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Are.na / Arrangement Collage
[also here:
https://github.com/dark-industries/dark-zine/blob/master/lukas_collage.md ]

[See also:
https://www.are.na/lukas-w/arrangement-collage ]

[via:
https://urcad.es/writing/new-american-outline/ ]

"In 2015, Frank Chimero wrote on the “Grain” of the Web, focusing on a web-native media that doesn’t try to fight the inherently rectangle-based HTML Document Object Model (DOM)—also shared with XML and XHTML. This remains true: any site that does not look rectilinear is usually just fooling you; strip the CSS and it’s just a pile of blocks. Perhaps tilted and stretched, or with the corners shaved off, but just a pile of blocks.

As McLuhan would have anticipated, this blocky model has substantial effects toward what web-native media looks like. Chimero documents this well. I’d like to add a psychological component, though, in that as an online culture, we’ve grown accustomed to block-based interfaces. We joke at Web 2.0’s desire to round over corners and balk at clunky Flash plugins; nonlinear, non-blocky interfaces are either salient or sore thumbs.

Native internet users consume media through HTML interfaces at an astounding pace; simple rectangles frame a continuous deluge of multimedia updates. In an age of both physical and digital abundance in the Western world, creation of new media from scratch requires ample justification. Acts of synthesis, archiving, compression, and remix are valuable tools for leveraging information otherwise lost to the unsorted heap. These verbs are ways to construct something new from pre-existing media objects, or at least finding some narrative or meaning within them.

A curator, classically, acts as composer and manager of (typically static) objects so as to convey narrative to a willing audience. The internet audience, however, expects more autonomy in the dynamic content they see. Self-selected content is simply a necessary tactic for navigating nearly limitless information. An explosion of digital “curation” caters to the desire, whether by user directly, tuned algorithms, or third-party human. This manifests when you select topics of interest on Quora and construct a twitter feed of only exactly the people you want. Going to a curated museum is now a relinquishing of control compared to typical digital art consumption, which comes mashed-up through various media platforms.

Even with stream moderation, the modern media viewer is accustomed to lack of coherence between adjacent content blocks. In your tumblr dashboard, a peer-reviewed journal article can sit immediately above an anonymously submitted shitpost. We don’t blink. In an arrangement of DOM blocks, each bit of media similarly carries its own context, history, and qualia. I posit we can effectively navigate our feeds not because we can rapidly jump between the context captured by each DOM block, but rather because we interpolate narrative and construct cohesion. Adjacency implies connection and synthesis, or, in the words of John Berger:
[An image reproduction] becomes itself the reference point for other images. The meaning of an image is changed according to what one sees immediately beside it or what comes immediately after it. (Ways Of Seeing)

Marius Watz, in a response on the New Aesthetic, writes on tumblr image culture: “Its art is juxtaposition: If we put this next to that and this other thing, surely a new understanding will emerge.” To be fair, there are uncountably many combinations that may be devoid of meaning—all I mean to point out is that a diptych is a third object, beyond the original two, with the possibility of value. Some find artistic practice in the form of a relentless stream of rectangles. People go nuts over releases of image dumps from Moodmail and JJJJound, and the Lost Image Desk is making professional practice of it.

(A scan of contemporary sculpture demonstrates that selection and arrangement of objects—often found or folk objects—is an ongoing trend. The viewer is trusted with finding meaning in the arrangement, selection, formal qualities, cultural context, and more in a relational tradition.)

HTML is perfectly built for image adjacency—a blank and infinite canvas, empowered by right-click “Copy Image Address.” Our expansive tumblrs and pinterest boards act as collected and performed narratives, collages of found digital media.
[Traditional] collages, […] were probably laid out carefully, aided by facsimiles, white-out, and tape, existed alongside the book, rather than being subsumed or created through the process of publishing and distribution, as is often the case with internet ‘collage’. Computers conceal distance; their collage move consists of juxtaposing elements that might be stored hundreds or thousands of miles apart, giving an illusion of spatial continuity. (Seth Price, Teen Image)

Traditional art collage used the intrigue and power in composing elements pulled from diverse sources. Meaning constructed by selection, editing, and combination. The HTML collage, however, is copy-pasted. What is the HTML-native collage?

I call it the “Arrangement Collage”—rectangular, transcontextual compositions of, ostensibly, found media. The arrangement collage does less work for the viewer than traditional collage: elements are kept fully intact rather than trimmed for blended. The composition often mitigates interaction between elements and instead celebrates raw adjacency.
When the historical avant-garde used valorized cultural objects such as the Mona Lisa or a violin, it profaned, overpowered, and destroyed them before going on to aestheticize them. In contrast, contemporary art uses mass-cultural things virtually intact. (Boris Groys, On The New)

The arrangement collage, while easy to construct in print, is truly native to the web, in which all objects are, by default, level rectangles, context-switching is the norm, and media to compose with is bountiful.

Our feeds, plentiful in the digital landscape, help populate the arrangement collage. Tumblr, ostensibly a micro-blogging site, is largely used for image collection; FFFFound is legendary for its contextless stream of collected imagery (and as birthing the name for JJJJound, when Justin Saunders couldn’t get an account); and Buzzfeed publishes “articles” that are frankly just stacks of image macros. A proliferation of mindless image consumption concerns Bob Gill.
There’s nothing original. ‘The Culture’ is the great mass of images and ideas which bombard us every day, and therefore shape the way we think visually. Only by recognising The Culture’s presence and its power, can designers move away from the clichés it promotes.

Irrefutably, the images we consume affect how we think, and what we can imagine. Gill’s words should be considered, and the internet-native should stay aware of “the clichés” promoted. Gill encourages “first-hand” research, but this points at a cultural gap—there is no line between reality and the internet; “first-hand” research takes place on the social web. In-person discussion and close examination of physical objects can be romanticized, but it should not detract from the fact that meaningful discussion and critical consumption can happen in a digital landscape as well.

