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An Essay by Miho Nonaka | Kenyon Review Online
[So good. There's really no good way to quote this one, so here are just a few sections.]

"Heavenly Worm

Mrs. Itō, our fourth-grade teacher, drew a new kanji character on the board: 蚕. “Worm from heaven,” she announced, “as you can see.” Heaven splits open like a curtain (天) and inside it dwells the worm (虫). For each student, she took out five worms from her basket and put them in a small paper box to take home. Having just hatched from their eggs, these worms were still covered in little black hairs. That’s why at this stage they are called kego (hairy baby), Mrs. Itō told us. To feed these dark babies, julienne your mulberry leaves first."



"Platinum Boy, 2006

After decades of research, Japanese silkworm breeders discovered a reliable method of hatching exclusively male silkworms. Female silkworms eat more, sleep more, take up more space, and are measurably less efficient in transforming mulberry leaves into silk. The verdict was clear: female silkworms are inferior for silk production.

Silk spinners and kimono weavers are unanimous in their praise of male silk: their thread is consistently finer, sturdier, glossier, whiter, and their cocoons are easier to harvest when boiled.

The birth site of Platinum Boy is literally black and white. When you look at a piece of paper where silkworm eggs are laid, white eggs are the empty shells from which male larvae have already hatched. They will thrive on the diet of tender mulberry shoot which, combined with their spit, will eventually turn into raw silk, translucent like frosted glass. The dark eggs contain female larvae that will never hatch and only keep darkening."



"Ten Thousand Leaves I

Compiled in the mideighth century, Man’yōshū (Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves) is the oldest Japanese anthology: more than forty-five hundred poems in twenty books. In the sweltering heat of the attic, I wasn’t looking for any particular motif when I happened on poem No. 2495, composed by Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, a low rank courtier and one of the “Saints of Japanese Poetry”:
like my mother’s
silkworms confined
inside cocoons,
how can I see my love
who lives secluded at home?

Poem No. 2991 is almost the same poem by another poet, simply tagged “unknown”:
like my mother’s
silkworms confined
inside cocoons,
sadness clouds my heart
when I cannot see her

The motif of a silk cocoon as the inaccessible, lyrical interior goes back to the dawn of Japanese poetics. The cocoon encases the image of the beloved, the poet’s longing that keeps building inside, and in my poem it holds the mother as a mythical seamstress, stitching blue in each wrist of her unborn daughter."



"職人 I

I used to blame my grandmother on my father’s side, who was described to me as fierce, frantic, funny, a destructive visionary and unsuccessful business entrepreneur during the critical times of the Second World War. When I felt defeated by the radical pull of my own emotion, I would attach them to the face of the woman I had never met in person, only in a fading picture where she stands next to my young father without glasses, still a student with surprisingly gentle eyes.

My father recently told me during one of our late-night international calls from Tokyo: “Your grandfathers were both shokunin (craftsman), remember? It’s in your DNA, too.” His father had come from a large family of silk farmers. After he left home, adopting the newly introduced Singer sewing machines, he began manufacturing Japanese cloven-toed socks, the traditional kind that used to be hand-sewn, and during the war, he took the assignment to sew parachutes for the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force. While he worked under dimmed light, my young father put up his primitive drawing of warplanes on the wall, covered in fine grains of sand."



"Small Things

They say (I love the convenience, but who are “they”?) that attention to detail is a characteristic of the Japanese. I am drawn to small things: tadpoles, silica beads, star sands in a vial, a notebook the size of a thumbnail, fish scales, a nativity scene inside half a walnut shell. I am terribly myopic like my father, and I like things that are near. Large things loom over and terrify: airports, Costco, churches in Texas, the Tokyo Skytree, Mount Rushmore (those granite faces I once believed had surfaced in response to the historic atomic bombing), and that elusive word “global.”"



"Komako

It didn’t occur to me until I tried translating a few passages from Snow Country that the young geisha’s name Komako (駒子) means Pony Child. What inspired the author Kawabata to portray his heroine as a woman of equine grace? We don’t know her family name. On the other hand, we don’t know the first name of Shimamura, who is referred to only by his last name.

I imagine if your family name is a gate to the house, your first name must be its interior. In the days when the first book of Man’yōshū was composed, asking a maiden’s first name was synonymous with proposing to her. Knowing it meant possessing the person.

Komako’s body is translucent like a silkworm, and an unearthly room encloses her fruitless passion like a white cocoon. While writing Snow Country, Kawabata says he distanced himself from Shimamura, who serves merely as a foil to Komako. “As an author, I entered deep inside the character of Komako, but casually turned my back to Shimamura,” he writes in the afterward. “Especially in terms of emotion—Komako’s sadness is nothing other than my own sadness. . . .” And so it is; his heart has become subsumed into her heart."



"Body

I find it impossible to talk about the body (mine and everyone else’s) without sounding embarrassed or oddly distant. I don’t mean to self-deprecate, but it has been almost too fashionable, too charged a topic for me to feel safe around. (A cowardly thing to say—the truth is, no one is safe.)

I won’t pretend my body is a plain blockhouse, or a slab of flesh aching with desire or lack thereof. Who could have taught me to stay at home in my own body all the while I traveled from one country to another, turning from the spontaneous, if careless, music of my mother tongue to the cautious economy of English, reaching out, in the hope of actually reaching and being reached?

For the subjects most critical to me, I find no teachers. Perhaps there is not enough demand? I believe I am badly behind everyone and that I missed an opportunity to ask questions long ago. People my age in this country sound fluent in the body, discussing it with just the right amount of sarcasm and laughter without revealing much, like they have been on intimate terms with it since they learned to speak. I suppose I should have listened to the body harder, without ulterior motives."
mihononaka  silk  essays  canon  howwewrite  2017  silkworms  multispecies  japan  japanese  language  gender  via:ayjay  poetry  writing  fabric  textiles  srg  glvo  insects  history  cocoons  craft  translation  languages  childhood  change  materials  process  form  details  weaving  texture  morethanhuman  shinto  bodies  body  small  slow 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
Oribotics Fabric Folding Process - YouTube
"This video shows the folding process, pleating technique, for creating an oribotic membrane. Two sheets of folded paper form the mould for a sheet of woven polyester fabric. The sandwich is then heated in an oven to set the creases permanently.

This is an extract from a complete presentation on the creation of oribotics 2010 found at https://vimeo.com/27150010 "
fabric  folding  miura  miurafold  miura-ori  fashion  classideas  miuraori 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Kaarina Kaikkonen
[via: https://twitter.com/womensart1/status/757455083969908736 ]

"Kaarina Kaikkonen studied at the Academy of Fine Arts between 1978 and 1983. She has become one of the leading artists of Finnish art thanks to her work in sculpture and installations.
Alongside the monumental features of her works – always strongly imbued with the environmental and architectural elements surrounding them – there is also a core linked to the impermanence and frailty of materials somewhat pointing back to the frailty of human beings.

