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robertogreco : fanfiction   27

Song Exploder | Grimes
[via:

"“I [made] the song that would play during the trailer of this fictional movie in my mind” @Grimezsz on @SongExploder"
https://twitter.com/austinkleon/status/755047783522983936

"“Music for me is like fan fiction.” –@Grimezsz on @SongExploder"
https://twitter.com/austinkleon/status/755048032769454080

"new fave podcast! Song Exploder. (good) Candy for your ears. Episode 78: Grimes on @SongExploder"
https://twitter.com/joyfulcarla/status/754441719274278912 ]
grimes  music  interviews  fanfiction  via:austinkleon  via:carlabergman  songwriting 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Open Channels – The New Inquiry
"Fan fiction is more than a genre. It’s a technology for generating new feelings out of old texts."
meganmilks  fanfiction  fiction  literature  via:anne 
july 2015 by robertogreco
The Octavia Project | Indiegogo
[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gZnUlB0uz4 ]

"We use sci-fi to encourage Brooklyn girls to dream big and empower them to design their own futures.
“Hard times are coming when we will be wanting the voices of writers who can see alternatives to how we live now.” —Ursula K. Le Guin at the National Book Awards

Young people are already envisioning, writing, and creating alternative ways of living, but they need to be given the space, the encouragement, the platform, and the tools to make it happen. With your help, the Octavia Project will bring this opportunity to young women from Brooklyn's under-served neighborhoods. These girls have important, world-altering stories living inside them, but without the support and space to flesh them out, these narratives may languish away in the purgatory of good ideas.

We want to use girls’ passion in sci-fi, fantasy, and fan-fiction to teach them skills in science, technology, art, and writing, equipping them with skills to dream and build new futures for themselves and their communities. Our inspiration and namesake is Octavia E. Butler, who broke barriers in writing and science fiction to become an award-winning and internationally recognized author (Kindred, Lilith's Brood). We are inspired by her visions of possible futures and commitment to social justice.

Twelve girls, ages 13-18, will participate in this free summer program. In the first workshop a girl might develop her story set two thousand years in the future. In the next workshop, she works with a professional architect to engineer a physical model of her own imaginary future city. In another workshop, girls might learn to code a simple program that morphs their names into strange aliases that inspire fictional adventures. Or they’ll learn the basics of circuits and light up the pages of their work with LEDs. They might even use Twine, an interactive storytelling platform, to share their narratives with the world.

No matter the final curriculum, our girls will have access to women working in science and tech, internship and online publishing opportunities, and college-aged mentors.

The Octavia Project is the brainchild of a robotics teacher, Meghan McNamara, and a science fiction author, Chana Porter."
scifi  sciencefiction  octaviabutler  girls  stem  education  octaviaproject  dreaming  thinking  futurism  dreams  children  youth  brooklyn  nyc  lcproject  openstudioproject  learning  imagination  fantasy  fanfiction  maghanmcnamara  chanaporter  teaching  howwelearn  ursulaleguin 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Fandom-Related Collections at the University of Iowa - Special Collections & University Archives - The University of Iowa Libraries
"Individual Collections:

Papers of Gertrude M. Carr (MsC 865)
Morgan Dawn Fanzine and Fanvid Collection (MsC 403)
Morgan Dawn The Professionals Circuit Library and Fanzine Collection (MsC 439)
Papers of Norman Felton (MsC 265)
S. Hereld Collection of Blake’s 7 Fanzines and Fan Fiction (MsC 877)
Susan Hill Fanzine Collection (MsC 401)
Debbie Hoover Fanzine Collection (MsC 430)
M. Horvat Collection of Genre Apazines (MsC 825)
M. Horvat National Fantasy Fan Federation Collection (MsC 886)
M. Horvat Collection of Science Fiction Convention Materials (MsC 884)
M. Horvat Collection of Science Fiction Fanzines (MsC 791)
Celeste Hotaling-Lyons Fanzine Collection (MsC 400)
Deidre Johnson Media Fandom Materials (MsC 960)
Brian Knapp Fanzine Collection (MsC 294)
Laura Leach Collection of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Fanzines and Related Materials (MsC 910)
Marian Mendez Blake’s 7 Fanzines Collection (MsC 969)
Lynda Mendoza Collection of David McCallum Memorabilia (MsC 895)
Papers of Nicholas Meyer (MsC 425)
Organization for Transformative Works Fanzine and Fan Fiction Collection (MsC 320)
Save Farscape Auction Collection (MsC 371)
Vee Stade Star Trek Fanzines (MsC 962)
Watchers of CIS Collection of Highlander Fan Materials (MsC 333)
Mariellen (Ming) Wathne Fanzine Archives Collection (MsC 313)

Science fiction fandom has been a vibrant subculture, with its own particular jargon, rituals, and relationships to mainstream culture, since at least the late 1920s. It emerged as a semi-organized community of like-minded individuals as a response to the rise of professional science fiction magazines. Hugo Gernsback published the first of these, Amazing Stories, in 1926, and fans responded with enthusiasm (sometimes critical enthusiasm) to the new stories by writing letters of comment to the magazine. Eventually, fans used these letters to begin making contact with each other; this led to the creation of both formal and informal fannish organizations, where SF fans – who often felt marginalized by the greater culture for their particular interests – could meet, socialize and talk about science fiction. The first fan-produced magazine, The Comet, was published in May 1930 and represented the start of a long and continuing tradition of science fiction fanzines – amateur publications that fans use as vehicles of personal and cultural expression and interest.