Of deeper concern is the stripping of value from imagery in overabundance. Edition MK’s 2010 DDDDoomed (the name, I assume, another reference to FFFFound) gets at the kernel of this problem: Image Aggregators (“IAs”—such as JJJJound and other blogs), which typically present images contextless alongside hundreds of others, can strip imagery of its power. IAs do work that is weaker, semiotically, than traditional collage, and less organized than archiving (which is often a process of attaching or generating metadata, whereas IAs frequently remove it). Images that find political power within a context are reduced to purely aesthetic objects in the stream. If you are a tumblr fiend, this very likely rings true: the multitude of streams filled with gorgeous scenery, motivational quotes, and supermodel women quickly reduce this imagery to banality and objectification.
We [distance ourselves] from our critical faculties as we slide into models of passive spectatorship that reinforce our passivity by promoting a one-way mode of cultural consumption. […] Continuous over-stimulation leads to desensitisation. (Peter Buwert, “Defamiliarization, Brecht and Criticality in Graphic Design” in Modes of Criticism 2: Critique of Method)

The arrangement collage might serve as a tool in this battle against desensitization. In Buwert’s essay, referenced above, he describes how Brecht’s famous defamiliarization of the theater encouraged “a condition of active critical spectatorship within the audience.” DDDDoomed is lamenting the supposed death of this critical spectator, replaced with the numb and passive viewer. Buwert is less concerned with context/lessness than Edition MK, and instead focuses on familiarity.

There are valiant efforts towards an inclusion of context and metadata with online imagery, but it is not built into the structure of the internet. Flickr and twitter use image covers to dissuade copy-pasting (circumnavigable by screen-shotting) and Mediachain attempts to inextricably tie media to metadata using blockchain methods. As of writing, however, the JPG is not going anywhere, and the ease of downloading and re-uploading an image far surpasses digging to find its source. Entropy is not on our side, and Google’s reverse image search will never be quite fast or comprehensive enough to keep up.

Walter Benjamin might lament the loss of contextual sensitivity, as it comes intertwined with a loss of “aura.” The authenticity that drives Benjamin’s aura is dependent on the idea of an original—which, in internet ecosystems, simply isn’t a relevant concept, as the original and reproduction can be… [more]
lukaswinklerprins  2016  frankchimero  arrangementcollage  web  online  feeds  juxtaposition  canon  curation  collections  tumblr  html  webdev  form  imagery  images  webnative  decomposition  composition  peterbuwert  aggregation  ffffound  justinsaunders  bobgill  sethprice  moodmail  lostimagedesk  waysofseeing  johnberger  dom  xml  xhtml  marshallmcluhan 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Missing the feed. — Scatological Sensibilities
[Also here: https://are.na/block/2485326 ]

[Related (via Allen): http://reallifemag.com/just-randomness/ ]

"So why the focus on the feed?

What does the want of an unfiltered linear feed mean? What are people really asking for when they ask for that? What pain are they solving for when they make this request?

A linear chronologically ordered feed is predictable. Its not hiding anything, its not wrestling control away from you. It isn't manipulating you in a way you can't ascertain. That should be the baseline.

Arguing for algorithmic feeds is fine, but it should never take away a users sense of control. If something is hidden, it better damn well be because I asked the system to explicitly hide that kind of thing from me. I don't want some hidden algorithm tuned to manipulate me, and I especially don't want it presented to me under a guise of paternalism. That smells like bullshit.

But of course Facebook hasn't done that. They started giving all the 'likes' you had liked pages, and handed control over to those pages to random people. Suddenly your feed was full of content from brands who had snuck in thru girardian style mimetic signaling good. And they're using it to manipulate us, as far as we can tell...

And its creepy.
“So half the Earth's Internet population is using Facebook. They are a site, along with others, that has allowed people to create an online persona with very little technical skill, and people responded by putting huge amounts of personal data online. So the result is that we have behavioral, preference, demographic data for hundreds of millions of people, which is unprecedented in history. And as a computer scientist, what this means is that I've been able to build models that can predict all sorts of hidden attributes for all of you that you don't even know you're sharing information about.”
Your social media “likes” espose more than you think [https://www.ted.com/talks/jennifer_golbeck_the_curly_fry_conundrum_why_social_media_likes_say_more_than_you_might_think/transcript ]

People started complaining they couldn't see all their friends. But the options at the time ran counter to Facebook's intention of being a platform for celebrities, brands and community building thru pages. They are only just now undoing this crappy mechanism design mistake.

Even their ads don't admit the mistake. They talk about friends and friends of friends. and all the crap that started polluting the feed. But the cats out of the bag and the ecosystem is polluted with people who have built up lives around those pages.

Facebook Here Together (UK) [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4zd7X98eOs ]

And when we step back and wonder what is going on?
We see something fishy and it smells rotten.
Facebook moves 1.5bn users out of reach of new European privacy law [https://amp.theguardian.com/technology/2018/apr/19/facebook-moves-15bn-users-out-of-reach-of-new-european-privacy-law ]

TL;DR: Is this Loss?

The incentives aren't there, and the arguments for changing this are misunderstood. Which is why I deleted my Facebook even though its the only way I can contact my dad.

I miss my dad.

And now you know my perspective."
feeds  algorithms  twitter  facebook  paternalism  socialmedia  control  trust  2018  nicholasperry 
july 2018 by robertogreco
recalibrating your sites – the ANOVA
"Not too long ago, I felt the need to change the stream of personalities and attitudes that were pouring into my head, and it’s been remarkable.

This was really the product of idiosyncratic personal conditions, but it’s ended up being a good intellectual exercise too. I had to rearrange a few things in my digital social life. And concurrently I had realized that my sense of the world was being distorted by the flow of information that was being deposited into my brain via the internet. I hadn’t really lost a sense of what the “other side” thinks politically; I’m still one of those geezers who forces himself to read Reason and the Wall Street Journal op/ed page and, god help me, National Review. But I had definitely lost a sense of the mental lives of people who did not occupy my various weird interests.

What were other people thinking about, at least as far as could be gleaned by what they shared online? What appeared to be a big deal to them and what didn’t? I had lost my sense of social proportion. I couldn’t tell if the things my friends were obsessing about were things that the rest of the world was obsessing about. Talking to IRL friends that don’t post much or at all online helped give me a sense that I was missing something. But I didn’t know what.

No, I had to use the tools available to me to dramatically change the opinions and ideas and attitudes that were coming flowing into my mental life. And it had become clear that, though I have an RSS feed and I peruse certain websites and publications regularly, though I still read lots of books and physical journals and magazines, the opinions I was receiving were coming overwhelmingly through social media. People shared things and commented on what they shared on Facebook and Twitter, they made clear what ideas were permissible and what weren’t on Facebook and Twitter, they defined the shared mental world on Facebook and Twitter. They created a language that, if you weren’t paying attention, looked like the lingua franca. I’m sure there are people out there who can take all of this in with the proper perspective and not allow it to subtly shape your perception of social attitudes writ large. But I can’t.

