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Think Like a Scientist: Renewal on Vimeo
[via: "How the Elwha River Was Saved: The inside story of the largest dam removal project in US history."
http://tlas.nautil.us/video/291/how-the-elwha-river-was-saved

"I know firsthand what a hydroelectric dam can do to the environment. As a tribal member growing up on the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe’s reservation, the Elwha River and its two hydroelectric dams were in my backyard. Before the dams, whose construction began in 1910, the river was rich with several species of fish, including steelhead trout, and all five species of Pacific salmon. My great-grandfather and tribal elder, Edward Sampson, shared stories with me of catching 100-pound Chinook salmon, then watching the salmon populations decline when the dams came. Salmon have always been culturally and spiritually important to my tribe. They are treated reverently, and celebrated with ceremonies after the first catch of each year.

The Elwha dams were built without fish ladders, gently sloping structures that connect waters on either side of the dam. These ladders are important for anadromous fish, meaning stream-born fish that live part of their lives in the ocean and later return to their natal streams to spawn. Salmons are anadromous, and carry with them marine-derived nutrients that are important to the entire Elwha watershed ecosystem. Salmon carcasses provide nutrients for other wildlife and fertilizer for riparian vegetation.

My work has strengthened my ties to my home.

Without fish ladders, the dams blocked access by salmon to 90 percent of their historic spawning grounds, halted the flow of marine-derived nutrients into the ecosystem, and dramatically reduced salmon populations. They also negated agreements in the tribe’s 1855 Point No Point Treaty, which stated that it would have permanent fishing rights on the Elwha River.

The history of the dam was tightly woven in the history of my own family. My grandfather worked for the company that ran the dams for his entire career, while my grandmother was an activist working to remove the dams and restore the salmon populations. Then, on Sept. 17, 2011, the largest dam removal and river restoration project in United States history was set into motion. Both dams were removed, and the Elwha River began to flow freely again for the first time in 100 years.

My realization of the role people have in ecosystem health, brought about in part by watching my tribe fight for the removal of the dams and the restoration of the salmon, inspired me to pursue a career working in natural resources. I decided to return to my home on the reservation to pursue a degree in environmental science at Western Washington University, after attending the University of Hawaii at Mānoa for two years and studying marine biology. I was hired as an intern for the tribe’s wildlife program in 2014. Four months into my internship, I was hired for a part-time position by the tribe’s wildlife program manager, Kim Sager-Fradkin, while maintaining a full-time student schedule. In addition to a Columbian black-tailed deer mortality study, this program gave me an opportunity to study Elwha river otters and to be a part of an Elwha River Restoration wildlife monitoring project.

I am particularly proud of my involvement in the three-year, collaborative study monitoring Elwha wildlife recolonization. The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, the United States Geological Survey, the National Park Service, and Western Washington University were all involved. The study gave me the opportunity to survey beavers, songbirds, deer and elk, vegetation and large woody debris, and small mammal trapping surveys. The experiences I’ve had during this study observing wildlife interactions with the environment over time have reinforced my desire to further my education studying population ecology. Because of this, I will be starting graduate school at the University of Idaho with a newly-funded project to study cougar population size and structure on the Olympic Peninsula.

My work has strengthened my ties to my home. In the years since I’ve returned, I’ve become closer with my tribal and scientific communities, and have grown an even stronger appreciation for the Elwha River ecosystem. The river restoration has been a major success for the Klallam people, and proves the effectiveness of methods for ecosystem restoration that will hopefully be used as a model in other restoration efforts worldwide. And for me personally, the experience of working on this restoration project and seeing firsthand the regeneration of the former lakebeds and of the historic lands of my people has been incredibly reaffirming."]
elwah  elwahiver  washingtonstate  2018  cameronmacias  rivers  nature  conservation  ecosystems  ecology  wildlife  dams  salmon  multispecies  morethanhuman  fish  klallam  olympicpeninsula  clallamcounty  restoration 
february 2019 by robertogreco
GhostFood on Vimeo
"GhostFood explores eating in a future of and biodiversity loss brought on by climate change. The GhostFood mobile food trailer serves scent-food pairings that are consumed by the public using a wearable device that adapts human physiology to enable taste experiences of unavailable foods.

Created in collaboration with Miriam Songster. Commissioned by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation for Marfa Dialogues/NY, with additional support provided by Takasago, NextFab Studios and Whole Foods. Marfa Dialogues/NY is a collaboration between the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Ballroom Marfa and the Public Concern Foundation. GhostFood was presented by Gallery Aferro in Newark, Rauschenberg Project Space in New York and by SteamWorkPhilly in Philadelphia."
2014  food  miriamsimun  miriamsongster  climatechange  speculativefiction  speculativedesign  physiology  taste  smell  senses  ghostfood  extinction  cod  fish  peanuts  cocoa  flavor  multisensory  flavors 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Lens of Time: Secrets of Schooling - bioGraphic
"Shimmering schools of fish have dazzled scientists for centuries with their synchronized maneuvers. Now, high-speed video is revealing how—and why—they do it."



"Collective behavior is embodied in swarms of insects, flocks of birds, herds of antelope, and schools of fish. In each of these cases, individuals move through their environment and respond to threats and opportunities almost simultaneously, forming an undulating enclave that seems to operate as a single entity. Such coordinated movement requires the rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, but understanding exactly how this information spreads through the group has long eluded scientists. Studying this behavior in schools of fish has been incredibly challenging, because the cues that drive it occur at lightening speed, come from multiple directions and sources, and of course because all of it takes place underwater. Now, Iain Couzin and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology at the University of Konstanz, Germany are using new observation techniques and technologies—including high-speed video, motion-tracking software, and advanced statistical modeling—to reveal the mysterious mechanics of schooling fish. Their findings may shed light on the evolution and benefits of collective behavior across the animal kingdom."
nature  animals  multispecies  collectivebehavior  fish  birds  herds  antelopes  insects  science  iaincouzin  video  towatch  motion  movement 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Your car has just been crushed by hagfish: Frequently Asked Questions | Southern Fried Science
"1396 words • 6~10 min read
Your car has just been crushed by hagfish: Frequently Asked Questions
Wait, what?