One of the more notable and important features of science fiction fandom has been the periodic gathering of fans at conventions. Conventions are events at which fans meet en masse to hear relevant speakers, speak at panels on different SF-related topics dress in various costumes, watch examples of SF movies or television shows, and participate in numerous other social events. Science fiction conventions began in the United States in the mid-1930s, and achieved a large and international following the institution of the first World Science Fiction Convention, held in New York City in 1939. Conventions continue to be a central feature of fandom, and are not limited to science fiction. Other genre fandoms, such as comic books, mystery novels and films, and animation, also hold conventions, create zines and other publications, and organize into distinct social communities.

SF fandom began with the emergence of popular science fiction literature in the early 20th century, but it quickly expanded beyond an interest in print works only. Broadcast media has always been a vital component of fannish concern, and the world of SF fandom experienced a major upsurge of interest with the television debut of Star Trek in 1966. [The first real media-centered fandom, however, might be said to have begun soon before this event, with the launching of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. television program, which quickly developed a group of devoted followers.] Since that time Star Trek and its multiple spinoff shows and movie sequels have become the source of a lively, independent fandom, sometimes associated with general SF fandom and sometimes not. The same sort of fannish phenomenon has occurred with a number of other media properties, including, to name just a few, the Star Wars movie series, the British SF television shows Doctor Who and Blake’s 7, and the TV shows created and written by Joss Whedon (i.e. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Firefly and Dollhouse). And, although the explosion of genre-related broadcast media has greatly swelled the ranks of fandom (and oftimes divided it), there still remain large audiences of fans that concern themselves more with literary works than with movies and television shows.

A few collections listed here are not specifically fan-oriented, but contain material relevant to the growth and development of genre fandom. The Norman Felton Papers document the creation of the cult series The Man From U.N.C.L.E.and include fannish material relating to that show. The Papers of Nicholas Meyer contain materials relating to Meyer’s direction of the films Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, including his negotiations during the making of the former with fans to get them placed in cameos.

Fandom represents an important American (and, indeed, international) cultural phenomenon, one that encompasses the beliefs, concerns, dreams and fantasies of a culturally influential and distinct social community. Archiving the productions of fan culture – zines, convention materials, literary productions such as stories of fan fiction, and so on – means the preservation of the historical record of this subculture and its adherents. Special Collections at the University of Iowa is committed to documenting the history and development of fandom and fannish communities.
The Fan Culture Preservation Project:

Special Collections is currently involved in a major cooperative effort with the Organization for Transformative Works (OTW) to preserve zines and other artifacts of fan culture. Through the efforts of OTW, an nonprofit fan-run organization that believes in and promotes the value of fannish works of creativity, Special Collections will be receiving donations of fannish materials from their creators and collators and making them available to future generations of researchers and other interested parties."
fandom  collections  libraries  reference  fanfiction 
april 2015 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] did I mention it vibrates? ["history is time breaking up with itself"]
"Lately I've been playing with the idea that history itself is the space left over as any two moments in time tear away from each other. Or as they fade the way a mural in the sun gradually disappears; people both aware of its disappearance and shocked when it finally vanishes.

There are still stand-out events (the clues) and we recognize those in the objects and artifacts we celebrate. More specifically that we celebrate those objects in common. The scarcities of the past meant that the pool of common celebrations from which to choose was pretty limited and so now while it might seem like we're swimming in tailor-made niche rituals I don't actually think the fundamental dynamic has changed.

There is still what Scott McCloud dubbed the magic in the gutter. The "gutter" being the space between any two panels (or frames) in a comic strip. The gutter is the place where the author and the artist let the reader act as the narrative bridge between two events. This is an integral part of comics as a form and I think fundamental to their popularity.

I like to think of the gutter as the space where fan-fiction operates. As a way of creating alternative reasons to explain why any two events are related to one another."



"Monkey Jesus. Let me start by saying: I love Monkey Jesus.

Monkey Jesus is sometimes known as Ecce Homo, a church fresco painted by Elias Garcia Martinez in the 1930s in Northern Spain. Like many churches in Europe it was abandoned and stood waiting to be reclaimed by the elements. In August of 2012 Cecilia Giminez, a nearby resident, decided that she would attempt to restore the painting before it was completely lost.

That last fact is really important: This fresco was the proverbial tree falling in the forest with no one around to hear it. Had another year or another decade passed the painting would have been washed away by the rain or the sun and no one would have known the difference.

What happened instead is that someone posted a picture of Giminez's efforts to the internet and the whole world when completely nuts. This, we were told, was an offense against all culture. Proof that the laity shouldn't be trusted with the arts. That this 90-year woman had single-handedly destroyed everything sacred about the Rennaissance.

