberg
"Roberto, I am thankful for you because, like Edna Sackson, you have opened my eyes to what a truly global education looks like.

I appreciate your views on unschooling and that you are showing that there are other ways to educate children.

I have learned much from your tweets and bookmarks – I like that much of your resources bring a different perspective and much needed nuance to not only education, but what it means to be a human.

I hope to meet you in person soon and enjoy a drink or two and look forward to having a conversation with you!  (So close, yet so far away…)

You can find all things Roberto Greco HERE."
ego  cv  stephendavis  unschooling  del.icio.us  bookmarking  bookmarks  edcuation  learning  children  schools  teaching  friends  education 
december 2010 by robertogreco
And Speaking of Revolutions. . . | Santa Fe Leadership Center
"If anyone is ready to lead the technology revolution in schools, it is Rob Greco, Middle Years Coordinator and humanities teacher at The Children’s School in La Jolla, CA. Rob is an educator who sees beyond the fads and fearlessly adopts technology in his classroom – hardware, software, social media alike. An artist, avid blogger, 21st century educator, and lifelong learner, Rob seamlessly integrates technology into his daily work with students.It is almost impossible to describe the way his students take up the endless technology options Rob presents them without simply experiencing it first hard. The SFLC invites you – urges you – to read the following post by Rob on his recent project with his students that resulted in a collaborative writing adventure with author Robin Sloan. I recommend following all of the links as you read along — you might learn a thing or two about teaching, blogging, feeding your passions, and serendipity."
tcsnmy  cv  ego  robinsloan  serendipity  edtech  technology  education  teaching  learning 
november 2010 by robertogreco
A family resemblance of obsessions « Snarkmarket
"Blogs — the best blogs — are public diaries of preoccupations. The reason why they are preoccupations is that you need someone who is continually pushing on the language to regenerate itself. The reason why they are public is so that those generations and regenerations and degenerations can find their kin, across space, across fame, across the likelihood of a connection, and even across time itself, to be rejoined and reclustered together.

Because that is how language and language-users are reborn; that is how the system, both artificial and natural, loops backward upon and maintains itself; because that is how a public and republic are made, how a man can be a media cyborg, and also become a city. That’s how this place where we gather becomes home."
timcarmody  language  blogs  blogging  definitions  cyborgs  regenerations  degenerations  connections  neologisms  words  time  etymology  ego  cv  obsessions  obsession  snarkmarket  robinsloan  timmaly  family-resemblance  ludwigwittgenstein  meaning  conversation  gamechanging  perspective  learning  understanding  misunderstanding 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Roberto Greco September 2010 | A Teacher's Desk [My contribution to a group blog. I'll be sending in an image and caption each month.]
"In transit to the next desk, a vacant seat in the classroom* of the moment (not pictured), with mate and thermos (the caffeine keeps me awake**, the process slows me down); laptop and charger (to research, record, communicate, and share***); and clipboard and miscellaneous papers (fewer and fewer each year)

*With desks like these, we call them studios.
**But maybe it doesn’t.
***Just a few of those places."

[On the post, several of these words link for context.]
teaching  schools  cv  glvo  desks  comments  tcsnmy  education  ego 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Cooking, Magic, Jamming Your Own Stuff Through the Machine & Changing Everything
[Frank: Thanks. That Grant Achatz piece came along while digging around online after seeing "A Day at El Bulli" [Phaidon] at the bookstore—some old-fashioned serendipity there. Don't miss this (bookmarked a year ago): http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/6105.html &, for the record, on Sunday, my kids were remarking about my actual sense of smell.]

