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Bindery.js · Book
"Bindery.js is a library for designing printable books with HTML and CSS.

At its simplest, Bindery flows content over multiple pages. From there, the designer can create running headers, spreads, footnotes, tables of contents, indexes, and more. Bindery also provides print options like bleed, crop marks, and booklet ordering.

Web designers can think about books as an extension of responsive design, and print designers can express layouts programmatically, without the need for InDesign."
bindery  csss  ebooks  html  books  css  webdev  epublishing  webdesign  print  papernet 
12 weeks ago by robertogreco
Publish good looking Google Docs
"Google Docs are nice, but they look ugly when published to the web. Well... not anymore!"



1 Edit your document in the google doc A4/Letter document interface
2 Publish it to the web...
3 Ohhh snap, the style is completely broken
4 Thanks to gdoc.pub, you get to publish it decently"



"YOUR ARTICLE
Google Docs becomes a WYSIWYG editor instantly

YOUR RESUME
Bring your good looking resume online instantly

YOUR COVER LETTER
Edit it as a document and changes apply immediately

YOUR SPREADSHEET NEW
Works with a live dashboard or any table you like

This project is open source"

[via: https://gdoc.pub/doc/e/2PACX-1vTkYJ0qIfbMDSSPYiRoIkwcags8BV610Qf7Rt0P83Y91j2o1u9eVzcqcyNA3AYr0nf1b8UjnrvSJtaD ]
webdev  onlinetoolkit  googledocs  opensource  formatting  web  online  wysiyg  publishing  epublishing 
january 2018 by robertogreco
HemiPress –
"HemiPress is the Hemispheric Institute’s digital publications imprint, created to house and centralize our diverse publication initiatives. Using a variety of customized open-source digital humanities platforms, HemiPress includes the Gesture short works series, the Duke U.P./HemiPress digital books, stand-alone essays, and the Institute’s peer-reviewed journal emisférica, alongside interviews, Cuadernos, and other online teaching resources. It also provides state-of-the-art multilingual publication capacities and immersive formats for capturing the “live” of performance, as well as a digital “bookshelf”—the interface that houses all of the Institute’s publications and connects communities of readers across the Americas."

[Digital Books:
https://hemi.press/digital-books/

"The Hemispheric Institute's focus on embodied practice requires both methodological and technological innovation. Through our Digital Books initiative, which utilizes both the Scalar and Tome publication platforms, we seek to create media-rich scholarly publications in order to produce and disseminate knowledge across geographic, linguistic, disciplinary, and mediatic borders. Staging a unique intervention in the field of academic publishing, Digital Books allows authors to utilize not only images and video, but also multilingual subtitles, maps and geotags, audio recordings, slideshows, and photo-essays, alongside other interactive features. Whether solo-authored, collaboratively written, or compiled as an edited volume, this critical initiative invites scholars, artists, activists, and students to explore the expansive possibilities of digital publishing in a hemispheric context."



"Tome [http://tome.press/ ] is an online authoring tool that facilitates long-form publishing in an immersive, media-rich environment. Built on the WordPress framework and in collaboration with the Hemispheric Institute, Tome features a suite of custom plugins that empowers scholars, students, and artists to create innovative born-digital work. Recent Tome publications include El Ciervo Encantado: An Altar in the Mangroves (Lillian Manzor and Jaime Gómez Triana), Art, Migration, and Human Rights: A collaborative dossier by artists, scholars, and activists on the issue of migration in southern Mexico, Villa Grimaldi (Diana Taylor), and six gestures (peter kulchyski)."



"Scalar [https://scalar.me/anvc/ ] is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to write long-form, born-digital scholarship online. Scalar enables users to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways, with minimal technical expertise required. Scalar also gives authors tools to structure essay- and book-length works in ways that take advantage of the unique capabilities of digital writing, including nested, recursive, and non-linear formats. The platform also supports collaborative authoring and reader commentary."]

[See also: emisférica
https://hemi.press/emisferica/

"emisférica is the Hemispheric Institute’s peer-reviewed, online, trilingual scholarly journal. Published biannually, journal issues focus on specific areas of inquiry in the study of performance and politics in the Americas. The journal publishes academic essays, multimedia artist presentations, activist interventions, and translations, as well as book, performance, and film reviews. Its languages are English, Spanish, and Portuguese."



"Dossier: Our dossiers are organized around a given theme and feature short texts, interviews, artworks, poetry, and video."



"Essays: We publish invited essays, essays submitted through our open calls, and translations of significant previously published works."



"Reviews: We review books, films, and performances from throughout the Americas"



"Multimedios: Multimedios are digital modules that feature the work of individual artists, artist collectives, curatorial projects, and activists movements. These video and photography, interviews, catalogue texts, essays, and critical reviews."]
publishing  americas  latinamerica  ebooks  epublishing  opensource  español  spanish  portugués  portuguese  digital  digitalpublishing  books  journals  multimedia  photography  poetry  video  art  wordpress  webdev  onlinetoolkit  scalar  hemipress 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Eli Horowitz Wants To Teach You How To Read - BuzzFeed News
"This might all sound very precious, or very insufferable. But Horowitz is used to people feeling that way: It’s the same sort of criticism that’s long been levied at McSweeney’s, the indie publishing organization that Horowitz ran for the better part of a decade. The cabins expand upon the aggressively twee style that made McSweeney’s publications into bookshelf fixtures in Brooklyn studios and dorm rooms across the land, but the work Horowitz does in those cabins is anything but stale. It sounds hyperbolic, but it’s true: He’s radically rethinking the boundaries of narrative and our expectations for the technology that surrounds us.

At the moment, Horowitz is commissioned to figure out a new form of audio tour for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and putting together the narrative puzzle pieces as a contributing editor of Starlee Kine’s Mystery Show podcast. He’s editing a narrative project called bcc that plays out in the form of a series of back-and-forth emails between two characters — on which the reader is bcc’ed. But most urgently, there’s The Pickle Index, his collaboration with developer Russell Quinn, which aims to effectively reconceptualize the book — in its digital and printed forms alike.

Horowitz helped change the book world once. Can he do it again?

Horowitz’s name is on five books; as an editor, he’s worked closely with dozens of authors, including those of Dave Eggers, indie filmmaker and artist Miranda July, essayist Wells Tower, Michael Chabon, Joyce Carol Oates, and Denis Johnson. Every book he’s written has been optioned for film or television: The New World, published in May, was optioned by Olivia Wilde; The Silent History, a digital app turned paperback from 2012, is slated to become AMC’s new prestige drama. “Everyone who knows him thinks of him as their secret weapon,” July told me.

But to understand how Horowitz arrived at this position of would-be digital visionary, you need to understand a few things about McSweeney’s, and the attitudes at its core. Much of it can be traced, at least originally, to the ethos of Dave Eggers — who, in the early ‘90s, moved to San Francisco and launched satirical magazine Might and slightly less satirical lit magazine Timothy McSweeney’s Literary Tendency. In 2000, Eggers, then 30, published his unconventional memoir A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, which became a best-seller and a nominee for the Pulitzer Prize.
With Heartbreaking Work, what had been a largely San Francisco-based literary phenomenon went national, and the Eggers name — and McSweeney’s along with it — came to stand in for a particular mix of playfulness and sincerity, doubling down on the intrinsic value of the printed object as the specter of a digital, bookless future started to haunt publishing. McSweeney’s can thus be understood as an attitude (optimism), a tone (oscillating, dynamically, between sincerity and satire, but never irony), and a posture (open).

