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robertogreco : encyclopedias   12

These ain't no books […]
"These ain't no books [...]
Realized projects lectures / talks / workshops
[...] But aesthetic investigations
these ain’t no books (…)

(…) But pro­jects in di­gi­tal and hy­brid pu­blis­hing.

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MISSION

We work at the in­ter­sec­tion of de­sign and tech­no­logy, crea­ting and de­si­gning in­di­vi­dual di­gi­tal and hy­brid pu­blis­hing work­flows.

Take a set of en­cy­clo­pe­dias and ask, “how do i make this di­gi­tal?” you get a Mi­cro­soft En­carta CD. Take the phi­lo­so­phy of en­cy­clo­pe­dia-ma­king and ask, “how does di­gi­tal ch­ange our en­ga­ge­ment with this?” you get wi­ki­pe­dia.

Post-artifact books and publishing – digital’s effect on how we produce, distribute and consume content.

“Most people are tal­king about a 1:1 Text trans­fer to di­gi­tal. Much more in­te­res­ting is the ques­tion: What lies bey­ond that bor­der? how do new ways of books look like? how can they be dis­played on di­gi­tal de­vices?” —Leander Wattig

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DESIGN

The de­ve­lop­ment of an in­di­vi­dual, cha­rac­te­ris­tic vi­sual lan­guage for every pu­blis­hing pro­ject is the main goal in our pro­cess.

By ex­pe­ri­men­ting, using tools dif­fer­ently and con­nec­ting lose ends in a new way, we try to find our own me­thods and work­flows.

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TECHNOLOGY

Pro­gramming and de­si­gning at the same time al­lows us to take ad­van­tage of the cur­rent tech­no­lo­gi­cal pos­si­bi­li­ties, thus co­m­ing up with uni­que so­lu­ti­ons.

“I don’t know… pro­gramming and de­si­gning is the same thing…” —Erik van Blokland

“We live in a tech­ni­cal rea­lity.” —Mercedes Bunz

“How ex­actly does the tech­no­logy we use to read ch­ange the way we read?” —Ferris Jabr

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ABOUT

“These ain’t no books (…)” is a pro­ject by John­son / Kings­ton, emer­ging from the en­ga­ge­ment with the fu­ture of the book and rea­ding on screens.

Tech­no­lo­gi­cal pro­gress has a big im­pact on so­ciety – it is our duty to take part in sha­ping these ch­an­ges.

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These ain't no books [...]
is a project by
Johnson / Kingston
Ivan Weiss / Michael Kryenbühl
Bern / Luzern

Contact us:
info@theseaintnobooks.com
www.johnsonkingston.ch"
books  bookfuturism  digital  screens  print  leanderwattig  publishing  technology  design  programming  erikvanblokland  mercedezbunz  ferrisjabr  ivanweiss  michaelkryenbühl  microsoftencarta  encarta  multimedia  encyclopedias  projectideas  howweread  reading  howwewrite  writing 
august 2018 by robertogreco
The Total Archive.
[See also: http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/25660

"The Total Archive: Dreams of Universal Knowledge from the Encyclopaedia to Big Data
19 March 2015 - 20 March 2015



The complete system of knowledge is a standard trope of science fiction, a techno-utopian dream and an aesthetic ideal. It is Solomon’s House, the Encyclopaedia and the Museum. It is also an ideology – of Enlightenment, High Modernism and absolute governance.

Far from ending the dream of a total archive, twentieth-century positivist rationality brought it ever closer. From Paul Otlet’s Mundaneum to Mass-Observation, from the Unity of Science movement to Isaac Asimov’s Encyclopedia Galactica, from the Whole Earth Catalog to Wikipedia, the dream of universal knowledge dies hard. These projects triumphantly burst their own bounds, generating more archival material, more information, than can ever be processed. When it encounters well defined areas – the sportsfield or the model organism – the total archive tracks every movement of every player, of recording every gene and mutation. Increasingly this approach is inverted: databases are linked; quantities are demanded where only qualities existed before. The Human Genome Project is the most famous, but now there are countless databases demanding ever more varied input. Here the question of what is excluded becomes central.