It’s all particularly disturbing because a lot of what you see and don’t online is the product of algorithms that are blunt instruments at best.

So I set about disconnecting, temporarily, from certain people, groups, publications, and conversations. I found voices that popped up in my feeds a lot and muted them. I unfollowed groups and pages. I looked out for certain markers of status and social belonging and used them as guides for what to avoid. I was less interested in avoiding certain subjects than I was in avoiding certain perspectives, the social frames that we all use to understand the world. The news cycle was what it was; I could not avoid Trump, as wonderful as that sounds. But I could avoid a certain way of looking at Trump, and at the broader world. In particular I wanted to look past what we once called ideology: I wanted to see the ways in which my internet-mediated intellectual life was dominated by assumptions that did not recognize themselves as assumptions, to understand how the perspective that did not understand itself to be a perspective had distorted my vision of the world. I wanted to better see the water in which my school of fish swims.

Now this can be touchy – mutually connecting with people on social media has become a loaded thing in IRL relationships, for better or worse. Luckily both Facebook and Twitter give you ways to not see someone’s posts without them knowing and without severing the connection. Just make a list of people, pages, and publications that you want to take a diet from, and after a month or two of seeing how different things look, go back to following them. (Alternatively: don’t.) Really do it! The tools are there, and you can always revert back. Just keep a record of what you’re doing.

I was prepared for this to result in a markedly different online experience for me, and for it to somewhat change my perception of what “everyone” thinks, of what people are reading, watching, and listening to, etc. But even so, I’ve been floored by how dramatically different the online world looks with a little manipulation of the feeds. A few subjects dropped out entirely; the Twin Peaks reboot went from being everywhere to being nowhere, for example. But what really changed was the affect through which the world was presenting itself to me.

You would not be surprised by what my lenses appear to have been (and still largely to be): very college educated, very left-leaing, very New York, very media-savvy, very middlebrow, and for lack of a better word, very “cool.” That is, the perspective that I had tried to wean myself off of was made up of people whose online self-presentation is ostentatiously ironic, in-joke heavy, filled with cultural references that are designed to hit just the right level of obscurity, and generally oriented towards impressing people through being performatively not impressed by anything. It was made up of people who are passionately invested in not appearing to be passionately invested in anything. It’s a sensibility that you can trace back to Gawker and Spy magazine and much, much further back than that, if you care to.

Perhaps most dramatic was the changes to what – and who – was perceived as a Big Deal. By cutting out a hundred voices or fewer, things and people that everybody talks about became things and people that nobody talks about. The internet is a technology for creating small ponds for us to all be big fish in. But you change your perspective just slightly, move over just an inch, and suddenly you get a sense of just how few people know about you or could possibly care. It’s oddly comforting, to be reminded that even if you enjoy a little internet notoriety, the average person on the street could not care less who you are or what you do. I recommend it.

Of course, there are profound limits to this. My feeds are still dominantly coming from a few overlapping social cultures. Trimming who I’m following hasn’t meant that I’m suddenly connected to more high school dropouts, orthodox Jews, senior citizens, or people who don’t speak English. I would never pretend that this little exercise has given me a truly broad perspective. The point has just been to see how dramatically a few changes to my digital life could alter my perception of “the conversation.” And it’s done that. More than ever, I worry that our sense of shared political assumptions and the perceived immorality of the status quo is the result of systems that exclude a large mass of people, whose opinions will surely matter in the political wars ahead.

I am now adding some of what I cut back in to my digital life. The point was never really to avoid particular publications or people. I like some of what and who I had cut out very much. The point is to remain alive to how arbitrary and idiosyncratic changes in the constant flow of information can alter our perception of the human race. It’s something I intend to do once a year or so, to jolt myself back into understanding how limiting my perspective really is.

Everyone knows, these days, that we’re living in digitally-enabled bubbles. The trouble is that our instincts are naturally to believe that everyone else is in a bubble, or at least that their bubbles are smaller and with thicker walls. But people like me – college educated, living in an urban enclave, at least socially liberal, tuned in to arts and culture news and criticism, possessed of the vocabulary of media and the academy, “savvy” – you face unique temptations in this regard. No, I don’t think that this kind of bubble is the same as someone who only gets their news from InfoWars and Breitbart. But the fact that so many people like me write the professional internet, the fact that the creators of the idioms and attitudes of our newsmedia and cultural industry almost universally come from a very thin slice of the American populace, is genuinely dangerous.

To regain perspective takes effort, and I encourage you all to expend that effort, particularly if you are an academic or journalist. Your world is small, and our world is big."
freddiedeboer  2017  internet  twitter  facebook  filterbubbles  socialmedia  relationships  algorithms  echochambers  academia  journalism  culture  society  diversity  perspective  listening  web  media  feeds 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Ghost in the machine: Snapchat isn’t mobile-first — it’s something else entirely — Free Code Camp
"Snapchat is not mobile-first, and it’s not really an app anymore. Nor is it a meta-app platform at this point like Facebook Messenger is angling to become (at least not yet). Snapchat is a true creature of mobile, a living, breathing embodiment of everything that our camera-enabled, networked pocket computer can possibly offer. And in its cooption of smartphones into a true social operating system, we see the inklings of what is beyond mobile.
When I open Snapchat up to the camera, I can’t shake the feeling that the ghost is banging on the glass, trying to break out into the world."
snapchat  benbasche  2016  photography  ar  augmentedreality  design  ux  ui  media  susansontag  nathanjurgenson  cameras  feeds  mobile  mobilefirst  twitter  facebook  instagram  experience  socialmedia  smartphones  uber  authenticallymobile  evanspiegel 
july 2016 by robertogreco
2, 6: Neighborhoods, the Anti-Algorithm
"So what does this have to do with my neighborhood?

G.K. Chesterton, in a collection of essays titled Heretics, wrote:
"The man who lives in a small community lives in a much larger world. He knows much more of the fierce variety and uncompromising divergences of men…In a large community, we can choose our companions. In a small community, our companions are chosen for us. Thus in all extensive and highly civilized society groups come into existence founded upon sympathy, and shut out the real world more sharply than the gates of a monastery."