Enter Horowitz. “The mythic version of how I came to McSweeney’s is pretty much true,” he told me, settling into a couch at the cabin. “826 Valencia (a writing tutoring program launched by Eggers) was getting ready to start. They needed help building the place, and I had this mild carpentry background — I’d taught myself from a book — so I helped build the Pirate Supply Store,” the storefront attached to the tutoring center that sells McSweeney’s publications and, uh, pirating supplies.

“They needed someone to sit at the register,” Horowitz tells me. “So I did that, and I would read books, and Dave saw that. He was busy trying to finish his first novel, You Shall Know Our Velocity, and he was like, ‘Wanna read this and tell me what you think?’”
Three months later, Horowitz found himself the managing editor of McSweeney’s. “There wasn’t anyone else around to manage,” he admits. “Which was good, because I didn’t know anything. None of us had ever worked in publishing before.”

Horowitz says this, like he says everything, with a tone of slight bemusement. His work has a sense of humor that oscillates between wry and farcical. He loves digressions and declaring new sections of conversation: “Now that’s a topic.” He’s around 5’10”, and feels coiled, like you might get an electric shock when you shake his hand. Chris Ying, editor-in-chief of the food magazine Lucky Peach, which launched under McSweeney’s, describes his mind as “endlessly churning.” In his demeanor, like his cabins and his projects, there’s a sense of “the new sincerity” — a term from music and film criticism often affixed to McSweeney’s. He might joke about the shitty construction of the dumbwaiter he made to bring up his book to one of his sleeping lofts. But he deeply, unmistakably loves it.

Horowitz winds through the story of how McSweeney’s gradually became more and more of a thing. In 2003, there was the launch of The Believer, a sister publication for interviews and nonfiction, the second 826 outpost in Park Slope, Brooklyn; then, a slew of books with the McSweeney’s imprint, all solicited and edited by Horowitz. And the predictable backlash: In its inaugural issue, the literary journal n+1, largely composed of East Coast intelligentsia, railed against it, calling Eggers and his followers “a regressive avant garde.”

Through all of this, Horowitz was holding the place together. He didn’t have Eggers’ visibility or celebrity, but behind the scenes, he was refining the voice and sensibility of the organization. He was editing and fixing the printer and figuring out how to make the postage work when the new issue took the form of a mass of old-timey letters and pamphlets in a box. “He came up with some of the best and strangest concepts for the journal and for our books,” Eggers told me. “He embodies a rare dichotomy of being very organized and very calm, but also has the soul of an artist.”

McSweeney’s, I’m told by others who’ve lived through it, was like any other close-knit organization, literature-based or otherwise, in that it functioned somewhat like a cult. And when you were in, you were in deep: Everyone was breaking laws and cutting corners and fucking around and each other.

So when I ask Horowitz, who left in 2012, if he’s nostalgic for those years, he looks at his lap and makes a laugh that sounds like a sigh. He pauses, gathers himself, half-smiles.

“No. That’s not what I feel.”"



"Horowitz applied the same philosophy to his newest work, The Pickle Index, which tells the story of a delightfully unskilled circus troupe against the backdrop of a fascist dystopia, united by a forced devotion to fermented items. “There are all these different ways that you can read that are valid, so I wanted to fully imagine all of those formats. So: the book-iest book I could do, and the app-iest app. Even the paperback, and the Kindle version. They’ll have their own sort of thing, with different reaches and different audiences.” For the hardback version of The Pickle Index, you go back and forth, chapter to chapter, between two beautifully illustrated volumes, each around 100 pages. For the paperback, those chapters are integrated, this time with accompanying woodcut illustrations. And then there’s the app, which releases sections of the narrative over the course of 10 days.

Horowitz paid for the 5000-copy hardcover run himself; whatever profits it and the app makes will be his and Quinn’s. When I ask how he’ll know if the project is a failure, he pauses. “I don’t see how this project could fail,” he says. “It just is! It might turn out well, people might like it, I might think back on it more fondly or less fondly. But it can’t be a failure. Failure is when you’re trying to be the No. 1 photo sharing platform, and then you either are or you aren’t.

Which is something Horowitz is uniquely capable of saying, of course, from the cushion of one of the Airbnbs that effectively bankroll his experimentation.

It’s pitch-black along the River Road back to Eli’s other cabin. He points out a roadside establishment, TJ’s Grill at Angie’s George’s Hideaway, whose name pleases him greatly. He’s pleased so easily, really: by a good garage sale, or teaching himself how to fix something, however poorly, so long as he learns something in the process, or by the artist who creates simply for the process, the doing, of it. “I really believe in people who make things just because they want to make things. Like a guy who dies, and you look in his backyard and find 700 little sculptures of little dudes. Like that.”

That ethos, however, is alien to the structures of the mainstream publishing industry, which ask for pitches with concrete promises of a final product, a certain audience: concrete markers of success. The sort of things that are hard to think about when you really just want to fiddle your way through a process, living the platonic ideal of the artistic experience, unencumbered by monetary concerns. Which is why Russell Quinn described the unifying quality of Horowitz’s projects as “low risk.”

“A lot of Eli’s projects appear to be big and monumental,” says Quinn, who lives in a geodesic dome, a five minute drive from Horowitz. “But even his cabins come from a place where he would rather buy a cheap thing and do it his way than buy a suburban house and do it up. Same for projects: We like thinking about how we can do them just the two of us. Because Eli has to get past the point where he doesn’t hate what he’s working on, and he doesn’t want to do that publicly, or with backers, or selling the concept of a book before it’s written. It’s a low-key humbleness: not figuring things out until the end.”

That night, I sleep the sleep of the well-cabined, and the sunrise wakes me instead of an alarm. We have plans to explore the app for The Pickle Index, but once we open it, I’m … [more]
elihorowitz  suddenoak  thepickleindex  annehelenpetersen  2015  books  publishing  mcsweeneys  apps  applications  ebooks  epublishing  srg  826valencia  daveeggers  bookfuturism  russianriver  tumblr  twitter  digital 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The Pickle: A Conversation About Making Digital Books — The Message — Medium
"1: Opening Salvo

Okay, Craig, I know you’re critical of the arrested state of ebooks today. For my part, I’m more… curious. It’s clear to me that, for all their commercial success, we don’t know what books on screens are supposed to look like; not yet. But that shouldn’t be surprising; the first Kindle came out a mere eight years ago, and most people have been reading books on screens for a few years at most.

It’s only now that we’re starting to see the really interesting work emerge.

I believe you’ve read The Pickle Index, and I think we can agree that it represents something interesting and new. The novel’s digital edition is much more than words on a screen; instead, it masquerades as a recipe app, complete with menus and lists and a wonderful little map. It’s quite slick; if it was a real recipe app, it would be a pretty solid one! Its creators, Eli Horowitz and Russell Quinn, use the idiom of the app to pull you more deeply into the story, to make you, as a reader, feel somehow like an accomplice.

It’s fabulous.

But the Pickle Index app (for reasons I don’t want to give away to people who haven’t read it yet) can only tell the Pickle Index story; the way it works is bound up with the tale it tells. Eli and Russell can’t reuse this machine for, say, The Istanbul Protocol or The Dragon Wizard. Those stories wouldn’t fit.

So, with your earlier criticism in mind: What do you think? Is this matching of content to container the road forward, or is it a lovely cul-de-sac? Is the non-naive, non-repackaged future of ebooks more of these unique apps, or is it some new, reusable “master format” that we have yet to invent?

