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Liberalism is Dead – The New Inquiry
"This three-decades-long ideological and organizational transformation on the right has not been matched with an equivalent strengthening of American liberalism. Rather the 2016 electoral losses of the presidency, both houses, and most governorships illustrate the inefficacy of the liberal project and its empty vision. The Democratic #resistance, rather than offering a concrete vision of a better world or even a better policy program, instead romanticizes a “center” status quo whose main advantage is that it destroys the environment and kills the poor at a slightly slower rate than the Republicans’ plan. Liberalism isn’t failing because the Democrats have chosen unpopular leaders. It is instead a result of the material limits of the debt-dependent economic policy to which it is devoted. Neoliberal economic policy has produced growth through a series of debt bubbles, but that series is reaching its terminal limits in student and medical debt. Liberalism today has nothing to offer but the symbolic inclusion of a small number of token individuals into the increasingly inaccessible upper classes.

As liberalism collapses, so too does the left-right divide that has marked the past century of domestic politics in the capitalist world. The political conflict of the future will not be between liberalism (or its friendlier European cousin, social democracy) and a conservatism that basically agrees with the principles of liberal democracy but wishes the police would swing their billy clubs a lot harder. Instead, the political dichotomy going forward will be between a “left” and “right” fascism. One is already ascendant, and the other is new but quickly growing.

Jürgen Habermas and various other 20th century Marxists used “left fascism” as a generic slander against their ideological opponents, but I am using it to refer to something more specific: the corporatocratic libertarianism that is the counterpart of right fascism’s authoritarian ethnonationalism, forming the two sides of the same coin. When, in the wake of the imminent economic downturn, Mark Zuckerberg runs for president on the promise of universal basic income and a more “global citizen”-style American identity in 2020, he will represent this new “left” fascism: one that, unlike Trump’s, sheds the nation-state as a central concept. A truly innovative and disruptive fascism for the 21st century."



"The difference between state and nation-state will become increasingly clear as a new fascist politics of total corporate sovereignty comes into view. Its romantic dreams of fully automated factories, moon colonies, and seasteads mirror the old Italian fascists’ fetishization of technology, violence, and speed. Packaged with a libertarian opposition to borders and all-out wars, this left fascism will represent the new cutting edge of capitalist restructuring.

In America, the right fascists find their base in agribusiness, the energy industry, and the military-industrial complex, all relying heavily on state subsidies, war, and border controls to produce their wealth. Although they hate taxes and civil rights, they rely on American imperialism, with its more traditional trade imbalances, negotiation of energy “agreements,” and forever wars to make their profits. But the left fascists, based in tech, education, and services, do best through global labor flows and free trade. Their reliance on logistics, global supply chains, and just-in-time manufacturing, combined with their messianic belief in the singularity and technological fixes for social problems, means they see the nation-state mostly as a hindrance and the military as an inefficient solution to global problems."



"Last February it was a big news story when Apple refused to help the FBI crack the company’s iPhone encryption. Most people understood this as Apple standing up for its customers, protecting their privacy rights. This was an absurd misreading that requires that one willfully forget everything else Apple does with customer data. In fact, it was a play for sovereignty, a move pointed at demonstrating the independence of Apple in particular and Silicon Valley in general from the state, a step toward the left-fascist politics of the future. In understanding the move as a form of protective noblesse oblige, Apple customers revealed nothing so much as their willingness to become customer-subjects of Apple Nation™."
willieosterweil  liberalism  politics  2017  labor  globalization  freetrade  fbi  encryption  sovereignty  apple  capitalism  corporatism  military  militaryindustrialcomplex  facism  borders  geopolitics  marxism  left  ethnonationalism  authoritarianism  democrats  class  inequality 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Meet Moxie Marlinspike, the Anarchist Bringing Encryption to All of Us | WIRED
"Marlinspike isn’t particularly interested in a debate, either; his mind was made up long ago, during years as an anarchist living on the fringes of society. “From very early in my life I’ve had this idea that the cops can do whatever they want, that they’re not on your team,” Marlinspike told me. “That they’re an armed, racist gang.”

Marlinspike views encryption as a preventative measure against a slide toward Orwellian fascism that makes protest and civil disobedience impossible, a threat he traces as far back as J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI wiretapping and blackmailing of Martin Luther King Jr. “Moxie is compelled by the troublemakers of history and their stories,” says Tyler Rein­hard, a designer who worked on Signal. “He sees encryption tools not as taking on the state directly but making sure that there’s still room for people to have those stories.”