The movement of “coming and going” from something is a recurrent formal element in the artist’s work – as we can also see in the works' titles – thus contributing to create a time bridge between past memories and their tension towards the future.

—Director, Collezione Maramotti, Reggio Emilia, Italy."



[from: http://kaarinakaikkonen.com/videos/

"[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_uM-cc_P4E ]

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[video: https://vimeo.com/15599877 ]

Finnish artist Kaarina Kaikkonen creates site-specific installations in both interior and exterior spaces using items of used clothing or shoes collected from local donors. The garments carry personal memories of the owner, and with them, she makes large-scale architectural forms or sculptures. While the materials she uses represent a common experience of domestic life, they also often allude to the artists' own parents - her deceased father's jackets as well as her mother's shoes.

In a new project, she collects second hand clothing from individuals of all ages around the Liverpool area, and installs them in FACT's public Atrium. The work reflects on the maternal act of doing the laundry, which can be understood as a basic symbol of healing, care, and unconditional love.

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[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHF2monXyPQ ]

Kaarina Kaikkonen uses a thousand dress shirts donated by people from the DC area to construct a large-scale, site-specific hanging installation that takes the shape of a boat. On display February 19-March 17, during the "Nordic Cool 2013 Festival" at The Kennedy Center.

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[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xDM9B_AoEI ]

The Blue Route is a new installation by leading Finnish artist Kaarina Kaikkonen commissioned with Brighton Festival for spring 2013. This short film forms part of the gallery interpretation and details Kaarina's work and her approach to this exhibition. Fabrica co-director also gives some context to the commissioning of this piece. The film was made by Ben Harding and Tom Thistlewaite and produced by Laurence Hill.

------

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ce7GVK2qEo ]

Kaarina Kaikkonen discusses her work and her process in this artist talk which took place at Fabrica, 24 April 2013. Fabrica worked with Kaikkonen in collaboration with Brighton Festival to bring two major new site-specific works to Brighton and Hove, one piece for the gallery (The Blue Route) and the other at an outdoor location in the city (Time Passing By). This co-commission by Fabrica and Brighton Festival is part of Out of the Blue, a collaborative project involving six organisations in Brighton & Hove and Amiens (France), funded by the Interreg IVa Channel programme of cross-border collaboration."
kaarinakaikkonen  art  artists  fabric  clothing  finland 
july 2016 by robertogreco
PRINT ALL OVER ME
"Print All Over Me is a creative community of people turning virtual ideas into real world objects. Join us to create, share, sell, produce and buy great design!"

[via: https://twitter.com/TheFutureLab/status/667009564068487168
and https://www.lsnglobal.com/seed/article/18543/clothes-by-algorithm ]
clothing  fashion  printing  clothes  fabric  printalloverme 
november 2015 by robertogreco
ABEER SEIKALY: Structural Fabric Weaves Tent Shelters into Communities
"Human life throughout history has developed in alternating waves of migration and settlement. The movement of people across the earth led to the discovery of new territories as well as the creation of new communities among strangers forming towns, cities, and nations. Navigating this duality between exploration and settlement, movement and stillness is a fundamental essence of what it means to be human.

In the aftermath of global wars and natural disasters, the world has witnessed the displacement of millions of people across continents. Refugees seeking shelter from disasters carry from their homes what they can and resettle in unknown lands, often starting with nothing but a tent to call home. “Weaving a home” reexamines the traditional architectural concept of tent shelters by creating a technical, structural fabric that expands to enclose and contracts for mobility while providing the comforts of contemporary life (heat, running water, electricity, storage, etc.)

Design is supposed to give form to a gap in people’s needs. This lightweight, mobile, structural fabric could potentially close the gap between need and desire as people metaphorically weave their lives back together, physically weaving their built environment into a place both new and familiar, transient and rooted, private and connected. In this space, the refugees find a place to pause from their turbulent worlds, a place to weave the tapestry of their new lives. They weave their shelter into home."
glvo  housing  textiles  fabric  via:steelemaley  abeerseikaly  folding  weaving  origami  tents  portability  mobility  shelters 
september 2015 by robertogreco
How textiles revolutionised technology – Virginia Postrel – Aeon
"Older than bronze and as new as nanowires, textiles are technology — and they have remade our world time and again"

"In February 1939, Vogue ran a major feature on the fashions of the future. Inspired by the soon-to-open New York World’s Fair, the magazine asked nine industrial designers to imagine what the people of ‘a far Tomorrow’ might wear and why. (The editors deemed fashion designers too of-the-moment for such speculations.) A mock‑up of each outfit was manufactured and photographed for a lavish nine-page colour spread.

You might have seen some of the results online: an evening dress with a see-through net top and strategically placed swirls of gold braid, for instance, or a baggy men’s jumpsuit with a utility belt and halo antenna. Bloggers periodically rediscover a British newsreel of models demonstrating the outfits while a campy narrator (‘Oh, swish!’) makes laboured jokes. The silly get‑ups are always good for self-satisfied smirks. What dopes those old-time prognosticators were!

The ridicule is unfair. Anticipating climate-controlled interiors, greater nudity, more athleticism, more travel and simpler wardrobes, the designers actually got a lot of trends right. Besides, the mock‑ups don’t reveal what really made the predicted fashions futuristic. Looking only at the pictures, you can’t detect the most prominent technological theme.

‘The important improvements and innovations in clothes for the World of Tomorrow will be in the fabrics themselves,’ declared Raymond Loewy, one of the Vogue contributors. His fellow visionaries agreed. Every single one talked about textile advances. Many of their designs specified yet-to-be-invented materials that could adjust to temperature, change colour or be crushed into suitcases without wrinkling. Without exception, everyone foretelling the ‘World of Tomorrow’ believed that an exciting future meant innovative new fabrics.

They all understood something we’ve largely forgotten: that textiles are technology, more ancient than bronze and as contemporary as nanowires. We hairless apes co-evolved with our apparel. But, to reverse Arthur C Clarke’s adage, any sufficiently familiar technology is indistinguishable from nature. It seems intuitive, obvious – so woven into the fabric of our lives that we take it for granted.

