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Yong Zhao "What Works May Hurt: Side Effects in Education" - YouTube
"Proponents of standardized testing and privatization in education have sought to prove their effectiveness in improving education with an abundance of evidence. These efforts, however, can have dangerous side effects, causing long-lasting damage to children, teachers, and schools. Yong Zhao, Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas, will argue that education interventions are like medical products: They can have serious, sometimes detrimental, side effects while also providing cures. Using standardized testing and privatization as examples, Zhao, author of the internationally bestselling Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon? Why China Has the Best (and Worst) Education System in the World, will talk about his new book on why and how pursuing a narrow set of short-term outcomes causes irreparable harm in education."
yongzhao  2018  schools  schooling  pisa  education  testing  standardizedtesting  standardization  china  us  history  testscores  children  teaching  howweteach  howwelearn  sideeffects  privatization  tims  math  reading  confidence  assessment  economics  depression  diversity  entrepreneurship  japan  creativity  korea  vietnam  homogenization  intolerance  prosperity  tolerance  filtering  sorting  humans  meritocracy  effort  inheritance  numeracy  literacy  achievementgap  kindergarten  nclb  rttt  policy  data  homogeneity  selectivity  charterschools  centralization  decentralization  local  control  inequity  curriculum  autonomy  learning  memorization  directinstruction  instruction  poverty  outcomes  tfa  teachforamerica  finland  singapore  miltonfriedman  vouchers  resilience  growthmindset  motivation  psychology  research  positivepsychology  caroldweck  intrinsicmotivation  choice  neoliberalism  high-stakestesting 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
FlipFeed - step into someone else's Twitter feed
"FlipFeed is a Google Chrome Extension that enables Twitter users to replace their own feed with that of another real Twitter user. Powered by deep learning and social network analysis, feeds are selected based on inferred political ideology ("left" or "right") and served to users of the extension. For example, a right-leaning user who uses FlipFeed may load and navigate a left-leaning user's feed, observing the news stories, commentary, and other content they consume. The user can then decide to flip back to their own feed or repeat the process with another feed.

FlipFeed was built by researchers in the Laboratory for Social Machines at the MIT Media Lab to explore how social media platforms can be used to mitigate, rather than exacerbate, ideological polarization by helping people explore and empathize with different perspectives."
twitter  tools  perspective  filterbubbles  filtering 
february 2017 by robertogreco
TILT #1: librarians like to search, everyone else likes to find
"My father was a technologist and bullshitter. Not in that "doesn't tell the truth" way (though maybe some of that) but mostly in that "likes to shoot the shit with people" way. When he was being sociable he'd pass the time idly wondering about things. Some of these were innumeracy tests "How many of this thing do you think could fit inside this other thing?" or "How many of these things do you think there are in the world?" Others were more concrete "Can I figure out what percentage of the movies that have been released this year will wind up on Netflix in the next twelve months?" and then he'd like to talk about how you'd get the answer. I mostly just wanted to get the answer, why just speculate about something you could know?

He wasn't often feeling sociable so it was worth trying to engage with these questions to keep the conversation going. I'd try some searches, I'd poke around online, I'd ask some people, his attention would wane. Often the interactions would end abruptly with some variant of head-shaking and "Well I guess you can't know some things..." I feel like many, possibly most, things are knowable given enough time to do the research. Still do.

To impatient people many things are "unknowable". The same is true for users of Google. Google is powerful and fast, sure. But they've buried their advanced search deeper and deeper over time, continually try to coerce you to sign in and give them location data, and they save your search history unless you tell them not to. It's common knowledge that they're the largest media owner on the planet, more than Disney, more than Comcast. I use Google. I like Google. But even though they're better than most other search engines out there, that doesn't mean that searching, and finding, can't be a lot better. Getting a million results feels like some sort of accomplishment but it's not worth much if you don't have the result you want.

As filtering and curating are becoming more and more what the internet is about, having a powerful, flexible, and "thoughtful" search feature residing on top of these vast stores of poorly archived digital stuff becomes more critical. No one should settle for a search tool that is just trying to sell you something. Everyone should work on getting their librarian merit badges in order to learn to search, not just find."
jessamynwest  search  internet  google  libraries  2016  filtering  curating  web  online  archives  algorithms 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Find the best movies on Netflix, iTunes, Amazon and more | Leanflix
"Leanflix is the easiest way to find movies worth watching on Netflix, Amazon, iTunes and HBO (and it's free).

Pre-filtered results.

We make it easy to find feature films by hiding documentaries, foreign films, and older movies by default - or, you can add them back in and save your own custom filters to see exactly what you want.

Better ratings through data science.

Our awesome machine learning algorithm sorts movies from best to worst so you spend less time looking and more time watching.

Every score in one place.

Filter by Rotten Tomatoes and IMDb ratings.

All the movies.

We pull in movies from Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and HBO to make it easy to find the best movies across all your streaming options."
netflix  amazonprime  amazon  hbo  movies  film  filtering  streaming  leanflix  itunes  search 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Why Twitter Should Not Algorithmically Curate the Timeline — The Message — Medium
"Twitter brims with human judgment, and the problem with algorithmic filtering is not losing the chronology, which I admit can be clumsy at times, but it’s losing the human judgment that makes the network rewarding and sometimes unpredictable. I also recently wrote about how #Ferguson surfaced on Twitter while it remained buried, at least for me, in curated Facebook—as many others noted, Facebook was awash with the Ice Bucket Challenge instead, which invites likes and provides videos and tagging of others; just the things an algorithm would value. This isn’t a judgement of the value of the ALS challenge but a clear example of how algorithms work—and don’t work.

Algorithms are meant to be gamed—my Facebook friends have now taken to posting faux “congratulations” to messages they want to push to the top of everyone’s feeds, because Facebook’s algorithm pushes such posts with the phrase “congratulations” in the comments to top of your feed. Recently, a clever friend of mine asked to be faux congratulated on her sale of used camera equipment. Sure enough! Her network reported that it stayed on top of everyone’s feed for days. (And that’s why you have so many baby/marriage/engagement announcements in your Facebook feed—and commercial marketers are also already looking to exploit this).

For another thing, algorithmic curation will make writing to be retweeted, which already plagues Twitter much worse. I’m not putting down the retweetable quote; just the behavior that optimizes for that above everything else — and I know you've seen that kind of user. Some are quite smart. Many are very good writers. Actually, many are unfortunately very good writers. They are also usually insufferable. I can see them taking over an algorithmic Twitter.

Bleargh, I say.

But the bigger loss will be the networked intelligence that prizes emergence over engagement and interaction above the retweetable— which gets very boring very quickly. I know Twitter thinks it may increase engagement, but it will decrease engagement among some of its most creative segments.