ASK MARLINSPIKE TO tell his own story, and—no surprise for a privacy zealot—he’ll often answer with diversions, mono­syllables, and guarded smiles. But anyone who’s crossed paths with him seems to have an outsize anecdote: how he once biked across San Francisco carrying a 40-foot-tall sailboat mast. The time he decided to teach himself to pilot a hot-air balloon, bought a used one from Craigslist, and spent a month on crutches after crashing it in the desert. One friend swears he’s seen Marlinspike play high-stakes rock-paper-scissors dozens of times—with bets of hundreds of dollars or many hours of his time on the line—and has never seen him lose.

But before Marlinspike was a subcultural contender for “most interesting man in the world,” he was a kid growing up with a different and far less interesting name on his birth certificate, somewhere in a region of central Georgia that he describes as “one big strip mall.” His parents—who called him Moxie as a nickname—separated early on. He lived mostly with his mother, a secretary and paralegal at a string of companies. Any other family details, like his real name, are among the personal subjects he prefers not to comment on.

Marlinspike hated the curiosity-killing drudgery of school. But he had the idea to try programming videogames on an Apple II in the school library. The computer had a Basic interpreter but no hard drive or even a floppy disk to save his code. Instead, he’d retype simple programs again and again from scratch with every reboot, copying in commands from manuals to make shapes fill the screen. Browsing the computer section of a local bookstore, the preteen Marlin­spike found a copy of 2600 magazine, the catechism of the ’90s hacker scene. After his mother bought a cheap desk­top computer with a modem, he used it to trawl bulletin board services, root friends’ computers to make messages appear on their screens, and run a “war-dialer” program overnight, reaching out to distant servers at random.

To a bored middle schooler, it was all a revelation. “You look around and things don’t feel right, but you’ve never been anywhere else and you don’t know what you’re missing,” Marlin­spike says. “The Internet felt like a secret world hidden within this one.”

By his teens, Marlinspike was working after school for a German software company, writing developer tools. After graduating high school—barely—he headed to Silicon Valley in 1999. “I thought it would be like a William Gibson novel,” he says. “Instead it was just office parks and highways.” Jobless and homeless, he spent his first nights in San Francisco sleeping in Alamo Square Park beside his desktop computer.

Eventually, Marlinspike found a programming job at BEA-owned Web­Logic. But almost as soon as he’d broken in to the tech industry, he wanted out, bored by the routine of spending 40 hours a week in front of a keyboard. “I thought, ‘I’m supposed to do this every day for the rest of my life?’” he recalls. “I got interested in experimenting with a way to live that didn’t involve working.”

For the next few years, Marlinspike settled into a Bay Area scene that was, if not cyberpunk, at least punk. He started squatting in abandoned buildings with friends, eventually moving into an old postal service warehouse. He began bumming rides to political protests around the country and uploading free audio books to the web of himself reading anarchist theorists like Emma Goldman.

He took up hitchhiking, then he upgraded his wanderlust to hopping freight trains. And in 2003 he spontaneously decided to learn to sail. He spent a few hundred dollars—all the money he had—on a beat-up 27-foot Catalina and rashly set out alone from San Francisco’s harbor for Mexico, teaching himself by trial and error along the way. The next year, Marlin­spike filmed his own DIY sailing documentary, called Hold Fast. It follows his journey with three friends as they navigate a rehabilitated, leaky sloop called the Pestilence from Florida to the Bahamas, finally ditching the boat in the Dominican Republic.

Even today, Marlinspike describes those reckless adven­tures in the itinerant underground as a kind of peak in his life. “Looking back, I and everyone I knew was looking for that secret world hidden in this one,” he says, repeating the same phrase he’d used to describe the early Internet. “I think we were already there.”

If anything can explain Marlinspike’s impulse for privacy, it may be that time spent off society’s grid: a set of experi­ences that have driven him to protect a less observed way of life. “I think he likes the idea that there is an unknown,” says Trevor Perrin, a security engineer who helped Marlinspike design Signal’s core protocol. “That the world is not a completely surveilled thing.”"



"Beneath its ultrasimple interface, Moxie Marlinspike’s crypto protocol hides a Rube Goldberg machine of automated moving parts. Here’s how it works.

1. When Alice installs an app that uses Marlinspike’s protocol, it generates pairs of numeric sequences known as keys. With each pair, one sequence, known as a public key, will be sent to the app’s server and shared with her contacts. The other, called a private key, is stored on Alice’s phone and is never shared with anyone. The first pair of keys serves as an identity for Alice and never changes. Subsequent pairs will be generated with each message or voice call, and these temporary keys won’t be saved.

2. When Alice contacts her friend Bob, the app combines their public and private keys—both their identity keys and the temporary ones generated for a new message or voice call—to create a secret shared key. The shared key is then used to encrypt and decrypt their messages or calls.