That was 1905. Long before the internet would give us the largest community of all. Yet, the oft-cited "filter bubble" of the internet is Chesterton's community of choice. The easy community. The one that just happens because we want what we want. And in a less troubled world, that wouldn't be much to fuss about. But in our world, the "filter bubble" is dangerous. It makes fear, hatred, and oppression all the more abundant, both online and off. Before the internet, we called "filter bubbles" segregation. We call them "filter bubbles" now because its easier to see them as a manifestation of technology than the effect of our choices. Because if we saw them for what they truly are, we'd have to call them segregation again. We thought we left that behind. But, no, we haven't. Segregation, of every kind, is the entropy against which we all struggle, the product of bodies living in time, wired down to our cells to survive at all costs, responding to their loudest signal, fear. Chesterton understood that the principal challenge we humans are given to work out in this life is each other, and that nowhere better than next door is that challenge met.

But in Facebook's world, next-door has no greater offer of intimacy than across town, or state, or country. In the large community, as Chesterton said, we can choose our companions. That's the appeal of the network. Community on my terms. Forget that we know it's not good for us. Or that it's dangerous. Forget that it's a shinier, faster form of segregation. Forget that it's invisible and layered, making it easier to explain away. None of this is Facebook's fault. If it wasn't them, then it would be AOL, or Friendster, or MySpace, or any of the many networks that came before it. We can't blame them — any of them — for segregation, however technological its 21st century incarnation may be. But we can blame them for selling it. The economic benefit of segregation is nothing new; it makes selling things easier. But segregation is Facebook's secret sauce. It's an economic imperative. Like just about every "platform" of the internet today, it is ruthlessly driven to box each one of us in. To confine us to an echo-chamber. Not for our own benefit, but for theirs. Because it makes it easier for them to control us. And no, not to usher in some dramatic, Illuminati-style new world order. It's hardly that interesting! It's to sell tiny display ads and make heaps of money. That's it. Controlling us is simply an act of inventory management.

Of course, it's easy to look past all of this. To point at the good that thrives on the network — and of that, there is plenty. The lonely who are no longer lonely because of it. The oppressed who grow more powerful when bound together. But to celebrate the network's role in that only heightens my awareness that it is something we could have — should have — without it. It's too easy, also, to celebrate the engines of our ingenuity. See this? Look what we have made! But that we are as enamored with the algorithm as we so clearly are is an indicator that our hearts are way out of sync with our minds. We have engineered such sophisticated tools for connecting, ordering, and studying ourselves; it's an astounding achievement. It's one we might even celebrate if it were truly an open project for the common good. But it isn't. Not even close. So why do we pretend that it is? The network is not ours. It's the other way around. We are the network's. To sell. That is, unless we get off the network. Or at least spend a whole lot less time there.

My neighbors have convinced me that community is not only of the network. Saying such a thing sounds trite. But it's another thing entirely to live it. Here's an example: Last year, the doctor and his wife down the street decided to organize weekly neighborhood dinners. Each Sunday evening, someone hosts dinner for the neighborhood. When I first heard the idea, I was aghast. Weekly! As in, every week? No, I thought, monthly, maybe. But we went to a few, then we hosted one of our own — which wasn't nearly as much work as we thought it would be — and we've regularly gone to most of the others since. It's not obligatory. It's not like if you go to one, you must go to them all. Or even that if you go to one, you must host one. Few people have gone to every dinner, but many of us have gone to most of them. And many of us have hosted one.

Spending this time together — committing to it — is how the work gets done, not the Facebook group. It's through being together, in each other's homes, in real life. Don't get me wrong, it's no utopia. People get on each other's nerves. Not everyone will become best friends. We're talking about people here. But that's the point. The network can't sell that. It can sell our attention, but the less of our lives we live on the network, the less our attention feels like us. That's the control we still have. Eventually, hopefully, leveraging that control could change the economics of the network. Consider the neighborhood the anti-algorithm."
2015  chrisbutler  facebook  socialnetworks  gkchesterson  difference  filterbubbles  algorithms  neighborhoods  discovery  community  communities  understanding  empathy  small  attention  feeds  segregation  diversity  technology  separation  togetherness  companionship  sympathy 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Can Algorithms Replace Your English Professor? — Who’s Afraid of Online Education? — Medium
"Algorithms are quickly becoming our new tastemakers and gatekeepers. Social media feeds are increasingly the most immediate source of news for many people, which means we are becoming more and more beholden to algorithms. Social media algorithms have been a popular topic of discussion lately, with people undertaking experiments on what happens when you “like” everything on Facebook, or when you refrain from “liking” anything. The Facebook algorithm is being held up as the primary reason why the #Ferguson protests are not showing up on user’s Facebook feeds, in comparison to Twitter, which is the only network that shows you what you choose to follow, rather than what its algorithm thinks you should. (Note that this may also be changing.)

Algorithms are becoming our curators. They show us—based on a secret, proprietary formula—what they think we want to see. In this experiment, Tim Herrara demonstrates that Facebook’s algorithm prefers to show its users older, more popular content than new content that has not been engaged with. Despite him trying to consume his entire Facebook feed for an entire day, he realized that he only saw 29% of new content produced by his network—and that for most users, that percentage is probably a lot lower. On Facebook there isn’t a way to bypass this algorithm, even if you select“most recent” posts rather than “most popular” posts in your setting (interestingly enough, I’ve heard reports that Facebook tends to secretly reset your settings back to “most popular” no matter what you do).

There’s a lot of controversy over the power that we are giving algorithms to display and represent our world to us. But these critiques miss an important point: we’ve never not had curators and filters. Before we had algorithms, we had “experts”, “authorities”, tastemakers—we had (or have)professors and academics, we had (have) institutions that studied things and told us what was important or unimportant about the world, we had (have) editors and publishers who decided what was “good” enough to be shared with the world. But the importance and reliabilty of these authorities and tastemakers is coming under serious fire because of the impact of some social media; for example in the reporting on Ferguson on major news networks versus Twitter. Furthermore, if you take the work of postcolonial studies critics like Edward Said seriously, much of our humanistic and scientific forms of research inquiry are hardly free of cultural prejudice, and are in fact informed and dictated by these modes of thinking.

