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Samin Nosrat’s 10 Essential Persian Recipes - The New York Times
"The author of “Salt Fat Acid Heat” and star of the related Netflix show chooses the dishes that define the cuisine for her."
food  recipes  saminnosrat  2019  persian 
11 days ago by robertogreco
Eat White Dirt
[Streaming here:
https://www.thirteen.org/programs/reel-south/reel-south-eat-white-dirt/ ]

[Trailer: https://vimeo.com/38115198 ]

[See also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaolinite
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geophagia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicinal_clay
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pica_(disorder)

"The American South Is Still Eating White Dirt: Geophagy, the technical term for deliberately eating earth, soil, or clay, sounds like a terrible idea. Yet in many parts of the world, this is not considered strange or rare, but a culinary past time."
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/pgxwvk/the-american-south-is-still-eating-white-dirt

"The Old And Mysterious Practice Of Eating Dirt, Revealed"
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/04/02/297881388/the-old-and-mysterious-practice-of-eating-dirt-revealed ]
dirt  whitedirt  geophagy  film  documentary  food  pica  south  americansouth  nutrition  clay  health  medicine 
13 days ago by robertogreco
These Five Cuisines Are Easier on the Planet - The New York Times
"Can I eat well without wrecking the planet? As a climate reporter and personal chef to a growing, ravenous child, I think about this question a lot. Is there a cuisine somewhere in the world that is healthy both for us and for the planet we live on? And if one exists, would we even want to eat it?

Turns out, there is no magic cuisine to save our species. There are, however, many ways to eat sustainably. They’re built into many traditional cuisines around the world, and we can learn from them.

In any case, we don’t have much choice. To avert the most severe effects of climate change, scientists say, we have to very quickly transform the way we eat. Food production accounts for somewhere between 21 and 26 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, depending on how you slice the data; food waste accounts for an additional 8 percent, considering that worldwide, we waste a third of the food we produce. Also, with climate change turbocharging droughts and storms, there are new risks to food security for the 800 million people worldwide who don’t have enough to eat.

Eating well doesn’t have to mean eating weirdly, or depriving ourselves, or even breaking the bank. Here are five simple ideas to guide you, whether you’re eating out or cooking at home."
sominisengupta  food  sustainability  venezuela  lebanon  kansas  indigenous  indigeneity  vietnam  vietnamese  india  globalwarming  climatechange 
20 days ago by robertogreco
Eros Black Sauce and Noodles – The Slow Zone
"If you pay no heed to what certain foods, in certain situations, tell us then we are missing something important and fundamental about the plot of a story.

Food in fiction allows the reader to share an intimate moment with a character, place or event. [Spoiler warning if you haven’t read Leviathan Wakes : Chapter 22 or S01E06]

“He’d stopped at a noodle cart, two new yens’ worth of egg noodles in black sauce steaming in their cone, when a hand clapped on his shoulder.” (Leviathan Wakes: 22 : Miller)

When Josephus Miller loses his job and travels to Eros searching for Julie Mao, he stops at a noodle cart for a steaming cone of “two new yens’ worth of egg noodles in black sauce.”

What do these noodles and sauce really represent?

The price gives us a first glance at the budget restrictions on Miller. We aren’t really sure what two new yen can really buy, but we infer that it isn’t much. Noodle carts are seen throughout the book and television series. They represent an irreplaceable part of the culture in which they feed. They are cheap, easy and abundant.

Out of all of the sauces James S. A. Corey could’ve have used, why does Miller select black sauce?

This imagery of black sauce represents two aspects of Miller’s current situation,

1. His sense of self-worth is low and the color black represents the dark thoughts, and confusion, that go unsaid. James S. A. Corey could have simply said that Miller wasn’t himself felt sad for the cards he’d been dealt. Instead we order some noodles alongside Miller taking in the scene. We, the readers, get to view the depth of his anguish for just two new yen.

2. We imagine the sauce as something dark and thick. It is a symbol of the situation Miller finds himself in. The troubles he has encountered, and will in the future, are seemingly inescapable. His difficulties seem so impassable. so dense and impenetrable.

