recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : flowers   8

Why Aren’t Figs Considered Vegan? | TASTE
Sorry if this ruins figs for you.

Like those of dumplings and sandwiches, the definition of veganism isn’t set in stone. Some practitioners eschew honey and sugars refined with animal-bone char, since both involve products derived from animals. Others avoid Italian aperitifs like Campari dyed with carminic acid, which is derived from crushed beetles. And then there are figs, which in and of themselves are obviously not animals, but are technically in part derived from them.

Botanically, figs aren’t fruits; they’re flowers that bloom internally, and like many flowers, they’re pollinated and propagated by insects. Specifically, fig wasps, one unique species per each of the 8,000 or so species of fig.

In the last days of her life, the female fig wasp subsists solely on figs before climbing through the tiny opening of one inverted flower to lay her eggs. Having accomplished her evolutionary purpose—not to mention having ripped off her antennae and wings when she squeezed her way inside the fig’s narrow entry—the wasp dies inside the fig while her babies gestate. Once hatched, the larvae wriggle free of the fig to continue the cycle of life. But the mother wasp is enzymatically digested by the fig until it becomes one with the plant that killed it and birthed her young. The whole routine is gross enough to turn some vegans off of figs completely, though of course this varies from person to person. But don’t worry—those crunchy bits in a fig are seeds, not wasp limbs. At least, most of the time."
fig  fruit  vegan  2019  campari  food  insects  wasps  flowers 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Introducing Versioning Poems
[Wayback to original posting: https://web.archive.org/web/20170712063519/http://nicola.io:80/versioning-poems/2015 ]

"In London we have a fantasic group of people that discusses cutting edge ideas, the group is called the Palo Alto Supermarket test1. A recurrent topic has been Post-Internet art which we think it can be the next artistic expression trend.

["1 It abbreviates as PST, maybe it is worth looking for an interesting acronym, e.g. Policy, Society and Technology. Please ping me on twitter if you want to join in."]

In this post, I would like to introduce one way of writing Post-Internet poetry that mixes traditional poetry and coding poetry: Versioning Poems - I hope to inspire a new generation of poets, please update me @nicolagreco if you write some.

Versioning Poems

A versioning poem has two characteristics:

1. Versioning tool: The poem written in commit messages using a versioning tool

2. Commit diff: Each line has a commit diff that has code related to the message

In this way, one could clone a repository and just list the commit messages. The following is a poem of mine 9*19 Flowers poem.

Understanding requirement 1

As you can see each line shows up as a poem

$ git clone https://github.com/nicola/flowers-poem
$ git fetch origin poem
$ git checkout poem
$ git log --format="%C(yellow)%h%Creset %Cgreen%s%Creset%n%b"

ea814f4 POEM: 9*19 flowers
02d0dc0 Handcraft flowers from maths and lines,
aa14064 Choose the colors to make them shine,
ad4e12c Till the soil to plant the seeds.
700b967 .
7cea9e1 See me to make me glow
93c57f8 Touch me to give you more
e023bd0 Touch me you'll never stop
e146d2c Please touch me again.

Understanding requirement 2

The difference added by 93c57f8 Touch me to give you more relates to a piece of code that adds the function start_touching

93c57f8 Touch me to give you more
+ function start_touching(d, i) {
+ var flower = d3.select(this);
+ flower
+ .transition()
+ .delay(10)
+ .duration(1000)
+ .attr("d", handcraft_flower)
+ .style("stroke", "#ccc");
+ }

Conclusion

You can get very bizarre, the code does not need to work necessarely. In the case of my flowers, the final commit brings up a final working version of a visualization of the poem (See Figure 1).

I challenge your engineering skills and creativity to surprise me with a poem of yours.