We drag out heirloom metaphors – ‘on tenterhooks’, ‘tow-headed’, ‘frazzled’ – with no idea that we’re talking about fabric and fibres. We repeat threadbare clichés: ‘whole cloth’, ‘hanging by a thread’, ‘dyed in the wool’. We catch airline shuttles, weave through traffic, follow comment threads. We talk of lifespans and spin‑offs and never wonder why drawing out fibres and twirling them into thread looms so large in our language."



"As late as the 1970s, textiles still enjoyed the aura of science. Since then, however, we’ve stopped thinking of them as a technical achievement. In today’s popular imagination, fabric entirely belongs to the frivolous world of fashion. Even in the pages of Vogue, ‘wearable technology’ means electronic gadgets awkwardly tricked out as accessories, not the soft stuff you wear against your skin – no matter how much brainpower went into producing it. When we imagine economic progress, we no longer think about cloth, or even the machines that make it.

This cultural amnesia has multiple causes. The rise of computers and software as the very definition of ‘high technology’ eclipsed other industries. Intense global competition drove down prices of fibres and fabric, making textiles and apparel a less noticeable part of household budgets, and turning textile makers into unglamorous, commodity businesses. Environmental campaigns made synthetic a synonym for toxic. And for the first time in human history, generations of women across the developed world grew up without learning the needle arts."



"Textiles illustrate a more general point about technology. The more advanced a field is, the more blasé we are about its latest upgrades. Success breeds indifference. We still expect Moore’s Law to hold, but we no longer get excited about the latest microprocessor. The public has largely forgotten the silicon in Silicon Valley.

New and improved fabric technologies haven’t attracted public enthusiasm since the backlash against leisure suits and disco shirts made synthetics declassé in the early 1980s. ‘Pity poor polyester. People pick on it,’ wrote The Wall Street Journal’s Ronald Alsop in 1982, describing DuPont’s efforts to rehabilitate the fibre’s image.

What ended the consumer hatred of polyester wasn’t a marketing campaign. It was a quiet series of technical innovations: the development of microfibres. These are synthetics, most often polyester or nylon, that are thinner than silk and incredibly soft, as well as lightweight, strong, washable and quick-drying. Their shapes can be engineered to control how water vapour and heat pass through the fabric or to create microcapsules to add sunscreen, antimicrobial agents or insect repellent. Over the past decade, microfibres have become ubiquitous; they’re found in everything from wickable workout wear to supersoft plush toys.

Microfibres are one reason the ‘air-conditioned’ fabrics Loewy and his fellow designers foresaw in 1939 have finally come to pass. These fabrics just aren’t promoted in the pages of Vogue or highlighted on the racks at Banana Republic. They don’t attract attention during New York Fashion Week. Their tribe gathers instead at the big Outdoor Retailer trade shows held twice a year in Salt Lake City. There, outdoor-apparel makers and their suppliers tout textiles that keep wearers warm in the cold and cool in the heat; that block raindrops but allow sweat to escape; that repel insects, screen out UV rays and control odour. By establishing that truly weather-resistant fabrics were possible, Gore-Tex (first sold in 1976) and Polartec synthetic fleece (1979) created an industry where engineers now vie to find ever-better ways to conquer the elements. For instance, ‘smart textiles’ originally developed for spacesuits use microencapsulated materials that melt when they get hot, keeping wearers comfortable by absorbing body heat; when temperatures fall, the materials solidify and warm the body."



"Reducing textiles to their functional properties misses much of their appeal, however. They’ve always been decorative as well, a source of sensory pleasure going all the way back to the sexy string skirts worn by Stone Age women. That’s why dyes have been so important in the history of chemistry and trade.

In our computer-centric era, the pursuit of beautiful textiles has naturally turned to information technology. Over the past decade, inkjet printing on fabric has taken off. Instead of requiring a separate plate for each colour, digital printing registers the entire design at once. So for the first time, designers can use as many colours, and as varied patterns, as they choose. Although it currently accounts for less than 5 per cent of printed fabrics, digital printing has already changed the way clothes look. It’s the technology driving the colourful prints so prominent in recent women’s fashion, as well as the crowdsourced design sites Threadless and Spoonflower.

The customers who’ve embraced those designs don’t think much about what makes them possible. But the very invisibility of textiles testifies to their power. We think of them as natural. The instinct behind ‘wearable technology’ is sound, even if the products so far are awkward. ‘Imagine a textile structured from a blend of different fibres which each function as component within a circuit, for example, battery fibres, solar fibres and antenna fibres,’ writes the US fashion technologist Amanda Parkes in an op-ed for the website Business of Fashion. ‘The material itself becomes a self-sustaining “textile circuit” that has its own power and interactive capabilities, but the embedded technology is essentially invisible.’

If the goal is to shrink the distance between nature and artifice, us and it, no technology is as powerful as fabric. Intimate and essential, it touches every moment of our lives. It is among the greatest products of human artifice. Yet it is also an extension of our skin."
textiles  glvo  virginiapostrel  history  clothing  crafts  culture  technology  2015  wearables  materials  industrialrevolution  fashion  craft  dyes  machines  printing  science  adamsmith  raymondloewy  arthurcclarke  dupont  synthetics  fabrics  fabric  elizabethbarber  williampetty  davidorban  josephmariejacquard  weaving  looms  knitting  spinning  craigmuldrew  jameshargreaves  richardarkwright  beverlylemire  samuelcrompton  1939  vogue  microfibres  gore-tex  polartec  ministryofsupply  mizzenandmain  yicui  materialsscience  threadless  spoonflower  amandaparkes  future  making  cv 
june 2015 by robertogreco
MIYAKE DESIGN STUDIO official site
"“A-POC” is an acronym for “A Piece of Cloth” and refers too, to the idea of “epoch.” It is a manufacturing method that uses computer technology to create clothing from a single piece of thread in a single process. Development began in 1997 as a project led by Issey Miyake and engineering designer Dai Fujiwara. The first results included ‘A-POC King & Queen, A-POC Le Feu’ and were presented in the Spring/Summer 1999 ISSEY MIYAKE Paris Collection. Following that, PLEATS PLEASE ISSEY MIYAKE and other collections began to develop items based upon the A-POC method (called “+A-POC”) starting in 2003. After 2007, the collection introduced design solutions under the subtext of "A-POC INSIDE" and has continued to refine its vision for making clothing."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1997  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Issey Miyake – A Piece of Cloth | Tokyo Telephone - Your Direct Line to Real Japanese Fashion
"A wee while ago now, my dear friend and I hotfooted it to the Barbican gallery in London to see their exhibition “Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion” – both being huge fans of Japanese fashion, street and couture, we felt the need to check it out! I won’t spoil the exhibition for those planning to see it too, but I will say that we left feeling slightly stuffed full after gorging our eyes and brains on the clothing & video installations; totally worth it. Being the shopper & book fiend that I am, I was very happy to note the excellent selection of Japanese fashion books on offer in the gift shop – quick, update your Christmas wish lists now!