Then a funny thing happened: By the end of 2013 forty thousand people had visited the church to see the fresco and Giminez herself was pushing for financial compensation claiming artist's rights for her work.

Monkey Jesus has crossed the event horizon of signifiers and now, I'm willing to bet, we're going to actively preserve the so-called failed restoration over the original fresco precisely because of this history. Because now the work has narrative pedigree. If you think that sounds like crazy-talk consider the exact same painting but done in the hand of Alex Katz or re-created by Cindy Sherman. Look carefully at Monkey Jesus and tell me you can't see the shadow of either artist's work in that painting.

The issue is not whether a different artist would have done Monkey Jesus better but in how we reconstruct the narrative around an event; the reasons we choose to understand why an object is worthy of a narrative at all."



"We did this so that the idea of visitors using a NFC-enabled pen in the galleries stopped being an idea and became something tangible. The problem with conceptual designs is that at a certain point they stop being devices for imagining possibilities and instead become a bucket for everyone's hopes and fears and anxieties. That tipping point is unique to every project but we had reached ours and the most important thing became to root the problem in a practical reality that we could use to make decision about rather than around."



"It turns out the Pen is a pretty good problem-solving interview question. You start with two immutable facts of nature and a warning. Fact number one is that all capacitive styluses have a metal core or metal woven in to the sheathing. (Go back and look at the slide with the vWand cases — that's metallic paint on the tip.) That metal is required in order for the stylus to work. Fact number two is that metal is the enemy of radio frequencies (NFC). The stern warning is that if any point the person answering the question says I saw a thing... on 60 minutes... about a guy in Shenzhen... then the interview is over.

Otherwise you just sit back and listen.

If they get far enough to figure out a design then you ask them how they'd power the thing. You can't really see it in any of the slides I've shown you but there's a button on the back of the Pen. That's the button which activates the NFC antenna because if it were always powered on the Pen would spend all day shouting HELLO? IS ANYONE OUT THERE?? in to the void and quickly exhaust its battery supply."



"It turns out that the Pen is in fact the minimum amount of infrastructure that you need if the goal is to enable some kind of meaningful recall for a museum visit. The point is not to provide users with a Pen experience but to offer them a tool that is quiet and polite and allows them to, literally, touch the objects as a way to remember them. To provide them with something less-shit than taking photos of wall labels. To provide them with a way to come to the museum and have a heads up visit confident that there is a way back after they've left the building."



"We changed the loan agreements to state that the museum reserves the right to display the fact that an object spent time with us and to display the images of those objects on our website and in our galleries. Forever. If you're not a museum person you may be staring at your screen right now wondering what the fuck I am talking about. Like specifically why this is a big deal. That is the correct response.

Pretty much every other loan agreement ever drafted between two museums or a museum and a private individual states that lender retains all image rights to the object being lent. Which is fine, in principle. In practice though it's created an environment where even if a museum enjoys a limited period of use the uncertainty around the licensing of that imagery after the fact means that it's easier to throw up our hands and despair the situation than to look for a viable alternative.

The problem is this: We tell visitors that it is important enough for them to travel to our musuem to see something in person rather than simply looking for it on Google. We tell them it is worth their time and expense and then we pretend as though it never happened.

Which is insane. It's flat out insane. Not to mention wrong. Also stupid.

So we've stopped doing it. We're not going to start making mugs and ties with other people's collections but we are going to assert that their thing was in our building for a while."



'Let's be honest: You are straight up fucked if you then try to search for that thing on a museum website and doubly-fucked if you're trying to do it on your phone. We should all strive to make that experience not suck but for the time being it does. If instead a person can remember that Oh yeah, I was there in October... and there's a way to find the object quickly and easily then two things happen:

1. They can actually find the thing they're talking about and not have it be a proxy object for another of life's annoyances.
2. They can put their phone away.

Imagine if you could take a museum for granted that way. Not in a creepy or selfish way but in a way that allowed you to think about it as a resource, with the patience to always be present. Imagine what it would mean for a museum to have the infinite space of everything to the right of a permalink's URL at its disposal.

It's not a permalink of the object (they already have their own permalinks) but a permalink of your having collected that object during that visit and these are the places where visitors and the museum together might actually explore what it means to better share an understanding of an object beyond a 75-word wall label. There is a fantastic amount of learning and writing that has produced about the objects in our collections over the years but almost no one, outside the hula-hoop of professional disciplines, ever sees it.

These, we hope, are the places where we might start to change that. These are the places where someone might finally read the 10,000 word essay about an exhibition in the comfort of their living room or even just on the subway ride home after their visit. These are the places where we might start to find a way to make the curatorial files I mentioned earlier an active participant in the collection."