Earlier today, Oregon State Police reported that a truck carrying a shipment of live hagfish overturned, spilling it’s slimy cargo all over the highway and damaging at least one vehicle."
science  humor  hagfish  2017  oregon  biology  andrewdavidthaler  nature  multispecies  fish  fishing  commercialfishing 
july 2017 by robertogreco
This Deep Sea Fisherman Posts His Discoveries on Twitter and OH MY GOD KILL IT WITH FIRE
"Roman Fedortsov is a deep sea fisherman in Russia. And he’s been taking photos of OH MY GOD WHAT IS THAT?

Seriously, I just took a quick three-minute scroll through Fedortsov’s Twitter page, and he has photos of ocean creatures that look like they’re from the most twisted Jim Henson movie ever produced. (If Jim Henson did a ton of fucking acid.)

The English-language site Moscow Times posted a handful of the photos, but I’ve found even more on Fedortsov’s Twitter. The fisherman is reportedly based in Murmansk, which is a real place in Russia, and not another planet where Hell has opened up and set demons free to roam the land and the seas."

[See also:

"Reasons to be proud of Twitter: we can accommodate such wildly specialised content verticals as... this. https://gizmodo.com/this-deep-sea-fisherman-posts-his-discoveries-on-twitte-1790323479 "
https://twitter.com/hautepop/status/811333399973654528

"Though actually, sharing photos of Fish Infrastructure is really valuable. Never seen this before - the scale! https://twitter.com/rfedortsov/status/804996047529476097 [video] "
https://twitter.com/hautepop/status/811357193450770432 ]
nature  oceans  animals  fish  fishing  russia  deapsea  twitter  socialmedia  2016  romanfedortsov  commercialfishing  mattnovak 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Ceviche, Poke, Crudo, Carpaccio: Your Guide To Raw Fish Dishes Around The World - Modern Farmer
"Most seafood-heavy cultures have figured out that you don't need heat to eat fish and shellfish. The latest: the Hawaiian dish poke, which after a few years of trendiness out on the west coast has officially breached New York City's borders.

Given that this list is inspired by the poke-craze, we should narrow our criteria down a bit. Merely the absence of heat doesn’t necessarily qualify a dish for inclusion on this list; lox, gravlax, and nova, for example, are brined and/or cold-smoked to cure them, but are typically eaten as an appetizer, rather than a main course. Escabeche (or the Caribbean version, escovitch), appears very similar to a ceviche, but is typically cooked, either fried or poached, which disqualifies it. Crudo and carpaccio, too, aren’t really dishes, but more just adjectives meaning “raw”: They can refer to any protein served in any way.

What we’re getting at here are raw or marinated fish dishes, served as a main course. These dishes are gaining steam even away from the coastal regions where raw fish is an old tradition, partly because the US is ever-hungry for new and more exotic foods, but also because raw is an excellent way to appreciate high-quality seafood. These dishes came about as a way to celebrate and make use of the local catch, and have taken on different characters based on the different fish caught in different parts of the world. Eating a raw fish dish is a way to really see and taste what it’s like to live along a certain coast.

That said, there is, as with any seafood dish, a high risk of eating something you shouldn’t. In general, you should opt for pretty high-quality stuff here, to avoid the risk of food poisoning (which, to be fair, is a lower risk than you might think). But even more, you should be careful not to eat certain species of fish. Seafood Watch, run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, is the leading resource for learning about fish—you’d be surprised how many common species (bluefin tuna, for example) you should just…never, ever eat. Anyway, here’s our list!

Ceviche

Most associated with the coastal region of Peru, ceviche has spread to most of Latin America and even up into North America. At its core, ceviche consists of raw seafood marinated in strong citrus juice. The variety of seafood, type of citrus, length of marination, and garnishes (often herbs, vegetables, and chiles) vary considerably based on where the ceviche comes from; a Mexican ceviche may have little in common with a Peruvian ceviche. Types of seafood often include shrimp, squid, white fish like sea bass, and shark. Often it’s served with something crunchy, like fried green plantains, popcorn, or fried tortillas. Occasionally it’s mixed with tomato sauce or even ketchup. In Peru, the marinade itself is incredibly acidic, salty, and spicy, and is sometimes served in a shot glass before the meal. This is called leche de tigre, which mean’s “tiger’s milk.”

Sashimi

Sashimi is a very old Japanese preparation, and one of the seemingly simplest. The dish consists of carefully sliced raw fish (and occasionally meat) that’s not typically marinated and often served with no sauce and minimal garnishes. Unlike other raw fish dishes, sashimi is not preserved with acid or smoke, but given a slight extension in shelf-life due to the method with which the fish is killed, a spike through the brain known as ike jime. (Sushi, for what it’s worth, refers to the vinegared rice and not the fish; any topping with sushi rice is considered sushi.) Common fish for sashimi include salmon, tuna, squid, mackerel, and sea urchin. The Korean dish hoe, when it includes seafood, is extremely similar and differs only in that it is usually served with a sauce (soy, chili paste, that kind of thing).

Poke

A sort of hybrid ceviche/sashimi dish, the Hawaiian poke (POH-kay) is, these days, usually a bowl of cubed raw fish, sometimes served over rice, in a sauce. Most commonly it’s dressed with soy sauce, seaweed, and sesame oil, but it’s not uncommon to see Japanese mayonnaise, wasabi, hot sauce (often Sriracha), onions, avocado, or basically anything else in poke. It’s a fairly young dish; raw fish has been eaten by Hawaiians for centuries, but the dish recognizable as poke dates back perhaps to the late 19th century. It’s also one informed by immigrants, so poke is a particularly fluid dish. On the US mainland, the word “poke” tends to be used to refer to any dish of cubed raw fish in a bowl.

Tartare

Traditionally a French dish consisting of minced raw beef, seasoned heavily, and often served with a raw egg yolk, the basic preparation has been extended out to other proteins. Tuna tartare is perhaps the most common: It’s also a mound of finely chopped raw flesh, seasoned with basically anything, and served with something to put it on, like toast. Tuna tartare dates to the 1970s at a restaurant called Le Duc, in Paris.