I think I know what I’d like Father Christmas to bring me this year: a piece of cloth. Preferably from Issey Miyake!

[images]

Usually here at Tokyo Telephone we strive to bring you the most up-to-date goings on in the wonderful melting pot of Japanese fashion, but I really felt that Dai Fujiwara’s A-POC (A Piece of Cloth) collection for Issey Miyake at the turn of the millennium was well worth a mention despite being a decade old, ancient history in fashion terms.

Traditionally Japanese fashion , particularly that of the 1980s when the Miyake brand began to take hold, was monochromatic – black being the favoured colour of everyone from sombre suited salary men to the young fashion elite on the Tokyo streets. So when we turned a corner at the Barbican exhibition, it was literally and figuratively: confronted with mannequins locked inside bright red material stretching up to the ceiling and back again. At once elegant and uncomfortable (a combination that Japanese design does best!) it was a visual spectacle at the very least.

The concept is an unusual one, as all the clothes in the A-POC collection are cut from a single long roll of fabric. A video installation of the catwalk premier showed the Issey Miyake team cutting a vast swath of cloth, and as if by the wonder of their magic scissors, all sort of garments appeared: socks, hats, tops, dresses… sort of like paper dolls for post-yuppie generation.

[image]

I did mention that the concept was unusual, maybe not entirely original: of course I have to mention kimono. Made in the age-old way from a single piece of cloth, perhaps beautifully dyed silk, the kimono requires no real tailoring and fits everyone no matter their weight or height. However, despite the inherent similarities to the fundamental construction of kimono, A-POC feels futuristic nonetheless. With bright primary colours and aching minimalism, there’s the sense that this collection could have been dreamed by a sci-fi writer in the 1960s, clothes and humans alike produced on huge rolls; cut to fit your taste.

[image]

The genius of Issey Miyake doesn’t stop at A-POC either: with another nod to Japanese traditions, consider the origami-like intricate folds of the Pleats Please collection. Anyone who can turn the above tightly folded material into the dress below is well deserving of praise! Like all the best magic tricks, my brain hurts just trying to work out how it’s done…

[image]

Issey Miyake: genius, visionary, traditionalist, magician, architect, and more.

[video]

Love this animation showing the attention paid to movement and line – a bit mesmerising."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  2010 
february 2015 by robertogreco
ISSEY MIYAKE - APOC Galaxy on Vimeo
"This project began as a still photograph for an exhibition by Miyake Design Studio at the Museu de Arte Moderna in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Designers Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara, asked us to create a photograph that would illustrate their concept of A-POC (A Piece of Cloth) wherein the finished fashion garment is woven into the bolt of cloth. When they saw the photograph they asked us if we could animate it.
isseymiyake.com

Produced by Trillium Studios (trilliumstudios.com)"
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  2003  daifujiwara  video 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Wired 12.04: Seamless
"Issey Miyake saw the future of fashion. So he gave up haute couture to become a softwear engineer."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  2003 
february 2015 by robertogreco
ISSEY MIYAKE Official Site
"In 1998, Miyake began to develop A-POC (A Piece Of Cloth) with Dai Fujiwara. A-POC was not only able to create clothing with a high degree of variation, but was also able to control the amount created through the process of casting, where each thread receives computerized instructions. A-POC was revolutionary in that it began with a single thread and resulted in fabric, texture and a fully finished set of clothing in a single process. It led the way, along with the concept of engineering design, to a new methodology of clothing design. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York added this project to its permanent collection in 2006. In 1998, soon after Miyake started research on A-POC, he presented the ISSEY MIYAKE MAKING THINGS exhibition in Paris. (This later traveled to both New York and Tokyo.) The exhibition presented his work from Pleats (1988) onward and was widely acclaimed. “His work is grounded in that stretch of history called the present and draws meaning from fashion’s immediate context. ‘Making Things’ presents that context with immense glamour and wit.” (By Herbert Muschamp, December 27, 1998 The New York Times)"

[image]

"From the exhibition ISSEY MIYAKE MAKING THINGS, Museum of contemporary Art Tokyo, 2000.Just Before [black], A-POC King & Queen[red]
Photo : Yasuaki Yoshinaga"

[image]

"NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, Jan. 2003
P.72-73 “Weaving the Future” A-POC Quatro Cotton, 2001
Photo : Cary Wolinsky and Barbara Emmel Wolinsky
Shown by Alvin Ailey Dancer Dwana Adiaha Smallwood"

[image]

"The New York Times
Sunday, December 27, 1998"
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  1998  2003  2000  2001 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Lurve - Home
"What is A-POC ?
Overlength sweaters, dresses off the roll, A-POCis based upon Miyake’s first design concept, a piece of cloth, is a new and unique suggestion for everyday life, which goes far beyond the boundaries of fashion.
It is made using an industrial knitting or weaving machine programed by a computer.
This process creates continuous tubes of fabric within which lie both shape and pattern. The customer cuts sleeves and skirts exactly to the length he wants. It is an idea that totally overthrows the existing standards for making clothes.
A-POC is made in a sequence in which thread literally goes into a machine and re-emerges as a piece of clothing, an accessory, or even a chair. This interactive new method not only reduces leftover fabric but also permits the wearers to participate in the final step of the design of their clothing: they determine the final shape of the product.
Mass production and custom-made clothing, seemingly opposing ideas, become compatible with each other through the wizardry of technology and the fire of imagination.