Note to readers: This is (going to be) a long, loopy conversation. The Pickle Index is crisp and compact. Consider sampling its tangy delights."

[Craig's first response: https://medium.com/message/the-pickle-a-conversation-about-making-digital-books-1e8464b469e4#.xjy0jenpm

Collection here: https://medium.com/tag/the-pickle-index/latest ]
2015  robinsloan  ebooks  books  publishing  elihorowitz  russellquinn  thepickleindex  bookfuturism  craigmod  epublishing  applications  suddenoak 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Goodbye, Native Mobile Apps
"Why Atavist is betting on the web"



"Now, after nearly five years and 51 stories in The Atavist Magazine—plus tens of thousands of publishers and individuals producing their own stories on the Atavist platform—we’re discontinuing our native mobile apps."



"Ultimately, whatever small slice of attention we were gaining by having our app on some people’s home screens was outweighed by the technical, business, and design considerations that had piled up against it."



"Meanwhile, we’ve been able to find our readers on their devices— exactly how we’d hoped to when we started out, except in mobile browsers instead of in our app."
webapps  mobile  design  web  webdev  apps  evanratliff  jeffersonrabb  theatavist  publishing  epublishing  html5  javascript  magazines  howweread  nativeweb  webdesign 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Made in Africa III: The rise of African literary digital platforms
"In the latest Made in Africa series, Bwesigye bwa Mwesigire turns to online literary platforms to understand the African literary digital landscape."
literature  africa  publishing  digital  epublishing  bwesigyebwamwesigire  via:senongo  2015 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Reedsy: Where authors meet the best publishing professionals
[not one woman on the team]

"What if the best publishing professionals were not at publishing houses anymore? Reedsy helps authors collaborate with expert editors and book designers to take their book to another level. We only work with a select group of the best freelancers, the ones who know the publishing landscape better than a writer knows the taste of hot coffee.

They know how to help. Come meet them."
publishing  ebooks  self-publishing  books  epublishing  selfpublishing 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Publishing | metaLAB (at) Harvard
"metaLAB is committed to developing and experimenting with new models of scholarly and cultural communication. Its publishing projects involve partnerships with university presses, museums, libraries, and archives, and explore the boundaries of both print plus and post-print publishing. Print plus refers to innovative intertwinings between digital and printed artifacts; post-print to purely digital/multimedia models of dissemination.

There are four main areas of publishing that we are currently exploring:

◉ alternate futures for the scholarly book (the metaLABprojects series)
◉ multichannel publishing (ludic variations on the metaLABprojects series books)
◉ iterative and instant publishing (print as process, not as product)
◉ digital publishing (natively digital publishing experiments)

***

Beautiful Data Publications

These publications serve as entry points to engagement with both the material and the modes of inquiry that shaped the Beautiful Data workshop. With the intention of “open-sourcing” the elements and processes that came out of the workshop, these publications complement the material available on this website, offering routes for exploration of this material that are meant to be applicable in diverse contexts. We hope that you will activate whatever elements seem useful to you, fostering the continuing evolution of Beautiful Data.

◉ The field guide documents the concepts and flows of information that came out of the Beautiful Data workshop, linking critical discussion with invitations to experimentation and making. Using a range of modes, including case studies, maps, activities, and prototypes (and linking to online documentation of these elements), the guide aims to serve as a resource, providing various entry points into the dialogue surrounding Beautiful Data and promoting further experimentation around this material.

◉ The prototyping game provides a set of raw materials for remixing and rethinking the ways in which we design experiences with objects. This playful framework, drawn from institutional missions and contexts, offers springboards for discussion, ideation, and project development.

◉ The provocation cards, drawn from the work of participants in Beautiful Data’s weekend workshop component, provide prompts for adventures in museums, lightly provoking users to engage with these spaces in new and generative ways.

***

metaLABprojects Series

Developed with our partner, Harvard University Press, the series provides a platform for emerging currents of experimental scholarship, documenting key moments in the history of networked culture, and promoting critical thinking about the future of institutions of learning. The volumes’ eclectic, improvisatory, idea-driven style advances the proposition that design is not merely ornamental, but a means of inquiry in its own right. Accessibly priced and provocatively designed, the series invites readers to take part in reimagining print-based scholarship for the digital age. The first three books in the series are:

Matthew Battles, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, The Library Beyond the Book

Johanna Drucker, Graphesis – Visual Forms of Knowledge Production

Todd Presner, David Shepherd, Yoh Kawano, HyperCities – Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities

The “provocations” strewn throughout The Library Beyond the Book may also be found in playing card deck form:

***

sandBOX

Inspired by mid-twentieth century experimental publications like Aspen Magazine, metaLAB is planning a “documentary in a box” project that will serve as a lab archive, time capsule, and collection of remixable provocations in material form. The publication, with sandBOX for its working title, will consist of a set of objects—maps, field guides, card decks, lego sets, and sundry unnameables that breach the analog/digital divide—delivered to its audience in a box. Under the editorial direction of metaLAB fellow Maggie Gram, sandBOX will eventuate through an iterative cascade of publishing phenomena beginning in early 2015."
metalab  2014  publishing  books  lcproject  openstudioproject  cscrd  print  srg  johannadrucker  matthewbattles  jeffreyschnapp  toddpresner  davidshepherd  yohkawano  hypercities  sandbox  beautifuldata  fieldguides  prototyping  cards  epublishing  digital 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Pollen: the book is a program
"Pollen is a publishing system that helps authors create beautiful and functional web-based books. Pollen includes tools for writing, designing, programming, testing, and publishing.

I used Pollen to create my book Butterick’s Practical Typography. Sure, go take a look. Is it better than the last digital book you encountered? Yes it is. Would you like your book to look like that? If so, keep reading.

At the core of Pollen is an argument:

• First, that digital books should be the best books we’ve ever had. So far, they’re not even close.

• Second, that because digital books are software, an author shouldn’t think of a book as merely data. The book is a program.

• Third, that the way we make digital books better than their predecessors is by exploiting this programmability.

That’s what Pollen is for.

Not that you need to be a programmer to use Pollen. On the contrary, the Pollen language is markup-based, so you can write & edit text naturally. But when you want to automate repetitive tasks, add cross-references, or pull in data from other sources, you can access a full programming language from within the text.

That language is Racket. I chose Racket because while the idea for Pollen had been with me for several years, it simply wasn’t possible to build it with other languages. So if it’s unfamiliar to you, don’t panic. It was unfamiliar to me. Once you see what you can do with Pollen & Racket, you may be persuaded. I was.

Or, if you can find a better digital-publishing tool, use that. But I’m never going back to the way I used to work."

[via: http://jslr.tumblr.com/post/95991552051/at-the-core-of-pollen-is-an-argument-first ]
ebooks  epublishing  html  typography  matthewbutterick  pollen  digital  software 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Journey West (East of Borneo)
"Coming from New York we found all this both exhilarating and baffling; Los Angeles seemed to be a city hiding in plain sight. There was plenty to see, interesting people to talk to, all easily accessible by the sporadically flowing freeway. But that veneer of easy connectivity masked a deeper, and more troubling, sense that nothing was easily available, a misleading perception of nothing going on. This was a city of outposts and easily missed landmarks connected by a sprawling, historical disposition not to connect; a deeply unsociable city – not unfriendly, just unsociable, the opposite of places like New York or Paris with their gabby rush to embrace and discard. When we left Los Angeles we had some ideas for future articles, but we didn’t have a satisfying grasp on the place.