Kinilaw

Ceviche, Poke, Crudo, Carpaccio: Your Guide To Raw Fish Dishes Around The World
By Dan Nosowitz on February 4, 2016

Mmmmm, delicious ceviche.y6y6y6, Flickr
Most seafood-heavy cultures have figured out that you don't need heat to eat fish and shellfish. The latest: the Hawaiian dish poke, which after a few years of trendiness out on the west coast has officially breached New York City's borders.

Given that this list is inspired by the poke-craze, we should narrow our criteria down a bit. Merely the absence of heat doesn’t necessarily qualify a dish for inclusion on this list; lox, gravlax, and nova, for example, are brined and/or cold-smoked to cure them, but are typically eaten as an appetizer, rather than a main course. Escabeche (or the Caribbean version, escovitch), appears very similar to a ceviche, but is typically cooked, either fried or poached, which disqualifies it. Crudo and carpaccio, too, aren’t really dishes, but more just adjectives meaning “raw”: They can refer to any protein served in any way.

What we’re getting at here are raw or marinated fish dishes, served as a main course. These dishes are gaining steam even away from the coastal regions where raw fish is an old tradition, partly because the US is ever-hungry for new and more exotic foods, but also because raw is an excellent way to appreciate high-quality seafood. These dishes came about as a way to celebrate and make use of the local catch, and have taken on different characters based on the different fish caught in different parts of the world. Eating a raw fish dish is a way to really see and taste what it’s like to live along a certain coast.

That said, there is, as with any seafood dish, a high risk of eating something you shouldn’t. In general, you should opt for pretty high-quality stuff here, to avoid the risk of food poisoning (which, to be fair, is a lower risk than you might think). But even more, you should be careful not to eat certain species of fish. Seafood Watch, run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, is the leading resource for learning about fish—you’d be surprised how many common species (bluefin tuna, for example) you should just…never, ever eat. Anyway, here’s our list!

Ceviche
cevichey6y6y6, Flickr
Most associated with the coastal region of Peru, ceviche has spread to most of Latin America and even up into North America. At its core, ceviche consists of raw seafood marinated in strong citrus juice. The variety of seafood, type of citrus, length of marination, and garnishes (often herbs, vegetables, and chiles) vary considerably based on where the ceviche comes from; a Mexican ceviche may have little in common with a Peruvian ceviche. Types of seafood often include shrimp, squid, white fish like sea bass, and shark. Often it’s served with something crunchy, like fried green plantains, popcorn, or fried tortillas. Occasionally it’s mixed with tomato sauce or even ketchup. In Peru, the marinade itself is incredibly acidic, salty, and spicy, and is sometimes served in a shot glass before the meal. This is called leche de tigre, which mean’s “tiger’s milk.”

Sashimi
ShutterstockShutterstock
Sashimi is a very old Japanese preparation, and one of the seemingly simplest. The dish consists of carefully sliced raw fish (and occasionally meat) that’s not typically marinated and often served with no sauce and minimal garnishes. Unlike other raw fish dishes, sashimi is not preserved with acid or smoke, but given a slight extension in shelf-life due to the method with which the fish is killed, a spike through the brain known as ike jime. (Sushi, for what it’s worth, refers to the vinegared rice and not the fish; any topping with sushi rice is considered sushi.) Common fish for sashimi include salmon, tuna, squid, mackerel, and sea urchin. The Korean dish hoe, when it includes seafood, is extremely similar and differs only in that it is usually served with a sauce (soy, chili paste, that kind of thing).

Poke
via Flickr user Grant ShindoGrant Shindo, Flickr
A sort of hybrid ceviche/sashimi dish, the Hawaiian poke (POH-kay) is, these days, usually a bowl of cubed raw fish, sometimes served over rice, in a sauce. Most commonly it’s dressed with soy sauce, seaweed, and sesame oil, but it’s not uncommon to see Japanese mayonnaise, wasabi, hot sauce (often Sriracha), onions, avocado, or basically anything else in poke. It’s a fairly young dish; raw fish has been eaten by Hawaiians for centuries, but the dish recognizable as poke dates back perhaps to the late 19th century. It’s also one informed by immigrants, so poke is a particularly fluid dish. On the US mainland, the word “poke” tends to be used to refer to any dish of cubed raw fish in a bowl.

Tartare
tuna tartareShutterstock
Traditionally a French dish consisting of minced raw beef, seasoned heavily, and often served with a raw egg yolk, the basic preparation has been extended out to other proteins. Tuna tartare is perhaps the most common: It’s also a mound of finely chopped raw flesh, seasoned with basically … [more]
food  recipes  ceviche  fish  cooking  2016  via:anne  sashimi  poke  tartare  kinilaw  yusheng  sushi  raw  crudo  carpaccio  rawfish 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Warm-Blooded Fish Discovered Near San Diego | KPBS
"The opah has also been called the moonfish due to its unusually round, silvery body. But the opah's shape isn't its only unusual trait. In a surprise finding, San Diego researchers have discovered that it's also warm-blooded.

In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in La Jolla describe the opah as the first example of a fish that can warm its entire body above the temperature of surrounding waters.

Researchers reeled in more than 20 opah off the coast of San Diego for the study. Temperature measurements revealed that all parts of the fish were warmer than its environment. Scientists already know that tuna and certain species of shark can selectively warm specific body parts, but the opah's self-heating extends throughout its entire body.

"It's the first fish that actually has a warm heart," said study author and fisheries research biologist Nick Wegner. "This is significant because it allows the fish to stay at depth in cold water and function at a higher level."

Over the last three years, Wegner has been catching lots of opah during surveys for the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. He's not sure why his catch of opah has been increasing in California. He said it's common in Hawaii, where it's often sold for meat.

At first Wegner thought they were probably sluggish creatures like most of the fish in similarly deep, chilly waters. But he's learned that the opah — despite looking like a manhole cover that sprouted fins — is actually a fast and formidable predator. He thinks the opah's advantage is its elevated body temperature.

"At warmer temperatures, muscles contract faster and they have more power," he said. "It can swim around faster, respond faster and see better than these animals that are the same temperature as that cold water."

The researchers dissected some of the opah for clues about how its body temperature is regulated. They found an intricately woven circulatory system. The opah's veins and arteries overlapped tightly. That density allows blood in the veins, warmed by vigorous muscle movement, to transfer heat into the arteries, chilled by oxygen entering the blood from cold surrounding waters through the fish's gills.