"I’m not sure I know specifically what magic is, but maybe it is encountering a good impossibility. We don’t run into many Willy Wonkas or Walt Disneys in our lives: someone who has a completely different viewpoint than our own, & somehow, through sheer talent or brute force, builds a temple to that point of view."… "I think the future belongs to designers who can create their own content; to designers who have a point of view about the world. To folks who can make people respond to what they make and build an audience and then let them support that point of view." … "At this point in my life, I believe the future of design is the polymath."
frankchmero  magic  design  ferranadrià  elbulli  vision  meaning  purpose  ego  serendipity  frankchimero  polymaths  generalists  future  cv  glvo  experience  surprise  delight  creativity  imagination  personality  audience 
august 2010 by robertogreco
csessums.com » Blog Archive » Generation Meh: Empathy and College Students Today
"The implications for reported low empathy findings are complex. For teachers, the Times article & report provide an opportunity to discuss these findings w/ their students. The key here is opening up an opportunity for dialog w/ students allowing them to share their thoughts on the issue of empathy. Keeping a journal that shows what kids are doing w/ their time outside school & a class discussion around their findings might also be useful & revealing to students. Role-playing is another safe & pro-social way to engage students in a discussion which, in turn, can help deepen their knowledge of empathy & empathetic behavior. While these suggested activities only scratch the surface, developing empathy & empathetic behavior is a critical skill that cannot be overlooked. If we want this depressing news regarding empathy in children & young adults to change, then we need to act now. If we don’t, as the Times article suggests, “don’t expect the next generation to sigh over it, too.”
empathy  narcissism  entitlement  netgen  generations  students  culture  ego  christophersessums  stephendownes  society  millennials 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The myth of the individual, AKA completely missing the point of Palomar 5 « Mindflip
"The truth is hard to accept – that we are an expression of others, the thoughts and ideas of those around us. An interpretation of the ideas that permeate society, a translation, an articulation of possibility. Ego guides us to think of these as the expression of one being, and we respect this because we can then possess the same illusion.
palomar5  collective  individual  ideas  tcsnmy  credit  awareness  leadership  management  administration  ego 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Athenians and Visigoths: Neil Postman’s Graduation Speech » First Thoughts | A First Things Blog
"To be an Athenian is to understand that the thread which holds civilized society together is thin and vulnerable; therefore, Athenians place great value on tradition, social restraint, and continuity. To an Athenian, bad manners are acts of violence against the social order. The modern Visigoth cares very little about any of this. The Visigoths think of themselves as the center of the universe. Tradition exists for their own convenience, good manners are an affectation and a burden, and history is merely what is in yesterday’s newspaper."

[See the comments for discussion of accuracy of Postman's depiction of Athenians and Visigoths.]

[via: http://lukescommonplacebook.tumblr.com/post/742157919/to-be-an-athenian-is-to-understand-that-the-thread ]
neilpostman  commencementspeeches  society  civilization  vulnerability  civics  violence  convenience  tradition  socialrestraint  civility  ego  selfishness  libertarianism  egalitarian  knowledge  learning  empathy  humanism  art  beauty  commerce  corruption  commencementaddresses 
july 2010 by robertogreco
An exercise in empathy « Snarkmarket
"thing I have done since 7/8th grade, at least, & still do all the time today.

It goes like this:

Sitting in any space with other people—a classroom, a city bus, even a big wide-open park—I’ll sometimes let my mind wander and imagine the space from someone else’s vantage point. It’s as simple as that. No deep emotional imagination involved; it’s really just visual.

But the important thing is that I am included in the transformed scene. Doodling on a legal pad, hunched into a laptop, reading a book, whatever. The core of the exercise, I think, is that you see yourself as just another person in the space—an opaque bag of bones—instead of as, you know, the movie camera. The privileged POV.

Does that make any sense? It’s stuck with me as a habit, I suppose, because it’s so simple. This isn’t level 12 meditation. It’s just a little flip, a little dose of visual imagination. But I always find it entirely transporting. And it tends to put me in my place.

Anybody else ever do this?"
empathy  meditation  transformation  robinsloan  totry  ego  pointofview  pov  perspective  thoughtexcercises  tcsnmy  imagination  snarkmarket 
june 2010 by robertogreco
RSAnimate | better taste than sorry.
"But the reason for noticing the RSA were their animations I found on the blog of Frank Chimero. And the fact that he founds it through a weblog of a 6th grade class makes me smile."
markusreuter  ego  tcsnmy6  tcsnmy  cv 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Blog: Frank Chimero (Okay, yes, the content of this snippet from a talk...)
"This was found on Rob Greco’s blog for his 6th grade class. I love the fact that I can find things on a blog for 6th graders and share it with all of you and feel that it’s relevant. In sixth grade I was picking my nose, pulling hair, and throwing rocks and not thinking about how standard economic concepts about incentives break sometimes.
ego  cv  frankchimero  tcsnmy  kindwords  glvo  tcsnmy6  tcsnmy7 
may 2010 by robertogreco
A stranger comes to town « Snarkmarket
"Step 1: Rob Greco reads Jason Kottke’s blog.

Step 3: I find myself strolling the streets of San Diego with a gang of smart 7th graders.

For the zeit­geisty con­nec­tive tis­sue that is step 2, check out Rob’s reflec­tion here. It includes some very nice words about Snark­mar­ket! (And some nice words about me, too—so of course I was hes­i­tant to link to it too eagerly here—but hon­estly the whole thing is such a cool panoramic tale of a new kind of learn­ing, and Rob’s artic­u­la­tion of it is so good, that I am will­ing to bite the bul­let and incur some neg­a­tive self-aggrandizement points for the sake of sharing.)