The total archive is a political tool. It encompasses population statistics, GDP, indices of the Standard of Living and the international ideology of UNESCO, the WHO, the free market and, most recently, Big Data. The information-gathering practices of statecraft are the total archive par excellence, carrying the potential to transfer power into the open fields of economics and law – or divest it into the hands of criminals, researchers and activists.

Questions of the total archive engage key issues in the philosophy of classification, the poetics of the universal, the ideology of surveillance and the technologies of information retrieval. What are the social structures and political dynamics required to sustain total archives, and what are the temporalities implied by such projects?

In order to confront the ideology and increasing reality of interconnected data-sets and communication technologies we need a robust conceptual framework – one that does not sacrifice historical nuance for the ability to speculate. This conference brings together scholars from a wide range of fields to discuss the aesthetics and political reality of the total archive."]
tumblr  classification  maps  knowledge  2015  tumblrs  archives  universality  collections  data  politics  bigdata  history  encyclopedias  paulotlet  mundaneum  isaacasimov  encyclopediagalactica  wholeearthcatalog  museums  ideology  highmodernism  sccifi  sciencefiction  humangenomeproject  libraries  wikipedia  universalknowledge 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Acts of Knowledge — edgar/Endress
"The Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge is a Chinese Encyclopedia described by Jose Luis Borges, where an alternative taxonomy is listed:

1. those that belong to the Emperor,
2. embalmed ones,
3. those that are trained,
4. suckling pigs,
5. mermaids,
6. fabulous ones,
7. stray dogs,
8. those included in the present classification,
9. those that tremble as if they were mad,
10. innumerable ones,
11. those drawn with a very fine camelhair brush,
12. others,
13. those that have just broken a flower vase,
14. those that from a long way off look like flies.

This classification explore the arbitrariness (and cultural specificity) of any attempt to categorize the world and  demonstrates an "other" to our system of thought. In Foucault's book the "Order of Things", Foucault explicates an "archaeological" investigation of knowledge acquisition; he also comments on the fragility of our current means of understanding the world. For Foucault reasoning is the ultimate act of control, delivered through the power of representation to confirm an objective order. Acts of Knowledge begins with a text found in an old social studies text used in U.S. classrooms. This educational text delivers a structural form of knowledge and a series of narratives about the similar and the other. Acts of Knowledge uses the primary forms of knowledge -the encyclopedia- to question the structure imposed by the reasoning. In that context, the acts of estrangement and the visual structuring of the dictionary and the encyclopedias through collages questions the categorization, knowledge, and the arbitrariness of otherness. 

Acts of Knowledge is a collaborative project with: John Morgan, Bill Macmillan, Lori Lee, Aschoy Collective"
borges  taxonomy  classification  literature  art  illustration  via:thatstyping  encyclopedias  knowledge  johnmorgan  billmacmillan  lorilee  aschoycollective 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Reading the dictionary - Joi Ito's Web [See also the comments.]
"My sister calls me an "interest driven learner."…code for "short attention span" or "not a good long term planner" or something like that. I can't imagine being able to read the dictionary from cover to cover…don't think most people could…

Although reading the dictionary & the encyclopedia from cover to cover may seem a bit extreme, it often feels like that's what we're asking kids to do who go through formal education…

I love videos of professors, amateurs & instructors putting their courseware online…great resource for interest driven learners like me. However, I wonder whether we should be structuring the future of learning as online universities where you are asked to do the equivalent of reading the encyclopedia from cover to cover online. Shouldn't we be looking at the Internet as an amazing network enabling "The Power of Pull" & be empowering kids to learn through building things together rather than assessing their ability to complete courses & produce the right "answers"?"
networkedlearning  motivation  2012  lcrpoject  interestdriven  dictionaries  encyclopedias  teaching  web  online  education  deschooling  unschooling  learning  joiito  dictionary 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Teachers: Please stop prohibiting the use of Wikipedia | ZDNet
"Here’s the problem with prohibiting the use of Wikipedia: We all use it anyway. Look up just about any new term, word, or expression in the search engine of your choice, and the Wikipedia entry for that term will be the first hit. And usually it’s not only spot on but gives you the information you need immediately.