Warm blood is often thought to be a unique property of mammals and birds. But Wegner said marine biologists can now point to the opah as one major exception."
fish  biology  sandiego  oceans  2015  opah  noaa 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Salmon - DSM color fans - Solutions - Products - DSM
"The DSM SalmoFan™ launched first in 1989 by Hoffman-La Roche as "Colour Card for Salmonids" is our days the industry’s color reference standard for the visual judging and comparison of degrees of pigmentation in salmon flesh perceived by the human eye."

[via: https://twitter.com/kathrynschulz/status/587259396666691584 ]
salmon  color  colors  creepy  food  pantone  marketing  fish  flesh  2015 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Trash Animals — University of Minnesota Press
"From pigeons to prairie dogs, reflections on reviled animals and their place in contemporary life

In Trash Animals, a diverse group of environmental writers explore the natural history of wildlife species deemed filthy, invasive, or worthless, highlighting the vexed relationship humans have with such creatures. Each essay focuses on a so-called trash species—gulls, coyotes, carp, and magpies, among others—examining the biology and behavior of each in contrast to the assumptions widely held about them."

[via: https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/579805654065360897
in response to https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/579804681314131968 ]
animals  books  environment  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  multispecies  pigeons  wildlife  urban  urbanism  coyotes  seagulls  carp  birds  fish  corvids  biology  behavior  kelsinagy  phillipdavidjohnson  invasivespecies  feral  nature  2013 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Inspiration Information: “The Whispering Muse” - The New Yorker
"At the beginning of my novel “The Whispering Muse,” the two main narrators meet for the first time in the mess room of a freighter on its maiden journey from Denmark to the Black Sea. As the octogenarian racial theorist/fish enthusiast Valdimar Haraldsson sizes up the ship’s muscular second mate, a man of the hesitant, storytelling type, he is surprised to see that his rival uses a primitive gadget to help him tell his tale:
Before embarking on his tales the mate had the habit of drawing a rotten chip of wood from his pocket and holding it to his right ear like a telephone receiver. He listened to the chip for a minute or two, closing his eyes as if in sleep, while under his eyelids his pupils quivered to and fro.

When the ship’s captain sees how flabbergasted old Haraldsson is by the second mate’s pantomime with this piece of wood—which looks like nothing so much as the rotten driftwood that used to wash up on the shores of his youth, “bored by worms, gnawed by insects, polished by wind and water, hammered by rocks”—he leans in and whispers, “That’s where he gets the story from … ”

The chip of wood turns out to be a splinter from the bow timber of the great ship Argo, the famous vessel steered through the Mediterranean Sea by the legendary Jason, the son of Aeson, and powered by his crew of heroes, the Argonauts. Because the bow of the Argo was fashioned from one of the talking oaks of Zeus, the splinter keeps a spark of its old power, a whisper of its original voice. It carries across the millennia the tales of its travels and the adventures of its crew:
At first it is wordless, like crooning over a cradle, then it swells into a song. The singer is a woman.

Just as the second mate relies on his instruments of wood and words to inspire his narration, so did I use a handful of metaphorical whispering devices to inspire and inform my writing of the novel: five books made from tree pulp, their pages sprinkled with letters.

The first of these was “Innan lands og utan” (“Home and Abroad”), a suspiciously boring book of travel stories written by my great-grandfather, Matthías Þórðarson frá Móum, an avid but forgotten author of books about the fish trade and himself. In it, he tells three stories: the first about his return to Iceland from Copenhagen after years abroad; the second about a visit to the Setes Valley, in Norway; and the third about a sea journey in the late nineteen-forties from Copenhagen to the Mediterranean.

Each story has its particular charm. In the first, he describes how happy and honored his countrymen were to see him again after all his years away; in the second, he is captivated by the traditional costumes and rhymed poetry of the Setes Valley people, their pale skin color, ruddy cheeks, and fine body postures; and, in the third, he is more occupied with the inside of the ship than anything that happens outside it—even when he steps ashore, in Morocco, and visits one of its Grand Bazaars, the narration falls flat compared to his enthusiastic descriptions of his cabin. It was this third story that caught my eye as possible material. Its “anti-narration” had the flavor of modernist writing in its main character’s insistent refusal to engage with what is supposed to be noteworthy in a story. Yet it wasn’t enough to sustain a whole novel.

Then I came across a two-part essay that my great-grandfather published in an Icelandic journal in 1936. It is called “Fiskur og menning” (“Fish and Culture”), and, while I read it, the image that I had had of him as a rather amusing but boring old fart got both weirder and darker. In the essay, he proposes, in all seriousness, a theory about the relationship between fish consumption and the superiority of the Nordic race. With its overt agenda of genetic purity, it’s quite an unsavory piece of writing. I figured that enough shadows had now been added to the old man’s character to keep a writer and his reader busy for at least a hundred and fifty pages. But the thought of being locked up for weeks on end on a ship with my fish-obsessed, racist great-grandfather instantly brought on an intense feeling of suffocation. I had to find a way to make it bearable.

Aboard his freighter, my great-grandfather had mentioned a crew member who continually told stories. He could be my ally against boredom! But, because my great-grandfather had found the sailor’s tales too cheap and dirty to record, I had to look elsewhere for tales from the salty seas. Two years earlier, at the annual used-book market in Reykjavík, a book had caught my eye by virtue of its ridiculous cover. It was garishly bedecked with photographs of a sturdy man in situations that clearly showed that he had sailed the seven seas, had feasted in many a harbor, and flexed his muscles both fighting and embracing. Of course, I had brought it home. The book, “Enn sigli ég minn sjó” (“More Life on the Ocean Wave”), was the seafaring memoirs of Hrafn Valdimarsson, and it was a horn of plenty when it came to tales of hardship on the seas and adventures in faraway lands. To my joy, I soon discovered that it was the sequel to “Ég sigli minn sjó” (“Life on the Ocean Wave”), in which the events described so shamelessly were even more delectable.

I had definitely found a figure strong enough to counter the lectures on racial superiority and seafood. But, as I started pitching him against the old man in my novel, who by now had acquired the name Valdimar Haraldsson, I realized that even these tales left no bigger mark on my fictional character than they had on my great-grandfather. I needed something that would clash like a titan’s shield against the overwhelming banality of one of the poorest excuses for a myth in modern times: the myth of the Nordic Übermensch.

