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robertogreco : fieldtrips   18

In Praise of the Field Trip - Teacher in a Strange Land - Education Week Teacher
"I wondered--what is this field trip's ultimate purpose? How will the students apply what they have learned? What are their takeaways?

And--because these are the questions we hear most often in national policy discussion--was this content standards-based? Could it be delivered (and measured) more efficiently and effectively? Say, in a video or interactive computer game?

I'm going to go ahead and answer that question: No.

There is no replacement for the field trip. I know buses are expensive, ticket costs are soaring, and taking 30 ,60 or 100 kids on the road--even for a half day--is a monumental, fraught undertaking. But sometimes, you have to get out of Dodge, into the wider world.

Because leaving the desks and playground behind is much more than a treat, or a reward. It is--when done well--exactly what we should be doing with all children: making it possible for them to explore their world, sample new sights and sounds, interact in different ways. It's even common for children to experience local landmarks and institutions for the first time on a field trip.

A field trip is much more than just fitting new objects, buildings or facts into a mental framework, however. It's understanding that someone's mom or dad has volunteered to watch over you for a day, and must be listened to, and respected. It's the anticipation of a new experience. It's managing lunch, directional signs, backpack and a new restroom. It's being on your own in a roomful of precious objects, listening to an expert who isn't your teacher, and isn't on a screen.

Puff pieces on virtual field trips appear frequently in edu-media. These can be great supplementary instructional materials--pre-packaged, targeted to specific learning goals, a virtual glimpse of the Smithsonian for kids who live in rural Montana. But the non-virtual field trip--probably because it's not easy to set up and accomplish, and always subject to the unpredictable-- lingers in students' memory.

I remember clearly going to Deer Park, the "first grade trip" at Orchard View Elementary, and feeding deer from a flat-bottomed ice cream cone. There were brightly painted plywood cottages and a playground, and we ate our sack lunches at picnic tables. Awesome sauce. (This was the 1950s, mind you, when my family got two black-and-white channels on our new TV set.)

Here are some indelible things I learned on that trip: Deer can be friendly, but are not tame. Their most critical sense is smell, and they have a difficult time seeing the color red. Also: some of the room mothers who chaperoned the trip were smokers, lighting up their Pall Malls outside the fence at lunch, while other moms tut-tutted back at the picnic tables. (You might call that social-cue learning...)

Most of the enthusiasm for virtual field trips is prefaced by the assertion that a computer-based experience is cheap--or even free (with the obvious assumption, of course, that you have "free" devices for every child--and those devices all operate perfectly). In a time when students spend so much time being entertained, drilled and emotionally jolted in front of screens, why wouldn't you opt for a first-hand experience, even if the content was more pedestrian--the fire house, the local library or the apple orchard?

The Michigan Historical Center, in Lansing, offers a five-day immersive experience for local classrooms, bringing students to the museum every day for a week. Students are not led past exhibits (or sent on competitive "treasure hunts")--but instead sit down for discussion, sketching items, journal-writing and share-outs around essential questions about how Michigan was settled and shaped. Margaret Holtschlag, who developed the Big History Lesson program, in 1999, understood the value of letting questions bubble up, allowing students time to wonder what an unfamiliar farm implement might do--or what the impact of a wave of immigrants might mean to an industry or region.

So why don't more museums, zoos, galleries and science centers offer week-long, in-depth programs? It's not the money--money can be raised or donated. It's fear about the time away from tested skills and content. Think about that.

I looked around for the obvious teacher(s) at the MIM, thinking to approach and compliment them on their students' behavior and enthusiasm, and to congratulate them on whatever preparation had made the kids so responsive and excited about the musical wonders they were immersed in. But I couldn't tell which of the adults was Teacher. That, in itself, is success.

Go see the MIM, if you're in Phoenix. It's incredible. I hope you get lucky and go on a day when the place is delightfully full of schoolkids."
fieldtrips  curriculum  nancyflanagan  2016  schools  education  howweteach  howwelearn  teaching  experience  social  independence  society  vr  virtualreality  technology  edtech 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Virtual Field Trips and Education (Technology) Inequalities
"Field trips are sometimes dismissed as trivial distractions and unnecessarily deviations from the curriculum, but the enrichment they offer is actually quite important, particularly for low-income students who might not otherwise have the opportunities their wealthier peers do to visit museums and the like."