What else will a curated feed optimize for? It will almost certainly look more like television since there is a reason television looks like television: that’s what advertisers like. There will be more celebrities. There will be more pithy quotes. There will be even more outrage, and even more lovable, fluffy things (both are engaging, and remember, algorithms will optimize for engagement). There will be more sports and television events. There will be less random, weird and otherwise obscure content being surfaced by the collective, networked judgement of the users I choose to follow.

Does Twitter have a signal-to-noise problem? Sure, sometimes. But remember, one person’s noise is another’s signal. Is the learning curve too steep? Yes, it is. Is there a harassment issue, especially for the users with amplified footprints? Absolutely."



"Never forget: the algorithm giveth but it also taketh away. Don’t let it take away the network because it’s the flock, not the bird, that provides the value."
algorithms  twitter  zeyneptufekci  2014  fliters  filtering  human  judgement  unpredictability  emergence  voice  facebook  socialmedia 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? - The Intercept
"There are cogent reasons for opposing the spread of the Foley beheading video, but there also are all sorts of valid reasons for wanting others to see it, including a desire to highlight the brutality of this group. It’s very similar to the debate over whether newspapers should show photos of corpses from wars and other attacks: is it gratuitously graphic and disrespectful to the dead, or newsworthy and important in showing people the visceral horrors of war?

Whatever one’s views are on all of these questions, do you really want Silicon Valley executives – driven by profit motive, drawn from narrow socioeconomic and national backgrounds, shaped by homogeneous ideological views, devoted to nationalistic agendas, and collaborative with and dependent on the U.S. government in all sorts of ways – making these decisions? Perhaps you don’t want the ISIS video circulating, and that leads you to support yesterday’s decision by Twitter. But it’s quite likely you’ll object to the next decision about what should be banned, or the one after that, which is why the much more relevant question is whether you really want these companies’ managers to be making such consequential decisions about what billions of people around the world can — and cannot – see, hear, read, watch and learn."
culture  facebook  twitter  google  filtering  censorship  2014  glengreenwald  jamesfoley  siliconvalley  government  freedomofspeech 
august 2014 by robertogreco
In praise of the terrible live stream — The Message — Medium
"Still images — and here I’m thinking particularly of the work of great photojournalists — can be a lot of things: honest, striking, darkly beautiful. They can act as primary documents — evidence — and they can also become symbols: powerful shorthand in communication and argumentation.

However, there’s one thing they can’t provide.

Photojournalists compose. They crop. Most crucially, they select. From a pile of hundreds of images, sometimes thousands, they choose one or two. Why? Because they convey something essential about a scene, certainly — but also because they are striking and/or darkly beautiful. Photojournalists choose the images that will please their employers and impress their peers. This is totally normal. It’s what professionals do.

But precisely because they are so carefully composed, so stingily selected, these images do not — cannot — convey the real lived experience of a scene.

Maybe someday in the far future, there will exist a device that can override your senses and put you, convincingly, in another place, with all its sights and sounds and smells, free to follow your own gaze. Maybe someday before that, we’ll have a kind of 3D telepresence delivered through VR goggles.

Until then, this is our telepresence, and it’s a precious thing.

The terrible live stream is precious because, of all the formats available to us now, it selects least. It resists the narrative compression of “news.” It shows a scene that, for all its intensity, is mostly slow-moving and confusing. It forces us to sit through the in-between minutes that an editor would cut. The live stream, uniquely among formats, is free to be muddled and boring, with no clear storyline and no assurance that This Is All Going Somewhere.

Just like life."

[See also (via CaseyGollan):
"In Defense of the Poor Image"
http://www.e-flux.com/journal/in-defense-of-the-poor-image/ ]
2014  robinsloan  livestreams  livestreaming  presence  multisensory  journalism  filtering  communication  photography  video  photojournalism  ferguson 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Kennedy: Capture the Now on the App Store on iTunes
[Main site: http://kennedyapp.com/]

"Capture the now with Kennedy – a new way to mark moments in time complete with surrounding context of the things happening around you.

With a single tap Kennedy will capture your location, the date and time, the current weather conditions, the latest world news headlines together with what music you're listening to at the time. Add a note or a photo and then save it to the archive of captured moments.

Use the archive to relive past moments. Remember where you were when that big news event happened, or show all those moments when it was raining or when you were listening to that much loved song.

All the data that Kennedy captures can be easily exported as an industry standard JSON or CSV file so if you love to code you can create your own data visualisations or import them into online data viz tools.

Other features include:
Edit your photos (stored in the app) to add effects and make adjustments.

Choose from different headlines that were happening at the time and view the actual news article.

View a map of where you were stood when you captured the now.

Filter the archive to find locations, weather conditions and more."
ios7  ios  applications  iphone  moments  brendandawes  kennedy  metadata  location  time  date  weather  context  news  visualization  photography  filtering 
january 2014 by robertogreco
“It wasn't for me.” - Austin Kleon
"I’ve become fond of the phrase “it wasn’t for me,” when referring to books (music, movies, etc.) that I don’t get into.

I like the phrase because it’s essentially positive: underlying it is the assumption that there is a book, or rather, books, for me, but this one just wasn’t one of them. It also allows me to tell you how I felt about the book without me shutting down the possibility that you might like it, or making you feel stupid if you did like it.

It just wasn’t for me. No big deal.

And “me” changes, so when you say, “It wasn’t for me,” maybe it’s not for the “me” right now—maybe it’s for future Me, or Me lounging in a beach chair in Jamaica, or Me at fourteen.

Responding to art is so much about the right place and right time. You have to feel free to skip things, move on, and (maybe) come back later.

And you have to be okay with saying, “It wasn’t for me.”"
austinkleon  timing  taste  readiness  2013  filtering  kindness  criticism  haters  notforme  it'snotforme  itwasn'tforme 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Subject, Theory, Practice: An Architecture of Creative Engagement on Vimeo
“Tell me to what you pay attention and I will tell you who you are.” José Ortega y Gasset

A 'manifesto' for the curious architect/designer/artist in search of depth, but in love with plenty, in the saturated world of the 21st Century.

