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robertogreco : firstperson   5

César Aira: My ideal is the fairy tale - YouTube
"Interview with Argentinian César Aira who has been called the Marcel Duchamp of Latin America because of his experimental and unpredictable books, heralded by e.g. Roberto Bolaño and Patti Smith. Here Aira talks about his writing and why his books end up like they do.

"You will have to travel to the south of Argentina to find the most original, the most shocking, the most exciting and subversive Spanish-speaking author of our time: César Aira" as put by Spanish newspaper El País. Carlos Fuentes has said that he thinks César Aira will be the first Argentinian to receive the Nobel Prize.

In this interview the Argentine writer César Aira talks about literature in general and his own writing in particular. Specifically he talks of the stories "Ghosts" (1990) and "An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter" (2000).

César Aira (b.1949) has published over eighty books of stories, novels and essays, half of which contain less than twenty pages. Since 1993 Aira has written two to four books each year. In this video Aira talks about his writing techniques and opinions and why he prefers writing shorter books. Writing should be story telling in an old fashioned way, much like a fairy tale, a story of something which happened once, to someone else, i.e. not told in the first person or present tense. Airas books may be short, but they are full of layers, he explains, starting perhaps with an experiment or some philosophical idea.

Aira has taught at the University of Buenos Aires (about Copi and Rimbaud) and at the University of Rosario (Constructivism and Mallarmé), and has translated and edited books from France, England, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Mexico, and Venezuela.

César Aira was interviewed by the Danish writer Peter Adolphsen at the Louisiana Literature festival 2012. Adolphsen also translated Aira's words into English in this video."
césaraira  argentina  literature  art  books  robertobolaño  pattismith  writing  carlosfuentes  mallarmé  constructivism  rimbaud  copi  fairytales  firstperson  layering  experimentalbooks  thisisnotabook  presenttense  howwewrite  storytelling  novels  shortstories  everyday  buenosaires  argenchino 
december 2013 by robertogreco
>You Are Standing in a Dark Cave: Robin Sloan and Charles Yu in Conversation - The Barnes & Noble Review
"I think you're onto something when you say first person is "the native mode of the early 21st century" although I would qualify that by saying that is much more true of writers who are just starting out or close to it, and less true for writers who have been writing since the last millennium. No doubt it has something to do with email and Twitter, as you point out, and also Facebook and video games and all of this first-person writing. Of course, people have always navigated the world in first-person – but I think the difference now is that everyone wants to be a protagonist. And if you're living in the U.S., and relatively comfortable, you have the means and opportunity to do so, to construct reality so that you're at the center of it."

"I'm actually optimistic about mass protagonization. One of the virtues of writing in first-person for an audience, even a very small one, is that it forces you to actually decide what you think."

[And so much more…]
edg  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  srg  if  metafiction  garyshteyngart  howfictionworks  freeindindirectstyle  thinking  thinkingbywriting  games  gaming  videogames  jameswood  mrpenumbra  facebook  twitter  email  digitalage  empathy  2012  firstperson  writing  charlesyu  robinsloan  interactivefiction 
october 2012 by robertogreco
275 Cultural Icons: Great Artists, Writers & Thinkers in Their Own Words | Open Culture
"Great writers, dazzling filmmakers and musicians, brilliant philosophers and scientists — you can now hear and see them in their own words. Here we present audio and video that captures the words of our greatest cultural icons."
education  culture  art  writing  writers  video  thinkers  filmmaking  music  firstperson  audio  classideas  primarysources  wcydwt 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Some Came Running: Truffaut/Hitchcock
"The film of tomorrow appears to me as even more personal than an individual and autobiographical novel, like a confession, or a diary. The young filmmakers will express themselves in the first person and will relate what has happened to them; it may be the story of their first love, or their most recent; of their political awakening; the story of a trip, a sickness, their military service, their marriage, their last vacation...and it will be enjoyable because it will be true and new...The film of tomorrow will not be directed by civil servants of the camera, but by artists for whom shooting a film constitutes a wonderful and thrilling adventure. The film of tomorrow will resemble the person who made it, and the number of spectators will be proportional to the number of friends the director has. The film of tomorrow will be an act of love."

—Francois Truffaut, "The Film of Tomorrow WIll Be An Act Of Love," Arts, May 15, 1957…

[via: http://faketv.tumblr.com/post/2909950163/the-film-of-tomorrow-appears-to-me-as-even-more ]
françoistruffaut  film  filmmaking  personal  identity  diaries  confessions  autobiography  storytelling  firstperson  writing  novels  expression  classideas 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Better living through self deception (kottke.org)
"Interesting article about how people tell their stories and think of their past experiences and how that influences their mood and general outlook on life."
happiness  psychology  stories  memory  experience  health  learning  life  exercise  sports  thinking  visual  brain  change  depression  kottke  self  mindset  perception  productivity  behavior  lifehacks  forgetting  thirdperson  firstperson  achievement  focus  edwardvogel  information  filtering  caroldweck  alleniverson  psychocybernetics  self-deception 
may 2007 by robertogreco

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