REALLIFE Magazine was very much the project of a walk-around city. We had an editorial point of view, which was that we wanted to provide a forum for younger artists who saw themselves operating in a post-conceptual landscape, with an interest in connecting to issues of everyday life. That is to say we were still working in the shadow of a well-known history, a narrative of progress and upset that we tended to accept as more or less given. The wrinkle in that acceptance was an ever-present conviction that the somatic experiments of Surrealism held out a lot more promise than our more academic peers allowed. Our editorial process had a trajectory, but it was one easily, and willingly, sent off track by an interesting chance encounter. We sought openness within a structure framed by opinion, and sought that through the old-fashioned networking of the street. Los Angeles proved fatal to this method, and the magazine came to an end shortly after the two of us moved here in the early ’90s.

In 2002, after a ten-year break from the business side of art magazines, I joined the editorial team of Afterall, a self-described “journal of art, context and enquiry” that had begun as a counterweight to the market-driven art talk prevalent in London in the ’90s, and that maintained a purposefully old-school attitude to the idea of the art journal as something deliberately out of time. The founders, an artist and a curator, designed an editorial process that took the form of a twice-yearly seminar to discover the most interesting artists to discuss. When they invited me to join them, the idea was to expand this method; investigating international art from two separate but simultaneous perspectives, that of London and Los Angeles. For several years this proved to be a rich, intense, and very productive experiment. And then an intellectual exhaustion set in and the project drifted into an ill-defined state of ennui. Paradoxically the root of this exhaustion was our lack of rootedness; in a fundamental way the journal had no point of view, only a premise. Unmoored in the jet stream, our two bases separated, buffeted by argument without end.

In the 21st century the ramifications of this rootlessness and the practical challenges facing publishing began to require ever more radical responses. The small bookstores that had once supported small magazines were closing at an increasing rate. Museums were turning their bookstores into gift shops. Fluctuations in the currency markets made it increasingly difficult to budget production costs in an international context, and then the huge economic crash made everything impossible. But the biggest challenge of all was the Internet, which manages to make everything simultaneously local and international. When Susan and I were publishing REALLIFE Magazine we had a substantial subscriber base, a much larger figure across the United States than Afterall ever achieved, despite significant institutional backing. But of course before the Internet, people had to subscribe to little magazines if they wanted to keep up-to-date, whereas now we inhabit the complex world of websites, blogs, aggregators and Twitter feeds, and can keep informed by the instant.

What this all suggested to me was that what an art publication could be now was something both more participatory and more traditionally edited. I still believe that people may actually like some editorial guidance – the most successful blogs seem to be the most opinionated. But these blogs tend to a linear, one-thing-after-the-other format that runs counter to the open horizontality of communication offered up by the hyperlink. Discussions flare, and can become engrossing, but they tend to be one-dimensional, focused on one issue at a time. I found I was hungering for a more complex participation. As a writer I have become accustomed to working in a way that allows skipping back and forth as a text builds, checking references, finding new evidence as a result of lateral moves across the Internet. A few online publications allow readers a similarly multifaceted experience, although most quarantine reader participation in the shadow zone reserved for comments. Until now no art publication has offered this kind of experience.

As you navigate the site today you will discover that East of Borneo incorporates the benefits of online media not only for timely art-related content, but also for lively dialogues and the sharing and distribution of research and archival material. Our articles incorporate and offer the materials—video, audio, links and texts—that the author drew from. Users can upload their own relevant contributions, creating a growing archive of associated content. Topics will develop depth over time as material accrues, becoming substantial repositories of information and interpretation.

What we imagined was an intricately interwoven site that would allow us to build an archive of Los Angeles, past and present, using the power of a networked collectivity to create depth and complexity. To some Web 2.0 is old news, but established magazines are only slowly awakening to its challenges and possibilities. East of Borneo’s genesis has been long and deliberative: several years of thinking past the delights and constraints of the printed page, and one very intense year of thinking through the actual possibilities of current online publication.

I am tremendously proud and excited about all this, and hope you will share my enthusiasm. Visit us often to watch the site grow in both content and interactivity as we roll out further features. Visit us often to upload that telling image, indispensible text, incredible link. Join us on this journey."
eastofborneo  losangeles  thomaslawson  art  history  2010  artjournalism  journalism  1980  publishing  online  linear  onlinemedia  epublishing  bookstores  cities  urbanism  nyc  urban  accretion  interpretation  internet  howwework  archives  networks  networkedcollectivity  collectivity  depth  complexity  howwewrite  howwethink  linearity 
august 2014 by robertogreco
inklewriter
"At inkle, we believe it takes great writers to tell great stories.
That’s why we’ve created inklewriter, to help writers tell interactive tales with the minimum of fuss. inklewriter keeps your branching story organised, so you can concentrate on what’s important – the writing.

inklewriter is a free tool designed to allow anyone to write and publish interactive stories. It’s perfect for writers who want to try out interactivity, but also for teachers and students looking to mix computer skills and creative writing."



"Education

inkle is looking to bring interactive stories to the classroom, and give teachers free and simple get-stuck-right-in software to use with their students. From within a web-browser, the inklewriter will let students make and play interactive stories with no programming required.
Why make stories interactive anyway?

The way our stories work is simple: the reader is given the text of a story in a small chunks, and after each, they get to make a decision about what happens next. That could be what a character says, or does - but it could also be a deeper choice, like why a character has done what they've done, or how they feel about something else in the story. Every decision the reader makes is remembered and has the potential to influence things later on - depending on how the author wants to tell their tale.

Our first project, Frankenstein, uses interactivity to explore the different facets of Mary Shelley's original novel - allowing the reader to discover different aspects of the world, follow up hints and allusions in the text, and maybe even take some narrative paths that Shelley herself considered.

How can students get involved?
In the classroom, interactive writing offers an innovative, fun environment in which to write stories. It teaches creativity, language, computer skills and logical thinking - all at the same time!

So we've made inklewriter: a simple, easy-to-use app for writing simple interactive stories. It works in a web browser so there's no setup and no installation. Just click on the link and start writing. Students will be able to save their work and test it without fuss.

Oh, and it's all free.

With a few clicks and a bit of imagination, anyone can start to tell a branching story - and with a bit more thought, they can harness the power of conditional logic to make their stories more intricate and rewarding."
interactivefiction  storytelling  tools  writing  srg  edg  inkle  ebooks  epublishing  games  gaming  inklewriter  if 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Library Beyond The Book - Jeffrey Schnapp - YouTube
"Harvard Prof. Jeffrey Schnapp on redundancy between digital and analogue formats, physically assembled communities, and multiple types of libraries"
libraries  jeffreyschnapp  2014  reading  books  ebooks  digitalbooks  digitalpublishing  epublishing  digitalage  future  matthewbattles  archives  databases  knowledge  pop-ups  popuplibraries  multiplicity  plurality  thirdspaces  diversity  libraryfuturism  bookfuturism  collecting  access  local  communities 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Subcompact Publishing — by Craig Mod
"A Subcompact Manifesto

Subcompact Publishing tools are first and foremost straightforward.

They require few to no instructions.

They are easily understood on first blush.

The editorial and design decisions around them react to digital as a distribution and consumption space.

They are the result of dumping our publishing related technology on a table and asking ourselves — what are the core tools we can build with all this stuff?