"In a world where grazing is the norm, in which the bitesize is the ideal that conflates ease of consumption with value, where yoghurts are increased in sales price by being reduced in size and packaged like medicines, downed in one gulp; in a world where choice is a democratic obligation that obliterates enjoyment, forced on consumers through the constant tasting, buying and trying of ever more gadgets; a world in which thoughts, concepts -entire lives- are fragmented into the instantaneous nothings of tweets and profile updates; it is in this world, where students of architecture graze Dezeen dot com and ArchDaily, hoovering up images in random succession with no method of differentiation or judgement, where architects -like everyone else- follow the dictum ‘what does not fit on the screen, won’t be seen’, where attentions rarely span longer than a minute, and architectural theory online has found the same formula as Danone’s Actimel (concepts downed in one gulp, delivered in no longer than 300 words!), conflating relevance with ease of consumption; it is in this world of exponentially multiplying inputs that we find ourselves looking at our work and asking ‘what is theory, and what is practice?’, and finding that whilst we yearn for the Modernist certainties of a body of work, of a lifelong ‘project’ in the context of a broader epoch-long ‘shared project’ on the one hand, and the ideas against which these projects can be critically tested on the other; we are actually embedded in an era in which any such oppositions, any such certainties have collapsed, and in which it is our duty –without nostalgia, but with bright eyes and bushy tails untainted by irony- to look for new relationships that can generate meaning, in a substantial manner, over the course of a professional life.

This film is a short section through this process from May 2012."

This montage film is based on a lecture delivered by Madam Studio in May of 2012 at Gent Sint-Lucas Hogeschool Voor Wetenschap & Kunst.

A Madam Studio Production by Adam Nathaniel Furman and Marco Ginex

[via: https://twitter.com/a_small_lab/status/310914404038348800 ]
via:chrisberthelsen  joséortegaygasset  theory  architecture  cv  media  dezeen  archdaily  practice  nostalgia  actimel  marcoginex  2013  tcsnmy  understanding  iteration  darkmatter  certainty  postmodernism  modernism  philosophy  relationships  context  meaningmaking  meaning  lifelongproject  lcproject  openstudioproject  relevance  consumption  canon  streams  internet  filtering  audiencesofone  film  adamnathanielfurman  creativity  bricolage  consumerism  unschooling  deschooling  education  lifelonglearning  curation  curating  blogs  discourse  thinking  soundbites  eyecandy  order  chaos  messiness  ephemerality  ephemeral  grandnarratives  storytelling  hierarchies  hierarchy  authority  rebellion  criticism  frameofdebate  robertventuri  taste  aura  highbrow  lowbrow  waywards  narrative  anarchism  anarchy  feedback  feedbackloops  substance  values  self  thewho  thewhat  authenticity  fiction  discussion  openended  openendedstories  process 
march 2013 by robertogreco
1 Pixel Camera : James Bridle: STML Portfolio
"1 Pixel Camera is an iPhone application which allows the user to take a photograph, select a dominant colour from a photo, and save that colour to the camera roll for storage and sharing on social networks.

The app was built using PhoneGap, HTML and Javascript. It works on all iPhones, but is not currently available on the App Store.

The 1 Pixel Camera is intended to be one logical conclusion of photo sharing and image filtering: the smallest possible transmittable unit of an image, the most edited and refined."

[Was thinking about this again today while reading "She focused on the colors found in each plant, and their varying levels of prominence." http://jorindevoigt.com/blog/wp-content/wp-content/uploads/J.Yau_J.Voigt_EN2.pdf ]
2012  filtering  filters  iphone  ios  color  cameras  applications  1pixelcamera  jorindevoigt  jamesbridle 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Social information processing - Wikipedia
"Social information processing is "an activity through which collective human actions organize knowledge."[1] It is the creation and processing of information by a group of people. As an academic field Social Information Processing studies the information processing power of networked social systems.

Typically computer tools are used such as:

* Authoring tools: e.g., blogs
* Collaboration tools: e.g., wikis, in particular, e.g., Wikipedia
* Translating tools: Duolingo, reCAPTCHA
* Tagging systems (social bookmarking): e.g., del.icio.us, Flickr, CiteULike
* Social networking: e.g., Facebook, MySpace, Essembly
* Collaborative filtering: e.g., Digg, the Amazon Product Recommendation System, Yahoo answers, Urtak"

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Social_information_processing ]
filtering  collaboration  wikipedia  wikis  blogs  informationprocessing  networks  networkeddata  socialnetworking  information  socialmedia  socialinformationprocessing  flickr  pinboard  del.icio.us  taxonomy  tagging 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Sad, Beautiful Fact That We're All Going To Miss Almost Everything : Monkey See : NPR
"What I've observed in recent years is that many people, in cultural conversations, are far more interested in culling than in surrender. And they want to cull as aggressively as they can. After all, you can eliminate a lot of discernment you'd otherwise have to apply to your choices of books if you say, "All genre fiction is trash." You have just massively reduced your effective surrender load, because you've thrown out so much at once.

The same goes for throwing out foreign films, documentaries, classical music, fantasy novels, soap operas, humor, or westerns. I see people culling by category, broadly and aggressively: television is not important, popular fiction is not important, blockbuster movies are not important. Don't talk about rap; it's not important. Don't talk about anyone famous; it isn't important. And by the way, don't tell me it is important, because that would mean I'm ignoring something important, and that's ... uncomfortable. That's surrender.

It's an effort, I think, to make the world smaller and easier to manage, to make the awareness of what we're missing less painful. There are people who choose not to watch television – and plenty of people don't, and good for them – who find it easier to declare that they don't watch television because there is no good television (which is culling) than to say they choose to do other things, but acknowledge that they're missing out on Mad Men (which is surrender).

And people cull in the other direction, too, obviously, dismissing any and all art museums as dull and old-fashioned because actually learning about art is time-consuming — and admitting that you simply don't prioritize it means you might be missing out. (Hint: You are.) …

If "well-read" means "not missing anything," then nobody has a chance. If "well-read" means "making a genuine effort to explore thoughtfully," then yes, we can all be well-read. But what we've seen is always going to be a very small cup dipped out of a very big ocean, and turning your back on the ocean to stare into the cup can't change that."
howweread  infooverload  well-read  fomo  via:selinjessa  2012  filtering  television  tv  culling  art  media  education  music  reading  life  culture  books 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Benji Lanyado is a journalist, coder – and a glimpse of the future? | News Burger
"When I first heard about The Reddit Edit, I thought it was a nifty idea.

It takes Reddit’s functional, information-laden appearance and turns it into a streamlined, colourful depiction of the top trending stories. The top three stories are displayed in an easy-to-use side-scrolling interface, plucked from five popular subreddits: /r/worldnews, /r/politics, /r/technology, /r/science and /r/pics, plus the reddit.com homepage.

You might think a project like this would be the undertaking of a web developer, but it’s the brainchild of 28-year-old British journalist Benji Lanyado. The Reddit Edit was his final project while taking front-end web development classes with General Assembly, a New-York based digital education company who have recently expanded to London.