3. The secret shared key changes with each message or call, and old shared keys aren’t stored. That means an eavesdropper who is recording their messages can’t decrypt their older communications even if that spy hacks one of their devices. (Alice and Bob should also periodically delete their message history.)

4. To make sure she’s communicating with Bob and not an impostor, Alice can check Bob’s fingerprint, a shortened version of his public identity key. If that key changes, either because someone is impersonating Bob in a so-called man-in-the-middle attack or simply because he ­reinstalled the app, Alice’s app will display a warning."
moxiemarlinspike  encryption  privacy  security  2016  2600  surveillance  whatsapp  signal  messaging  anarchists  anarchism  openwhispersystems  tylerreinhard  emmagoldman  unschooling  education  learning  autodidacts  internet  web  online  work  economics  life  living  lawenforcement 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Open Whisper Systems
"PRIVATE MESSAGING
For iPhone and Android

• Say Anything - Send high-quality group, text, picture, and video messages, all without SMS and MMS fees.


• Be Yourself - Use your existing phone number and address book. There are no separate logins, usernames, passwords, or PINs to manage or lose.


• Stay Private - We cannot read your messages, and no one else can either. Everything is always end-to-end encrypted and painstakingly engineered in order to keep your communication safe.


• Get Organized - Archive functionality makes it easy to keep track of the conversations that matter to you right now.


• Pay Nothing - The development team is supported by community donations and grants. There are no advertisements, and it doesn't cost anything to use.

PRIVATE CALLING
For iPhone and Android

• Speak Freely - Make crystal-clear phone calls to people who live across town, or across the ocean, with no long-distance charges.


• Stay Private - We cannot hear your conversations, and no one else can either. No exceptions.


• Pay Nothing - The development team is supported by community donations and grants. There are no advertisements, and it doesn't cost anything to use."
android  encryption  security  sms  software  ios  applications  phones  voice 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Kardashian Krypt - Chrome Web Store
"Covertly send messages to friends, family, paramours & more by hiding messages in pictures of Kim Kardashian!!!!!

Leverage Kim Kardashian's visual omnipresence thru KARDASHIAN KRYPT, a steganography Chrome extension that hides your messages in pictures of Kim Kardashian.

Easy to use, optional passwords for XTRA protection!!"

[See also:
http://fffff.at/kardashian-krypt/
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/finally-a-way-to-send-secret-messages-inside-pictures-of-kim-kardashian

and

http://fffff.at/kanyefy-your-dock/
http://www.avclub.com/article/heres-how-kanye-fy-your-apple-dock-206030 ]
maddyvarner  encryption  chrome  extensions  kimkardashian  kanyewest  computing  computers  data  imagery  mac  osx 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Signal - Private Messenger on the App Store on iTunes
"Privacy is possible. Signal makes it easy.

* Say Anything - Send high-quality group, text, picture, and video messages, all without SMS and MMS fees.
* Speak Freely - Make crystal-clear phone calls to people who live across town, or across the ocean, with no long-distance charges.
* Be Yourself - Signal uses your existing phone number and address book. There are no separate logins, usernames, passwords, or PINs to manage or lose.
* Stay Secure - We cannot hear your conversations or see your messages, and no one else can either. No exceptions. You can even tap and hold on a contact's name to see advanced identity verification options. Everything in Signal is always end-to-end encrypted and painstakingly engineered in order to keep your communication safe.
* Go Fast - Signal is optimized for speed without compromise. Our state-of-the-art Axolotl protocol is unmatched in its performance, strength, and reliability.
* Remain Connected - Push notifications let you know when new messages have arrived, and they'll be waiting for you even if your battery dies or you temporarily lose service.
* Get Organized - Unique archive functionality makes it easy to keep track of the conversations that matter to you right now.
* Pay Nothing - Signal is supported by a team of dedicated developers, community donations, and grants. There are no advertisements, and it doesn't cost anything to use.
* View Source - All of our code is free, open, and available on GitHub (https://github.com/WhisperSystems).
* Join Movements - Technology developed by Open Whisper Systems is trusted and used by millions of people around the world every day.
* Include Everyone - Signal is fully compatible with TextSecure and RedPhone for Android."
privacy  mobile  ios  android  via:maxfenton  applications  ios8  free  encryption  security 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Secrets, lies and Snowden's email: why I was forced to shut down Lavabit | Comment is free | theguardian.com
"For the first time, the founder of an encrypted email startup that was supposed to insure privacy for all reveals how the FBI and the US legal system made sure we don't have the right to much privacy in the first place"



"The problem here is technological: until any communication has been decrypted and the contents parsed, it is currently impossible for a surveillance device to determine which network connections belong to any given suspect. The government argued that, since the "inspection" of the data was to be carried out by a machine, they were exempt from the normal search-and-seizure protections of the Fourth Amendment.