The year before, I had traveled to Greece to be at the opening ceremony of the 2004 Olympic Games, in Athens, where Björk sang the song that she and I had written for the occasion. The lyrics had been inspired by the Greek myths, with their cycles of metamorphosis and their complicated interactions between man and the superior powers that surround him, and so I made a point during my stay to visit the ruins of the great Temple of Poseidon, at Sounion. There, I discovered that Poseidon had never left the dilapidated temple, that in fact he still lay, in his magnificent blueness, at the bottom of the cliffs that supported this structure that men had so long ago built in his honor. With the memory of that year’s Indonesian tsunami fresh in my mind, I knew that, although he was calm and beautiful on the day of my visit to his temple, Poseidon remained an uncontrollable, unpredictable force. He and his fellow gods from Mount Olympus had not forsaken us, even if we had forsaken them.

Now I turned to them for help.

After a short search through my library that included quickly rejecting the Odyssey (for the obvious reason that it has already been used with good results by diverse novelists and poets, such as James Joyce and Derek Walcott, to name but two), I found a story, a setting, and a character that matched the journey I had already set out on. The story was the Argonautica, by Appollonius of Rhodes. It was a story that I thought I knew well from repeated viewings of the Ray Harryhausen film “Jason and the Argonauts” at the Sunday matinées of my childhood. But now I discovered an episode in the original that takes place well before the Argo sails through the Symplegades in search of the Golden Fleece, a tale of how the fearless captain and his crew of mighty heroes become trapped on Lemnos, an island of women who take the Argonauts on as lovers/sex slaves while they repopulate their nation. It is a gem of a seafaring tale—the germ of a tale—that has been told in an endless variety of ways ever since. And it was a tale that I knew a sailor like Hrafn Valdimarsson would have loved, and would have loved to tell.

From the crew list of the Argo (as it is proposed by Robert Graves), I hired a little-known hero who, I believed, brought the most interesting point of view on the situation of a group of men held captive by their lust for womanly flesh: Caeneus, who had been born a girl but metamorphosed into an invincible man after being raped by Poseidon; after life as a soldier, he transformed into a bird in a battle with the centaurs. Now he could take on the unlikely guise of the second mate aboard my novel’s merchant ship.

That is how an alliance was made between the ancient hero Caeneus and the Icelandic seaman Hrafn Valdimarsson, how their voices, their fates, were joined to fight the intolerable drone of my great-grandfather. But even great men like those two need an amazing tool to help them to tell their tale: a talkative, rotten chip of wood that came from the great ship Argo itself. At the end of “The Whispering Muse,” the old man does indeed learn a lesson, but the cost to his rival storyteller is dear.

My great-grandfather died in 1959, having completed his magnum opus, “Síldarsaga Íslands” (“The History of Herring Fishing in Iceland”). It is said that Hrafn Valdimarsson spent his last years in Greenwich Village. Caeneus is eternal and flying around the world on his seagull’s wings.

As I walked through the Village during my stay in New York for the World Voices Literary Festival, I heard a seagull’s scream: “ARRK! ARRK!”

That is a tale for another day, but now you know where I got my story."
sjón  2014  iceland  writing  literature  howwewrite  research  storytelling  odyssey  ancientgreece  combinatorywriting  fish  culture  history  argonautica  appollonius  rayharryhausen 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Awesome fish cannon shoots salmon safely over dams
"One company is using fish cannons to safely get migrating fish through man-made obstacles. Salmon are curious creatures going from the saltwater ocean to travel hundreds of miles up freshwater rivers and streams to return to where they were born to spawn. Along the way, the salmon navigate through some serious obstacles with head-scratching amazement, but occasionally run into dams and other obstacles they can’t get around or over and that is where the Whooshh Innovations fish cannon can help."
via:alexismadrigal  salmon  fish  dams  2014 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Interview: Paul Greenberg, Author Of 'American Catch: The Fight For Our Local Seafood' : The Salt : NPR
"What's the most popular seafood in the U.S.? Shrimp. The average American eats more shrimp per capita than tuna and salmon combined. Most of that shrimp comes from Asia, and most of the salmon we eat is also imported. In fact, 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, but one-third of the seafood Americans catch gets sold to other countries.

Shrimp and salmon are two case studies in the unraveling of America's seafood economy, according to Paul Greenberg, author of the new book American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood. Greenberg tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross about what's driving the changes in America's seafood economy and why you should buy wild salmon frozen when its out of season."



"We only eat about 15 pounds of seafood per year per capita. That's half of the global average, so there's that. The other thing is that other countries really are hip to seafood. The Chinese love seafood; the Japanese, the Koreans — they love seafood. They're willing to pay top dollar for it. We just aren't willing to do so. We want our food cheap and easy.

All of this fast-food commodification of seafood protein — because that's kind of what it is at this point — adds to that general preference for cheap stuff. Kind of in tandem and in league with that is the American tendency to avoid taste. ... Foodies [talk] about flavor and texture and the food movement and that kind of thing, and that's true of about 5 percent of Americans, but 95 percent of Americans really are not so into flavor. ... If we don't like the flavorsome fish — like bluefish, mackerel, things like oysters, things that really taste of the sea — if we don't like that, then we're going to go for these generic, homogenized, industrialized products."



"On the decline of local fish markets

We don't want fish markets in our view shed. We don't want to smell them. We don't want to look at them. So they really have been banished from the center of our cities and sequestered to a corner of our supermarkets.