They are, as it were, little N360s.

I propose Subcompact Publishing tools and editorial ethos begin (but not end) with the following qualities:

• Small issue sizes (3-7 articles / issue)
• Small file sizes
• Digital-aware subscription prices
• Fluid publishing schedule
• Scroll (don’t paginate)
• Clear navigation
• HTML(ish) based
• Touching the open web

Many of these qualities play off one another. Let’s look at them in detail.

Small issue sizes
I’ve written quite a bit about creating a sense of ‘edge’ in digital space. One of the easiest and most intuitive ways to do so is to limit the amount of data you present to the user.12

It’s much more difficult for someone to intuit the breadth of a digital magazine containing twenty articles than a digital magazine containing, for example, five. By keeping article number low this also helps decrease file size and simplify navigation.

Small file size
Speed is grossly undervalued in much of today’s software — digital magazines inclusive. Speed (and with it a fluid and joyful user experience) should be the thing you absolutely optimize for once you have a minimum viable product.

One way to bake speed into a publishing product is to keep issue file sizes as small as possible. This happens naturally when you limit the number of articles per issue.

Reasonable subscription prices
Ideally, digital subscription prices should reflect the cost of doing business as a digitally indigenous product, not the cost of protecting print subscriptions. This is yet another advantage digital-first publications have — unlike print publications transitioning to digital, there is no legacy infrastructure to subsidize during this transition.

Fluid publishing schedule
With smaller issue sizes comes more fluid publishing schedules. Again, to create a strong sense of edge and understanding, the goal isn’t to publish ten articles a day, but rather to publish just a few high-quality articles with a predictable looseness. Depending on the type of content you’re publishing, days can feel too granular, and months require the payload to be too large. Weeks feel just about right in digital.

Scroll (for now)
When I originally presented these ideas at the Books in Browsers conference in 2012, the dismissal of pagination was by far the most contentious point. I don’t mean to imply all pagination is bad. Remember — we’re outlining the very core of Subcompact Publishing. Anything extraneous or overly complex should be excised.

I’ve spent the last two and half years deconstructing scrolling and pagination on tablets and smartphones. If your content is formless, then you might be able to paginate with minimal effort. Although, probably not.

Certain kinds of pagination increase the complexity of an application by orders of magnitude. The engineering efforts required to produce beautiful, simple, indigenous, consistent — and fast — pagination are simply too high to belong in the subcompact space.

Furthermore, when you remove pagination, you vastly simplify navigation and thereby simplify users’ mental models around content.

No pagination is vastly superior to pagination done poorly.

Clear navigation
Navigation should be consistent and effortless. Subcompact Publishing applications don’t require complex how-to pages or tutorials. You shouldn’t have to hire a famous actor to show readers how to use the app with his nose. Much like a printed magazine or book, the interaction should be intuitive, effortless, and grounding. The user should never feel lost.

By limiting the number of articles per issue, and by removing pagination, many of the routes leading to complex navigation are also removed.

HTML(ish) based
When I say HTML I also mean EPUB or MOBI or any other format with an HTML pedigree. HTML has indisputably emerged as the future format for all text (and perhaps also interactive) content. By constraining Subcompact Publishing systems to HTML we bake portability and future-proofness into the platforms. We also minimize engineering efforts because most all computing devices come with high-quality HTML rendering engines built in.

Open web
Simply: whatever content is published on a tablet should have a corresponding, touchable home on the open web.

Content without a public address is non-existent in the eyes of all the inter-operable sharing mechanisms that together bind the web."
craigmod  publishing  epublishing  magazines  themagazine  writing  digital  design  2012  digitalpublishing  html  html5  matter  joshuabenton  touch  mobilephone  ios  iphone  ipad  skeuomorphs  openweb  scrolling  pagination  navigation  tablets  claytonchristensen  davidskok  jamesallsworth  marcoarment 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Full stack writing (and publishing): Welcome to Hi – Tokyo, Japan — A Hi Moment
"Hi is what we call a “full stack”1 writing and publishing platform. Just what is a writing stack? Capture. Write. Publish. is our summary of it, but really it breaks down into five parts:

Sudden inspiration!
Capture
Draft
Publish
Converse
Some platforms provide tools for parts of the stack.
Hi gives you tools for the full stack.
All the pancakes.

**All the pancakes**

What advantages come from having all of your pancakes in one place? The biggest advantage is that it’s easy to weave community into each stage of the writing process. This creates a unique intimacy with an audience. It also makes building an audience feel accessible. In fact, writing on Hi feels less like using a set of tools and more like having an increasingly deepening, extended conversation.

In service to this, much of the work we’ve done these past eight months has been explicitly focused on community building. For example, we have a Welcome Committee at Hi. (Of course, please join if you feel so inclined.) And all conversations for each Hi member are consolidated under a single stream called, unsurprisingly, Conversations.

As you post sketches (our term for short snippets that then turn into longer stories), our community gently prods you to Tell them more. And as you publish finished stories, our community responds with a chorus of Thanks. It may not sound like much, but those two, simple actions create a powerful feedback loop predicated on guidance and optimism.

**Sense and sense making**

Another advantage of having all your pancakes one place is that as a moment moves from sketch to published story, the address (its URL) stays the same. Sketches and stories intermingle. We like to describe sketches as sensing and the full stories as sense making. On Hi, the sense and sense making happen in parallel.

**Real-time**

Which points to another key attribute of Hi: Real-time. Because Hi and our community encourages lots of sketching, we’ve made sure Hi works where inspiration hits — on mobile platforms.2 Location is an integral part of any Hi moment.

What happens when you give a community real-time and mobile friendly tools? They “narratively map the world.”

Thomas Clark in his epic travel poem, In Praise of Walking, describes variously the traversed routes of the world:
Always, everywhere, people have walked, veining the earth with paths, visible and invisible, symmetrical and meandering.


Give folks the proper tools and those veined paths — both as etched into the earth and into our minds — suddenly become more concrete, real, with each sketch or story on Hi existing as a marker in time and place.

**Loops**

Finally, Hi acts — prosaically yet powerfully — as a mailing list. Readers who have asked a writer to “Tell me more” are notified by email when the writer has, indeed, written more. And a writer’s subscribers will similarly get an email when they publish a new story.

In other words: the full stack writing experience on Hi is, at its core, an interlocking set of feedback loops built atop our great community.

For example, when poet Lia Pas sketches about a new iPad, we want her to Tell us more, and so she does: [image]

Or when Luis sketched rather cryptically about a graveyard in Tokyo … he told us more and it was a doozie: [image]

**Writing and rewriting**

Does this full stack of publishing pancakes work for all types of writing? Of course not. Certain writing doesn’t benefit from an everything-public, community-everywhere stack like that of Hi. In fact, certain writing can only be accomplished off the stack. Which is to say there is a meditative quality that presents itself when you move away from an environment like ours.3

But! Many types of writing benefit from, and thrive, within Hi’s full stack.

Travel writing — writing with location at its core — obviously feels at home on this full stack. Real-time, iterative journalism (the covering of protests, emerging and evolving stories, etc) benefits from full stack tools wrapped in community.4 Journaling or chronicling feels particularly comfy on this full stack.