"In the end I think the hardest part of this project for the museum will be being patient and in measuring success over the long-term. Some people will see and immediate and personal value in what we're trying to do but it would be unfair, and unrealistic, to demand the same of everyone else. People have busy, complicated lives and it sometimes takes people a while to warm up to an idea. Our disposition, our super-power, as cultural heritage institutions is that we have time on our side. We should learn to share it with those who don't."
2015  aaronstraupcope  cooper-hewitt  museums  history  memory  objects  interaction  monkeyjesus  fanfiction  scottmccloud  sebchan  billmoggridge  aaronkeefer  alisoufan  selfawareroomba  roomba  design  waronterror  narrative  storytelling  culture  smithsonian  internet  web  online  collections  socialmedia  rfid  nfc 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Livet sprillar av hopp och pop, roachpatrol: jumpingjacktrash: ...
"so i’ve been thinking about it, and i’ve realized the main objection i have to the daemon thing is really a whole lot of pedantry and failure to suspend disbelief. stuff like: dead certain mine would be a bear, and where the hell would she sleep? you’re not supposed to touch other people’s daemons, and your daemon can’t be very far from you, so… how the hell does a crowded subway work? would there have to be discrimination laws about people’s daemons — and how much traction would those laws get, when you can tell at a glance that someone with a scorpion daemon is gonna be an asshole, and there is no room in the office for a horse?

also, having a part of your soul visible like that just changes character so much. it changes how people develop. i can’t imagine how different i’d be if all the people who were inclined to bully the short ginger faggot took a look at the mama grizzly padding along beside him and went “nope!” — would i have as much of an urge to help and protect other marginalized people if i hadn’t been bullied and threatened myself? and i’m p sure seebs’s daemon would’ve settled early into a large cat, something playful and fearless and a little cruel, and i would’ve known right away that we were a good match, instead of just being friends for so long while i sampled a whole buffet of other guys. and my brother — almost certainly a lion, which would have a hard time play-fighting with smaller daemons, so there goes his hobbies…

heh, after saying i have problems with it, i went and had all this fun thinking about it. and hell, it would be really cool to have a bear hanging out with me all the time. epic snuggles, dang.

edit: hm, do you suppose trans folks would be able to tell early what their real gender was because their daemon’s sex was the same as theirs? and what about nonbinary and agendered people — would they have a nonbinary daemon like a jellyfish, or something that can change sexes like some lizards and insects can do? or would their daemon just refuse to settle on the sex question, changing size/plumage/etc slightly from time to time as their human’s gender fluctuates?

on an almost unrelated note: a goliath beetle daemon would be really cool. do people in the daemonverse canon even have insect daemons?"

[and responses, for example:

"my biggest peeve for daemon fics is when the writer gives everyone really obscure animals, like muntjaks and binturongs and pallas cats and gnus and quolls— animals that are so obscure they have no easily understandable symbolism, and that aren’t native to wherever the person is from. how would you know your soul is best summarized as shoebill or a snowcrab if you’re from inner city new jersey, you know? what would that even mean?

in the books, very few characters had exotic or inconvenient daemons. lord asrael had a leopard, but he was a nobleman, and had spent a lot of his youth traveling—plus leopards are already considered noble and heraldic beasts by english nobility. it says something about him, it’s an animal he would have learned about and considered. the academics at lyra’s oxford were a lot of owls, starlings, ravens, serpents, and tortoises— again, reasonable animals to consider if you’re a studious kid settling into an academic career, and ones with a lot of symbolism attached for that culture.

the gyptians had hawks and cats and river otters, a lot of serving staff had dogs and chickens—but we don’t hear about anyone having horses or sheep. street kids have street-animal daemons, they’re not said to have the imagination or education to think up being lions or tigers or anything, wheras lyra’s daemon sneers at that and changes at one point into a little dragon just to show off. thugs have foxes and weasels and wolves, but no one has a rhino or a gorilla, for all that that would make intimidation tactics pretty easy!

i think who you want to be, the role you want to play in life, decides a lot of what your daemon settles as, as well as the education you get and the cultural meaning loaded on to various forms. so if you want to live in cities you don’t want to be a moose, so you won’t be. if you’ve never heard of a pangolin, you’d never think to describe yourself that way. and the taboo against touching someone’s daemon i think encourages them to settle on forms that could reasonably keep to themselves. like if you’re a wise, strong, family-focused, tough, long-memoried kind of guy, your soul could be an elephant— or it could be a beaver. if you’re a gentle giant until someone really provokes you and then you charge them you could be a bull— or you could be a bull terrier. there are probably plenty of alternatives to huge animals when it comes to settling."]
fanfiction  fandom  daemons  hisdarkmaterials  via:sophia  2014  gender 
november 2014 by robertogreco
How Videogames Like Minecraft Actually Help Kids Learn to Read | WIRED
"Minecraft is the hot new videogame among teachers and parents. It's considered genuinely educational: Like an infinite set of programmable Lego blocks, it's a way to instill spatial reasoning, math, and logic—the skills beloved by science and technology educators. But from what I've seen, it also teaches something else: good old-fashioned reading and writing.

How does it do this? The secret lies not inside the game itself but in the players' activities outside of it. Minecraft is surrounded by a culture of literacy. The game comes with minimal instructions or tutorials, so new players immediately set about hunting for info on how it works. That means watching YouTube videos of experts at play, of course, but it also means poring over how-to texts at Minecraft wikis and “walk-through” sites, written by gamers for gamers. Or digging into printed manuals like The Ultimate Player's Guide to Minecraft or the official Minecraft Redstone Handbook, some of which are now best sellers.