Given all of this, I have two thoughts:

One. How is algorithmic selection actually similar to older modes of tastemaking and gatekeeping (i.e. experts and authorities who tell us what to value and what not to)? How is it different? Does either mode entertain the feedback of those who they serve (i.e., can you help train an algorithm to show you more of what you want, or can you have impact on your “experts” in having them study what you think is important?)

Two. A great deal of virtual ink has been spilled on whether educators are going to be replaced by online courses such as MOOCs. Less has been said, however, about the replacement of the tastemaking function of educators/researchers—especially in the humanities, our goal has been to train students to find value in what they otherwise might not, to make legible to our students modes of seeing and doing which depart from their own. Can an algorithm replace that tastemaking function? Put another way: instead of having the “best” news and information filtered to you by “experts” (your teachers, your professors, editors and publishers etc.), what happens when an algorithm starts taking over this process? Is this necessarily good, bad, or neither? And how similar is this filtering of information to previous modes of filtering? In other words—can an algorithm become smart enough to replace your English literature professor? And what would be the result of such a scenario?"

[via (great thread follows): https://twitter.com/Jessifer/status/502632112261169152 ]
adelinekoh  2014  algorithms  facebook  twitter  education  curation  curators  gatekeepers  tastemakers  trendsetters  mooc  moocs  tastemaking  experts  authority  authorities  humanism  humanities  power  control  academia  highereducation  highered  feeds  filters 
august 2014 by robertogreco
J.G. Ballard, Social Media Prophet | Space Canon
"All this, of course, will be mere electronic wallpaper, the background to the main programme in which each of us will be both star and supporting player. Every one of our actions during the day, across the entire spectrum of domestic life, will be instantly recorded on video-tape. In the evening we will sit back to scan the rushes, selected by a computer trained to pick out only our best profiles, our wittiest dialogue, our most affecting expressions filmed through the kindest filters, and then stitch these together into a heightened re-enactment of the day. Regardless of our place in the family pecking order, each of us within the privacy of our own rooms will be the star in a continually unfolding domestic saga, with parents, husbands, wives and children demoted to an appropriate starring role."
jgballard  socialmedia  201  internet  internetasfavoritebook  web  online  filters  claireevans  rushes  feeds  internetasliterature 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Adactio: Links—The true web « Snarkmarket
"The web’s walled gardens are threatened by the decentralised power of RSS.

Google is threatened by RSS. Google is closing down Google Reader.

Twitter is threatened by RSS. Twitter has switched off all of its RSS feeds.

Fuck ‘em.

It will dip and diminish, but will RSS ever go away? Nah. One of RSS’s weaknesses in its early days—its chaotic decentralized weirdness—has become, in its dotage, a surprising strength. RSS doesn’t route through a single leviathan’s servers. It lacks a kill switch."

[Referencing this http://snarkmarket.com/2013/8093 referencing this http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2013/06/big-up-to-the-rss-massive.html ]
2013  rss  googlereader  twitter  feeds  decentralization  jeremykeith 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The Pretty New Web and the Future of “Native” Advertising | The Awl
"Web publishing tools" were first about easy customization, from Blogger to Livejournal, with the last big monster being Tumblr. (Though the funny thing about Tumblr is, for all the time tweens put in to tweaking their "themes," nobody really reads their sites except by the internal "dashboard." So really, Tumblr was the genius publishing tool that transitioned us into "apps.") After Twitter, that's all really over. Twitter is for sure an "app" not a "website" or a "publishing tool"—it's not something you make "look like you." You don't bring Twitter to you and make it yours, you go to it.

Now one beloved troll, I mean, VISIONARY (totally same difference, no?), is calling for the end of web pages. …

The hot word in advertising right now is "native." If I hear "native" one more time this week, oof, I swear. As with all terms in advertising, it's a word that doesn't make much sense on its face."
reading  instapaper  dashboard  daringfireball  spam  ads  income  money  business  content  feeds  pages  stockandflow  flow  branch  svbtle  medium  2012  anildash  choiresicha  tumblr  twitter  nativeadvertising 
august 2012 by robertogreco
How Modern Life Is Like a Zombie Onslaught - NYTimes.com
"Every zombie war is a war of attrition. It’s always a numbers game. And it’s more repetitive than complex. In other words, zombie killing is philosophically similar to reading and deleting 400 work e-mails on a Monday morning or filling out paperwork that only generates more paperwork, or following Twitter gossip out of obligation, or performing tedious tasks in which the only true risk is being consumed by the avalanche. The principal downside to any zombie attack is that the zombies will never stop coming; the principal downside to life is that you will be never be finished with whatever it is you do.

The Internet reminds of us this every day."
infooverload  flow  internet  web  online  modernlife  cv  tv  television  twitter  email  paperwork  feeds  2010  chuckklosterman 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Unlink Your Feeds - A Manifesto.
"You need to unlink your feeds.

I understand why you did it. I’ve made the same mistake myself. But it’s hurting your friends, you, & the Internet. You need to stop.

You need to stop automatically dumping your feeds from one account into another.

I know it’s tempting. New service, not sure how you’ll keep up w/ ever demanding maw & there’s the “import your content” button, right there in sign-up process. A quick trip through a login screen or an OAuth link & there you are: All your stuff automatically aggregated…

No muss, no fuss, right?

This is an illusory solution. It’s a false idol. It’s contributing to noise pollution…It’s diminishing the quality of your output and of others’ experiences.

You need to unlink your feeds and put a tiny bit more effort into using each service for what it is.

More [links to each of these topics]:It’s hurting your friends.It’s hurting you.It’s hurting the Internet.There’s a better way."
twitter  manifesto  socialmedia  facebook  feeds  rss  del.icio.us  tumblr  timmaly  social  socialnetworking  linkpollution  automation  manifestos 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Feed
"Do you have an appetite for information?

The Feed is a Google Reader client for your iPad that lets you decide how to consume all the juicy content of your feeds.

The Feed’s flexible and uncluttered interface gives you a better overview of everything on the menu while a versatile filtering system and two different zoom levels make content more appetizing and digestible.