Images from A-POC MAKING
ISSEY MIYAKE & DAI FUJIWARA
Vitra Design Museum
1999
Alien
Eskimo
They were among the Issey Miyake Autumn-Winter 1999 Collection held on March 10 at la Grande Halle de la Villette, Salle Charlie Parker, Paris.
” Alien” was made of double layers of airy knitted mesh to add interest and depth.
” Eskimo”, with padded geometric patterns, had three-dimentional interest."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Duro Olowu Shares Vintage Senegalese-Inspired Fashion Film Okayafrica.
"Duro Olowu, the innovative Nigerian designer whose bold technicolor prints have been favorites of ours the last few seasons, has unveiled a new fashion film in support of his recent Spring/Summer 15 collection. Senegalese model Kinee Diouf stars as the face of Olowu’s S/S 15 film, and her languid movements in the collection’s gowns, A-line skirts, capes and oversized jackets showcase the structural genius and elegance of Olowu’s pieces. The Lagos-born designer, who now calls London home, found inspiration for the collection’s vivid patterns and flowing silhouettes after a recent trip to the Senegalese island of Saint-Louis, where the appliqued starched brocade used for the garments was made. Japanese film noir, 1940’s pinups and the cover artwork for The Pointer Sisters eponymous debut album also acted as reference points for Olowu as he constructed the collection’s retro looks. Watch the film, directed by Portuguese fashion photographer Luis Monteiro, below. For more from Duro Olowu, see photos from his explosive Fall/Winter 14 and Spring/Summer 14 shows at London Fashion Week."
duroolowu  nigeria  senegal  2015  fashion  fabric  textiles  glvo  africa  kineediouf  clothing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
▶ Miura-Ori Origami Tessellation Tutorial - YouTube
folding  paper  glvo  miura-ori  origami  miurafold  folds  fabric  miura  triangles  pauljackson  ericgjerde  classideas  miuraori 
december 2013 by robertogreco
ELISA STROZYK
""Wooden Textiles" convey a new tactile experience. We are used to experience wood as a hard material; we know the feeling of walking across wooden floors, to touch a wooden tabletop or to feel the bark of a tree. But we usually don't experience a wooden surface which can be manipulated by touch.

"Wooden Textiles" is a material that is half wood-half textile, between hard and soft, challenging what can be expected from a material or category. It looks and smells familiar but feels strange, as it is able to move and form in unexpected ways.

The processes to transform wood into a flexible wooden surface is its deconstruction into pieces, which are then attached to a textile base. Depending on the geometry and size of the tiles each design shows a different behavior regarding flexibility and mobility. There are various possible applications, for example as floorings, curtains, drapes, plaids, upholstery or parts of furniture."

[See also: http://thisispaper.com/Elisa-Strozyk-Wooden-Textiles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmf7OK6fKck

and

http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/lamps.html
http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/woodenrug.html
http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/woodencarpet.html ]
wood  fabric  textiles  elisstrozyc  glvo  foldable  wearables  wearable  design  triangles 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Entfaltung: Collapsible Fashion | strictlypaper
"Enfaltung, which in german harbors many meanings: unfold, expand or develop, is the basis of this Master’s thesis project created by german native Jule Waible for her Design Products program at the Royal College of Art. This series features a yellow dress that transformes its shape dependent upon the movement of the body, a green expandable accordion styled bag and an orange umbrella which all use a style referred to as origami tessellation. It is exactly that in which it describes along with the magic of the source of her inspiration, Mary Poppin’s enchanted bag. “Collapsible structures reflect how our world is constantly changing,” she writes. “My response is to use folding as part of my design process.”"

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/70925798
https://vimeo.com/julewaibel
https://vimeo.com/68908713
https://vimeo.com/68951582
https://vimeo.com/80056324 ]

[See also: http://www.core77.com/blog/fashion_design/below_the_fold_jule_waibels_mary_poppins-inspired_accordion-like_entfaltung_collection_25220.asp and
http://www.dezeen.com/2013/07/24/entfaltung-fashion-by-jule-waibel/ ]
fashion  wearable  folding  fabric  textiles  origami  glvo  wearables  design  triangles 
december 2013 by robertogreco
ishback» Blog Archive » Moiré in z-axis
"I shoot video and take pictures of screen-based interfaces quite often and Moiré patterns, despite anti-aliasing filters, are very present. I found out that fashion photographers encounter the same issue when taking close-ups of garments. The Moiré effect happens when two or more grids are superposed. A grid can be the interweave of fabric, the array of a digital camera sensor,  the pixels in a screen, etc."
photography  moiré  glvo  grids  fabric  2013  ishacbertran 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Parangolés – Wikipédia
"Os Parangolés, do artista brasileiro Hélio Oiticica, é um conjunto de obras que nasceu, segundo o próprio artista, de "uma necessidade vital de desintelectualização, de desinibição intelectual, da necessidade de uma livre expressão"."

[See also http://www.digestivocultural.com/colunistas/coluna.asp?codigo=856&titulo=Parangole:_anti-obra_de_Helio_Oiticica and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zTJDCugNB4 and
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/17/arts/design/17oiti.html?pagewanted=all and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9lio_Oiticica ]

"He also created works called Parangolés which consisted layers of fabric, plastic and matting intended to be worn like costumes but experienced as mobile sculptures. The first parangolés experiences were made together with dancers from the Mangueira Samba school, where Oiticica was also a participant."
heeliooiticica  paranolés  art  ncmideas  glvo  wearables  wearable  tropicália  brasil  brazil  gruponeoconcreto  dance  fabric  textiles  artists  costumes  sculpture  openstudioproject 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Stealth Wear Aims to Make a Tech Statement - NYTimes.com
"Adam Harvey, an artist and design professor at the School of Visual Arts and an early creator of stealth wear, acknowledges that countersurveillance clothing sounds like something out of a William Gibson novel.

“The science-fiction part has become a reality,” he said, “and there’s a growing need for products that offer privacy.”

Mr. Harvey exhibited a number of his stealth-wear designs and prototypes in an art show this year in London. His work includes a series of hoodies and cloaks that use reflective, metallic fabric — like the kind used in protective gear for firefighters — that he has repurposed to  reduce a person’s thermal footprint. In theory, this limits one’s visibility to aerial surveillance vehicles employing heat-imaging cameras to track people on the ground.

He also developed a purse with extra-bright LEDs that can be activated when someone is taking unwanted pictures; the effect is to reduce an intrusive photograph to a washed-out blur. In addition, he created a guide for hairstyling and makeup application that might keep a camera from recognizing the person beneath the elaborate get-up. The technique is called CV Dazzle — a riff on “computer vision” and “dazzle,” a type of camouflage used during World War II to make it hard to detect the size and shape of warships.

Mr. Harvey isn’t the only one working on such products. …"
surveillance  countersurveillance  uniformproject  razzledazzle  light  facerecognition  clothing  wearables  wearable  privacy  2013  adamharvey  googleglass  drones  beckstern  toddblatt  joannemcneil  janchipchase  camouflage  jennawortham  fashion  technology  fabric  dazzle 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Fort Makers
"Fort Makers is a Brooklyn based collaborative art group that aims to launch emerging artists’ careers through unconventional means of exposure. We are a gang of friends who are also artists. We travel, play, explore and make art together. We learn from each other and push each other forward as artists. Fort Makers was founded in Brooklyn during the summer of 2008."