All of this is communicated to us in a single sentence. This is the power of food in fiction. In a story that may seem distant and difficult to comprehend, we are able to engage with the story on a very human level.

Eros Black Sauce and Noodles

[recipe follows, with video]"

[See also: http://theslowzone.com/

"I, Carlo, created this site dedicated to everything Expanse: novels, novellas, and the series. The inspiration to make this site came from a literal hunger. Yes, my stomach made me do it!

Every time James S. A. Corey made reference to food, my stomach growled and protested. The meals presented were different, but described so well that I could almost smell the curry or peanut sauce.

My focus is not only on the food of the Expanse, but also the literary elements of the novels and novellas.

Please follow and comment on my quest for everything Expanse!

Cordially,

Carlo"]
theexpanse  recipes  srg  food  noodles  via:lukeneff  2019  belters  jamescorey  books  fiction 
24 days ago by robertogreco
Climavore
"CLIMAVORE is a long-term project initiated by Cooking Sections in 2015. It sets out to envision seasons of food production and consumption that react to man-induced climatic events and landscape alterations. Different from the now obsolete Eurocentric cycle of spring, summer, autumn and winter, CLIMAVORE rethinks the construction of space and infrastructure by focusing on how climate alterations offer a new set of clues to adapt our diet to them. Unexpected climatic phenomena, like subsidence, flash floods or drought, may span minutes, days, months, years or centuries. CLIMAVORE is then proposed as a form of devouring following their effects on anthropogenic landscapes. Unlike carnivore, omnivore, locavore, vegetarian or vegan, CLIMAVORE is not only about the origin of ingredients, but also about the agency that those ingredients have in providing spatial and infrastructural responses to man-induced climatic events for a certain period of time. At the core is to embrace a flexible form of eating, shifting for instance to drought resistant crops in a period of water scarcity or filter feeders during times of polluted or acidified waters. Framing our diet within a globally financialised landscape, and challenging large-scale agribusiness groups dictating what is to be produced and consumed, the notion of CLIMAVORE critically questions the geopolitical implications behind the making of climate alterations and the pressures they enforce on humans and nonhumans alike.

season@climavore.org

Collaborators: Jesse Connuck (2015), Tanya Kramer (2017), Harry Keene (2017-2018), Blanca Pujals (2017-2018), Matthew Darmour-Paul (2018)
Graphic Design: An Endless Supply"
climavore  climate  food  cooking  seasons  seasonal  climatechange  local  scarcity  multispecies  morethanhuman 
26 days ago by robertogreco
The Complete Guide to Eating and Drinking in San Francisco - Eater SF
"Unofficial, highly opinionated information about the city by the Bay

In the home of green goddess dressing, Mission-style burritos, farm-to-table everything, and the toast-as-menu-item phenomenon, there's a lot of noise when it comes to what to eat. This guide will help you get to the real San Francisco treats out there."
eater  sanfrancisco  food  restaurants  bayarea  eastbay  oakland  berkeley 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
James Luckett en Instagram: “people ask me all the time, they say James, that toasted black sesame + nori sourdough sounds neat but what do you do with it, and i always…”
"people ask me all the time, they say James, that toasted black sesame + nori sourdough sounds neat but what do you do with it, and i always say, make a grilled Amish havarti + Black Forest ham + Korean kkaennip-jangajji sandowich - pair this umami rich layered melty with a minerally sauvingon blanc or spicey bitter pilsner and your evening porching just went from decidedly good to decadently great and kool as ever."
food  recipes  jamesluckett  breat  sandwiches  grilledcheese  2019 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
A Message From the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez - YouTube
"What if we actually pulled off a Green New Deal? What would the future look like? The Intercept presents a film narrated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and illustrated by Molly Crabapple.

Set a couple of decades from now, the film is a flat-out rejection of the idea that a dystopian future is a forgone conclusion. Instead, it offers a thought experiment: What if we decided not to drive off the climate cliff? What if we chose to radically change course and save both our habitat and ourselves?