And don’t worry about finishing everything on your plate: The Feed uses proportionately sized stacks to illustrate your read and unread items, rather than badges that cause unnecessary stress. Bon Appétit!"
googlereader  rss  feedreader  aggregator  ipad  applications  thefeed  feeds 
november 2010 by robertogreco
The iPad Pulse Reader Scales the Charts - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com
"Pulse is a stylish and easy-to-use news aggregator. Users select which news sources to follow and the latest articles are presented in a grid of texts and photos. Users can finger-swipe back and forth across various articles from a single news source, or up and down through up to 20 news sources.
ipad  aggregator  aggregation  newspapers  apple  applications  feeds  readers  rss 
july 2010 by robertogreco
MediaShift Idea Lab . Our Friends Become Curators of Twitter-Based News | PBS
"Maybe I am the outlier here, the one who spends too much time reading news and too much time following the evolution of thought and interests of certain individuals. But I also feel like this is a general trend for everyone - that we all are increasingly depending on individuals and not organizations to curate the day's news for us."
socialmedia  digg  news  reddit  twitter  curation  filters  feeds  information  blogging  blogs  davidsasaki 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Official Google Reader Blog: May we recommend...
"Long time readers of our blog will note that we occasionally throw in links to crazy, interesting, and fun items in our posts. You may be wondering, “How can I find such interesting content to share?” Today we’re launching two new features that are designed to help you do just that"
rss  feeds  recommendations  googlereader 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Unlink Your Feeds - Format for your medium.
"All of the characters used for placing the message in a context on Twitter are noise now. They aren’t clickable. They don’t make any sense. They don’t refer to anything (there is no @chr1sa on Facebook). They may as well be assembly code. Why are you polluting your Facebook stream with assembly code?"
twitter  code  links  feeds  facebook  context 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Docent: Your guide to galleries « Flickr Blog
"Galleries are an exceptional way for members to curate their favorite Flickr photos. Don’t you wish you had a guide to help you find Flickr galleries from trusted sources? Happily, developer Paul Mison brings us Docent, which is now available in the App Garden. Docent is your “friendly Flickr guide” who finds your contacts’ galleries and notifies you of new galleries as they’re created. It’s a fun and super easy way to see what your friends are curating, and all the links take you directly to the galleries, so that you can read your contact’s commentary, leave a comment, or visit the photos to add as faves. You can also get notifications pushed to you by using the application’s Atom feed; just add it to your news reader and the content comes to you!"
photography  flickr  tools  docent  galeries  feeds 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Journalism 2.0 | Mark Briggs | A conversation about journalism and technology » Too much information to follow? Build your own feed generator
"As I pretty much live inside my RSS readers, I find myself bouncing around between different websites copying and pasting feed links far more than I should. For example, if I want to create RSS feeds for the keyword ‘obama’, I don’t want to have to go to Google News, Yahoo News, Delicious, Flickr, Bing, Youtube and all those other services to retrieve those feeds. Try as I might, I couldn’t find any web service that would produce feeds for a given search term across multiple social media services and news sites.
coding  journalism  programming  search  netvibes  aggregation  rss  feeds  diy  data  howto  webdev  webdesign 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The World Question Center: The Edge Annual Question — 2010: How is the internet changing the way you think?: Tim O'Reilly: Pattern Recognition
"It used to be the case that there was a canon, a body of knowledge shared by all educated men and women. Now, we need the skills of a scout, the ability to learn, to follow a trail, to make sense out of faint clues, and to recognize the way forward through confused thickets. We need a sense of direction that carries us onward through the wood despite our twists and turns. We need "soft eyes" that take in everything we see, not just what we are looking for.

The information river rushes by. Usenet, email, the world wide web, RSS, twitter: each generation carrying us faster than the one before.

But patterns remain. You can map a river as well as you can map a mountain or a wood. You just need to remember that the sandbars may have moved the next time you come by."
timoreilly  flow  feeds  streams  information  knowledge  21stcenturyskills  canon  learning  adaptability  tcsnmy  edge  2010 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Fraser Speirs - Blog - Hidden Internet: Delicious Network
"One of the most consistently interesting feeds in my RSS reader is my Delicious Network. What's my Delicious Network? It's an aggregation of the Delicious bookmarks of people I choose to make part of my network on that site.
via:britta  feeds  rss  linkblogs  sharing  del.icio.us 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Tweeteorites - Leaderboard
"Tweeteorites scans favorites from Twitter users and builds "favorite streams" of what a person’s friends are favoriting."
twitter  aggregator  feeds  favorites  tools  applications 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: Weblog: The Long Tail of Humor
"As I’ve used it, I’ve found I like Tweeteorites better than the Favrd leaderboard for the same reason I like Foursquare but not Yelp; or the reason I like the Last.fm page that shows what my friends are listening to, but not actual music recommendations; or the reason I like my Delicious network or Tumblr dashboard but not Digg. The latter services are usually only reliable ways to find the broadest possible stuff, because things have to appeal to the masses to bubble up to the top. The former services, however, show me what individual people whose opinion I respect think is cool simply by allowing me to observe them appreciating (if this sounds familiar, it’s because I’ve written about this principle before)."
social  media  recommendations  aggregator  serendipity  tweeteorites  tumblr  del.icio.us  feeds  longtail 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Weeknotes.com | Talent & Fervor
"Weeknotes are updates about what your business has been doing over the past seven days or so.
aggregator  berg  schulzeandwebb  berglondon  transparency  workplace  business  tcsnmy  storytelling  notes  weeknotes  webservice  collaboration  blogging  feeds 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Black&White™ — Slaves of the feed – This is not the realtime we’ve been looking for
"Constantly checking our feeds for new information, we seem to be hoping to discover something of interest, something that we can share with our networks, something that we can use, something that we can talk about, something that we can act on, something we didn’t know we didn’t know.