Benji, who writes for The Guardian and The New York Times, is part of a growing number of media types that are taking it upon themselves to know how to write and code to bring their content to life…"

[An interview follows.]
redditedit  programming  generalists  crossdisciplinary  classideas  glvo  srg  edg  howwework  filters  filtering  clayshirky  facebook  twitter  howweread  news  developers  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  learning  nyc  html  css  javascript  generalassembly  rubyonrails  codecademy  kerouapp  nytimes  guardian  2012  media  reading  theredditedit  benjilanyado  via:russelldavies  reddit  careers  coding  journalism 
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Dangerous Effects of Reading | Certain Extent
"If the world overwhelms you with its constant production of useless crap which you filter more and more to things that only interest you can I calmly suggest that you just create things that you like & cut out the rest of the world as a middle-man to your happiness?
From where I sit creating things does the following:

Let’s you filter to something you like…Frees you…Makes you happy…Plays to strengths not weaknesses…

I can’t say it better than _why [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Why_the_lucky_stiff ]: "when you don’t create things, you become defined by your tastes rather than ability. your tastes only narrow & exclude people. so create."



If you quiet your mind & allow yourself to stop judging everything you will find that you have more potential for innovation (at work, in the kitchen…with your hobbies…your thoughts) than you thought before. You were using the same brutal quality filter on yourself that you used on viral videos, talk radio, and blog posts. You deserve better."
davidtate  cv  judgemental  stockandflow  reading  quiet  thedarkholeoftheinternet  taste  ability  leisurearts  production  consumption  filters  filtering  happiness  philosophy  self-improvement  creation  creativity  doing  making  glvo  judjemental  judgement  artleisure 
january 2012 by robertogreco
On firehoses and filters: Part 1 – confused of calcutta
"Ever since then, I’ve been spending time thinking about the hows and whys of filtering information, and have arrived “provisionally” at the following conclusions, my three laws of information filtering:

1. Where possible, avoid filtering “on the way in”; let the brain work out what is valuable and what is not.

2. Always filter “on the way out”: think hard about what you say or write for public consumption: why you share what you share.

3. If you must filter “on the way in”, then make sure the filter is at the edge, the consumer, the receiver, the subscriber, and not at the source or publisher."
jprangaswami  filtering  internet  clayshirky  georgeorwell  aldoushuxley  bravenewworld  1984  jonathanzittrain  elipariser  input  output  flow  socialsoftware  curation  curating  sharing  information  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Technium: The Satisfaction Paradox
"Let's say that after all is said and done, in the history of the world there are 2,000 theatrical movies, 500 documentaries, 200 TV shows, 100,000 songs, and 10,000 books that I would be crazy about. I don't have enough time to absorb them all, even if I were a full time fan. But what if our tools could deliver to me only those items to choose from? How would I -- or you -- choose from those select choices?"
kevinkelly  serendipity  choice  paradox  paradoxofchoice  satisfaction  satisfactionparadox  netflix  amazon  scarcity  abundance  google  spotify  music  film  curation  filters  filtering  discovery  recommendations  psychology  economics 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Neven Mrgan's tumbl [On Art]
"Art consists of ideas, execution, and filtering; plus the consistent, repeated delivery of these elements. You’re welcome to mix up the ratios any way you want: an artist may not have tremendous ideas but she might be masterfully skilled; or a clever and capable artist may only work for a short while. True giants of art do everything well and for a long time, but not everyone is or should be a giant."
art  craft  ideas  execution  filtering  nevenmrgan  glvo  delivery 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Are Distractible People More Creative? | Wired Science | Wired.com
"not enough to simply pay attention to everything—such a deluge of sensation can quickly get confusing. (Kierkegaard referred to this mental state as “drowning in possibility”. Some scientists believe that schizophrenia is characterized by extremely low latent inhibition coupled w/ severe working memory deficits…leads to a mind constantly hijacked by minor distractions.)…We need to let more info in, but we also need to be ruthless about throwing out useless stuff.

People bemoan infinite distractions of web, way we’re constantly being seduced by hyperlinks, unexpected search results, arcane Wikipedia entries. & yes, that’s all true—I just wasted 30 minutes searching for that Kierkegaard quote. (I ended up on a Danish culture website, which led me to a photography collection of Danish modern furniture…) But the problem isn’t distractibility per se—it's distractibility coupled w/ failure to curate our thoughts, to monitor relevancy of whatever is loitering in working memory."
jonahlehrer  neuroscience  attention  distraction  psychology  creativity  research  brain  behavior  intelligence  imaginzation  schizophrenia  memory  internet  online  cv  curation  curating  filtering  forgetting  focus 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Hibari: A Mac Twitter client with keyword filtering, muting, inline saved search results, inline conversations, tweet lookup, and more
"* Block Keywords: Hibari blocks tweets you don't want to see based on keywords you choose. You can also block all retweets. Learn more »

* Mute Users: No more stressing about whether to follow someone—in Hibari, you can temporarily mute any user if their tweets go overboard, saving you from having to unfollow. Learn more »

* Inline Saved Search: Hibari interleaves your favorite search results into your home timeline so you never miss a thing. Your less important searches stay tucked away in the search timeline. Learn more »

* Inline Images: Image links from Twitpic, YFrog, and other services are displayed as thumbnails in your timeline, saving you from visiting the webpage just to see what the image is about.

* Tweet Lookup: Trying to remember what somebody tweeted? Use the search field in the toolbar to look up tweets and users in your timeline.

* Inline Conversations: Explore threads of replies without ever leaving your timeline."
osx  macosx  mac  twitter  filtering  search  hibari  applications 
august 2010 by robertogreco
What I Read: Jay Rosen | The Atlantic Wire
"How do other people deal with the torrent of information that pours down on us all? Do they have some secret? Perhaps. We are asking various friends and colleagues who seem well-informed to describe their media diets. This is from an interview with Jay Rosen, press critic, writer, and professor of journalism at New York University."

[Just part of his answer:] "Throughout the day I will be watching Twitter for what my 600 sources are telling me, which means I'm clicking all over the Web because I tend to follow people who give good link. I don't use RSS and I don't use alerts. I do everything from the Web; Twitter is my RSS reader."
jayrosen  twitter  aggregation  filtering  information  journalism  media  news  reading  feedreader  atlantic  internet  flow  infooverload  howwework 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The Archdruid Report: Seeking the Gaianomicon
"Our time, as the media never tires of telling us, is the information age, a time when each of us can count on being besieged and bombarded by more information in an average day than most premodern people encountered in their entire lives. Now it’s important to remember that this is true only when the term “information” is assumed to mean the sort of information that comes prepackaged and preprocessed in symbolic form; the average hunter-gatherer moving through a tropical rain forest picks up more information about the world of nature through his or her senses in the course of an average day than the average resident in an industrial city receives through that channel in the course of their lives."