This is complex, challenging material. I analyzed several chunks of The Ultimate Player's Guide using the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease scale, and they scored from grade 8 to grade 11. Yet in my neighborhood they're being devoured by kids in the early phases of elementary school. Games, it seems, can motivate kids to read—and to read way above their level. This is what Constance Steinkuehler, a games researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, discovered. She asked middle and high school students who were struggling readers (one 11th-grade student read at a 6th-grade level) to choose a game topic they were interested in, and then she picked texts from game sites for them to read—some as difficult as first-year-college language. The kids devoured them with no help and nearly perfect accuracy.

How could they do this? “Because they're really, really motivated,” Steinkuehler tells me. It wasn't just that the students knew the domain well; there were plenty of unfamiliar words. But they persisted more because they cared about the task. “It's situated knowledge. They see a piece of language, a turn of phrase, and they figure it out.”

Hannah Gerber, a literacy researcher at Sam Houston State University, found much the same thing. She monitored several 10th-grade students at school and at home and saw that they read only 10 minutes a day in English class—but an astonishing 70 minutes at home as they boned up on games. Again, it was challenging stuff. Steinkuehler found that videogame sites devoted to World of Warcraft, for example, are written at nearly 12th-grade level, with a 2 to 6 percent incidence of “academic” jargon.

Passion for games drives writing too. When Steinkuehler informally observes kids contributing to game sites and discussions online, she sees serious craft. “Suddenly, being a writer is sexy and hip and cool. They have an audience that knows their stuff, and they expect you to be knowledgeable,” she says. What about fiction? Oh, games have you covered there too: Behold the teeming seas of Minecraft fan stories at sites like FanFiction.net or Wattpad. My kids are deep into a trilogy of Minecraft novellas—written by a 13-year-old girl in Missouri.

I'm praising Minecraft, but nearly all games have this effect. The lesson here is the same one John Dewey instructed us in a century ago: To get kids reading and writing, give them a real-world task they care about. These days that's games."
minecraft  2014  clivethomson  games  gaming  videogames  literacy  edg  srg  reading  writing  multiliteracies  motivation  johndewey  hannahgerber  passion  interest  fanfiction  constancesteinkuehler  comprehension  howweread  children  learning  howwelearn  education 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Mobile Storytelling: The Rebirth of Reading and Writing on Vimeo
"“People say teens don’t read… I have some evidence to suggest completely otherwise,” says Candice Faktor. Wattpad has revolutionized the way novels are created and consumed. As a social platform, Wattpad offers writers an outlet to share their voice and have their stories resonate with a larger community, while allowing global access through mobile devices."

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wattpad
"Wattpad is a writing community in which users are able to post articles, stories, fan fiction, and poems about anything either online or through the Wattpad app. The content includes work by undiscovered and published writers. Users are able to comment and like stories or join groups associated with the website. Around half of the users are U.S. based; most users also come from the U.K., Canada, the Philippines, Australia, United Arab Emirates and more."]

[Wattpad: http://www.wattpad.com/ ]
2015  reading  writing  ebooks  community  mobile  margaretatwood  fanfiction  howweread  howwewrite  candicefaktor  wattpad  android  ios  application  iphone  kindlefire  blackberry  teens  youth  conversation  srg 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Maciej Ceglowski - Barely succeed! It's easier! - YouTube
"We live in a remarkable time when small teams (or even lone programmers) can successfully compete against internet giants. But while the last few years have seen an explosion of product ideas, there has been far less innovation in how to actually build a business. Silicon Valley is stuck in an outdated 'grow or die' mentality that overvalues risk, while investors dismiss sustainable, interesting projects for being too practical. So who needs investors anyway?

I'll talk about some alternative definitions of success that are more achievable (and more fun!) than the Silicon Valley casino. It turns out that staying small offers some surprising advantages, not just in the day-to-day experience of work, but in marketing and getting customers to love your project. Best of all, there's plenty more room at the bottom.

If your goal is to do meaningful work you love, you may be much closer to realizing your dreams than you think."
via:lukeneff  maciejceglowski  2013  startups  pinboard  culture  atalhualpa  larrywall  perl  coding  slow  small  success  community  communities  diversity  growth  sustainability  venturecapital  technology  tonyrobbins  timferris  raykurzweil  singularity  humanism  laziness  idleness  wealth  motivation  siliconvalley  money  imperialism  corneliusvanderbilt  meaning  incubators  stevejobs  stevewozniak  empirebuilders  makers  fundraising  closedloops  viscouscircles  labor  paulgraham  ycombinator  gender  publishing  hits  recordingindustry  business  lavabit  mistakes  duckduckgo  zootool  instapaper  newsblur  metafilter  minecraft  ravelry  4chan  backblaze  prgmr.com  conscience  growstuff  parentmeetings  lifestylebusinesses  authenticity  googlereader  yahoopipes  voice  longtail  fanfiction  internet  web  online  powerofculture  counterculture  transcontextualism  maciejcegłowski  transcontextualization 
march 2014 by robertogreco
▶ Ideas at the House: Tavi Gevinson - Tavi's Big Big World (At 17) - YouTube
"She's been called the voice of her generation. The future of journalism. A style icon. A muse. Oh, and she's still in high school.