[via: http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/28/fort-makers/ via @sldistin ]
art  brooklyn  artists  collectives  collaborative  collaboration  cv  interdisciplinary  elizabethwhitcomb  nanaspears  noahjamesspencer  naomiclark  fabric  textiles 
march 2013 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Spacesuit: An Interview with Nicholas de Monchaux
"I was looking for a way to discuss the essential lessons of complexity and emergence—which, even in 2003, were pretty unfamiliar words in the context of design—and I hit upon this research on the spacesuit as the one thing I’d done that could encapsulate the potential lessons of those ideas, both for scientists and for designers. The book really was a melding of these two things."

"But then the actual spacesuit—this 21-layered messy assemblage made by a bra company, using hand-stitched couture techniques—is kind of an anti-hero. It’s much more embarrassing, of course—it’s made by people who make women’s underwear—but, then, it’s also much more urbane. It’s a complex, multilayered assemblage that actually recapitulates the messy logic of our own bodies, rather than present us with the singular ideal of a cyborg or the hard, one-piece, military-industrial suits against which the Playtex suit was always competing.

The spacesuit, in the end, is an object that crystallizes a lot of ideas about who we are and what the nature of the human body may be—but, then, crucially, it’s also an object in which many centuries of ideas about the relationship of our bodies to technology are reflected."

"The same individuals and organizations who were presuming to engineer the internal climate of the body and create the figure of the cyborg were the same institutions who, in the same context of the 1960s, were proposing major efforts in climate-modification.

Embedded in both of those ideas is the notion that we can reduce a complex, emergent system—whether it’s the body or the planet or something closer to the scale of the city—to a series of cybernetically inflected inputs, outputs, and controls. As Edward Teller remarked in the context of his own climate-engineering proposals, “to give the earth a thermostat.”"

"most attempts to cybernetically optimize urban systems were spectacular failures, from which very few lessons seem to have been learned"

"architecture can be informed by technology and, at the same time, avoid what I view as the dead-end of an algorithmically inflected formalism from which many of the, to my mind, less convincing examples of contemporary practice have emerged"

"connections…between the early writing of Jane Jacobs…and the early research done in the 1950s and 60s on complexity and emergence under the aegis of the Rockefeller Foundation"

"Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt—who have gone a long way in showing that, not only should cities be viewed through the analogical lens of complex natural systems, but, in fact, some of the mathematics—in particular, to do with scaling laws, the consumption of resources, and the production of innovation by cities—proves itself far more susceptible to analyses that have come out of biology than, say, conventional economics."
militaryindustrialcomplex  tools  cad  gis  luisbettencourt  janejacobs  meatropolis  manhattan  meat  property  fakestates  alancolquhoun  lizdiller  cyberneticurbanism  glenswanson  parametricarchitecture  parametricurbanism  interstitialspaces  urbanism  urban  bernardshriever  simonramo  neilsheehan  jayforrester  housing  hud  huberthumphrey  vitruvius  naca  smartcities  nyc  joeflood  husseinchalayan  cushicle  michaelwebb  spacerace  buildings  scuba  diving  1960s  fantasticvoyage  adromedastrain  quarantine  systemsthinking  matta-clark  edwardteller  climatecontrol  earth  exploration  spacetravel  terraforming  humanbody  bodies  cyborgs  travel  mongolfier  wileypost  management  planning  robertmoses  cybernetics  materials  fabric  2003  stewartbrand  jamescrick  apollo  complexitytheory  complexity  studioone  geoffreywest  cities  research  clothing  glvo  wearables  christiandior  playtex  interviews  technology  history  design  science  fashion  nasa  books  spacesuits  architecture  space  bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  2012  nicholasdemonchaux  wearable  elizabethdiller  interstitial  bod 
november 2012 by robertogreco
We Find Wildness: FRANZ EHRARD WALTHER
"…objects or ‘instruments‘ out of fabric that people could manipulate to increase their awareness of time, space and the human body. His work is therefore not an autonomous, independent work; it becomes a tool that invites the viewer to become its user. If the viewer accepts the invitation, a sculpture arises in the interaction between user and object.

In 1963 while a student… in Düsseldorf, WALTHER began fabricating simple forms made from muslin and Styrofoam, which were stacked, folded, and wrapped: This moment of manipulation, and then action as a component of the work, or as the work itself, became the main theme. The decisive fundamental idea was to build up an œuvre from action.

Consisting of 58 fabric elements or “instruments for process” (the artist’s term) made from thick cotton in an array of earth tones, the First Work Set (1963-1969) invites visitors to volunteer in a two-fold activity, to become both subject & object & to engage in actions as individuals & with others…"
glvo  participatory  art  fabric  firstworkset  franzerhardwalther  ncm  participatoryart 
november 2012 by robertogreco
9 | Ew! A Pulsating Dress Made Of Realistic Fake Skin [NSFW] | Co.Design: business + innovation + design
"You know how some people’s temples pulse wildly when they’re mad or spooked or nervous? That’s more or less the idea behind Like Living Organisms, by Dutch fashion designers Cor Baauw and Leonie Baauw of Local Androids. A futuristic neckpiece (or dress, depending on whether you think boob coverage is a requirement for the latter), it’s made of freakishly life-like fake skin and has “veins” that beat visibly in the company of other people, then deflate when touched as a “sign of trust,” the designers say.

How it works: The garment comes equipped with two sensors and air pumps. When the wearer approaches another person, one sensor forces air to flow through the veins, simulating a pulse. A second sensor, which responds to touch, then flattens the veins."
fabric  textiles  clothing  technosensual  livingorganisms  leoniebaauw  corbaauw  garments  glvo  localandroids  wearables  fashion  wearable 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Karel Martens on Vimeo
"Evoking meaning, rather than boldly presenting truth: this is the essence of typographer Karel Martens' work. To achieve this he likes to experiment with numbers, abstract figures and vivid colors.

During the seventies Karel Martens worked for SUN, a socialist publisher led by a group of highly motivated individuals. He succeeded in giving all their publications a very distinctive appearance.

Martens has been teaching throughout most of his career. Like for instance here at Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem."

One quote:

"The nicest way to deal with students is to take them seriously, to listen to them well, and to trust them."

[Posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/30376075304/evoking-meaning-rather-than-boldly-presenting AND here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/30377108566/the-nicest-way-to-deal-with-students-is-to-take ]
via:litherland  reality  fabric  numbers  color  listening  trust  graphics  cv  teaching  typography  design  graphicdesign  karelmartens 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Hallowgreen | Art21 Blog
"While we often think of contemporary art and how our older students might respond to it, we are always pleased that our very youngest students are so enthusiastic about it, too. Nick Cave is one reason why.