[via: http://www.doorsofperception.com/mailinglist/archives/2010/07/from_doomers_to.php ]
art  culture  economics  environment  philosophy  philanthropy  technology  information  hunter-gatherer  sensemaking  perception  noise  filtering  meaning  nature  media  johnmichaelgreer 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Eide Neurolearning Blog: Simpler is Better: Avoiding the TMI Trap
"In studies of map-based problem solving, whether young or old, expert or novice, a consistent pattern was always seen - people of all ages & expertise seemed to prefer being presented more information, not less, even if it takes longer to study detail-laden maps, figures, or diagrams filled with extraneous material.
simplification  abstraction  displays  design  information  processing  filtering  sensemaking  maps  mapping  tmi  realism  patternrecognition  patterns  simplicity  research 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Syphir
"Rules beta » turbo-charged filters for your Gmail
* Powerful. Filter emails by arrival time, age, importance, and more.
* Effective. Save time, stay organized, and defeat email overload.
SmartPush » intelligent email alerts on your iPhone
* Focused. SmartPush knows which emails need your attention.
* Flexible. Receive alerts for all your emails, or only the important ones."
syphir  applications  iphone  email  filtering  filters  gmail  gtd  productivity  ios 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Least Restrictive Environment - Practical Theory
"I was thinking about Special Ed concept of Least Restrictive Environment & idea that many of the concepts of special education, such as an IEP, are concepts we should want for every student...

Banning all these devices when there are many kids who can use them wisely & well is not putting kids into the least restrictive environment for their own learning.

Yes, there are some kids who struggle—despite many opportunities to figure how to manage it—to use technology in a classroom without it serving as a distraction. Let's admit that. [some examples & solutions]...Those instances are absolutely the exception, not the rule. (In talking w/ colleagues, I'd say that cell phone misuse is much lower at SLA than it is at schools that theoretically ban their existence.)...

But banning their use or locking up every laptop would hamstring so much of what we do, & it would not be, for the overwhelming majority of students, the least restrictive environment in which they could—& do—learn."
chrislehmann  specialed  leastrestrictiveenvironment  cellphones  mobile  phones  laptops  filtering  learning  empowerment  tcsnmy  individualized  teaching  schools  policy  blanketpolicies  restrictthemallforthedifficultiesoffew  millennials  technology  theyrealldifferentbutweshouldtreatthemthesame  ieps  digital 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Thinking about democratised curation – confused of calcutta
"Production, consumption and distribution of information have already been democratised. There’s no turning back. Curation will go that way. Which means that the very concept of the expert, the professional, the editor, the moderator of all that is great and good, changes."
curation  authenticity  2010  democratization  ericschmidt  filtering  growth  information  jprangaswami  editing  content  data  curating 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Derek Powazek - Press the Magic Button
"If you use Twitter, you pay attention to your mentions – the tweets that include @yourusername – because that’s how you have conversations. And therein lies the problem, because anyone can tweet at you that way. Some of those people are batshit crazy like the Haight Street Guy, while others are just merely rude like the Conference Talker Guy.

The difference is, on Haight Street, you have to walk briskly away and hope you’re not followed. And at the conference, you have to de-escalate the conversation politely, in front of a crowd. But on Twitter, there is a magic button, and in one click, poof, the crazy is gone.

It’s a wonderful thing. A thing so lovely I often find myself wishing it existed in real life. So why is blocking such a taboo?...

Imagine for a moment if the function was called: “It’s not you, it’s me.” Or: “I just need a little space.” Or simply: “Engage cloaking device.” I doubt it would feel so personally insulting."
netiquette  attention  blogging  etiquette  anonymity  facebook  internet  flickr  lifehacks  twitter  tips  socialmedia  derekpowazek  blocking  filtering  sanity  cloackingdevices 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Does the Internet Make You Smarter? - WSJ.com
"Digital media have made creating and disseminating text, sound, and images cheap, easy and global. The bulk of publicly available media is now created by people who understand little of the professional standards and practices for media. Instead, these amateurs produce endless streams of mediocrity, eroding cultural norms about quality and acceptability, and leading to increasingly alarmed predictions of incipient chaos and intellectual collapse. But of course, that's what always happens. Every increase in freedom to create or consume media, from paperback books to YouTube, alarms people accustomed to the restrictions of the old system, convincing them that the new media will make young people stupid. This fear dates back to at least the invention of movable type."
2010  clayshirky  distraction  attention  academia  education  evolution  future  history  intelligence  revolution  society  learning  literacy  media  culture  change  online  web  internet  links  hypertext  hyperlinks  infooverload  filtering  sorting  curation  content  crapdetection 
june 2010 by robertogreco
WARNING - We Filter Websites At School! on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"If you work in a school that filters websites, feel free to post it in your front entrance, or in your classroom."
cybersafety  edtech  humor  sarcasm  children  parenting  teaching  online  web  internet  filtering  filters  schools  policy 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Connect Safely |How to teach Net safety, ethics & security? Blend them in! | NetFamilyNews
"The biggest hurdle to Net-safety instruction may actually be school filters! Note this statement in the study's press release: "The survey also found a high reliance on shielding students instead of teaching behaviors for safe and secure Internet use. More than 90% of schools have built up digital defenses, such as filtering and blocking social network sites...." Then note UK education watchdog Ofsted's finding just last month – that schools using extensive or "locked down" filtering "were less effective in helping [students] to learn how to use new technologies safely." If schools could just teach a lot of what they've always taught, folding digital media in with traditional media (aka books, pencils, etc.), the academic ethics and citizenship they've always "taught" (hopefully modeled and encouraged) will naturally include "cyberethics," for example."
citizenship  cybersafety  digitalcitizenship  security  edtech  teaching  filters  filtering  safety  schools 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Bulls#@t and the Art of Crap-Detection : Stager-to-Go
"Back in the late 1960s, Neil Postman wrote extensively about how educational quality and a healthy democracy were dependent on each citizen having a highly sensitive “shockproof crap detector in their survival kit.” The classic book he co-authored with Charles Weingarten, Teaching as a Subversive Activity, (Delacorte Press, 1969) discusses crap detection as fundamental to learning. This work is as timely today as it was forty years ago. In fact, Postman delivered a paper at the 1969 National Council of Teachers of English annual conference, entitled, “Bullshit and the Art of Crap-Detection.” Read the historic speech here or scroll down"
neilpostman  skepticism  writing  bullshit  education  learning  filtering  authority 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Teaching in Social and Technological Networks « Connectivism
"social & technological networks subvert the classroom-based role of the teacher. Networks thin classroom walls. Experts are no longer “out there” or “over there”. Skype brings anyone, from anywhere, into a classroom. Students are not confined to interacting with only the ideas of a researcher or theorist...The largely unitary voice of the traditional teacher is fragmented by the limitless conversation opportunities available in networks. When learners have control of the tools of conversation, they also control the conversations in which they choose to engage. Course content is similarly fragmented. The textbook is now augmented with YouTube videos, online articles, simulations, Second Life builds, virtual museums, Diigo content trails, StumpleUpon reflections, and so on...The following are roles teacher play in networked learning environments: 1. Amplifying 2. Curating 3. Wayfinding and socially-driven sensemaking 4. Aggregating 5. Filtering 6. Modelling 7. Persistent presence"
connectivism  teaching  learning  technology  education  networking  socialmedia  georgesiemens  wayfinding  unschooling  deschooling  networkedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  curation  filtering  modeling  sensemaking  cv  amplifying  content  textbooks  pedagogy  21stcenturylearning  openeducation  highereducation  networks  e-learning  elearning  apprenticeships  teacherasmasterlearner 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Joho the Blog » [2b2k] Clay Shirky, info overload, and when filters increase the size of what’s filtered
"Clay traces information overload to the 15th century, but others have taken it back earlier than that, & there’s even a quotation from Seneca (4 BCE) that can be pressed into service: “What is the point of having countless books & libraries whose titles the owner could scarcely read through in his whole lifetime? That mass of books burdens the student without instructing…"..."many of our new filters reflect the basic change in our knowledge strategy. We are moving from managing the perpetual overload Clay talks about by reducing the amount we have to deal with, to reducing it in ways that simultaneously add to the overload. Merely filtering is not enough, and filtering is no longer a merely reductive activity. The filters themselves are information that are then discussed, shared, & argued about. When we swim through information overload, we’re not swimming in little buckets that result from filters; we are swimming in a sea made bigger by the loquacious filters that are guiding us."
information  davidweinberger  clayshirky  infooverload  semanticweb  knowledge  flow  filters  filtering  internet 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The librarian edge: Teachers, Meaningful Connections, & Mindful Information Consumption
"Here we are, for the first time in history with all the information we want. It's the "Informavore's Dilemma" ***. Now we just need to develop the discipline for mindful information consumption."
katieday  infooverload  information  flow  filtering  curation  social  ego  cv  online  web  internet  technology  schools  teaching  learning 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Black&White™ — Slaves of the feed – This is not the realtime we’ve been looking for
"Constantly checking our feeds for new information, we seem to be hoping to discover something of interest, something that we can share with our networks, something that we can use, something that we can talk about, something that we can act on, something we didn’t know we didn’t know.