P.S. I feel like I have not rec­om­mended a Deli­cious account in years, but Rob’s links are basi­cally what keep me com­ing back to my net­work page. They are thought­ful, thor­oughly anno­tated (his notes are almost lit­tle blog entries), and fright­en­ingly well-tagged."
robinsloan  tcsnmy  tcsnmy7  ego  cv  kottke  taxonomy  zeitgeist  tagging  tags  sandiego  del.icio.us 
april 2010 by robertogreco
La Jolla's newest option for Middle School
"Rob and several of the students from the NMY program recently spoke with parents about the program, providing them with an outline of what their typical day consists of (there is no typical day in the NMY classrooms), what the evaluation process looks like (students throughout The Children's School do not receive Letter grades, but written assessments of their progress) and how each student determines what the assignments and projects will be, based on his or her interest."
tcsnmy  cv  ego 
march 2010 by robertogreco
The librarian edge: Teachers, Meaningful Connections, & Mindful Information Consumption
"Here we are, for the first time in history with all the information we want. It's the "Informavore's Dilemma" ***. Now we just need to develop the discipline for mindful information consumption."
katieday  infooverload  information  flow  filtering  curation  social  ego  cv  online  web  internet  technology  schools  teaching  learning 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: Weblog: It was a couple of simple questions: Have you ever...
"couple of simple questions: Have you ever made a mistake? &, if so, what was your worst mistake? people who said, ‘Gee, I haven’t really had one,’ or, ‘I’ve had a couple of bad outcomes but they were due to things outside my control’—invariably those were the worst candidates. & residents who said, ‘I make mistakes all the time. There was this horrible thing that happened just yesterday & here’s what it was.’ They were the best. They had ability to rethink everything that they’d done & imagine how they might have done it differently. — Charles Bosk, on “a set of interviews w/ young doctors who had either resigned or been fired from neurosurgery-training programs, in an effort to figure out what separated unsuccessful surgeons from successful counterparts,”...The more I’ve had to deal with people professionally, the more convinced I’ve become that, as Milton Glaser says, “One of the signs of a damaged ego is absolute certainty.” Beware of people who lack the capacity for self doubt."
success  mistakes  learning  hiring  ego  miltonglaser  self-doubt  cv  honesty  human  failure  tcsnmy  certainty  administration  management 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Reasons to Be Cheerful, robertogreco:   (via selflesh) map....
"map. territory. ia. roads. I have a new favourite Tumblr. Follow this person immediately."
ego  glvo  tumblr 
december 2009 by robertogreco
edublogs: Creativity as an egotistical, solitary, (profitable) endeavour
"The idea that the best creative thought can come from not working in a team, from not working collaboratively, but is derived from solitude and being headstrong with one's peers, pushing one's own ideas through regardless of whether "the team" feels comfortable with it is, in many education circles (and professional ones), treated as a selfish, dirty, shameful notion to possess.
collaboration  ego  creativity  productivity  attention  distraction  independence  independent 
april 2009 by robertogreco
scraplab : fighting natural laws
"Considering these two laws together suggests to me that information follows a pattern of burst and decay. This is why your permalinks will never be permanent. This is why I have no qualms with wiping six years of my blog. This is why I don’t care if my URL shortener disappears.
via:preoccupations  forgetting  memory  linkrot  ego  ephemeral  permalinks  online  internet  tomtaylor  posterity  ephemerality 
april 2009 by robertogreco
First Man of Letters
“It is certain that success naturally confirms us in a favorable opinion of our own abilities. Scarce any man is willing to allot to accident, friendship, and a thousand causes which concur in every event without human contrivance or interposition, the part which they may justly claim in his advancement. We rate ourselves by our fortune rather than our virtues, and exorbitant claims are quickly produced by imaginary merit.”
samueljohnson  humans  opinion  selfimage  ability  assessment  ego  success  fortune  virtue  merit  friendship  chance  luck 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Gapers Block : A/C : Chicago Arts & Culture - Whose Goons Are These, Anyway?
"Maybe you've seen these wheat paste faces grinning out at you as you grab a Red Eye or pass a doorway. You're not the only Chicagoan to take notice. There is an entire Flickr group dedicated to capturing and collecting the work of this prolific graffiti artist and speculating on his identity. "I dig the the goons. They are like off-brand, Third World Sesame Street-like characters from a show that you could only pick up on a scrambled channel." -- jugheadjones, via Flickr Now if only a crafty Etsy seller would turn these drawings into stuffed animals."
glvo  ego  softies  plush  streetart  chicago  mysteries  graffiti  wheatpaste  projectideas 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Research Proves Power Corrupts ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Vicki Davis looks at research showing that people in positions of power abuse their power, and asks "How can we empower effective leaders?" and "how can they retain the skills of leadership that got them there in the first place." My response is: don't empower leaders. Take power away from them. And as for the second question, from what I've seem, the 'skills that got them there in the first place' are skills in the abuse of power. People become leaders by thinking of their own needs first, by ignoring the needs of their underlings, and by acting as though the rules don't apply to them."
leadership  power  abuse  management  administration  human  psychology  organizations  ego  selfishness  stephendownes 
august 2008 by robertogreco

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