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robertogreco : environmentaldesign   11

The Guild
"In the beginning it was a welder, a wood buringin stove and fifteen hundred bucks.

FRANKLY, WE COULDN'T EVEN AFFORD A PROPER COMPUTER OR SAW. We picked up the phone and called everyone we knew and told them we could make stuff.

Some stuff turned into more stuff. More stuff turned into our first employee. Our first employee got a graphic novel book deal and left us which led us to our second employee. Don't worry Sarah, we still love you a ton and own all your books!

From there we have grown bit by painstaking bit. We work through the nights and ask the people who love us to understand that it won't always be like this. There are days we don't get to go home for days. We take comfort in a cup of strong coffee with a splash of pride in a job well done.

Our generous and creative clients give us opportunities to prove ourselves. They continue to believe in our good thoughts and hard work, and we continue to think well and work hard for them.

Today the Guild is a broad collection of artists, designers, architects, project managers, developers, carpenters and painters. We come together to lend our talents to making dynamic environments and unique experiences.

There are changes we would make if we had to do it again. The learning curve is sharp at times and the growing pains hurt like hell. In spite of proverbial skinned knees, we absolutely love what we do and are glad that it shows. "
design  theguild  losangeles  brooklyn  miami  making  environmentaldesign  projectmanagement  architecture  art  construction  portland  oregon 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Between the By-Road and the Main Road: How Does School Environment Shape Teenagers' Behaviors?
"Childress explains there were 3 questions that framed his study:

I had built my study on 3 simple questions: How do teenagers use spaces? How do they apply meanings & values to any particular place? How do conflicts about those places arise btwn teens & adults & btwn particular subsets of teens, & how are those conflicts resolved?

In…answering those questions, Childress comes to name 13 pairs of competing ideas he labels as modernist & existential. I couldn't help but consider how the ambiguities that Childress frames in his study of how teenagers live & behave w/ the sensibilities that inform high school design. In what ways do our rather modernist secondary school environments shape teenager's behavior? What might happen if the assumptions that informed school design were less modernist & more existential?

[13 pairs listed]

Childress concludes his study by stating that the presence of joy is the factor most important in what works & doesn't…work in teenagers' lives."
maryannreilly  schools  schooldesign  adolescents  teens  modernism  herbchildress  2000  books  toread  lcproject  tcsnmy  learning  education  joy  well-being  environment  environmentaldesign  purpose  society  unschooling  deschooling  2011 
september 2011 by robertogreco
New Ways of Designing the Modern Workspace - NYTimes.com
"Adjustable desks, foldout benches & louvered shades have their place but…furniture is not the problem…But in the same way that bamboo floors, hybrid SUVs and eco-couture haven’t done much to curb carbon emissions, designing (& buying) more stuff for offices, no matter how sleek or sustainable it is, likely won’t help reset the culture of work.

Design itself is the problem because it is being used to solve the wrong ones…has to expand beyond noodling with the cubicle. I’m willing to bet that almost any office worker would happily swap Webcam lighting…for solutions to more pressing work issues like…burnout or fear of losing health coverage…

Two other factors often undervalued (and often ignored) in the workplace? Family and time…