It almost seems like an obsession and many critics of digital technology would argue that by consuming information this way we are running the danger of destroying social interaction between humans. One might even say that we have become slaves of the feed."
aggregation  rss  overload  feeds  information  attention  twitter  realtime  internet  cv  infooverload  flow  filtering  curation 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Laurent Haug’s blog » Truth + counter truth = emptiness
"What created culture is not conservation but filtering. There’s randomness in how the works have reached us. We will never know if, among the 4000 scrolls burned in the library of Alexandria in ancient times was not a masterpiece of humanity greater than Homer…Our culture is thus the product of what has survived filters more or less hazardous, censorship, failures, losses…And the Internet is the scandal of a memory without filtering, where we can no longer distinguish the truth from error. Finally, it also produces an erasure of memory. There is a kind of encyclopedia accepted by everyone, even if a man of 70 years knows more than a 25 year old. Internet could mean the eventual demise of the common encyclopedia, replaced by six billion encyclopedias, each individual constructing his own, each of which may prefer leisure to Ptolemy to Copernicus, the story of Genesis to the evolution of species. We run the risk of an inability to communicate, the impossibility of a universal knowledge"
umbertoeco  internet  knowledge  culture  communication  commons  encyclopedia  filtering  curation  individual  memory  forgetting  edhirsch 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Children Largely Surf the Web Unsupervised. ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"OK, if these numbers reflect anything like similar trends over the last decade or so, shouldn't we have seen by now a wave of injury and trauma? I mean, if this sort of situation is dangerous, shouldn't we be seeing casualties by now? If 60 percent of children ran through red lights, we'd be hearing about it. So, given these statistics, what is the case for Internet Safety, properly so-called?"
stephendownes  children  safety  internet  data  supervision  parenting  filtering 
october 2009 by robertogreco
» Would You Please Block? Bud the Teacher
"What we’ve decided is that we will no longer use the web filter as a classroom management tool. Blocking one distraction doesn’t solve the problem of students off task – it just encourages them to find another site to distract them. Students off task is not a technology problem – it’s a behavior problem. It is our intention that we help students to learn the appropriate on-task behaviors instead of assuming that we can use filters to manage student use. Rather than blocking sites on an ad hoc basis, we will instead be working with folks to help them through computer and lab management issues in a way that promotes student responsibility. We know that the best filters in a classroom or lab are the people in that lab – both the educational staff monitoring student computer use as well as the students themselves."
filtering  internet  cipa  web  schools  policy  behavior 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: An Operating System for the Mind [Stephen Downes on the Core Knowledge "Challenge to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills"]
Two quotes (not the whole story): "When you teach children facts as facts, & do it through a process of study & drill, it doesn't occur to children to question whether or not those facts are true, appropriate, moral, egal, or anything else. Rote learning is a short circuit into the brain. It's direct programming. People who study & learn, that 2+2=4, know that 2+2=4, not because they understand the theory of mathematics, not because they have read Hilbert & understand formalism, or can refute Brouwer & reject intuitionism, but because they know (full stop) 2+2=4." ... "We are in a period of transition. We still to a great degree treat facts as things & of education as the acquisition of those things. But more and more, as our work, homes and lives become increasingly complex, we see this understanding becoming not only increasingly obsolete, but increasingly an impediment...if you simply follow the rules, do what you're told, do your job & stay out of trouble, you will be led to ruin."