Uniquely, writing almost has to happen in stages. An instagram photo may be finished as soon as its taken, and a sketch on Hi might be worked out the instant it’s posted, but, a longer story? That (usually) needs much more time. E. B. White is famously quoted, “Writing is rewriting.” If you’re looking for thoughtfulness, a piece of writing needs multiple passes. 5

Which is why we’ve deliberately embedded enclaves of calm into our stack. The capture process happens with whatever device you have in hand, as soon as inspiration hits. But the followup or drafting or sense making — the more meditative processes of rewriting — can happen either on that same device, a tablet, or on the desktop. And it can happen minutes, days, or months later.

Which is to say that life happens in real-time but thoughtfulness happens in slow-motion, requiring appropriate time and distance from an event, an insight, a moment. The tools of any full stack writing platform should understand, respond to, and respect that.

**Community**

Hi is a community. A community both narratively mapping the world, and making sense of their everyday lives, their loves, fears, joys, insights — all as connected to place and bound together by topic.

We’ve had a blast these past eight months working on Hi, straightening out the kinks, tightening the feedback loops, making the community feel stronger and more easily connected to one another. Hi is still not perfect, and it’s not for every kind of writer, but if sounds interesting to you, we’d love for you to join us at the table. There’s pancakes aplenty. "
craigmod  hitotoki  writing  howwewrite  publishing  ebooks  blogging  epublishing  web  internet  hi  hi.co  2014  process  walking  place  thomasclark  maps  mapping  time  timing  rewriting  editing  feedback  community  instagram  photography  inspiration  communication  ebwhite  blogs  sharing  digitalpublishing 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Q&A: Craig Mod on making writing more mobile-friendly and where digital publishing is headed » Nieman Journalism Lab
[See also: https://medium.com/p/4c78e6883ec0
http://pando.com/2013/07/17/craig-mods-new-publishing-platform-hi-maps-writers-to-place/
https://hi.co/moments/q4oi5i68 ]

"Mod: One of the great benefits of the web is everything can have a unique address that is accessible as a net connection, effectively. There’s something incredible powerful about that. So, to build an iOS app-only, Android app-only ecosystem feels like, to me, you’re leaving on the floor 80 percent of the magic of what the Internet brings to publishing.

So one of the core precepts of this project was certainly to be very open on the web — accessible anywhere, from any device. When you start from that place, it just makes sense to first and foremost optimize for the web experience and then kind of work your way back.

One of the reasons I think Safari on the iPhone, the Chrome browser, any of these things, aren’t as good as they could be for running applications is because five years ago, or whenever the App Store opened, we sort of abandoned the web in a way."



"Mod: When we started, it was far more focused on the mapping piece. I remember one of the stakes in the ground that we had a year ago was “every page must have a map.” You quickly realize that maps are not that interesting. It’s this fallacy, that maps are inherently interesting objects.

I love maps. I love old maps, I love printed maps, I love navigating cities with strange maps. I love all of that. But I think we tend to conflate maps as context vs. content. And a lot of products that use maps and feature maps treat it as content, and most of the time a map is not a very interesting thing. We just need it quickly, for a little bit of context, and then have it go away."



"You can look at a tool like Hi and go, “Well, why am I putting my writing into this other space that I don’t own?” Whereas with WordPress you can download it, can host your own WordPress site, and yada, yada, yada. But one of the advantages of placing it into this pre-existing space is you get the community. So that’s been fun."



"Mod: I think it depends on the kind of writing that you’re doing and what your goals as a writer are. As isolated as writers tend to be, there are so many workshopping groups. And I think there is a natural tendency as a writer to need to get out of your isolation chamber and get some feedback and have human contact and discuss things out in the open. So I think there’s a tremendous benefit to that.But obviously not all kinds of writing should be done in this way, it goes without saying.

But I think there are certain kinds that — why not do the experiment of trying them? And travel writing, I think, fits really naturally within this space. One of the things going on with Hi that we haven’t really talked a lot about is the topics. Anybody can add a moment, they can invent a topic, they can add to existing topics — they can do whatever they want. Topics are meant to be a response to undiscoverability and impossibility to navigate — the nature of hashtags."
web  craigmod  interviews  2014  hi  hitotoki  maps  mapping  context  content  applications  open  accessibility  publishing  community  openweb  internet  howwewrite  discoverability  search  editing  feednack  workinginpublic  writing  simplenote  instagram  iphone  mobile  mobilephones  cellphones  html5  webapps  hi.co  epublishing  blogging  blogs  digitalpublishing  ios 
april 2014 by robertogreco
DIGITAL PUBLISHING TOOLKIT for the Arts and Culture | RAAK-MKB project by Institute of Network Cultures, Hogeschool van Amsterdam
"Digital Publications are slowly ascending since a couple of years. Due to the rise of tablets and smartphones this development has accelerated and by now these publications – e-books, newspaper apps and digital magazines – are forever part of our media landscape. More and more people use mobile devices to read books and magazines and the coming years this way of information processing will dominate the market. Publishers can’t stay behind in relation to digital publishing. However, many publishers in the art- and cultural sector are unfamiliar with these developments. They do not have the knowledge, resources and capacities to develop new methods of digital publishing and participate in the digital market. Moreover, the art- and culture books have an extra challenge, because the form and content are deeply intertwined.

This RAAK-MKB project will provide the research and realization of such a platform. The following research questions is formulated: “In what way can a platform be created with new tools for open source-publishing, by which publishers in the art- and cultural sector can produce interactive e-publications by themselves?”

To answer this research question, the Institute of Network Cultures (lectortaat Netwerkcultuur) of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and Knowledge center Creating 010 of the Hogeschool van Rotterdam are executing state-of-the-art research. In collaboration with an already existing consortium of eleven MKB-companies consisting of publishers, designers and developers, a fivesome subprojects will be formulated. Within these subgroups publishers, designers and developers, (research)lecturers and students of the participating applied universities will collaborate.

The result is a new developed toolkit that exists of tools for digital publishing, based on open source-software of which the source code will be published and freely accessible. As a result everyone can freely copy, adjust and distribute the tools. Five e-publications of titles of the art- and culture books fund of the participating publishers will be produced and presented on a platform that is developed for that purpose. Moreover the following manual will be created: “How to publish an e-book?” on digital publishing processes."
publishing  epub  books  digital  digitalpublishing  amsterdam  epublishing  toolkit  opensource  raak  mkb  raa-mkb  epubs 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Print-on-demand | Experimental Book
"I know a few of you are thinking about print-on-demand (POD) for the photobook project. POD is fast and cheap and has totally changed the nature of self-publishing. It’s quite good for some things, and not so great for others.

A few reasons to use POD:

— easy, quick mock-up of an idea, even if you plan to produce it in another way;
— cost: some formats allow you to print a book for under $10;
— with very low up-front costs, you can produce a few machine-made, perfect-bound books with a more commercial feel;
— your books can be purchased through a digital storefront;
— if you plan on producing 1–100 books——more than that and it makes sense to look at other formats;
— if you plan to make changes to your book and you’re unsure how many to print;
— to have access to formats that are not typically available outside of a commercial context (newsprint, magazine).

A few reasons not to use POD:

— you give up control of some aspects of the production of your work;
— frequent printing/binding errors (printer will usually offer a credit);
— you’re limited by the specs of the POD printer (size, finish, paper);
— not cost-efficient for producing more than a few books (especially if over 100);
— cost (you’re bound by the printer’s set pricing).