Cave, chair of the Department of Fashion Design at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, brings together his interests in fashion, performance and sculpture while making reference to African ceremonial costumes. Watch a video of Nick Cave, produced by United States Artists:"
nickcave  performance  performanceart  sewing  costumes  classideas  tcsnmy  art  fashion  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  design  glvo  wearable  textiles  sound  dance  sculpture  soundsuits  fabric  crossdisciplinary  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Nick Cave Lecture at Fowler Museum, Jan. 9, 2010 on Vimeo
"A lecture presentation by Nick Cave about his signature Soundsuits is followed by a conversation between Nick Cave and the Fowler Museum's director Marla C. Berns about the global resonances in the artist's work.

This event was organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Nick Cave: Meet Me At The Center Of The Earth" which is on view at the Fowler Museum at UCLA January 10 - May 30, 2010."
costumes  music  masks  nickcave  art  performance  fowlermuseum  ucla  lectures  conversations  2010  textiles  wearable  performanceart  sewing  sound  soundsuits  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  artists  expression  design  dance  sculpture  fabric  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago: Profiles: Nick Cave
"My work, clothing & fiber-based sculptures, collages, installations, & performances, explore use of textiles & clothing as conceptual modes of expression & pose fundamental questions about human condition in social & political realm…

I believe that what happens in my studio & living life as an artist are the single most important things I bring to the classroom. Artists must design their own pathways, work through plateaus in their work & understand that they will find themselves humbled by the very process of art-making.

I encourage my students to build their work w/ conviction, come face-to-face w/ truth of what they are attempting to create, & be open to experimentation.

I have been lucky to have been mentored by talented artists who taught me to challenge myself & build level of confidence & trust in my creative judgment…I hope to provide my students w/ knowledge that their art making holds the possibility for acting as a vehicle for change on a larger, global scale."
nickcave  art  performance  textiles  classideas  performanceart  design  collage  assemblage  life  living  teaching  education  learning  artists  glvo  cv  sound  interactive  sculpture  installation  expression  humancondition  society  politics  sensemaking  experimentation  doing  making  understanding  self  confidence  trust  wearable  fabric  sewing  change  costumes  dance  soundsuits  tcsnmy  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  pedagogy  howwework  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Art - Nick Cave, Dreaming the Clothing Electric, at the Yerba Buena Center - NYTimes.com
"Over the last decade Mr. Cave has become known for making colorful, extravagant sculptures with this kind of double life: they can stand alone in galleries as visually compelling art objects, or they can be worn by dancers as vehicles for sound and movement. He calls them Soundsuits.

Some Soundsuits, like a bouquet of metal toys and tops perched on top of a bodysuit made of crocheted hot pads, make a clanking commotion. Others, like the Soundsuits made of human hair (bought already dyed from a wholesaler in New York), tend to fall in the quiet, whispery range. All come to life in performance.

Yerba Buena’s director, Kenneth Foster, who described his institution as “deeply multidisciplinary,” called Mr. Cave a natural choice for the center for that reason. “So many visual artists cross over in a way that the performance world would be aghast at,” he said. “Nick is one of the rare artists as strong in his secondary field as he is in his home art form.”"
nickcave  design  performanceart  performance  dance  art  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  costumes  sound  soundsuits  2009  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  fabric  sewing  textiles  wearable  sculpture  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Soundsuits of Nick Cave: Contemporary Art or Material Culture? : Bad at Sports
"My own lack of familiarity  with Cave’s work makes me wonder, though: Why is Cave’s show traveling to the Fowler Museum, which is a museum of cultural history, and not an art museum that has an equally strong ability to support and exhibit interdisciplinary art of this nature, like, say, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) or even UCLA’s “other” arts institution, the white-hot Hammer Museum*?"
art  fashion  costumes  design  sound  nickcave  fowlermuseum  ucla  2009  classification  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  wearable  performanceart  performance  sewing  soundsuits  dance  sculpture  fabric  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Move: Choreographing You / Amanda Levete | ArchDaily
"The exhibition design was driven by the relationships between choreography and geometry, movement and form. Inspired by the photographic motion studies of the human body of Etienne-Jules Marey and Eadweard Muybridge, we have created a collection of spatial dividers which are defined by a serial transformation of a single material: a sequence of folded oscillations of Dupont Tyvek. The resulting translucent paper-like fabric ribbons, a counterpoint to the brutality of the building, rise and fall with undulating folds which simultaneously define themselves as way finding devices, partitions, suspended ceilings, and portals. These fluid spatial and formal transformations choreograph the movement of the visitor through areas of sculpture, film, archive and performance."
choreography  architecture  sculpture  eadweardmuybridge  etienne-julesmarey  anatomy  human  body  movement  geometry  form  motion  motionstudies  fabric  glvo  bodies 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Bum flap - Wikipedia
"The bum or butt flap is a piece of removable material that hangs from the waist to cover the rear end. The flap is of ambiguous origin, but probably originally intended to reduce abrasive wear to pants. In homelessness the surface of pavement can rapidly wear the seat of pants and flaps act as replaceable buffer material. Bum flaps are often worn as a superfluous fashion statement, usually emblazoned with punk iconography.

The typical anti-consumer attitudes of flap wearers make them nearly exclusively handmade. Flaps are usually constructed by the wearer with the most suitable material on hand, often the canvas or denim of discarded clothing. Water resistant and thermally insulating flaps are desirable for long distance rail travel and camping. Flaps may be stitched to the underlying garment or suspended from the belt."