[summary here: http://www.daveswhiteboard.com/archives/2818 ]
knowledge  literacy  criticalthinking  skills  connectivism  education  stephendownes  programming  brainwashing  cognition  automatons  directinstruction  cv  tcsnmy  history  future  agency  activism  learning2.0  change  gamechanging  information  learning  truth  relevance  infooverload  filtering  unschooling  deschooling  psychology  brain  attention  mind  diversity  ict  pedagogy  e-learning  theory  elearning  21stcenturyskills  21stcenturylearning 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — Fever and the Future of Feed Readers
"Feed readers as we’ve known them are dying, but it’s as yet unclear what will take their place. Filtering feeds for relevance algorithmically seems all but fruitless; filtering through the social graph is only a slight improvement, but misses the rare content that may only strike a chord with a small audience...there’s more work to be done & more businesses to emerge in this field. Social networks alone aren’t focused enough tools to bubble up & share quality content. My hope is that a surplus open data of the sort we’re trying hard to share at Twitter will help spawn a new generation of tools to manage the flood of content... [not] a problem that Twitter, or any other pipeline for information, can solve on its own. With all that said, perhaps the right approach really is to abdicate one’s consumption of content to whatever you’re passively exposed to, & to occupy your mind with other things. The act of creation is almost always self-affirming, & the act of consumption so rarely is."
rss  feeds  aggregator  filtering  fever  web  2009  infooverload  informationmanagement  consumption  creation  creating  discovery 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — Fever and the Future of Feed Readers
"Feed readers as we’ve known them are dying, but it’s as yet unclear what will take their place. Filtering feeds for relevance algorithmically seems all but fruitless; filtering through the social graph is only a slight improvement, but misses the rare content that may only strike a chord with a small audience...there’s more work to be done & more businesses to emerge in this field. Social networks alone aren’t focused enough tools to bubble up & share quality content. My hope is that a surplus open data of the sort we’re trying hard to share at Twitter will help spawn a new generation of tools to manage the flood of content... [not] a problem that Twitter, or any other pipeline for information, can solve on its own. With all that said, perhaps the right approach really is to abdicate one’s consumption of content to whatever you’re passively exposed to, & to occupy your mind with other things. The act of creation is almost always self-affirming, & the act of consumption so rarely is."
rss  feeds  aggregator  filtering  fever  web  2009  infooverload  informationmanagement  consumption  creation  creating  discovery 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Vodafone | receiver » Blog Archive » Real time – thriving in the culture of efficiency
"To thrive in a culture of efficiency, it is vital to carve out time to foster physical and emotional health, to build and sustain meaningful relationships, to contribute to the communities where we live and work, and to repair the world. For the time-pressed, this is a tall order on an already ambitiously-packed agenda. But even small steps will enhance well-being and personal satisfaction and will have rippling, positive repercussions. So seize the moment: work, play, and rest; balance, breathe, and renew."
infooverload  technology  downtime  balance  etiquette  work  productivity  time  health  efficiency  filtering  attention  relationships 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: Compress Into Diamonds
"Google, I want you to give me a button labeled “Compress into diamonds.” When I click that button, spin your little algorithmic wheels and turn my reader into a personalized Memeorandum. Show me the most linked-to items in the bunch, and show me which of my feeds are linking to them. And take it a step further. You’ve got all that trends data that reflects the items I’m reading. Underneath the hood might very well be data about the links I click on in those posts. Use that information about me to compress my unread items into diamonds I will find uniquely wonderful.
rss  googlereader  filtering  attention  google  infooverload  smartfiltering 
march 2009 by robertogreco
e-learning: School Internet Policies: Protecting Students or the Organisation??
"While States like Queensland are rolling out a new Managed Operating Environment across its state schools, the draconian policies of blocking almost all Websites and virtually all the available Web 2.0 tools, means that student learning experiences are much poorer than those they can experience outside of school."
filters  filtering  policy  safety  schools  internet  web  online  productivity  ict  fear 
march 2009 by robertogreco
ed4wb » The New Bottom-up Authority
"Many students, especially those who are participating in interest-driven networks, are more accepting of an authority which comes from the bottom up as opposed to from the top down. Credibility and reputation in networked publics is earned by high-quality, active participation. In many cases, each contribution can be rated by participants, and the most prolific can earn titles such as “top reviewer”. This network-produced evaluation, coming from the bottom up, not only looks much different from what is happening in the classroom, but also motivates differently."
teaching  schools  online  internet  filtering  authority  clayshirky  information  hierarchy  administration  management  leadership  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  schooling  informal  informaleducation  informallearning 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Wiki:this very short warning | Social Media CoLab
"This is definitely related to the mindfulness-about-laptops-in-class issue. The technology has leaped ahead of social norms -- the ways we integrate social processes like college courses with media like Wi-Fi. So I'm interested -- as you should be -- in finding what the advantages and dangers of unfettered use of laptops during class meetings are, then exploring ways to leverage the advantages and avoid the dangers. My hypothesis, formulated inductively by experimenting with four previous classes, is that it's a mixture of attention-training (just as note-taking is a form of attention-training) and social norms (if most people put their laptop away most of the time, when they aren't using it to look up something class-related, then most people will be able to Facebook, email, or Twitter part of the time). So there is a collective action social dilemma involved, akin to the tragedy of the commons. Individual self-interest, if aggregated enough, can act counter to the interests of all."
learning  laptops  society  etiquette  teaching  information  multitasking  attention  pedagogy  overload  filtering  via:preoccupations  newmedia  flow  time  rss  gtd  socialmedia 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Interview with Clay Shirky, Part I : CJR - “There’s always a new Luddism whenever there’s change.”
"I’m just so impatient with the argument that the world should be slowed down to help people who aren’t smart enough to understand what’s going on. It’s in part because I grew up in a generation that benefited enormously from not doing that. Right? The baby boomers, when we were young, we had zero, zero patience for the idea that people who are in their fifties in the ’70s and ’80s should somehow be shielded from cultural changes because somehow the stuff that we were doing was upsetting them. So, now it’s our turn and we ought to just suck it up."
technology  clayshirky  generations  culture  overload  newmedia  journalism  reading  brain  attention  change  media  history  interviews  literacy  thinking  filtering  information  internet  future  web 
january 2009 by robertogreco
ed4wb » Insulat-Ed
Applying Clay Shirky: "A scribe [school], someone [an institution] who has given his life over [whose mission is] to literacy [education] as a cardinal virtue, would be conflicted about the meaning of movable type [free-forming educational networks]. After all, if books [information/teachers/experts] are good, then surely more books [information/teachers/experts] are better. But at the same time the very scarcity of literacy [information/teachers/experts] was what gave scribal [school/institutional] effort its primacy, and the scribal [school/institutional] way of life was based on this scarcity. Now the scribe’s [institution’s/school’s] skills [information/teachers/expertise] were [are] eminently replaceable, and his [its] function–making copies of books [educating]–was [is] better accomplished by ignoring tradition than by embracing it.” (p. 67)