Tavi Gevinson has gone from bedroom blogger to founder and editor-in-chief of website and print series, Rookie, in just a few years. Rookie attracted over one million views within a week of launching, and has featured contributors such as Lena Dunham, Thom Yorke, Joss Whedon, Malcolm Gladwell, and Sarah Silverman.

Watch this inspiring talk as Tavi discusses adversity, the creative process, her outlook on life, what inspires her, and the value of being a 'fangirl.'"
tavigevinson  2013  teens  adolescence  rookie  writing  creativity  life  living  depression  frannyandzooey  books  reading  howwework  patternrecognition  procrastination  howwelive  teenagers  gender  feminism  authenticity  writer'sblock  making  fangirls  fanboys  wonder  relationships  art  originality  internet  web  fangirling  identity  happiness  fanart  theideaofthethingisbetterthanthethingitself  culture  fanfiction  davidattenborough  passion  success  fame  love  fans  disaffection  museumofjurassictechnology  collections  words  shimmer  confusion  davidwilson  davidhildebrandwilson  fanaticism  connection  noticing  angst  adolescents  feelings  emotions  chriskraus  jdsalinger  literature  meaning  meaningmaking  sensemaking  jean-paulsartre  sincerity  earnestness  howtolove  thevirginsuicides  purity  loving  innocence  naïvité  journaling  journals  notetaking  sketching  notebooks  sketchbooks  virginiawoolf  openness  beauty  observation  observing  interestedness  daydreaming  self  uniqueness  belatedness  inspiration  imagination  obsessions  fandom  lawrenceweschler  so 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Hacking the word | booktwo.org
"If we struggle with online literatures, it is because we struggle to understand the network itself. Writing about the network requires a literacy in technology itself – but like the telephone before it, the Internet feels like a profoundly anti-literary plot device – at least until we develop new and better modes of expression to describe it, and it’s affect on our lives. Literature’s inability to describe meaningfully the technologically augmented contemporary world in which we find ourselves seems to mirror our own.



And so not only must our literatures reflect the ubiquity of the network, they must also account for its communality, and its computationality. Literatures produced by groups, by all of us, and literatures produced by the machines, and by us and the machines.

Fan fiction is the first native literary form of the network. It has existed for a long time, before the internet, but it finds its best home there, outwith the domains of copyright and fixed authorship rigorously enforced elsewhere.



Literary form and tradition is not all that remains to be hacked. The systems of production and distribution are more accessible to us, allowing for new hybrid forms, particularly in non-fiction and journalism, books which bleed out of the network in stages, gathered as firsthand reports on Twitter and BBM, coalescing into blogposts and essays, filtered by editors for online columns and opinion pieces, collected into temporary, unstable ebooks as time allows and slowly solidifying into paper books – which themselves might be revised many times, flipping back to digital, quoted and rewritten. This process, again, may not be entirely new, but it is newly visible, exposed by the network and thus more flexible, more amenable to irruption and reconfiguration.



Our attitude to technology, particularly in literary circles, has for far too long been exclusionary and oppositional, envisioning some kind of battle between the “natural” world of human expression and the “unnatural” chattering of the machines. There have been excellent attempts to breach this divide, in the imaginings of science fiction; the coruscating; spam-filled prose of Stewart Home; Kenneth Goldsmith’s “Uncreative Writing”; the spasming code of Kenji Siratori; and many more. But the true literatures of the network will emerge when we abandon notions of the single-authored work, when we abandon authority entirely, when we write in machine argots and programmatic codes, when we listen to the bots and collaborate with them, when we truly begin to understand, and describe, the technologically-saturated culture we are already living in."

[Also published here: http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/16298/1/hackyourfuture-hack-the-word ]
jamesbridle  internet  literature  machines  technology  publishing  2013  networkedliterature  networkedfictions  writing  reading  kenjisiratori  kennethgoldsmith  uncreativewriting  authority  coding  fanfiction  process  journalism  books  twitter  online  web  literacy  googlepoertics  timeshaiku  machinewriting  wikipedia  bots  machinelanguage  automation  ebooks  form 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Plagiarism: Maybe It's Not So Bad - On The Media
"Artists often draw inspiration from other sources. Musicians sample songs. Painters recreate existing masterpieces. Kenneth Goldsmith believes writers should catch-up with other mediums and embrace plagiarism in their work. Brooke talks with Goldsmith, MoMA’s new Poet Laureate, about how he plagiarizes in his own poetry and asks if appropriation is something best left in the art world."