We realized that the biggest obstacle to the kind of transformative change the Green New Deal envisions is overcoming the skepticism that humanity could ever pull off something at this scale and speed. That’s the message we’ve been hearing from the “serious” center for four months straight: that it’s too big, too ambitious, that our Twitter-addled brains are incapable of it, and that we are destined to just watch walruses fall to their deaths on Netflix until it’s too late.

This film flips the script. It’s about how, in the nick of time, a critical mass of humanity in the largest economy on earth came to believe that we were actually worth saving. Because, as Ocasio-Cortez says in the film, our future has not been written yet and “we can be whatever we have the courage to see.”"

[See also:
https://theintercept.com/2019/04/17/green-new-deal-short-film-alexandria-ocasio-cortez/

"The question was: How do we tell the story of something that hasn’t happened yet?

We realized that the biggest obstacle to the kind of transformative change the Green New Deal envisions is overcoming the skepticism that humanity could ever pull off something at this scale and speed. That’s the message we’ve been hearing from the “serious” center for four months straight: that it’s too big, too ambitious, that our Twitter-addled brains are incapable of it, and that we are destined to just watch walruses fall to their deaths on Netflix until it’s too late.

This skepticism is understandable. The idea that societies could collectively decide to embrace rapid foundational changes to transportation, housing, energy, agriculture, forestry, and more — precisely what is needed to avert climate breakdown — is not something for which most of us have any living reference. We have grown up bombarded with the message that there is no alternative to the crappy system that is destabilizing the planet and hoarding vast wealth at the top. From most economists, we hear that we are fundamentally selfish, gratification-seeking units. From historians, we learn that social change has always been the work of singular great men.

Science fiction hasn’t been much help either. Almost every vision of the future that we get from best-selling novels and big-budget Hollywood films takes some kind of ecological and social apocalypse for granted. It’s almost as if we have collectively stopped believing that the future is going to happen, let alone that it could be better, in many ways, than the present.

The media debates that paint the Green New Deal as either impossibly impractical or a recipe for tyranny just reinforce the sense of futility. But here’s the good news: The old New Deal faced almost precisely the same kinds of opposition — and it didn’t stop it for a minute."]
alexandriaocasio-cortez  2019  mollycrabapple  greennewdeal  speculativefiction  politics  policy  future  climatechange  globalwarming  1988  us  oil  petroleum  fossilfuels  environment  sustainability  puertorico  crisis  change  food  transportation  economics  capitalism  inequality  medicareforall  livingwages  labor  work  infrastructure  trains  masstransit  publictransit  americorps  unions  indigenous  indigeneity  childcare  care  caring  teaching  domesticwork  universalrights  healthcare  humanism  humanity  avilewis  naomiklein  skepticism  imagination  newdeal  fdr  wpa  greatdepression  moonshots  art  artists  collectivism  society 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Secret to Fried Cauliflower That Is Savory Yet Light - The New York Times
"When I’m craving a lunch that’s special but not fancy, or when lunchtime catches me by surprise, I head to the tiny restaurant Standard Fare in Berkeley. Run by Kelsie Kerr, one of the chefs at Chez Panisse who taught me to cook, Standard Fare is mostly kitchen; at lunchtime, customers turn the wide sidewalk into an ad hoc dining room, perching atop a row of metal stools with bowls of soup and focaccia sandwiches on their laps.

My lunch mantra is “as many vegetables as possible,” so I usually order the vegetarian sandwich, which is always piled high with whatever greens and vegetables catch Kerr’s eye at the farmers’ market, all enriched and brightened by generous doses of sauces and vinaigrettes. But when I stopped in a month or so ago, the daily special of cauliflower steaks with turmeric-spiced chickpeas sounded equally virtuous but more satisfying. Besides, I love caramel-sweet roasted cauliflower and will take any opportunity to eat it. I was typically harried, hungry and running late, so I felt lucky when I snagged one of the few inside seats. As I turned to scan the kitchen and gauge how long it might take the cooks to prepare my lunch, Kerr brought over a plate of fried cauliflower on a bed of fragrant spiced chickpeas, all showered with herbs and sizzled cumin seeds.