It almost seems like an obsession and many critics of digital technology would argue that by consuming information this way we are running the danger of destroying social interaction between humans. One might even say that we have become slaves of the feed."
aggregation  rss  overload  feeds  information  attention  twitter  realtime  internet  cv  infooverload  flow  filtering  curation 
december 2009 by robertogreco
RSS never blocks you or goes down: why social networks need to be decentralized - O'Reilly Radar
"Recurring outages on major networking sites such as Twitter and LinkedIn, along with incidents where Twitter members were mysteriously dropped for days at a time, have led many people to challenge the centralized control exerted by companies running social networks. Whether you're a street demonstrator or a business analyst, you may well have come to depend on Twitter. We may have been willing to build our virtual houses on shaky foundations might when they were temporary beach huts; but now we need to examine the ground on which many are proposing to build our virtual shopping malls and even our virtual federal offices."
rss  socialnetworks  collaboration  decentralized  networking  networks  decentralization  socialnetworking  socialmedia  open  feeds  twitter  facebook  internet  distributed  rsscloud  syndication 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — Fever and the Future of Feed Readers
"Feed readers as we’ve known them are dying, but it’s as yet unclear what will take their place. Filtering feeds for relevance algorithmically seems all but fruitless; filtering through the social graph is only a slight improvement, but misses the rare content that may only strike a chord with a small audience...there’s more work to be done & more businesses to emerge in this field. Social networks alone aren’t focused enough tools to bubble up & share quality content. My hope is that a surplus open data of the sort we’re trying hard to share at Twitter will help spawn a new generation of tools to manage the flood of content... [not] a problem that Twitter, or any other pipeline for information, can solve on its own. With all that said, perhaps the right approach really is to abdicate one’s consumption of content to whatever you’re passively exposed to, & to occupy your mind with other things. The act of creation is almost always self-affirming, & the act of consumption so rarely is."
rss  feeds  aggregator  filtering  fever  web  2009  infooverload  informationmanagement  consumption  creation  creating  discovery 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — Fever and the Future of Feed Readers
"Feed readers as we’ve known them are dying, but it’s as yet unclear what will take their place. Filtering feeds for relevance algorithmically seems all but fruitless; filtering through the social graph is only a slight improvement, but misses the rare content that may only strike a chord with a small audience...there’s more work to be done & more businesses to emerge in this field. Social networks alone aren’t focused enough tools to bubble up & share quality content. My hope is that a surplus open data of the sort we’re trying hard to share at Twitter will help spawn a new generation of tools to manage the flood of content... [not] a problem that Twitter, or any other pipeline for information, can solve on its own. With all that said, perhaps the right approach really is to abdicate one’s consumption of content to whatever you’re passively exposed to, & to occupy your mind with other things. The act of creation is almost always self-affirming, & the act of consumption so rarely is."
rss  feeds  aggregator  filtering  fever  web  2009  infooverload  informationmanagement  consumption  creation  creating  discovery 
july 2009 by robertogreco
pachube.apps | connecting environments, patching the planet
"Pachube is a service that enables you to connect, tag and share real time sensor data from objects, devices, buildings and environments around the world. Here, we collect together Pachube apps that create/modulate input feeds or make use of output feeds. Sign up for Pachube here!"
applications  pachube  visualization  realtime  sensing  sensors  tracking  rss  sharing  interface  feeds  api  software 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Fever° Red hot. Well read. [much like the Snark Market concept "Compress into diamonds": http://snarkmarket.com/blog/snarkives/technosnark/compress_into_diamonds/index.html]
"Only $30 Your current feed reader is full of unread items. You’re hesitant to subscribe to any more feeds because you can't keep up with your existing subs. Maybe you've even abandoned feeds altogether.
rss  applications  mac  osx  iphone  aggregator  webapp  feeds  aggregation  feedreader  software  ios 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Social Networks: The Case for a "Pause" Button | 43 Folders
"You can pause your newspaper delivery, and the newspaper never complains. Unfortunately most people online haven’t figured out that they’re just another publisher in a crowded space. Which is kind of a shame, because I think accepting that mantle of “publisher” might improve many peoples’ contributions as well as add a useful layer or two to their epidermis."
friending  jaiku  merlinmann  facebook  socialnetworking  microblogging  43folders  socialnetworks  interaction  twitter  attention  friendfeed  infooverload  feeds  flow  news  rss 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Fake following
"This is a little bit genius. One of the new features of FriendFeed (a Twitter-like thingie) is "fake following". That means you can friend someone but you don't see their updates. That way, it appears that you're paying attention to them when you're really not. Just like everyone does all the time in real life to maintain their sanity. Rex calls it "most important feature in the history of social networks" and I'm inclined to agree. It's one of the few new social features I've seen that makes being online buddies with someone manageable and doesn't just make being social a game or competition."
socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  friendfeed  kottke  flow  infooverload  culture  interaction  technology  twitter  feeds  news  rss 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Musing about lifestreams, subscribe-aggregation and publish-aggregation - "current lifestreams capture things that are happening or have happened; what we now need to do is augment all that with lifestreams of things that are in the future...
"Our intentions. Our wants and needs...I want to be able to say “I’m landing at SFO in 10 hours, I’m in the market for a Toyota Prius, 3 days, drop off Sausalito.” I want people who are interested in meeting that need to respond to me."
comments  blogging  aggregator  dopplr  upcoming  spacetime  timelines  future  lifestreams  internet  feeds  rss  flickr  twitter  43things  serendipity 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Peripheral vision and ambient knowledge :: Blog :: Headshift
"We need to let people organise their inputs by exposing all relevant information in granular feed form and then provide smart aggregation and tagging tools to create a personal eco-system of content, cues and links."
via:preoccupations  filtering  infooverload  flow  feeds  rss  tagging  tags  content  information  management  knowledge  ambient 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Phantom Fish - Byline - Google Reader on the go. [video here: http://www.phantomfish.com/bylinevideotour.html]
"Simply use your free Google Reader account to subscribe to websites you'd like to keep track of. Byline will automatically bring you new content, putting thousands of RSS and Atom feeds at your fingertips."
iphone  rss  applications  googlereader  google  feeds  mobile  offline  sync  csiap  aggregator  ios 
july 2008 by robertogreco
twitterfeed.com : feed your blog to twitter - post RSS to twitter automatically