[via: http://twitter.com/agpublic/status/23170061412 ]
bumflap  clothing  homeless  fabric  tools  seating  wearable  buttflap  fashion  punk  wearables 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Chairless by vitra.
"seating device for the modern nomad...sturdy strap of fabric allows user to sit down in relaxed manner – but w/ neither seat nor backrest...a solution par excellence for times when chairs are in short supply...so light & compact that you can carry it with you wherever you go...relieves spine & legs, so that hugging your knees or using a support is no longer necessary. because the pressure is taken off so many areas of the body, you feel relaxed all over. now your hands are free...
alejandroaravena  architecture  furniture  backpacking  design  fashion  vitra  nomads  neo-nomads  portability  fabric  gifts  glvo  srg  edg 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Sewing Patterns, Tutorials, Skills, Projects – For People Who Sew | BurdaStyle.com
"destination for do-it-yourself style...a virtual sewing circle, an open-source hub of ideas, expertise, and amazing patterns you can download & sew at home. We want you to learn something new every time you visit BurdaStyle. We want this website to inspire you...we want you to get involved: We're offering our ideas, expertise and downloadable patterns to the BurdaStyle community, and we hope that you'll contribute, too. There are many ways to be a part of BurdaStyle. Discuss sewing tricks and fixes with members of the BurdaStyle community. Add your sewing term definitions to the ones in our Sewpedia, or check out tips in our user-generated photo and video How Tos. Explore other users' creations in the Gallery, and upload photos of your own. You can even barter or sell what you make through BurdaStyle: Burda is the first established pattern publisher to release its designs without copyrights, allowing members of the public to market their BurdaStyle creations in limited editions."
burda  burdastyle  sewing  glvo  sharing  opensource  clothing  fashion  diy  howto  tutorials  patterns  craft  creativity  community  social  design  handmade  fabric  crafts 
june 2009 by robertogreco
'soft sculpture' exhibition at national gallery of australia
"'soft sculpture' exhibition currently on show at national gallery of australia looks at the ways artists use
art  sculpture  glvo  fabric  softies  plush 
may 2009 by robertogreco
'dritto rovescio' exhibition at the triennale museum, milan
"curated by the group do- knit- yourself the weaving of the fabric is the metaphor to express relations in narrative art, music, logic, society, science and to show the relationship between them. performance, photographs, installations, videos and objects from around 50 artists and designers including the campana brothers, tom dixon, marcel wanders, patricia urquiola and tokujin"
art  glvo  textiles  knitting  fabric 
march 2009 by robertogreco
map quilts by leah evans
"leah evans is a textile artist based in madison, wisconsin. she makes quilts that are far from traditional. each piece features a map which is hand-sewn in fine detail forming an almost abstract pattern. evans uses appliqué, reverse appliqué, piecing, natural and synthetic dyeing, needle-felting, hand printing and a variety of embroidery to make each piece. she takes the imagery from maps, aerial photography and satellite images. however she doesn’t simply translate maps onto here quilts, instead she creates imaginary lands uses elements from different maps."
leahevans  maps  quilts  sewing  glvo  geography  design  mapping  embroidery  appliqué  fabric  cartography 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Nick Cave’s Soundsuits : Bad at Sports
"Nick Cave’s Soundsuits are fabulous creations made of thrift store finds, twigs, plastic bags, discarded thcotchkes, and just about anything else that strikes his fancy. Children loved seeing his work and guessing the materials they were made from, and seeing a video presentation of people inhabiting them. They enjoyed learning about his process, too. Often, Cave’s Soundsuits are assembled by a multigenerational, multicultural group of volunteers in his Chicago neighborhood.”

[see also: http://blog.art21.org/2008/10/29/hallowgreen/ ]
nickcave  children  art  glvo  wearable  via:regine  sound  dance  performance  recycling  costumes  design  sculpture  soundsuits  sewing  classideas  tcsnmy  fabric  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  performanceart  wearables 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Cool Tool: Spoonflower
"It's a service that let's you upload an image to a web site and the company prints the design as a pattern on 100% cotton fabric. Their customer service is great, and I think the fabric is reasonably-priced: it costs $18/yard, not counting shipping, and an individual 8x8-inch swatch is $5. The site is still in beta, so I had to request an invite to use Spoonflower, but a week after contacting them I was experimenting with patterns and ordering fabric."
art  glvo  fabric  printing  materials  design  textiles 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Michael Chabon on why real-life superhero costumes don't work. This... (kottke.org)
"A constructed superhero costume is a replica with no original, a model built on a scale of x:1. However accurate and detailed, such a work has the tidy airlessness of a model-train layout but none of the gravitas that such little railyards and townscapes
superheroes  glvo  costumes  michaelchabon  comics  illustration  sewing  fabric  fashion 
march 2008 by robertogreco
PingMag MAKE - The House where Indigo Lives
"An indigo dye workshop built in the Edo period. It is here where Tadashi Higeta tends his vats of dye, full to the brim with foaming blue liquid. Indigo was once a pillar of Japanese domestic life, and has now been pushed to the wayside. This quiet, inte
craft  japan  indigo  fabric  glvo  pingmag 
march 2008 by robertogreco
the Iaakuza chronicles: iK News | "I want to erase architecture" (Kengo Kuma)
"When Kuma saw the Palazzo della Ragione for the first time, he imagined carps swimming in the air: flying fishes are the methaphor for architecture interpreted as a continuity of experience, rather than static."
architecture  japan  kengokuma  interiors  installation  design  fabric 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Aliza Lelah :: Painter
"I present my family history with collected fabric remnants and worn clothing. As I sew pieces of fabric together to form their faces and bodies, each portrait is tangible on my lap. A bit of cloth from my dad’s dress shirt, a swath from my mother’s s
artists  fabric  collage  sewing  potraits 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Crafts Collection - Textile Stones
"The cushions are round shapes of fulled wool with a number of non-identical ‘sliced blobs’ in various colours."
design  fabric  textiles  furnishings  make  gifts 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Music textile
"Music textile is a large tactile interface for playing electronic music."
interface  music  tactile  textiles  technology  future  fabric 
april 2007 by robertogreco
PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about "Design and Making Things" » Archive » Kabul Matters: no bombs but art in Afghanistan
"Luis Berrios Negron, after recently finishing his studies in architecture at the MIT, went to Kabul to do a workshop with art students in Afghanistan. The Puerto Rican ended up doing an architectural performance involving the remains of a huge swimming p
urban  art  architecture  fabric  afghanistan  glvo  cities  pingmag 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Philips Photonic Textiles - Home
"Photonic textiles open up a wide range of applications in the fields of ambient lighting, communication, and personal health care."
design  gadgets  textiles  innovation  light  technology  fabric  fashion 
october 2006 by robertogreco
SELK'BAG Sleeping Bag - Gizmodo
"The SELK’BAG is a sleeping bag you wear. The entire bag, covered in straps and belts for maximum snugness, fits like a glove and makes you look like a plush Transformer. Confusingly, there’s no mention of the any way to remove the bottom portion for
homes  clothing  gadgets  fabric 
february 2006 by robertogreco
oona//sculptures
scultpures from "The Portfolio of Visual Artist Oona Tikkaoja"
art  robots  fabric  finland 
january 2006 by robertogreco
seamless
"seamless is a fashion event featuring innovative and experimental works in computational apparel design, interactive clothing, and technology-based fashion. each project [re]interprets the conceptual goal of a seamless relationship between technology and
art  fabric  technology  clothing  interactive 
january 2006 by robertogreco
***marthasue.net - genus belua florus ***
Botanica Beluosa (Monsterous Botany) - sewn installation
art  fabric  illustration  installation  nature 
december 2005 by robertogreco
Guardian Unlimited | The Guardian | Women: Marimekko was set up by women, for women
"Marimekko was set up by women, for women, and put on the map by Jackie Kennedy. Hannah Booth welcomes a retrospective"
design  business  women  fabric  society  finland  graphics  gender 
september 2005 by robertogreco

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