I hadn’t expected the cauliflower to be fried, but I was delighted by the way the tender, golden crust shattered in my mouth. Fried vegetables, often overbattered and undercooked, tend to disappoint me with their tough or soggy crusts. This cauliflower, though, was savory yet light. And though it had clearly been battered, it was also somehow sweet with the sort of browning that results from long, steady roasting. I looked back at the kitchen to thank the person who’d done such a nice job of preparing my lunch. But no one was frying anything! Fried food — especially when it’s battered — must be cooked to order and served immediately; otherwise it grows limp as it cools. And while there’s plenty of pleasure to be taken in sneaking a bite of cold, leftover fried chicken from the fridge late at night, you cannot serve soggy fried chicken — or soggy anything else — at a restaurant. Especially if you’re Kelsie Kerr, one of the most steadfast, exacting chefs the Bay Area has ever known.

On my way out, I asked Kerr for her recipe. I wanted to know how she had managed the technical feat of producing cauliflower that boasted the best characteristics of both roasted and fried. “Oh,” she responded with a knowing chuckle that sent her freckles dancing, “it’s Ella’s recipe.” I was stunned. I met Ella, Kelsie’s lithe, red-haired daughter, in 2001, when she could barely walk. It took me a moment to get used to the thought that she’s now 19 and able to develop recipes that hold muster in her mother’s kitchen. I begged Kerr to email me the recipe.

What she sent seemed simple enough. Made with a mixture of brown rice and tapioca flours, the batter lacked gluten, which explained the cauliflower’s delicate crust. When wheat flour is mixed with water, gluten strands develop and strengthen, giving structure to a batter or dough — a characteristic desirable in a crusty loaf of bread, but less so in a light pastry or crust.

When I tried the recipe at home, the cauliflower’s thin batter turned an amber lace as it fried in coconut oil. By the time I flipped each slice, the batter no longer covered the entirety of the second side, but those exposed bits of cauliflower — hugging the hot metal of the pan — took on a dark caramel color, growing extra sweet along the way.

“When Ella was a high school sophomore,” Kerr told me when I called her for the cauliflower’s origin story, “she invited some friends over for dinner.” Not wanting to intrude where she sensed she was not welcome, Kerr kept quiet even as she watched her teenager battering and frying the cauliflower in advance. “I remember thinking there was no way it’d still be crispy that evening, but I didn’t say a word.” Then, when Ella served dinner, Kerr was taken aback. “I thought: Holy mackerel! This is delicious,” she recounted with delight. “I knew it was a keeper because it was a fried dish we could make ahead in batches at the restaurant and warm to order.”

Culinary progeny often end up in the kitchen alongside their parents, but I didn’t remember Ella’s ever showing an interest in cooking. I asked Kerr if Ella has always liked to cook. “She has, but she doesn’t like to take advice from her mother,” she answered dryly. “She prefers to learn from YouTube.” I wasn’t sure I heard Kerr right, so I asked her to clarify. “Yeah, she has all of these different YouTube cooks that she loves to watch.” Bursting into laughter, I marveled at the thought. Kerr has been cooking professionally since 1981 — probably longer than some of those YouTube chefs have been alive. She’s one of the most accomplished, knowledgeable chefs in the country. And yet, her daughter is partial to watching other folks cook online. As a student of cooking, I find this maddening. As the daughter of a steadfast, exacting mother of my own, I find it entirely relatable.

When I asked Kerr how it made her feel to be upstaged by YouTube, her generosity surprised me, “That’s Ella,” she said. “She’s so casual in her cooking. I’ve learned to trust her because she always does things I find suspicious, and they always turn out delicious.”"

[Recipe:
"Crispy Spiced Cauliflower Steaks"
https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1020168-crispy-spiced-cauliflower-steaks ]
cauliflower  recipes  2019  saminnosrat  food  cooking 
5 weeks ago by robertogreco
Welcome to Red Sauce America - Bon Appétit
"From chicken parm to clams casino, this is our celebration of the Italian-American restaurants we love.