Popular POD printers:

— Blurb.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— special finishes specifically for photobooks (much more $)
— magazine format (including printing on inside front and back covers)—I can show you a sample of this if you’re interested
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Lulu.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Newspaperclub.com
— various newsprint formats
— free shipping to most places
— scheduled printing 2x per week
— upload PDF via website

Espresso Book Machine (various locations)
— lower quality
— b/w interiors / color covers
— very fast (sometimes on-the-spot)
— physical, walk-in locations only

Magcloud.com
— magazine format from HP

I’ve had mostly good experiences with Blurb, Lulu, Espresso and Newspaperclub, but I’ve never used Magcloud."

[via this thread: https://twitter.com/rogre/status/405790451791175680

@soulellis What do you use for digital printing on demand? Lulu? Blurb? Other?

@rogre all of the above plus @newspaperclub. but for 530 [http://soulellis.com/projects/530-2/ ] I found a digital printer in Reykjavík, who was able to print 50 books only.

@soulellis @newspaperclub Thank you.

@soulellis Any preference or noticeable differences between Lulu and Blurb?

@rogre Blurb good for magazine format and photobooks, Lulu good for thick text-based pubs. Also --> http://experimentalbook.wordpress.com/2013/10/17/print-on-demand/

@soulellis Perfect. Thanks so much. ]
books  publishing  paulsoulellis  printondemand  lulu  magcloud  espressobookmachine  newspaperclub  blurb  printondemnad  printing  selfpublishing  ondemand  self-publishing  epublishing  digitalpublishing 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The People's E-Book
"The web’s simplest, fastest e-book creation tool is now in beta!
We’re bringing in more users every week. If you weren’t a Kickstarter backer,
sign-up below to get on the list."

"What is the People’s E-Book?
The People’s E-Book is a web application you can use to quickly and easily make e-books that work on a ton of platforms. You create, edit, rearrange, refine and experiment with your book on the People’s E‑Book, and the tool takes care of the coding and kicks out an e-book file whenever you need it.

Is it really that fast and easy?
We think so. All you need is a title, a cover image, and a single bit of content to start and you can create an e-book in minutes, not hours.

[video: https://vimeo.com/77174346 ]

What does it cost?
Everyone will always be able to make e-books using The People's E-book for free. While in beta, there will be no restraints, but as we move forward towards the full roll out of the tool, we will be developing a low cost Pro-level tier in order to handle heavy users and storage. This will help ensure that The People's E-book will have a sustainable future.

Does it work on both Mac and PC?
Yes! The People’s E-Book is a web application that runs in any modern browser. There is no software to download or install. You just visit thepeoplesebook.net from any laptop or desktop computer with Internet access. (Sorry, it doesn't work on iPads or other mobile devices.) Your work is continually saved, and your books and asset files are stored in the cloud for accessing any time from anywhere.

What kind of e-books does it make?
Web
The People’s E-Book outputs books in the EPUB format. This is the same format used by Apple, Google, Sony, Kobo, Barnes & Noble and dozens of other e-book vendors in their online stores and e-reading systems. EPUB is the most flexible and universal e-book format available, and with the advent of EPUB 3, it now also supports audio and video.

EPUB is also non-proprietary, requires no license to create or to read, and is based on standard web-compliant HTML and CSS. This means your People’s E-Book e-book will be readable on the most possible devices, for the longest possible time, and in a format designed to outlast even the People’s E-Book itself.

What about Amazon?
Will my People’s E-Book work on the Kindle?
Not yet. Amazon uses an e-book format that's slightly different than everyone else. You may have heard it referred to variously as MOBI, KF8 or AZW. While we hope to offer these and other formats eventually, right now we're focused on helping you make the best possible e-books in what we believe is the best possible format, EPUB. In the meantime, we'll be providing detailed instructions on how you can easily convert your People's E-Book files to a variety of other reading formats on your own.

I want to sell my e-book through Apple and other stores, with the People’s E-Book do that for me?
No. We are not currently offering distribution services for any e-book vendor, though we will provide ideas, resources and recommendations for ways you can do it yourself, or for services you might use. We're also working on a People's E-Book marketplace that will let you share and sell your e-books directly to your fans, quickly and easily.

Do I own the copyright on books I make?
Yes! Your books are your books. We will never sell, distribute or otherwise share your books without your express permission."
thepeople'se-book  webapps  publishing  onlinetoolkit  epubs  epub  epublishing  digitalpublishing  ebooks 
october 2013 by robertogreco
A list of writing tools is a displacement activity - rodcorp
"Writing, focussing, assembling, editing, collaborating, feeding back, researching, structuring, outputting and publishing.

Focus through constraint:

• iaWriter - "Keep your hands on the keyboard and your mind in the text". Has good reviews.
• Byword - "Simple and efficient text editing". Also has good reviews.
• Writeroom - appears a generation older than iaWriter and Byword.
• Textmate - does text , html and a zillion other developer's things.

Research speed and convenience:

• nvALT - Speeds up that did-I-already-write-about-this? moment, auto-saves, does text files, Markdown. Nice. I'm writing this post in it.
• Pinboard - elegantly executed webpage bookmarking.

Collaborating and community feedback:

• Draft - its drafts are neat version control, has premium "ask a pro".
• Poetica - "Get feedback about your writing from people you trust, wherever they are" - not released yet.
• Google Docs - good at collaboration and export, auto-saves. Has automated versioning but without actual version *control*.

Assembling, structuring, editing and eBook workflow:

• Ulysses 3 - "All your texts. In one place. Always." Not tried, but this review says "the app reimagines the text editor in a way that visually resembles Mail and conceptually sits somewhere between iA Writer and the project-based Scrivener". Which sounds like quite a thing.
• Scrivener - looks a bit of a mess to be honest. They also have Scapple, a mind map/words-on-sticks app.
• LeanPub - "Publish Early, Publish Often - Authors and publishers use Leanpub to publish amazing in-progress and completed books". Costs $0.50 plus 10%.
• Lacuna books - "the best way to write and publish a book". Big on structuring, rendering chapters and ebooks easily.

Formats and outputs:

• Marked, Mou - because between text and html, Markdown is the popular "intermediary" format, and these (and nvALT) are good at simultaneous preview.
• And a simple Google Apps script to convert a Google Drive Document to markdown

Online publishing and attention:

• Medium - "A better place to read and write things that matter" - becoming a centre of gravity for serious writing, per-para commenting interesting
• Wattpad - an ebook platform/store/agora that isn't Kindleland.

Back to it now."
writing  tools  onlinetoolkit  rodmclaren  2013  jawriter  byword  writeroom  textmate  nvalt  pinboard  draft  poetica  googledocs  ulysses3  scrivener  leanpub  lacunabooks  marked  mou  markdown  googleapps  googledrive  medium  wattpad  howwework  howwewrite  webapps  publishing  formatting  ebooks  epub  collaboration  editing  focusing  focus  feedback  researching  epublishing  collaborativewriting  digitalpublishing  epubs 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Pandoc - About pandoc
"If you need to convert files from one markup format into another, pandoc is your swiss-army knife. Pandoc can convert documents in markdown, reStructuredText, textile, HTML, DocBook, LaTeX, or MediaWiki markup to

• HTML formats: XHTML, HTML5, and HTML slide shows using Slidy, Slideous, S5, or DZSlides.
• Word processor formats: Microsoft Word docx, OpenOffice/LibreOffice ODT, OpenDocument XML
• Ebooks: EPUB version 2 or 3, FictionBook2
• Documentation formats: DocBook, GNU TexInfo, Groff man pages
• TeX formats: LaTeX, ConTeXt, LaTeX Beamer slides
• PDF via LaTeX
• Lightweight markup formats: Markdown, reStructuredText, AsciiDoc, MediaWiki markup, Emacs Org-Mode, Textile