"Other research has found that field trips have a long-lasting impact on students, most of whom can still (like me) recall significant elements from the outings – who was there, what they saw, what they did – even years later"



"But let's be honest: virtual field trips are not field trips. Oh sure, they might provide educational content. They might, as Google’s newly unveiled “Expeditions” cardboard VR tool promises, boast "360° photo spheres, 3D images and video, ambient sounds -- annotated with details, points of interest and questions that make them easy to integrate into curriculum already used in schools." But virtual field trips do not offer physical context; they do not offer social context. Despite invoking the adjective “immersive,” they most definitely are not.

"So when Google says, as it did onstage today at its annual developer/marketing event Google IO, that its new tool will “take your students to places a school can’t,” let’s ask more questions and not simply parrot the tech giant’s PR.
Let’s ask why certain students from certain schools can’t go places -- even local places -- anymore (if, indeed, they ever were able to). Let’s consider how equating viewing 3D movies in the classroom with experiential learning off-campus could give even more schools an excuse to cut back further on funding actual field trips. And, please, let’s not conflate providing students a VR viewer made out of cardboard with actually addressing how education technology exacerbates inequalities."
google  inequality  audreywatters  vr  fieldtrips  virtualreality  googleio  googlexpeditions  experience  memory  2015 
june 2015 by robertogreco
For Lessons About Class, a Field Trip Takes Students Home - NYTimes.com
"Some of us have more toys and bigger homes than others. We all have a lot in common, but there are certain things that make us unique, too. Let’s talk about those things and celebrate them, even.

This is not standard prekindergarten curricular fare, but it’s part of what the 4- and 5-year-olds at the Manhattan Country School learn by visiting one another’s homes during the school day. These are no mere play dates though; it’s more like Ethnography 101. Do classmates take the bus to school or walk? What neighborhood do they live in? What do they have in their homes? Over the last several weeks, I tagged along to find out.

The progressive private school considers the visits to be one of the most radical things it does. “We knew we needed to talk about social class,” said Lois Gelernt, the teacher who came up with the idea. “It was opening up a can of worms, but if we were never going to talk about who we are and where we come from, the sense of community wasn’t going to be there.”

At first glance, Manhattan Country School seems like an unlikely place to be having that conversation. The school, which starts with the pre-K-aged children and goes through eighth grade, occupies a giant townhouse on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, just steps from Central Park. The name evokes clenched-jaw accents and competitive horsemanship, though in reality the older children milk cows and gather eggs on a school-owned farm upstate."



"At both apartments, however, the children concerned themselves with the objects they found exploring inside. At the Harlem apartment, the young host, whose parents did not want to be identified because of a wary employer, demonstrated various African instruments for his classmates. In Morningside Heights, Ella Reich-Sharpe modeled her leopard-print space helmet made from a Fresh Direct grocery box by a babysitter whose name she couldn’t quite remember.

In both apartments, the children piled into every bed, including a dog’s; examined the items on the parents’ night stands; and tested every musical instrument. Ella’s father, Adam Reich, performed a few measures of Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” after some insistent prompting.

Ella’s mother, Teresa Sharpe, happens to be a lecturer at Columbia who teaches a course on the sociology of education. So I put a question to her: How can families who live in areas with little socioeconomic diversity create their own lessons like this? She suggested letting children come along if the parents do work in different types of communities. This summer, Ella will accompany Mr. Reich, who is also a sociologist, as he and his students visit Walmart workers.

There are other possibilities too. The right Little League, scouting troop or house of worship can allow children to form deep relationships with peers they might not otherwise encounter. And spending time with families who have much less or more than you do can be illuminating for children as well, though not always in the way parents might expect."
education  class  economics  fieldtrips  2014  homevisits  manhattancountrydayschool  nyc  classideas  comparison  showandtell  sharing  schools  learning  ethnography 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Field Trip Day | Events in Six Cities on September 29, 2012
"Field Trip day is a series of explorations in six cities on Saturday, September 29th.

Find hidden places, and learn skills long forgotten. There are no right choices, no wrong turns - but there are wonders to be uncovered. Tickets are limited. Register below.