We shouldn’t be rethinking the cubicle or corner office but rather rethinking all aspects of work…"
psychology  work  design  officedesign  allisonarieff  cubicles  classrooms  schooldesign  sustainability  productivity  life  families  parenting  time  workplace  workspace  nathanshedroff  furniture  homes  housing  babysitting  childcare  flexibility  coworking  efficiency  yiconglu  serbanionescu  jimdreilein  justinsmith  theminerandmajorproject  architecture  interiors  interiordesign  environmentaldesign  environment  broodwork  florianidenburg  jingliu  commonground  eames  froebel  kindergarten  andrewberardini  larrysummers  rachelbotsman  creativity  innovation  2011  autonomy  learning  workspaces  classroom  friedrichfroebel 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Local Projects
"Local Projects is a media design firm for museums and public spaces. We create a diverse range of installations from large environmental interactives, websites, and mobile applications, to simple experiences composed of thumbtacks, vellum, or conversation.<br />
While innovation drives much of today’s design, we’re interested in creating projects that can endure. For us at Local Projects, interaction design is more than just controlling technology. We create media that is integrated into architecture, and that connects people with the world and each other. We look to create experiences that inspire awe and wonder.<br />
<br />
Many of our projects are about co-creation: gathering visitor stories, or collecting opinions, or memories. We’ve learned that the most incredible material emerges when you create a platform for visitors to communicate."
design  art  culture  architecture  history  mediadesign  museums  publicspace  installation  environment  web  internet  environmentaldesign  localprojects  experience  lcproject  cocreation  community  communication  change 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Lifework - Herman Miller ["Ideal Live/Work Space: Architects Tim Durfee and Iris Anna Regn"]
"In our future house we hope to build on this small example of telescoping space: where the different parts are simultaneously visible, welcoming different modes of living.<br />
<br />
Iris: I have always admired the way Marguerite Duras worked – stolen spaces in her living room, or in a simple sunny nook. Having work areas in various locations of the house, somewhat defined (by Duras as stacks of books and ashtrays), allows for the different functions and humors.<br />
<br />
Duras writes: “There are houses that are too well made, too well thought out, completely without surprises, devised in advance by experts. By surprise I mean the unpredictable element produced by the way a house is used…” (Practicalities: Marguerite Duras Speaks to Jerome Beaujour, Grove/Atlantic, Inc, 1993)"
timdurfee  irisannaregn  broodwork  homes  glvo  work  space  margueriteduras  housing  design  predictablity  unpredictability  architecture  environmentaldesign 
november 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: The Third Technology
"I began my week in Virginia talking about "Colonialism in Education." The idea that we must not insist that the only way for children to succeed is to become clones of the educational policy makers. & I ended the week talking mostly about architecture & ecological systems & environments. Because this "third technology" - that environment - enframes both what we - adults in school - do, & what students see & imagine. If a class has desks in rows, only a few things can happen. If a class has a variety of spaces, many more things can. If classrooms have open views of the school & outside, learning is seen in a continuum, if a classroom has paper covering the door window & drawn blinds - we are telling children that learning starts & stops in a defined space. & if kids are comfortable they will imagine, dream, & investigate. & if they are not, they will resist & shut down."
irasocol  schooldesign  environmentaldesign  design  schools  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  architecture  thirdteacher  reggioemilia 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Open social scene: Coffeesmith, Garosu-gil | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"I thought this was just an exemplary platform for conviviality.

Coffeesmith's multiple zones readily support:
- prospect and refuge;
- solitary drinking/reading/studying/people-watching;
- socialization at a variety of scales, from couples to mid-sized groups;
- a range of options for lighting and ventilation."
lcproject  space  conviviality  thirdplaces  design  architecture  environmentaldesign  lighting  ventilation  seoul  korea  socialization  adamgreenfield  experience  coffeehouses  work  workplace  workspace  cafes  classroomdesigns  thirdspaces  openstudioproject  workspaces 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Space SIG 7: Designing Knowledge Spaces that work for Learning: the experiment of the art exhibition and the garden shed - KnowledgeBoard
"early decision was made to create some unspecified type of artefact that could be first used at the evening event & then re-used at the Design & Education exhibit. Until very late, this was to be an oral artefact – a story which would capture the passing listener but have no visible form – the story as vehicle for the elicitation, structuring & dissemination of key insights...by chance, at a late stage in project planning...theatre designer, writer & poet Angela Dove suggested that the artefact should be a garden shed...The garden shed was an exceptional success...ordinary 8x6 Homebase shed, adapted only to make it easier to assemble & reassemble, served as an incredibly powerful metaphor for the organic nature of knowledge management. Apart from the obvious role of the shed in artistic creativity - George Bernard Shaw, Hemingway & Mahler all wrote in sheds or huts - the organic growing metaphor really connected with attendees."
lcproject  knowledgespaces  art  design  schooldesign  learning  experience  knowledgemanagement  museums  theater  environmentaldesign 
july 2009 by robertogreco
The Third Teacher
"Our Commitment to Tomorrow's Graduate

The child starting kindergarten this fall will graduate in the third decade of the 21st century.
All we can know about the world she will step into is that it will have challenges and opportunities beyond what we can imagine today, problems and possibilities that will de­mand creativity and ingenuity, responsibility and compassion.

Whether this year’s kindergarten student will merely survive or positively thrive in the decades to come depends in large measure on the experiences she has in school.
Those experiences will be shaped by adults, by peers, and ultimately by places, by the physical environments where she does her learning.

United in the conviction that environment is our children’s third teacher, we can begin anew a vital mission: designing today’s schools for tomorrow’s world."
architecture  design  furniture  schools  schooldesign  lcproject  tcsnmy  children  teaching  learning  education  environment  environmentaldesign  brucemau  bmd 
april 2009 by robertogreco

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