[Full show here: http://www.onthemedia.org/2013/mar/08/ ]

"A special hour on our changing understanding of ownership and how it is affected by the law. An author and professor who encourages creative writing through plagiarism, 3D printing, fan fiction & fair use, and the strange tale of who owns "The Happy Birthday Song""
plagiarism  poetry  poems  2013  kennethgoldsmith  moma  appropriation  creativity  originality  writing  creativewriting  3dprinting  fanfiction  happybirthday  songs  music  drm  copyright  fairuse  ownership  possessions  property  law  legal  ip  intellectualproperty  campervan  beethoven  robertbrauneis  jamesboyle  history  rebeccatushnet  chrisanderson  michaelweinberg  public  publicknowledge  campervanbeethoven  davidlowey  johncage  representation  copying  sampling  photography  painting  art  economics  content  aesthetics  jamesjoyce  patchwriting  ulysses 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Ian Bogost - Shit Crayons
"Chaim Gingold gave us the useful concept of the Magic Crayon… a tool that facilitates creativity in a way that wouldn't otherwise be possible… lets its users breathe life into things.

…has a shadow side…

Inspirations like that are not magic crayons, but shit crayons…

Shit stinks. When forced to root in it, we wretch and cower. It strips us of our pride. And yet, despite it all, we rise above. We find tiny crevasses in the slippery stone walls of our cells and we climb up out of the filth. We overcome.

How resilient is the human spirit that it withstands so much? No matter what shit we throw, nevertheless people endure, they thrive even, spinning shit into gold.

Minecraft is a game about that resilience rather than one that just incites it, a masterful magic crayon made of shit crayons. A ludic prisonette.

Even if creativity comes from constraint, there's constraint and there's incarceration. A despot in a sorcerer's hat does not deserve praise for inciting desperate resilience."
poetry  williamblake  fanfiction  videogames  gaming  games  ingenuity  constraints  cowclicker  inspiration  making  resilience  wolesoyinka  chaimgingold  shotcrayons  2011  ianbogost  creativity 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Start-ups and Slash Fiction | booktwo.org
"My talk from NEXT Berlin 2012, in which I talk about ways of making meaning and fiction online (Original video on the NEXT site).

The quote at the the end, that “the history of the Internet is a history of metaphors about the Internet”, which I mistakenly attribute to Sherry Turkle, is actually by Christine Smallwood, as quoted in Andrew Blum’s Tubes (below), and appears to originate in an article called “What does the Internet look like?” in The Baffler, no longer online but preserved by the Internet Archive."

[Video also here http://nextberlin.eu/2012/07/james-bridle-metaphors-considered-harmful/ and here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1Y_g8jOQus ]

[Phrases of note:

* post-geographical position (William Gibson)
* notional space (William Gibson)
* Borges wrote fanfiction
* Gibson was always a Beat writer

]
libraryofbabel  mapping  maps  metaphors  metaphor  allaboard  slashfic  writing  collaborativewriting  omegle  forourtimes  tlönuqbarorbistertius  fiftyshadesofgray  twilight  pierremenard  andreafrancke  storytelling  stories  steampunk  allenginsberg  jackkerouac  charliestross  belatedness  hplovecraft  fanfiction  change  memory  startups  fiction  slashfiction  books  imagination  jamesbridle  videogames  notionalspace  context  walkman  postgeography  internet  christinesmallwood  scifi  sciencefiction  nextberlin  nextberlin2012  2012  williamgibson  borges  thelibraryofbabel 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Fans Are All Right (Pinboard Blog)
"I learned a lot about fandom couple of years ago in conversations with my friend Britta, who was working at the time as community manager for Delicious. She taught me that fans were among the heaviest users of the bookmarking site, and had constructed an edifice of incredibly elaborate tagging conventions, plugins, and scripts to organize their output along a bewildering number of dimensions. If you wanted to read a 3000 word fic where Picard forces Gandalf into sexual bondage, and it seems unconsensual but secretly both want it, and it's R-explicit but not NC-17 explicit, all you had to do was search along the appropriate combination of tags (and if you couldn't find it, someone would probably write it for you). By 2008 a whole suite of theoretical ideas about folksonomy, crowdsourcing, faceted infomation retrieval, collaborative editing and emergent ontology had been implemented by a bunch of friendly people so that they could read about Kirk drilling Spock."
pinboard  2011  fanfiction  taxonomy  folksonomy  brittagustafson  del.icio.us  avos  bookmarking  bookmarks  tags  tagging  collaboration  collaborative  crowdsourcing  fans 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Archive of Our Own
"The Organization for Transformative Works (OTW) is a nonprofit organization established by fans to serve the interests of fans by providing access to and preserving the history of fanworks and fan culture in its myriad forms. We believe that fanworks are transformative and that transformative works are legitimate. The OTW represents a practice of transformative fanwork historically rooted in a primarily female culture. The OTW will preserve the record of that history as we pursue our mission while encouraging new and non-mainstream expressions of cultural identity within fandom."
fanfiction  fandom  multifandom  archive  writing  otw  tv 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Amazon.com: A New Literacies Sampler (New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies) (9780820495231): Knobel Michele, Lankshear Colin: Books
"The study of new literacies is quickly emerging as a major research field. This book "samples" work in the broad area of new literacies research along two dimensions. First, it samples some typical examples of new literacies—video gaming, fan fiction writing, weblogging, role play gaming, using websites to participate in affinity practices, memes, and other social activities involving mobile technologies. Second, the studies collectively sample from a wide range of approaches potentially available for researching and studying new literacies from a sociocultural perspective. Readers will come away with a rich sense of what new literacies are, and a generous appreciation of how they are being researched."