The oversize portions. The red-and-white-checked tablecloths. A carafe of the house red. Old-school Italian-American restaurants, a.k.a. red sauce joints, are the kind of institutions you’ll find, with very few deviations, in just about any city in America. But as we discovered upon reaching out to dozens of writers, chefs, and celebrities, these restaurants are about a lot more than a plate of penne alla vodka. Whether or not you’re Italian, red sauce likely means something to you—about family, or home, or history, or politics, or class, or citizenship, or selfhood, or otherness, or all the above, or a million other things. And that’s what this package is all about. Welcome to Red Sauce America."

["A Home Is More Than a House. Sometimes It’s Also a Red Sauce Restaurant
The longer I live in Los Angeles, the more I try to find places where I feel like a thread in the fabric of something bigger than myself. Enter: Little Dom's." by Roxane Gay
https://www.bonappetit.com/story/home-red-sauce-restaurant

"When Will American Chinese Food Get the Red Sauce Treatment?
I look at the way Italian Americans have progressed from a demonized immigrant group to an unquestioned part of the country’s fabric, and I think, Damn, I want that too." by Chris Ying
https://www.bonappetit.com/story/american-chinese-food-red-sauce-treatment

"Why I Take All My First Dates to Olive Garden
It starts with free wine samples, endless breadsticks, and keeping my expectations low." by Kristen N. Arnett
https://www.bonappetit.com/story/first-dates-olive-garden

"The Bizarre History of Buca di Beppo, America’s Most Postmodern Red Sauce Chain
How a Lutheran from central Illinois created a genre-defining Italian-American restaurant." by Priya Krishna
https://www.bonappetit.com/story/bizarre-history-buca-di-beppo ]
food  us  italianamerican  italian  brettmartin  roxanegay  hilarycadigan  mikesula  tylerkord  sarahjampel  chrisying  amielstanek  redsauce  gregelwell  priyakrishna  alizaabaranel  paulfreedman  cleopatrazuli  alexdelany  andrewknowlton  baoong  mylestanzer  madeleinedavies  clairecarusillo  lizcook  laurenlarson  mollybirnbaum  elyseinamine  jendoll  kellyconaboy  emilyschultz  brettewarshaw  alexbeggs  bobbyfinger  ericginsburg  sarahcascone  traciemcmillan  melissamccart  giuliamelucci  marissaross  careypolis  kristenarnett  maggielange  alexpemoulie  christianelauterbach  amandashapiro  emmastraub  virginiawillis  andreknowlton  oldschool  sanfrancisco  losangeles  immigration  acceptance  families 
5 weeks ago by robertogreco
Why Aren’t Figs Considered Vegan? | TASTE
Sorry if this ruins figs for you.

Like those of dumplings and sandwiches, the definition of veganism isn’t set in stone. Some practitioners eschew honey and sugars refined with animal-bone char, since both involve products derived from animals. Others avoid Italian aperitifs like Campari dyed with carminic acid, which is derived from crushed beetles. And then there are figs, which in and of themselves are obviously not animals, but are technically in part derived from them.

Botanically, figs aren’t fruits; they’re flowers that bloom internally, and like many flowers, they’re pollinated and propagated by insects. Specifically, fig wasps, one unique species per each of the 8,000 or so species of fig.

In the last days of her life, the female fig wasp subsists solely on figs before climbing through the tiny opening of one inverted flower to lay her eggs. Having accomplished her evolutionary purpose—not to mention having ripped off her antennae and wings when she squeezed her way inside the fig’s narrow entry—the wasp dies inside the fig while her babies gestate. Once hatched, the larvae wriggle free of the fig to continue the cycle of life. But the mother wasp is enzymatically digested by the fig until it becomes one with the plant that killed it and birthed her young. The whole routine is gross enough to turn some vegans off of figs completely, though of course this varies from person to person. But don’t worry—those crunchy bits in a fig are seeds, not wasp limbs. At least, most of the time."
fig  fruit  vegan  2019  campari  food  insects  wasps  flowers 
5 weeks ago by robertogreco
401(k)s, abortion, youth football: 15 things we do now that will be considered unthinkable in 50 years - Vox
[via: https://kottke.org/19/04/what-do-we-do-now-that-will-be-unthinkable-in-50-years ]