NEW YORK • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • CHICAGO • MINNEAPOLIS • BOSTON"
discovery  fieldtrips  fieldtripday  urbanexploration  urbanism  urban  boston  chicago  greenpoint  brooklyn  minneapolis  nyc  losangeles  sanfrancisco  cities  2012  atlasobscura 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Fab Lab San Diego — A place where you can make almost anything
"In 2007, a collaboration between the MIT & the San Diego-based non-profit Heads On Fire allowed for the creation of an advanced digital design & fabrication laboratory where community members can utilize high-tech tools to actualize ideas through design & fabrication.

Today, in addition to localized learning, Fab Lab programs are available in a distributed format, bringing the opportunity to turn concepts into creations to as many community members as possible. Fab Lab programs offer experiences in design, science, engineering, electronics, computation, mathematics & the scientific method, through project-based learning, resulting in personal development & real-world skill attainment.

By promoting learning that addresses empirical education, innovation, production & creativity, we aim to provide accessible & applicable educational experiences for individual learners in order to support the development of more ingenious & resourceful communities."
diy  sandiego  fablab  education  fabbing  hackerspaces  headsonfire  macsd  ucsd  sdsu  steam  engineering  classideas  edg  srg  fieldtrips 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Situated learning - Wikipedia
"Situated learning was first proposed by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger as a model of learning in a Community of practice. At its simplest, situated learning is learning that takes place in the same context in which it is applied. Lave and Wenger (1991)[1] argue that learning should not be viewed as simply the transmission of abstract and decontextualised knowledge from one individual to another, but a social process whereby knowledge is co-constructed; they suggest that such learning is situated in a specific context and embedded within a particular social and physical environment."

[Also includes a section on "Situated Learning and Social Media"]
education  learning  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  tcsnmy  situationist  situatedlearning  jeanlave  étiennewenger  pedagogy  socialmedia  lifelonglearning  cooperative  apprenticeships  fieldtrips  cooking  gardening  interaction  experientiallearning  cognition  edtech 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Mapnificent - Dynamic Public Transport Travel Time Maps
"Mapnificent shows you the area you can reach with public transport from any point in a given time. It is available for major cities in the US and world wide.
You may be interested to watch a video about what Mapnificent can do, read a blog post about how Mapnificent works or jump to the Mapnificent API Documentation.
Mapnificent was originally inspired by MySociety's Mapumental which is sadly still in private beta.
Mapnificent was created by StefanWehrmeyer."
mapnificent  cities  urban  maps  mapping  visualization  publictransit  local  time  transit  travel  transportation  urbanism  fieldtrips 
june 2011 by robertogreco
eye | feature : All you need is love: pictures, words and worship [Great piece on Sister Corita Kent]
"Corita’s cultural contribution spanned several decades. Although she described herself as an artist rather than a design professional, her 1960s work spanned both fields. Graphic strategies such as lettering and layout were central to her artistic voice. At the same time, she had no qualms about accepting commissions for magazine covers, book jackets, album sleeves, ads and posters, although even here she should be seen less as a jobbing designer than as an artist with a distinctive and easily recognisable graphic sensibility. As Harvey Cox said, “The world of signs and sales slogans and plastic containers was not, for her, an empty wasteland. It was the dough out of which she baked the bread of life.” 12 At its best, her work proposed a symbolic template that blurred the boundaries between art, design and communication, between a life of worship and the everyday life of her time."
sistercorita  art  vernacular  life  everyday  glvo  design  communication  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  advertising  signs  symbols  via:britta  teaching  printmaking  serigraphs  accessibility  urban  urbanism  decontextualization  photography  noticing  seeing  seeingtheworld  fieldtrips  unschooling  deschooling  education  immaculateheartcollege  eames  viewfinders  process  julieault  2000  1960s  martinbeck  society  perspective  activism  coritakent 
may 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm
"CITYterm, a semester program for thirty intellectually adventuresome juniors and seniors in high school, makes New York City its Laboratory and Classroom.

At CITYterm you will explore the city. You will immerse yourself in the city's five boroughs, connecting with them. You will meet authors, city officials, historians, urban planners, the homeless. you will come to understand New York City, its inhabitants and your own learning potential, returning to your home school ready to embark upon new adventures."
nyc  cityterm  classtrips  conferences  teaching  experientiallearning  education  cities  lcproject  cv  exploration  urban  urbanism  psychogeography  classideas  fieldtrips  highschool  learning  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  residential  camps  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary 
february 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm: Admission » Admitted Students » Outside Lies Magic
"Get out now. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people at the end of our century. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run. Forget about blood pressure and arthritis, cardiovascular rejuvenation and weight reduction. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore.

Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now, and seek out the resting place of a technology almost forgotten. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings.

Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around--the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic."
architecture  books  via:britta  johnstilgoe  pedestrians  walking  biking  bikes  psychogeography  noticing  learning  landscape  classideas  openstudio  classtrips  fieldtrips  bighere  exploration  looking  cities  urban  urbanism  builtenvironment  visibility  meandering  deliberate 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Fringe benefits of escalaphobia - Bobulate
"In third grade, we went to The Globe Store. This, downtown Scranton’s only department store in the ’70s, was our class field trip, our travel to commerce, to the city. It was sparkling and linoleum and had the only moving walkway we knew.

Stepping onto an escalator is an act of faith, and we were reminded of this each Globe Store field trip by Maura Hoban. Maura Hoban had escalaphobia. She was afraid of the escalator.

So instead of gliding magically between floors, 25 of us, uniformed but not in uniform, moved to find alternative routes. Because while trusting in the technology of the newest moving walkway was one kind of faith, learning to trust in the strength of the group, when needed, was far better. United in escalaphobia."
community  escalaphobia  tcsnmy  fieldtrips  learning  empathy  trust  elevators  escalators  lizdanzico 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Education - Change.org: Goin' Mobile
"I’ve probably come across...as something of a tech geek, [but] in day-to-day life I still tend to organize my worldview not by what I can find on Wikipedia, but on what I’ve found...on the real highway...Most of our school buildings are made for the Industrial Age...meant as incubators of local society, which is precisely why folks like Woody Guthrie & Jack Kerouac resonated with the sorts of kids for whom that localized industrial structure just didn’t cut it...What we need is to put the power of mobile media into their hands, teach them how to use it & then send them out into the world to engage with both their physical & online selves. We need to stop complaining about the time away from classroom learning that fieldtrips represent & start complaining about the time away from fieldtrips that classroom learning represents...We need to get away from the school building mentality. This doesn’t mean we don’t need school buildings, but...that we need to re-evaluate their function."
education  learning  mobile  technology  offcampustrips  tcsnmy  schools  schooling  place  phones  iphone  future  change  media  fieldtrips  reform  schooldesign  classrooms  exploration  communities  travel  lcproject  classroom 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Bay Ferry Youth Field Trip Program
"The Classroom Day Tripper Program has partnered with the San Diego Harbor Excursion to add a new and affordable option to enhance your next field trip experience. See special discounted rates below when you book your field trip through the Classroom Day
sandiego  transportation  boats  ferry  classideas  fieldtrips  tcsnmy  offcampustrips  coronado 
may 2008 by robertogreco
San Diego MTS Daytripper Program + Bay Ferry Youth Program + Amtrak California "Kids N' Trains"
"To book a field trip, we need at least 14 business days to plan your trip. Call the hotline and leave a detailed message about the trip. The coordinator will call back within two working days. Only confirmed trips are eligible for the Classroom Day Pass
sandiego  transit  transportation  lajolla  buses  rail  classideas  teaching  learning  trains  amtrak  ferry  boats  offcampustrips  tcsnmy  mts  fieldtrips 
may 2008 by robertogreco
A Tourist of the Everyday - Dwell Blog - dwell.com
"1x/week Kate leaves directions on telephone hotline telling how to find offbeat attractions in SF area. 3-4 times/year leads bus trips called Mundane Journeys...drops passengers at locations with handouts instructing them to admire sidewalk markings, cha
sanfrancisco  books  tours  travel  cities  experience  visual  senses  social  local  urban  place  color  glvo  gamechanging  fieldtrips  lcproject  katepocrass  vacation  walking  illustration  events  california  art 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Mundane Journeys: Field Guide to Color. by Pocrass, Kate. : William Stout Architectural Books
"San Francisco, 2007 San Francisco guide book. Kate Pocrass has distilled the unique beauty of San Francisco in astonishingly poetic moments of bliss, sensuality, and wonder. Destined to become a classic."
sanfrancisco  books  tours  travel  cities  experience  visual  senses  social  local  urban  place  color  glvo  gamechanging  fieldtrips  lcproject  katepocrass  vacation  walking  illustration  events  california  art 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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