[Via a comment by Adam Mackie here: http://www.dmlcentral.net/blog/antero-garcia/multiliteracies-and-designing-learning-futures ]
multiliteracies  literacy  newliteracies  videogames  gaming  games  education  blogging  memes  fanfiction  books  toread  2007  socialmedia  roleplaying  rpg  mmog  mmorpg  culture  expression  research  colinlankshear  micheleknobel 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Online Fanfiction: What Technology and Popular Culture Can Teach Us About Writing and Literacy Instruction
"Across the globe youth are growing up w/ digital & interactive media tech as integral part of their lives. This generation of learners, often called 'Net-Generation, spends a great deal of free time engaging in online literacy-related activities such as instant messaging, gaming, surfing, & publishing on web. Such media & tech-literate students can pose special challenges for educators who grew up w/ & value more print-based forms of literacy. However, because these youth often find digital literacy activities to be more engaging than the print-based ones associated w/ classrooms, it seems important for us, as literacy educators & researchers, to take an in-depth look at some of these media & activities that young people find so engaging. One such activity that warrants a closer look is online fanfiction. While paper-based fanfiction has been around for years, in recent decades, fans have started "meeting" in online spaces to publish, share, & critique each other's texts."
via:britta  fanfiction  curriculum  education  writing  learning  literacy  research  online  web  rebeccablack  henryjenkins 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » Nervous Writing / Well-Trained Teachers
"Last week when I told this story, a tech director raised her hand and said “You know, I think it’s interesting that your son is nervous about sharing his writing. Does he ever get nervous about his writing for school?” I thought for a second and said “Um, no…you know you’re right. He hardly thinks twice about that stuff.” She said “I’m guessing he’d be more motivated to work on his Percy Jackson story to make it good than he is his homework.” And ever since I’ve been wondering why we can’t instill a healthy nervousness every now and then into our writing process, now that we have these ready made audiences (or at least easily found audiences). All it would take is a willingness on our parts to let kids write about the things they truly love from time to time and connect that to an audience larger than the classroom. Shouldn’t be too hard these days…"
fanfiction  education  willrichardson  writing  apprehension  children  audience  importance  authenticity  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  learning  anonymity  sharing  criticism  constructivecriticism  discussion  schools  teaching 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Telling stories about stories « Snarkmarket
"Increas­ingly, I’m con­vinced that no media is suc­cess­ful or even com­plete until it’s been trans­formed or extended. I know this is not super-controversial—it’s sort of the Cre­ative Com­mons party line—but it turns out things don’t trans­form them­selves! A lot of media gets CC-licensed and then just sits there.
robinsloan  annabelscheme  platforms  creativecommons  remixing  fanfiction  storytelling  media  henryjenkins  cocreation  participatoryculture  participatory  snarkmarket  newmedia  starwars  harrypotter  narrative  engagement  remixculture 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Confessions of an Aca/Fan: The Radical Idea that Children are People
"I couldn't tell you about almost anything I did in high school; a few fantastic teachers are easy to recall, but even the details of what I learned in their classes is fuzzy and dim. Yet I can remember the experience of getting feedback on my fanfiction as if it were yesterday...how much I struggled to write my first fanfiction novel...reading Strunk and White's The Elements of Style because I translated it into Harry Potter terms...I was driven to write, read, found a non-profit company...all before I reached the age of 16. In comparison, my time in high school seems empty, void, a place-holder that let me get that precious diploma & hightail it to college...My internet connection gave me the opportunity to try on a new role: the role of an fan author & editor. That role wasn't one that was tied to my "kid" status. Anyone could be a fan author...[or] fan editor & if I could do those things as well as anyone, I could earn the right to be just as important and respected as an adult."
education  fanfiction  harrypotter  children  identity  society  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  writing  passion  learning  youth  teens  respect  communities  schools  schooling  engagement 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: When love is harder to show than hate | Technology | guardian.co.uk
"one of the most perverse elements of copyright law: the reality that loving something doesn't confer any right to make it a part of your creative life. The damage here is twofold: first, this privileges creativity that knocks things down over things that build things up. ... Second, this perverse system acts as a censor of genuine upwellings of creativity that are worthy in their own right, merely because they are inspired by another work. ... This isn't a plea for unlimited licence to commercially exploit the creations of others. ... it's a vision of copyright that says that fannish celebration – the noncommercial, cultural realm of expression and creativity that has always accompanied commercial art, but only lately attained easy visibility thanks to the internet – should get protection, too. That once an artist has put their works in our head, made them part of our lives, we should be able to live those lives."
art  law  copyright  opinion  corydoctorow  fanfiction  creativity  via:preoccupations 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Southwest Airlines Spirit Magazine / Fan Fiction
"These readers and writers hold canon in the highest regard—and for good reason: The community of writers, readers, and betas (fan editors) criticize any stories that mischaracterize the characters or scramble the facts."
fanfiction  writing  literature 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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