More importantly for my case, the prosecution also argued that my users had no expectation of privacy, even though the service I provided – encryption – is designed for users' privacy.

If my experience serves any purpose, it is to illustrate what most already know: courts must not be allowed to consider matters of great importance under the shroud of secrecy, lest we find ourselves summarily deprived of meaningful due process. If we allow our government to continue operating in secret, it is only a matter of time before you or a loved one find yourself in a position like I did – standing in a secret courtroom, alone, and without any of the meaningful protections that were always supposed to be the people's defense against an abuse of the state's power."
email  encryption  government  privacy  lavabit  2013  2014  ladarlevison  edwardsnowden  surveillance  law  legal  secrecy  justice 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Keybase
"Keybase will be a public directory of publicly auditable public keys. All paired, for convenience, with unique usernames."



"Keybase.io is also a Keybase client, however certain crypto actions (signing and decrypting) are limited to users who store client-encrypted copies of their private keys on the server, an optional feature we didn't mention above.

On the website, all crypto is performed in JavaScript, in your browser. Some people have strong feelings about this, for good reason."
security  crypto  cryptography  keybase  usernames  identity  2014  publickeys  directories  keybase.io  encryption 
march 2014 by robertogreco
FreedomBox Foundation
"What is FreedomBox?

Email and telecommunications that protects privacy and resists eavesdropping

A publishing platform that resists oppression and censorship.

An organizing tool for democratic activists in hostile regimes.

An emergency communication network in times of crisis.

FreedomBox will put in people's own hands and under their own control encrypted voice and text communication, anonymous publishing, social networking, media sharing, and (micro)blogging.

Much of the software already exists: onion routing, encryption, virtual private networks, etc. There are tiny, low-watt computers known as "plug servers" to run this software. The hard parts is integrating that technology, distributing it, and making it easy to use without expertise. The harder part is to decentralize it so users have no need to rely on and trust centralized infrastructure."
decentralized  decentralizedcomputing  decentralization  infrastructure  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  mediasharing  encryption  eavesdropping  telecommunications  email  oppression  censorship  microblogging  publishing  ebenmoglen  activism  hardware  technology  linux  security  freedom  privacy  opensource  software  freedombox 
may 2012 by robertogreco
The Technology Behind Spying : NPR
"According to the FBI, the alleged Russian spies arrested earlier this week sent messages to each other that were hidden in seemingly ordinary image files. The technique they used is called steganography. Dartmouth computer scientist Hany Farid tells Melissa Block that freely available computer programs make it easy for anyone to embed messages in digital photos." [see also: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128262863]
steganography  spying  offtheshelfespionage  photography  classideas  trythis  encryption 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Safer Than A Gamble: Finding Truly Random Numbers : NPR
"This is where the weird properties of quantum mechanics come in. In this world, you can have a magnet that is pointing north and south at the same time, so long as you don't look at it.
random  randomnumbers  quantamentanglement  quantummechanics  physics  geigercounters  encryption 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Users can automatically encrypt Gmail traffic | News - Digital Media - CNET News.com
"Gmail now can be set to encrypt communications e-mail by default, an option that makes the e-mail service harder to snoop on but also potentially slower. Users already could encrypt communications with Gmail servers (by going to https://mail.google.com),
gmail  security  encryption 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Encrypt your Gmail Email! - Instructables - DIY, How To, tech
"In this Instructable, I'll walk you through the simple process of setting up GPG and then installing a Firefox plugin that will make it easy to encrypt your Gmail."
encryption  gmail  security  email  privacy  howto  cryptography  instructables 
may 2008 by robertogreco
So long Mifare RFID system
"Absolutely fascinating stuff the impact of which could be pretty big when the next unbreakable technology is widely adopted, implemented and cracked! Oh that was Microsoft’s Windows Media DRM, no wait or was it Apple’s FairPlay, no wait it was… Goo
encryption  hacking  rfid  via:timo  urbancomputing  NFC  security  ubicomp  electronics  transit 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Freedom to Tinker
"The focus is on issues related to legal regulation of technology, and especially on legal attempts to restrict the right of technologists and citizens to tinker with technological devices. But we reserve the right to write about anything that strikes our
activism  tinkering  technology  opensource  open  legal  law  homebrew  engineering  ethics  encryption  modding  mobile  commons  censorship  anarchy  software  making  make  hacking  hardware  piracy  policy  politics  regulation  security  society  patents  copyright  anarchism 
december 2007 by robertogreco
freenigma gmbh
"freenigma adds privacy technology (with strong e-mail encryption) to your favourite webmail service."
email  privacy  security  software  technology  tools  utilities  web  free  internet  encryption 
september 2006 by robertogreco

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