"Our server will check your blog's feed at the specified interval and post any new items to your twitter account. You just sit back and relax!"
twitter  rss  feeds  blogging  microblogging  services  aggregator  via:foe 
june 2008 by robertogreco
8 Useful Tips To Manage And Avoid RSS Overload
"Make a ' Primary ' or ' Everyday ' Folder, Make a ' News ' Folder, Use Keyboard Shortcuts, Track your time, Create an ' Unread ' Folder, Mark all as read when required, Search, Analyze once in a while"
feeds  howto  gtd  rss  overload  management  tips 
june 2008 by robertogreco
TwitterLocal
"TwitterLocal lets you generate an RSS or XML Feed to filter out Tweets around a certain area. Just enter a city, state, postal code, choose the range of miles you want to include, and hit the button. You'll instantly get URLs to add to your RSS reader."
twitter  local  rss  feeds  aggregator  via:preoccupations  location 
june 2008 by robertogreco
The Stats Are In: You're Just Skimming This Article - ReadWriteWeb
"Are there people who have a natural ability to scan and process massive amounts of information, yet still be able to find the signal amongst the noise?"
reading  web  productivity  usability  internet  information  statistics  overload  readwriteweb  feeds  rss 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Mildly Diverting: RSS aggregation as a friend filter
"So a social aggregator with degree-of-intimacy - where you can choose elements of a person's behaviour to subscribe to...with a few smart bits at back which would desubscribe or deemphasise sections...according to your consumption behaviour."
attention  filtering  friends  intimacy  ambientintimacy  feeds  social  filters  semanticweb  via:preoccupations 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Textism: Please stop doing this [making user choose between multiple feed formats]
"Surely any semantic machine doing semantic machine-reading will be semantically smart enough to know what to look for. Do we really need to think about it every time? Just a feed that works will do nicely kthxbai."
rss  trends  usability  feeds  simplicity  format  web  deanallen  textism 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Welcome to the Blogosphere Twitter! : The Blog Herald
"Have you claimed your Twitter feed on Technorati profile yet? This may be the perfect time to do so because Technorati is now indexing Twitter. It heatens up the debate whether Twitter is a form of blogging or not."
technorati  twitter  blogs  feeds  rss  blogging 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Socialthing!
"See everything that's going on with your friends in all the sites you use, easily figure out where you're missing connections with your friends, interact with multiple sites at once, and more!"
lifestreams  lifestreaming  feeds  twitter  aggregator  socialnetworking  socialthing  onlinetoolkit  facebook  flickr  lastfm  socialgraph  last.fm 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Egos
"Featuring the mouths, minds, and egos of folks like Scoble, Cuban, Trump, and Winer."
aggregator  blogger  blogging  blogs  alltop  feeds  socialmedia 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Second Brain™ - All Your Content
"* Keep track of your content in a single library * Import content from your favorite services * Browse and search all your content * Remix content into collections * Share your lifestream"
aggregator  lifestreams  content  secondbrain  sharing  social  socialnetworking  metadata  feeds  flickr  online  web  onlinetoolkit 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Read what matters - AideRSS
"AideRSS is an intelligent assistant that saves time and keeps you on top of the latest news. We research every story and filter out the noise, allowing you to focus on what matters most."
rss  feeds  filtering  aggregator  algorithms  attention  productivity  rankings  ratings  popularity 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Pulse Laser: Snap
"What I’ve previously suggested is that we need a kind of RSS for interactions–and you can see a mockup here. At the time, the concept got some attention."
rss  mattwebb  internet  web  interaction  feeds  productivity  patterns  attention  workflow  ux  ideas  schulzeandwebb  berg  berglondon 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Feed reading (kottke.org)
"All this folder business might seem overcomplicated, but I find that grouping feeds by mode helps greatly. And by mode, I mean when I'm reading link blogs, that's a different style than reading/skimming long-form blogs in the Always folder."
feeds  googlereader  rss  productivity  habits  howwework  reading  news  aggregator  web 
december 2007 by robertogreco
booktwo.org Notebook » The dea(r)th of Blogging
"I’ve noticed a trend in longtime bloggers, which I’m certainly a part of. Blogging less, linking more, generally winding down the straight blog in favour of a more distributed presence via Twitter, Delicious, videoblog apps like Seesmic."
rss  blogs  blogging  future  trends  writing  ambientintimacy  links  feeds  lifefeeds  aggregator 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Feevy home
"display content from other blogs at your website with just one simple html tag"
aggregator  blogs  blogging  tools  social  socialsoftware  css  collaboration  badges  generator  html  plugins  feeds  rss  wordpress  widgets 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Grazr, Recent Files
"Grazr.com offers free management of feeds and Reading lists. Registration is fast and easy."
rss  feeds  online  aggregator  onlinetoolkit  browsing  content  socialsoftware  sharing  services 
september 2007 by robertogreco
OUseful Info: And Then There Were Three, Err, Four, RSS Mashup Tools
"DAMIA - Data Mashup Fabric for Intranet Applications is IBM's new rival to the graphical feed mashup offerings from Yahoo (Pipes) and Microsoft (Popfly), and the text based environment from Google (Google mashup editor)."
rss  ibm  mashup  feeds 
september 2007 by robertogreco
FeedBlendr - blending RSS, Atom and RDF feeds into a single river of news!
"FeedBlendr lets you combine a bunch of feeds into one. Enter the URLs of any RSS, Atom or RDF feeds (news, blog, podcast or any other type) you'd like to blend into a single feed below."
aggregator  applications  blogging  blogs  del.icio.us  feeds  lifehacks  links  mashup  online  internet  services  rss  remix  tools  web  web2.0  website  webdesign  technology  tags  software  webdev 
july 2007 by robertogreco
H2O Playlist: Home
"H2O playlists are more than just a cool, sleek technology -- they represent a new way of thinking about education online. An H2O Playlist is a series of links to books, articles, and other materials that collectively explore an idea or set the stage for
bookmarks  learning  del.icio.us  socialsoftware  social  technology  online  links  reference  search  education  rss  resources  bookmarking  tagging  tags  folksonomy  taxonomy  feeds  academia  aggregator  archives  audio  bibliography  books  citation  collaboration  collaborative  collections  community  curriculum  directory  documentation  documents  information  knowledge  pedagogy 
may 2007 by robertogreco
H2O Playlist: Social Bookmarking - sort of...
"Links to support a presentation given at an OU eLearning Community Workshop. Looks at the evolution of my relationship with social bookmarking, moving from simple link collections and their exploition via embedded RSS feeds, to a more general take on boo
bookmarks  learning  del.icio.us  socialsoftware  social  technology  online  links  reference  search  education  rss  resources  bookmarking  tagging  tags  folksonomy  taxonomy  feeds 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Educational Feeds Directory
"Educational Feeds - Easily find educational feeds by searching or navigating Educational Feed directory."
education  feeds  rss  search 
march 2007 by robertogreco

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