"Youth tackle football
Bosses
Eating meat
Conspicuous consumption
The drug war
The way we die
Banning sex work
401(k)s
Ending the draft
Facebook and Google
Abortion
Self-driving cars
Our obsession with rationality
Abandoning public education
The idea of a “wrong side of history”



"Some 50 years ago, in 1964, 42 percent of Americans smoked cigarettes. Smoking in bars and offices was normal and cigarettes were given to soldiers as part of military rations. Half of American physicians smoked. Ads for cigarettes bombarded the American public. That year, the surgeon general released a report outlining the health risks of smoking. Two years later, only 40 percent of Americans said that they believed smoking was a major cause of cancer.

Today, we know that smoking is bad for our health. We’ve banned smoking in most indoor public spaces. We stopped allowing tobacco companies to advertise and forced them to put warning labels on cigarette boxes. By 2001, 71 percent of the country said they recognized smoking was a major cause of cancer, and by 2017, the rate of smokers dropped to 14 percent. The habit is now looked at as a relic of the past, something we’ve come to accept as unquestionably harmful.

When we think about what common habits, social norms, or laws that are widely considered unthinkable in today’s world, a variety of past atrocities come to mind. We could point to bloodletting, Jim Crow-era segregation, and drinking and driving as being on the “wrong side” of history.

But what modern practices will we one day think of as barbaric? It’s a framework invoked frequently in political or scientific beliefs: Actor Harrison Ford recently said leaders who deny climate change are on the “wrong side of history.” President Barack Obama said Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine was on the “wrong side of history.” Filmmaker Spike Lee said that President Donald Trump himself is on the “wrong side of history.”

So what, by 2070 — some 50 years in the future — will join this group? We asked 15 thinkers, writers, and advocates to take their best guess.

Bioethicist Peter Singer says people will stop the habit of conspicuous consumption. “The ostentatious display of wealth, in a world that still has many people in need, is not in good taste. Within 50 years, we’ll wonder how people did not see that,” he writes.

Historian Jennifer Mittelstadt predicts that our volunteer army will be widely considered a mistake: “Fifty years from now Americans will observe with shock the damage to both foreign policy and domestic institutions wrought by our acceptance of an increasingly privatized, socially isolated, and politically powerful US military.”

For philosopher Jacob T. Levy, the very idea of there being a “wrong side of history” is wrong itself.

Other answers range from kids playing tackle football to expecting workers to invest in 401(k)s."
us  future  obsolescence  barbarity  draft  cars  self-drivingcars  retirement  saving  drugwar  football  americanfootball  conspicuousconsumption  capitalism  consumption  rationality  scientism  publiceducations  publicschools  schools  schooling  education  facebook  google  abortion  war  military  sexwork  death  dying  meat  food  howwelive  predictions  history  petersinger  kristatippett  jaboblevy  jennifermittelstadt  haiderwarraich  kathleenfrydl  meredithbroussard  chrisnowinski  adiaharveywingfield  bhaskarsunkara  horizontality  hierarchy  inequality  jacobhacker  economics  society  transportation 
5 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Best Indian Food In LA Is In A Gas Station | Legendary Eats - YouTube
"This brother and sister team serve some of LA's best Indian food in their family's gas station. Instead of serving typical fast food, they decided to serve the food that they grew up eating. When you visit Bombay Frankie Company, you'll find long lines of people clamoring for delicious curries and the best chicken tikka masala you can imagine, all wrapped up in freshly baked naan straight from the tandoor oven.

For more, visit http://www.thebombayfrankiecompany.com "
food  indian  losangeles  restaurants  2019  burritos 
6 weeks ago by robertogreco
Review: At Fonda Mixcoac in Anaheim, order a cheesy 29-inch machete. Bring friends - Los Angeles Times
"There is more to Fonda Mixcoac than machetes.