This is a process that aids all of the facelessness and commodification of seafood. ... Seafood has been taken out of the hands of the experts and put into the hands of the traders, so people really cannot identify the specificity of fish anymore. Because supermarkets rely on mass distribution systems, often frozen product, it means that the relationship between coastal producers of seafood is broken and so it's much easier for them to deal with the Syscos of the world, or these large purveyors that use these massive shrimp operations in Thailand or China, than it is for them to deal with the kind of knotty nature of local fishermen."
2014  fish  fishing  food  paulgreenberg  books  toread  commerce  globalization  salmon  shrimp 
july 2014 by robertogreco
The True Inner Beauty of Fishes | Science | Smithsonian
"A biologist and a poet team up for a new exhibition at the Seattle Aquarium that features images of bleached and stained fish skeletons"
animals  biology  fish  fishes  photography  adamsummers  helenthompson  poetry  sierranelson  nature  museums  translucence 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Shocking Truth About Piranhas Revealed! - NYTimes.com
"This is an awful lot of hype for piranhas to live up to, and predictably, they disappoint. To test the colorful mythology of the ferocious piranha, I once climbed into a tank of hungry red-bellied piranhas at the Dallas World Aquarium. (They fled to the opposite corner.) In the Peruvian Amazon, I stood waist-deep in the Rio Napo while catching and releasing piranhas on a hook-and-line. (The nibbles were strictly of the usual kind.) In the flooded grasslands of Venezuela, I drove around tossing a chicken carcass into various bodies of water to time how long it took for the flesh-maddened swarms to strip it to feathers. (There was enough chicken left at the end of the day to feed a family of four.)

The point of this exercise, recounted in my book “Swimming With Piranhas at Feeding Time,” was that piranhas do that swarming, blood-crazed, flesh-ripping thing only in a couple of rare circumstances, both involving a highly concentrated food source: They will swarm around bird rookeries, where the fledglings leaving the nest often tumble straight down into the water. And they’ll do it around docks where fishermen clean their catch and heave the guts into the water.

Otherwise, you can swim without fear."
animals  fish  myths  piranhas  nature  2014 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The Centre For Innovative and Radical Fishmongery : Bad at Sports
"To respond to the art world with a fish may be a surrealist gesture. But to respond with an entire fish counter, complete with fishmongers in white boots, ice and creative displays of the seafood itself, is surely pushing the 20th century genre to breaking point.

Such is the effect of the so-called Centre for Innovative and Radical Fishmongery, spotted in public at Sluice Art Fair, London, late October. Amidst the plentiful art for sale, the wares at CIRF included a scrambling pile of langoustine and a sinister-looking hake chewing on a lemon.

The artist behind the project is Sam Curtis who came to fishmongery by chance in 2006. A part time MFA at prestigious art school Goldsmiths necessitated finding work. By strange twist of fate, he found an opening on the fish counter at luxury department store Harrods.

“I decided to kill two birds with one stone,” he tells me when we catch up via phone. “I was under a lot of pressure to make work and earn at the same time, so I turned the day job into a studio, into a springboard, a platform for creating new projects.”

Curtis took his fishmongery skills back to successful crits at Goldsmiths. “I called it working in stealth mode, an undercover residency where my employer and my colleagues weren’t aware of the things that I was doing, what I was taking from the job, until the end,” he says.

After leaving this post, the artist blew his cover. “It was hard for them to grasp, in a way,” he says of his erstwhile colleagues, and equally hard to get their heads round was the film Curtis went on to make about them, “about their creativity and how they potentially see themselves as artists”.

“There’s a performative aspect to it,” says the artist of his former trade, and, “There is a lot of theatre there,” he says of his former workplace. But he now sees his installation at Sluice as a conceptual piece, and one he hopes to be able to tour.

“Fish are different all round the country,” he explains, adding that he hopes to collaborate with more fishmongers and artists alike. Pre CIRF, in 2011 he completed a residency in a fish shop in Penzance, Cornwall. There are clearly openings for artists working with fish.

But his new project is nothing if not inclusive. For the London art fair, Curtis invited half a dozen visiting artists to make their own displays. He can now add their ideas to the ever growing repertoire: “They created displays that I would never have done,” he admits.

And with an art fair audience already primed for excitement, Curtis can claim reactions of genuine surprise towards his intervention at Sluice. With plenty of conversation about fish, there was also an interest in day jobs in general and ways in which they can be creative.

Curtis says that artists and creative types are highly prone to disappointment in the realities of working life: “Your expectations aren’t really fulfilled quite often, because you might have more glamorous ideals about what being an artist is.”

By contrast, the fish-loving artist also says: “I’m interested in treating life as an artwork. Hence the turning of day job into a residency. I think if you can inject creativity into the more banal parts of your life, you’re more likely to become fulfilled.”

“I’ve always played on the fact you can insert your practice into your day job, no matter how far detached away from art that job is.” But even Curtis has his moments of doubt, having recently taken on a new full time job, he admits to being “slightly scared” about losing time for his art.

“As to what the best day jobs are, I don’t know,” he says, having tried working in a gallery and not liking the experience. “I prefer being quite far away from the art world.”

The trick is surely to become Innovative and Radical in everything you do, be that showing fish alongside video or giving away seafood at an art fair. “In terms of fishmongery and the radicalization of fishmongery I don’t think we’ve reached that point yet,” says Curtis. CIRF is clearly going after the big, ocean-going game."
via:annegalloway  fish  marksheerin  fishmongery  samcurtis  art  goldsmiths  harrods  work  labor  working  lifeasart  glvo  leisurearts  everday  performanceart  sluice  2013  artleisure 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Glowing Sushi
"The GloFish® is a patented and trademarked brand of genetically modified (GM) fluorescent zebrafish sold by Yorktown Technologies. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available as a pet. Although not originally developed for use in sushi, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available as meat."



"A WORD ON INNOVATION

Glowing Sushi is a byproduct of business innovation
in the life sciences.
Innovation is very often doing something that
"wasn't supposed to be done".

ZebraFish weren't supposed to glow.
Glowing ZebraFish weren't supposed to leave the lab.
Glowing ZebraFish weren't supposed to
help fight environmental pollution.
(Actually, that one never panned out!)

Glowing ZebraFish weren't supposed to be sold as pets.
Lifeforms weren't supposed to be patented and trademarked.
GloFish® weren't supposed to be crossbred at home.
GloFish® weren't supposed to be eaten.

A byproduct of innovation is more innovation.
And never quite as one expected.
What do innovators upstream think about their progeny?
Do they even recognize them?
A byproduct of innovation is more innovation."



"California is the only state in the nation that does not allow the sale of GloFish®. Sale or possession of GloFish® remains illegal in California due to a regulation that restricts all genetically modified fish. The regulation was implemented before the marketing of GloFish®, largely due to concern about AquaBounty's AquaAdvantage® Salmon product. Yorktown Technologies has decided to not undertake California's ecological review to comply with the California Environmental Quality Act citing the cost and time involved in that process, as well as the uncertainty of the outcome. Although California is a large state it does share borders with states where GoFish® are totally legal to purchase."