- Nicola Greco,
Keep on rocking the decentralized web"

[code here: https://github.com/nicola/flowers-poem ]

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2015/10/12/filtered ]

[See also: http://nicola.io/art/
http://nicola.io/flowers-poem/
http://old.virginialonso.com/2015/ ]
nicolagreco  art  poetry  poems  versioning  coding  codingpoetry  classideas  flowers  visualization 
october 2015 by robertogreco
This Crazy Tree Grows 40 Kinds of Fruit - YouTube
"Sam Van Aken, an artist and professor at Syracuse University, uses "chip grafting" to create trees that each bear 40 different varieties of stone fruits, or fruits with pits. The grafting process involves slicing a bit of a branch with a bud from a tree of one of the varieties and inserting it into a slit in a branch on the "working tree," then wrapping the wound with tape until it heals and the bud starts to grow into a new branch. Over several years he adds slices of branches from other varieties to the working tree. In the spring the "Tree of 40 Fruit" has blossoms in many hues of pink and purple, and in the summer it begins to bear the fruits in sequence—Van Aken says it's both a work of art and a time line of the varieties' blossoming and fruiting. He's created more than a dozen of the trees that have been planted at sites such as museums around the U.S., which he sees as a way to spread diversity on a small scale."

[See also:

“‘Tree of 40 Fruit’, A Hyper Hybrid Tree That Grows Over 40 Varieties of Heirloom Stone Fruits”
http://laughingsquid.com/tree-of-40-fruit-a-hyper-hybrid-tree-that-grows-over-40-varieties-of-heirloom-stone-fruits/

http://www.samvanaken.com/?works=tree-of-40-fruit
http://www.treeof40fruit.com/

"The Tree of 40 Fruit is an ongoing series of hybridized fruit trees by contemporary artist Sam Van Aken. Each unique Tree of 40 Fruit grows over forty different types of stone fruit including peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines, cherries, and almonds. Sculpted through the process of grafting, the Tree of 40 Fruit blossom in variegated tones of pink, crimson and white in spring, and in summer bear a multitude of fruit. Primarily composed of native and antique varieties the Tree of 40 Fruit are a form of conversation, preserving heirloom stone fruit varieties that are not commercially produced or available." ]
fruits  trees  stonefruits  peaches  nectarines  plums  cherries  apricots  almonds  2015  art  samvanaken  plants  food  flowers  hybrids  grafting  orchards  fruit 
july 2015 by robertogreco
my learning disability
“This learning story was excerpted from The Connected Family: Bridging the Digital Generation Gap (Longstreet Press, 1996).

---------------

All my life, I have had a hard time learning flower names. I would look at a flower and try and try, but the name simply wouldn't come. It was very frustrating.

Then one day I took a different approach: I started with a flower's name, and then tried to think of why the name fit the flower. It became a challenge, a little game I would play with myself. I actually became quite good at it.

I had turned a learning situation into a project to fit my individual interests and learning style.

Now I have no trouble with the names of most flowers. I have come to see flowers as a metaphor for the process of learning itself.”
learning  seymourpapert  flowers  learningdisabilities  workarounds  approach  metaphor  anotherway  howwelearn  names  naming  via:litherland 
july 2012 by robertogreco
A bees-eye view: How insects see flowers very differently to us | Mail Online
"To the human eye, a garden in bloom is a riot of colour. Flowers jostle for our attention, utilising just about every colour of the rainbow.

But of course, it is not our attention they need to attract, but that of insects, the perfect pollinating agents.

And as these remarkable pictures show, there is more to many flowers than meets the eye - the human eye at least. Many species, including bees, can see a broader spectrum of light than we can, opening up a whole new world.

The images, taken by Norwegian scientist-cameraman Bjorn Roslett, present a series of flowers in both natural and ultraviolet light, revealing an insect's eye view."
bees  flowers  light  physics  color  sight  animals  nature  perception  insects 
december 2010 by robertogreco
plsj tumblelog: Anthonephophobia
“Anthonephophobia: A fear of flowers falling from clouds."
words  glvo  fear  language  flowers  clouds  projectideas 
march 2008 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read