Pandoc understands a number of useful markdown syntax extensions, including document metadata (title, author, date); footnotes; tables; definition lists; superscript and subscript; strikeout; enhanced ordered lists (start number and numbering style are significant); running example lists; delimited code blocks with syntax highlighting; smart quotes, dashes, and ellipses; markdown inside HTML blocks; and inline LaTeX. If strict markdown compatibility is desired, all of these extensions can be turned off."
pandoc  conversion  html  epub  latex  pdf  html5  onlinetoolkit  ebooks  documents  markdown  text  tools  epublishing  digitalpublishing  epubs 
august 2013 by robertogreco
How to Make a Book with PressBooks | PressBooks
"How to Make a Book with PressBooks

PressBooks is a simple book publishing tool. Put your book content into PressBooks, edit as you like, and export into ebook and PDF/print-on-demand formats. Here’s how it works:

Short 4-Step Guide to Making a Book with PressBooks

1. Add Book Information (title, author name etc).
2. Add/Organize Text (your chapters etc)
3. Choose Book Design Theme (what your book will look like)
4. Export your book (in MOBI {for Kindle}, EPUB {for Nook/iBooks etc), PDF {for print-on-demand}"
ebooks  publishing  tools  howto  pressbooks  epub  epubs  mobi  pdf  kindle  nook  epublishing  digitalpublishing 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Savory | The new platform for digital publishing
"NOW writers, editors, and publishers have a new tool to design and publish narrative content on the web.

Savory™ provides app-like designs for publications, and an on-line content management system to build them.

Powered by Treesaver®, the adaptive HTML technology, Savory lays out content onto pages that fit any size screen. Desktops, laptops, tablets and phone. Any device that has a browser.

Savory is an upgrade from blog hosting services. It's made for multiple stories or chapters. And publishers can produce editions whenever they want—and add updates any time.

Sign up for for the Charter Rate, only $49 (€49) a month."
browser  browsers  savory  newspapers  magazines  books  html  adaptivehtml  web  copenhagen  epublishing  epub3  epub  design  publishing  html5  digitalpublishing  epubs 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Platforming Books — by Craig Mod
"Transitions from physical to digital don't need to be one-to-one forced representations. A defining quality of good design is one in which the essence of a thing can be transmitted between mediums while staying true to the new medium. Or, in Mr. Chimero's words, "What is the marker of good design? It moves." 13

Is everything perfect? No. But it's pretty good. Certainly acceptable. These platforms are still young and evolving. As they mature, we'll be watching and making more beautiful, better formatted digital editions."

"The massive shifts in publishing in the past two years have been those of adoption and distribution. Crowd funding can help provide publishing capital. If you create just one file — one file — an EPUB, you can publish to nearly every single mobile device in the world."

"If you’re a publisher wondering what to do, the lowest investment, highest return action in this liminal stage of digital publishing is to embrace open EPUB standards."
epub3  artspacetokyo  design  2010  2012  ipad  iphone  ipod  kindle  digital  books  publishing  epub  ebooks  craigmod  html  html5  epublishing  digitalpublishing  epubs 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Booktype
"With Booktype you can create books. Real paper books that look good…You can also use Booktype to produce books in the form of epub (electronic books), PDF, OpenOffice files, web pages and more...

Booktype is a web based software which means you do not install it on your computer, rather you access it through a browser. Your organisation can install its own copy of Booktype on a server. Access is then made through a url provided by your organisation.

Once installed Booktype supports any individual or group that wishes to write a book. All you need is a browser. Some typical uses:
Writing books - e.g. a fiction, manuals, cookbooks etc.
Producing printed books
Producing ebooks
Writing any content as an individual
Collaboratively authoring content
Rapidly developing content in Book Sprints
Customising existing content to apply to a very specific context
Translating a book into another language"

[See also: http://www.booki.cc/ ]

[via: http://www.booki.cc/the-importance-of-the-way-stories-are-being-told/introduction/ ]
opensource  free  collaborativewriting  online  open  openoffice  pdf  epublishing  epub  booktype  tools  writing  collaboration  books  ebooks  digitalpublishing  epubs 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Baker Ebook Framework 2.0
"Baker is an HTML5 ebook framework to publish on the iPad using open web standards"
books  mobile  iphone  webstandards  web  html5  ios  ipad  publishing  baker  epublishing  ebooks  digitalpublishing 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Zhook is a simple ebook format. - Ochook.org
"Perhaps you want to craft beautiful ebooks. The open industry-standard format, EPUB, is pretty good and very comprehensive, but it’s not really intended for making books by hand.

*Zhook keeps it simple. Just create a webpage (yes, probably a very long webpage) and zip it up.

*Zhook is really easy to test. You can do most of your testing in Firefox and Safari or Chrome. If you zip and upload it here, you can do further testing and tweaking quite quickly with Ochook.org tools.

*Zhook has higher-fidelity semantics. This is because Zhook uses HTML5, which has more useful semantic elements (like grouping headings together with hgroup, or captioning an image with figure). We have good uses for all that semantic richness, as you’ll see.

And perhaps most importantly: * Zhook makes a best-of-breed EPUB."
publishing  epub  ebooks  writing  books  development  via:robinsloan  zhook  html5  zip  epublishing  digitalpublishing  epubs 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Welcome | Ibis Reader ™
""Clean, Simple Reading: Ibis Reader gets out of your way with its intuitive, unobtrusive reading interface. Extensive support for ebook design helps your books look their best.
iphone  ebook  reader  ebooks  epub  web  books  android  applications  epublishing  digitalpublishing  ios  epubs 
february 2010 by robertogreco
A new class of content for a new class of device « Snarkmarket
"the web kinda hates bounded, holis­tic work...likes bits & pieces, cross-references & rec­om­men­da­tions, frag­ments & tabs...loves the fact that you’re read­ing this post in Google Reader...iPad looks to me like a focus machine...such an oppor­tu­nity for sto­ry­telling, & for inno­va­tion around sto­ry­telling...oppor­tu­nity to make the Myst of 2010...con­nect the dots. For all its power & flex­i­bil­ity, the web is really bad at pre­sent­ing bounded, holis­tic work in a focused, immer­sive way. This is why web shows never worked. The web is bad at con­tain­ers...bad at frames... the young Hayao Miyaza­kis & Mark Z. Danielewskis & Edward Goreys of this world ought to be learn­ing Objective-C—or at least mak­ing some new friends. Because this new device gives us the power and flex­i­bil­ity to real­ize a whole new class of crazy vision—and it puts that vision in a frame. ... In five years, the coolest stuff on the iPad should be… jeez, you know, I think it should be art."
design  culture  storytelling  snarkmarket  blogging  journalism  robinsloan  immersion  epub  content  ipad  marketing  attention  future  books  change  multimedia  apple  media  innovation  2010  focus  singletasking  multitasking  epublishing  digitalpublishing  epubs  monotasking 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Ibis Reader and BookServer : Threepress Consulting blog
"Our part of this open ecosystem is Ibis Reader, an in-development digital reading system for a range of internet devices that provides access to books both online and offline. Like Bookworm, it provides ePub support and a traditional web interface. But I’m really excited about its unique features:"
iphone  applications  webapps  epub  ebooks  ibisreader  bookserver  epublishing  digitalpublishing  ios  epubs 
november 2009 by robertogreco

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