Yet all that junk that we worry about on Wikipedia also gets used by students who haven’t been taught to correctly verify sources or to understand the reliability of web materials. Without a thorough understanding of its powers, pitfalls, and how to determine both, students won’t be able to sort the wheat from the chaff."
wikipedia  education  teaching  learning  tcsnmy  encyclopedias 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Jorge Luis Borges interview
"Encyclopedias have been, I’d say, my life’s chief reading...used to go to the Biblioteca Nacional in Buenos Aires — and since I was so shy, I felt I could not cope with asking for a book, or a librarian, so I looked on the shelves for the Encyclopædia Britannica...one night I was richly rewarded, because I read all about the Druses, Dryden, and the Druids — a treasure trove, no? — all in the same volume...I thought, well, I’d write a story of the fancy encyclopedia [previously described]. Then of course that would need many different people to write it, to get together and to discuss many things — the mathematicians, philosophers, men of letters, architects, engineers, then also novelists or historians....
borges  literature  interviews  writing  academia  philosophy  books  shyness  encyclopedias  libraries  bertrandrussell 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Eide Neurolearning Blog: Gifted Big Picture / High Conceptual Thinkers
"HTCs are often...Omnivorous Learners..Because of their quest for the "interesting", they may love Internet, read entire encyclopedias, or incessantly question adults about real world, & so learn a little bit about everything. They may not hit ceiling scores on conceptual knowledge IQ subtests because omnivorous approach to figuring out world around them...New is the Thing: HCTs prefer novelty (this is how they develop new conceptual categories) & are tickled by unconventional viewpoints or discoveries...Big Picture, Not Little Details: HCTs don't always transition well to "precision years" of late elementary, middle school, or beyond...Boredom is Death:...these kids rebel against what they see as boredom. Boredom may really seem like death to young HCTs. If young HCTs seem "driven by a motor", it's intellectual restlessness and it can be a blessing as well as a burden. Not surprisingly, these kids often find classroom learning unsatisfying."
highconceptualthinkers  generalists  bigpicture  cv  teaching  learning  gifted  omnivorouslearners  internet  encyclopedias  curiosity  novelty  unconventionl  details  tcsnmy 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Microsoft To Shutter Encarta, Read All About It On Wikipedia
"Microsoft is preparing to shut down Encarta, the digital encyclopedia it first launched in 1993 as a direct competitor to old reference standbys like Encyclopedia Britannica. The encyclopedia, which for years was based on optical media and eventually made its way to the web too, grew quickly in the mid to late 90’s as a reference guide that was more convenient than book-based encyclopedias and was available for a tiny fraction of the price. According to its FAQ, Encarta’s web sites will be discontinued on October 31, 2009 (Except for Japan, which has until December 31, 2009). Microsoft will also stop selling the Encarta products by June."
wikipedia  microsoft  encarta  encyclopedias  reference  online 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The Charms of Wikipedia - The New York Review of Books
"point of convergence for self-taught and expensively educated...cranks had to consort with mainstreamers & hash it all out—and nobody knew who really knew what he/she was talking about...everyone's identity was hidden behind jokey username."
wikipedia  books  encyclopedias  reviews  culture  history  via:russelldavies  education  knowledge  nicholsonbaker  collaboration  writing  language  encyclopedia 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics: Incremental Vs. Discrete Content
"Micro-incremental growth is an under-appreciated element of successful new media. This method is way beyond issuing beta versions, because there are no versions, just ever tiny modifications, some of which are not even improvements but simply changes."
wikipedia  change  growth  citizendium  jimmywales  crowdsourcing  quality  time  wikis  wikiasearch  slow  longterm  kevinkelly  content  encyclopedias  semantic  semanticweb  internet  web  online  data  database  information  knowledge 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Visual dictionary
"to learn by way of image with thematic, clear and precise pages, with concise and rigorous texts, bilingual, the InfoVisual will become a academic resource. Different from an encyclopedia or from a traditional online dictionaries, thesauri and glossaries
dictionary  language  visualization  visual  diagrams  graphics  medical  encyclopedias  anatomy  biology  dictionaries 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Laurent Haug’s blog » "Wikipedia is like a sausageyou might like the taste of it, but you don’t necessarily want to see how it’s made”."
“The problem most people have with Wikipedia’s quality and accuracy seems to have more to do with their knowledge of how it is made, rather than any observed problem with the end results.”
wikipedia  perception  crowdsourcing  content  research  encyclopedias  quality  accuracy 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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