[via: https://twitter.com/Interdome/status/343111155381829632 ]
glofish  zebrafish  animals  fish  genetics  geneticmodification  biotechnology  bioengineering  gmo  sushi  food  innovation  patents  low  legal 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Ignacio's Mostly Latin Lunch, A Selby Film. Presented by T, The New York Times Style Magazine on Vimeo
"Chef Ignacio Mattos (formerly of Isa and Il Buco) makes a mostly Latin lunch at his home in Brooklyn with his wife, Gabi Plater; their son, Paco Plater Noya; and their friends David Tanis (a New York Times contributor and the author, most recently, of “A Platter of Figs“), Fernando Aciar (owner of O Café) and Pam Yung (a former pastry chef at Isa). Click here to see what’s on the menu."

[Recipes here: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/06/19/t-magazine/19selbyvideo.html ]
drink  caipirinhas  pamtung  fernandoaciar  davidtanis  gabiplater  ignaciomattos  fish  howto  video  theselby  edg  glvo  srg  recipes  cooking  brasileiro  brasil  brazil 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Ekstasis [A response to Robin Sloan's Fish app]
[Wonderful, but for me, most notable for including this poem, via: http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/hejinian/reason.html ]

“There are things
We live among ‘and to see them
Is to know ourselves.’”

—George Oppen

[More]

"So “Fish…” is just that, an essay that shows you the same thing over and over again. Or, not. Finish tapping through the screens and the app gives you the option to “reset” back to the ugh Sloan counsels to leave it in place. It’s tempting, to make the app into some special piece of time, but that would do it a disservice. It bears repeated reading because it’s so carefully crafted. The first item in its own cannon. A real memory."
louisagassiz  love  attention  lynhejinian  frederickseidel  davidcole  kennethgoldsmith  canon  2012  online  internet  stockandflow  stock  flow  fish  fishapp  robinsloan  georgeoppen  poetry  poems  williamball 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Oregon Field Guide — Fishing Quotas · Oregon Public Broadcasting
"Join a trawler on the high seas as he makes the worst catch imaginable: highly restricted canary rockfish. He must handle the unwanted haul under a brand new set of rules imposed on the industry in 2011. Catch shares now give out individual quotas of fish and hold those trawlers accountable when they catch too many. It's the biggest change to west coast trawling in 50 years."
fishing  friends  oregon  warrenton  economics  quotas  2011  fish  food 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Malthus, a Meal a Day. Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying About the Food and Love the (Population) Bomb. — Conceptual Devices
"It is an in-home aquaponics unit designed for the next generation kitchen or living room. It grows one meal a day: a portion of fish & a side salad. Aquaponics farming is a technique that combines the cultivation of fish with the growing of vegetables. The fish provides rich fertilizer for the plants and in return, the plants clean the water from the tank. The fish & the plants co-exist in a symbiotic relationship.

Malthus is an appliance for the kitchen of the future that grows food right next to where you cook it. Malthus consists of a fish tank that holds 400 litres which can support more then 2kg of fish like tilapia, salmon, grey fish or carp. The water is pumped through three cultivated grow beds which filter the water for the fish.

Malthus is designed to optimize space & costs with indoor food production. The weight of the fish tank is comparable to the one of a full bathtub, its width is about the size of two small refrigerators…parts…available in most DIY stores."
aquaponics  via:lukeneff  food  foodproduction  fish  sustainability  environment  ecology  classideas  kitchens  tilapia  carp  salmon  greyfish  farming  indoorfarming  personalfarms  agriculture 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Doors of Perception weblog: Fish systems and design
"The design lesson here is that there can be no one global “sustainable fish system”. The design task, instead, is to look for practical ways to help a multitude of different models – like MEPA in the South, or Pisces in the North – succeed, multiply, connect and adapt - in different ways in different contexts."
systemsthinking  systems  sustainability  food  fish  design  designthinking  johnthackara  iphone  applications  environment  extinction  energy  differentiation  2009  ios 
august 2010 by robertogreco
One Strange Fish Tale - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Behold the regal rainbow trout, dappled denizen of deep lake and rushing river, fierce hunter of fish and fly—and prize of pork-barrel politics, invigorator of men, eradicator of native species, payload of numerous bombing missions.
animals  environment  fish  fishing  nature  science  trout  rainbowtrout 
march 2010 by robertogreco
the living: amphibious architecture
"'amphibious architecture' is a new project by the new york city design studio the living. the project specifically uses water as a surface, since it is so ubiquitous in the world, yet under-explored in art and design. the project consists of two networks of floating interactive tubes that feature light beacons on top and a range of sensors below. these sensors 'monitor water quality, presence of fish, and human interest in the river ecosystem', while the lights respond and 'create feedback loops between humans, fish, and their shared environment'. 'an SMS interface allows citizens to text-message the fish, to receive real-time information about the river, and to contribute to a display of collective interest in the environment.’"

[more: http://www.thelivingnewyork.com/ AND http://www.thelivingnewyork.com/amphibiousarchitecture.htm ]
realtime  fish  pollution  water  waterquality  art  design  sensors  iphone  nyc 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Y2K, Dot-com Party Sushi, and Vodka Luges - Food Media - - CHOW
"When the ball drops on January 1, we’ll be entering a new decade. Isn’t it funny to think that just 10 years ago we were eating sushi all the time, working at dot-coms, and wearing high-tech-looking shoes with wavy Space Age soles? Imagine if somebody had told us that beards, pickles, and backyard chickens would be cutting-edge, 2010 fashion. CHOW.com busted out the time capsule to investigate more of what we were eating and drinking in 1999, and how it’s changed. Take a look…"