education  learning  tcsnmy  networks  constraints  filtering  insulation  rules  regulation  clayshirky  control  change  reform  school  schooling  policy  networkedlearning  administration  leadership  management  connectivism  21stcenturyskills  networking  learning2.0  future 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Children's welfare groups slam net filters - Technology - theage.com.au
"Support for the Government's plan to censor the internet has hit rock bottom, with even some children's welfare groups now saying that that the mandatory filters, aimed squarely at protecting kids, are ineffective and a waste of money. Live trials of the filters, which will block "illegal" content for all Australian internet users and "inappropriate" adult content on an opt-in basis, are slated to begin by Christmas, despite harsh opposition from the Greens, Opposition, the internet industry, consumers and online rights groups. Holly Doel-Mackaway, adviser with Save the Children, the largest independent children's rights agency in the world, said educating kids and parents was the way to empower young people to be safe internet users. She said the filter scheme was "fundamentally flawed" because it failed to tackle the problem at the source and would inadvertently block legitimate resources."
education  internet  australia  censorship  filtering  net  web  online  law  safety  abuse  youth  via:preoccupations 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Tarina - Teemu Arina’s blog on networked learning, knowlege and collaboration in organizations » Blog Archive » Subliminal pattern recognition and RSS readers
"This is exactly why those people who use RSS readers to scan through thousands of feeds, read blog posts from various decentrally connected sources and who engage themselves into assembling multiple unrelated sources of information into one (probing connections between them) have much greater ability to sense and respond to changing conditions in increasingly complex environments than those who read only the major newspapers, watch only the major news networks and don’t put themselves into a difficult situation of being hammered with a lot of stuff at once. Linear, intentional learning was how you learned in the past. Enter nonlinear, visually active way of learning of the future."
rss  overload  knowledge  networkedlearning  information  flow  generalists  filtering  stress  insight  teemuarina  learning  connections  gamechanging 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Open the Future: Making the Visible Invisible
"an augmented reality world that really takes off will out of necessity be one that offers freedom of use closer to that of the Internet than of the iPhone...An AR world dominated by closed, controlled systems will be safe, but have a limited impact...instead of just blocking advertisers, I wanted to block out the people who annoyed me...The flip side of "show me everything I want to know about the world" is "don't show me anything I don't want to know."
future  futurism  metaverse  visualization  augmentedreality  open  closed  iphone  innovation  jamaiscascio  adblocking  filtering  spam  via:blackbeltjones  interface  ubicomp  attention  gps  maps  ar 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Peripheral vision and ambient knowledge :: Blog :: Headshift
"We need to let people organise their inputs by exposing all relevant information in granular feed form and then provide smart aggregation and tagging tools to create a personal eco-system of content, cues and links."
via:preoccupations  filtering  infooverload  flow  feeds  rss  tagging  tags  content  information  management  knowledge  ambient 
july 2008 by robertogreco
The Filter
"The Filter, the vision of Peter Gabriel, the Grammy award-winning artist and digital media pioneer, is an online discovery experience that filters the world of online entertainment and information, personalising it for each individual user."
music  software  itunes  mp3  playlist  ipod  aggregator  filtering  generator  attention  discovery  webapps  recommendations  video  arg  petergabriel 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Why Online "Noise" is Good For You - ReadWriteWeb
"Social media noise is an essential part of learning and living on the web. Hear are some reasons why.: Unexpected opportunities, Future Needs, Maximizing Recall, General Knowledge, Personal Growth"
socialnetworking  socialmedia  noise  technology  complexity  serendipity  overload  aggregator  skimming  conversation  filtering  socialnetworks  lifestreams  learning  memory  rss  online  twitter 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Is mobile Internet really such a good thing? - Joi Ito's Web
"if we move over to mobile too quickly...risk moving game to platform where DNA is not what we're used to on Internet...putting money in pockets of people who do not redistribute to startups, but feed giant vendor ecologies instead."
mobile  internet  web  open  markets  control  gamechanging  phones  filtering 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Mildly Diverting: RSS aggregation as a friend filter
"So a social aggregator with degree-of-intimacy - where you can choose elements of a person's behaviour to subscribe to...with a few smart bits at back which would desubscribe or deemphasise sections...according to your consumption behaviour."
attention  filtering  friends  intimacy  ambientintimacy  feeds  social  filters  semanticweb  via:preoccupations 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Nearly a million users, and no spam or trolls - RussellBeattie.com
"any online community system ever created - Usenet, The WELL, IRC, Slashdot, Digg...have dealt w/ core problem of idiots on Internet...Twitter w/ ~million members, thriving community, lots of discussions...doesn't have spam/troll issues...pretty amazing."
twitter  trolls  spam  filtering  digg  usenet  thewell  irc  slashdot  microblogging  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  community  internet  web  online  users  social 
february 2008 by robertogreco
“The Connection Has Been Reset”
"China’s Great Firewall is crude, slapdash, and surprisingly easy to breach. Here’s why it’s so effective anyway."
theatlantic  censorship  china  politics  firewall  technology  humanrights  filtering  information  control  society  internet 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Read what matters - AideRSS
"AideRSS is an intelligent assistant that saves time and keeps you on top of the latest news. We research every story and filter out the noise, allowing you to focus on what matters most."
rss  feeds  filtering  aggregator  algorithms  attention  productivity  rankings  ratings  popularity 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Random Etc. : Blog Archive : The Importance of Perspective
“Trout wondered what a child who was just learning to read would make of a message like that. The child would suppose that the message was terrifically important, since somebody had gone to the trouble of writing it in letters so big.”
vonnegut  twitter  writing  blogging  del.icio.us  importance  filtering  information  overload  minutiae  kurtvonnegut 
january 2008 by robertogreco
When Two Tribes Go To War ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"never heard of a policy for what to do when you pass peer/colleague/superior/lecturer/student in street - why do we need one for online social behaviour?'." The beauty of living in free society is in how much of our behaviour goes unregulated."
ict  schools  workplace  control  filtering  computers  standardization  open  choice  trust 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Time to end the digital 'arms race' of parental spying? | Tech news blog - CNET News.com
"Nobody wants to be controlled, least of all youth trying to find their own identities and gain a measure of independence...."Internet safety isn't something you can effectively impose on anyone over the age of ten."
teens  children  parenting  online  safety  privacy  trust  behavior  social  web  internet  teaching  filtering  control  youth 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Marlboro Man in the school library? | Tech news blog - CNET News.com
"It's unclear whether any schools changed their course, but the nonprofit Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC) slammed the NSBA on Friday, alleging that it published a study that was inherently biased."
schools  libraries  filtering  filters  online  internet  students  studies  research  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  blogs  blogging  wikis 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Better living through self deception (kottke.org)
"Interesting article about how people tell their stories and think of their past experiences and how that influences their mood and general outlook on life."
happiness  psychology  stories  memory  experience  health  learning  life  exercise  sports  thinking  visual  brain  change  depression  kottke  self  mindset  perception  productivity  behavior  lifehacks  forgetting  thirdperson  firstperson  achievement  focus  edwardvogel  information  filtering  caroldweck  alleniverson  psychocybernetics  self-deception 
may 2007 by robertogreco

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