[via: http://www.hereandnow.org/2010/01/rundown-11/ ]
food  trends  00s  2000s  lists  diy  frugality  simplicity  affordability  organics  drink  fish  seafood  sustainability  local  farmersmarkets  restaurants  starbucks  independent  pop-uprestaurants  beer  wine  smoking  diet 
january 2010 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: The Bioluminescent Metropolis
"what if a city, particularly well-populated with fireflies...simply got rid of its public streetlights altogether, being so thoroughly drenched in a shining golden haze of insects that it didn't need them anymore? You don't cultivate honeybees, you build vast lightning bug farms. How absolutely extraordinary it would be to light your city using genetically-modified species of bioluminescent nocturnal birds...trained to nest at certain visually strategic points...how might architects, landscape architects & industrial designers incorporate bioluminescence into their work? Perhaps there really will be a way to using glowing vines on the sides of buildings as a non-electrical means of urban illumination..gglowing tides of bioluminescent algae really could be cultivated in the Thames – and you could win the Turner Prize for doing so. Kids would sit on the edges of bridges all night, as serpentine forms of living light snake by in the waters below."
bioluminescence  bldgblog  architecture  design  biology  animals  engineering  light  fish  lighting  birds  fireflies  science  technology  urban  scifi  cities  infrastructure 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Seafood Watch Recommendations for Your iPhone | Monterey Bay Aquarium
"Our new iPhone application brings the latest Seafood Watch recommendations directly to your iPhone or iPod touch. Now you can make sustainable seafood choices quickly and easily—whether you’re eating at your favorite restaurant or shopping for dinner. And at a time when the world’s oceans are severely overfished, your seafood choices make a big difference."
iphone  applications  environment  sustainability  food  fish  seafood  csiap  ios 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Mutant fish develops a taste for human flesh in India - Telegraph
"The enormous goonch, a type of catfish, is said to have developed a taste for human flesh after feeding on corpses thrown into the river after funeral ceremonies. Locals rumours have held for years that a mysterious monster lurks in the water. But they think it has moved on from scavenging to targeting live bathers who swim in the Great Kali, which flows along the India-Nepal borde"
fish  animals  india  monsters  food  oddities  via:regine 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Dawn of the Picasso Fish | The Loom | Discover Magazine
"Sometimes a species is so complex, so marvelous, or simply so weird that it’s hard to imagine how it could have possibly evolved by natural selection. Among the weirdest is the flounder." see also: http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080709/full/news.2008.
evolution  animals  fish  science  flounder  biology 
july 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Chinook Salmon Invade South America
"People introduced chinook to southern South America for aquaculture about 25 years ago, but now the species has started self-sustaining & rapidly expanding in wild...While North American counterparts are dwindling South American chinook are flourishing"
chile  aquaculture  animals  fish  nature  invasivespecies  environment  ecosystems  southamerica  northamerica  us  cascadia  alaska  canada  salmon 
june 2008 by robertogreco
TOPP [Tagging of Pacific Predators] - "Follow the adventures of leatherback turtles, white sharks, elephant seals, salmon sharks, albatross, and 18 other species on TOPP"
"began in 2000 as one of 17 projects of the Census of Marine Life, an ambitious 10-year, 80-nation endeavor to assess and explain the diversity and abundance of life in the oceans, and where that life has lived, is living, and will live."
via:tomc  sharks  animals  biology  birds  classideas  data  environment  fish  geography  maps  mapping  reference  research  science  interactivity  locative  location-based  tagging  oceans  wildlife  nature  turtles  realtime  tracking  pacific  marine 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Self Catching Fish
"If it works, the system could eventually allow black sea bass to be released into the open ocean, where they would grow to market size, then swim into an underwater cage to be harvested when they hear the signal."
animals  fish  food  oceans  via:regine 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Flexible robotic fin does away with drag - tech - 29 February 2008 - New Scientist Tech
"A robotic fin that mimics the energy-efficient manoeuvres of an agile fish's pectoral fins has been developed by US researchers. Working out how to use multiple versions in conjunction could allow robot submarines to hover and turn on a dime as natural s
robots  propulsion  fish  biology  biomimicry  robotics  biomimetics 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Birds Do It. Bees Do It. Dragons Don’t Need To. - New York Times
"In a world of clones, there would not be enough variation for populations to adapt. Virgin birth, then, is a great stopgap measure to ensure the survival of a species, but works against it in the long haul."
animals  evolution  survival  biology  kimododragons  fish  amphibians  reproduction 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Interview with Antony Hall - we make money not art
"currently focusing on investigation of biological & physical phenomenon...experiments involve communication with electric fish, creation of life through growing crystals electrically on volcanic stone, hunting for Moss bears, training Planarian worms"
art  nature  performance  biology  wmmna  antonyhall  technology  fish 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Review: Your Inner Fish by Neil Shubin | By genre | guardian.co.uk Books
"Spasms in our diaphragms, hiccups are triggered by electric signals generated in the brain stem. Amphibian...similar signals...control regular motion of gills. Ours inherited from amphibian ancestors, still spurt out odd signals producing hiccups"
amphibians  evolution  fish  human  biology  science 
february 2008 by robertogreco
From Ants to People, an Instinct to Swarm - New York Times
"By studying army ants — as well as birds, fish, locusts and other swarming animals — Dr. Couzin and his colleagues are starting to discover simple rules that allow swarms to work so well."
animals  behavior  swarms  groups  intelligence  ants  fish  insects 
november 2007 by robertogreco
designboom - imaginative sea creatures [order and natural history at the herzog august bibliothek]
"wasn't a naturalist, and never left holland, dutch huguenot publisher louis renard succeeded in turning motley collection of drawings from east indies into one of the rarest, most fantastic evocations of exotic aquatic life ever published"
drawing  glvo  animals  biology  plants  illustration  discovery  history  science  fantasy  myth  fish  oceans 
october 2007 by robertogreco
If it's any consolation, fish get insomnia too: Scientific American
"Fish might not have eyelids, but they do sleep, and some suffer from insomnia, scientists reported on Monday."
sleep  fish  animals  biology 
october 2007 by robertogreco
TED | TEDBlog: Step into the open ocean with Tierney Thys
"the Mola mola, or giant ocean sunfish. Basking, eating jellyfish, and getting massages, this behemoth offers clues to life in the open ocean"
animals  science  biology  molamola  oceans  marine  fish  planet  environment 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Backstory: The cook has no beef with fish | csmonitor.com
"On the banks of the mighty Parana River is an Argentine rarity – a fish restaurant."
food  argentina  fish  parana 
february 2007 by robertogreco

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