But you’re here, in Anaheim, four miles but a world away from the tourist hotels and chain restaurants of Disneylandia, for the machetes. A staple of Mexico City street stalls since at least the 1960s, they are the freak show cousins of quesadillas and huaraches: roughly the length of a Louisville Slugger, a folded-over surfboard of masa stuffed with two or three meals’ worth of cheese-smothered meats and veggies.

Fonda Mixcoac is run by several members of the Villegas family, a multi-generational clan who routinely trade off kitchen duties. The elder Villegas, Jose, opened the restaurant about five years ago with a vision that was simple and twofold: to carve out a niche for machetes in Southern California, where they are still relatively hard to find — and to make machetes bigger than those in Mexico City.

To that end, Fonda Mixcoac makes 29-inch machetes — griddle-crisped behemoths so long they barely fit on the restaurant’s tables. (A 12-inch, junior-size version called a machetito is also available). I’m told it took the family years to fine-tune a masa recipe sturdy and stretchy enough to withstand the dish’s exaggerated proportions. They’re stuffed with the standard guisados: thin sheets of the marinated beef called cecina de res; slinky, gooey pork skins of chicharrón prensado; juicy, slightly spicy nubs of homemade chorizo. You can configure a vegetarian machete from wilted, buttery flor de calabaza (squash blossoms); smoky rajas with epazote; or a thick spread of huitlacoche, the earthy, jet-black corn fungus that’s been a culinary staple in Mexico since pre-Columbian times.

Your machete is bulging with melted Oaxaca cheese, finely chopped iceberg lettuce and rivulets of crema fresca. It lands on the table with a whiff of head-turning fanfare, wrapped in the perfume of clean, hot oil. You whip out your smartphone to take pictures. Someone gently raises the baby cradled in their arms next to the machete for a sense of scale (the machete is bigger). It takes three or four adults to polish off one two-plus-foot-long machete. Someone else wisely carves into the dish, divvying it up into smaller, more manageable sections. Hot cheese dribbles out of every loose end. When you take a bite, the fried corn shell splinters against your teeth with a sharp crunch. Stretchy ribbons of cheese and quivering flaps of meat threaten to splatter onto the table. You devour your piece in one unseemly breath, nearly smashing it into your mouth to avoid spillage.

Beyond machetes, the cafe’s wide-ranging menu hews closely to the foods that Jose Villegas grew up eating in Mexico City, and his devotion to home-style Mexican cooking is broadcast loud and clear on the menu. “COMIDA MEXICANA,” the cover declares in all-caps typeface. “No ‘Mexican Food’.”

“My dad always says that if you want ‘Mexican food,’ go to Taco Bell,” Jose Villegas’ son, Erick, explains. “But if you want comida Mexicana, come here.”

So, in place of Doritos Locos Tacos, there are pambazos, plump, chile-stained French roll sandwiches stuffed with a cheesy blend of chorizo and potatoes. There’s beefy alambre, a platter of chopped steak, ham, peppers, onions and bacon fused together with lavish amounts of melted cheese, served with short stacks of hot corn tortillas. Huaraches, smeared with black beans and blanketed with queso fresco, are crisp and massive. Try the huarache azteca, furnished with thin, salty scraps of cecina, grilled onions, nopales, avocado and a drizzle of fresh salsa verde.

There are tacos made with nubbins of gently charred carne asada, or loosely packed with a creamy, spicy choriqueso. The al pastor is altogether unremarkable, but there is always cecina de res, air-dried beef that has something of the clean, thin-sliced, salty appeal of prosciutto.

On the weekends, the restaurant slow-cooks large quantities of lamb barbacoa, a city version of rural Hidalgo’s famous pit-roasted barbecue. The meat is shredded into flossy, slightly chewy tendrils that are gently charred around the edges on the grill and piled into aluminum to-go containers. If you order the family-style barbacoa package, it comes with a large bowl of consommé, a deep, musky aromatic broth filled with stewed garbanzo beans. You splash the meat with some of that lovely, meaty broth, and eat it with hot tortillas and salsa roja.

But a half-pound of lamb is probably not why you wandered into Fonda Mixcoac’s sunny, bare-bones dining room in the first place. You came for the same reason that people pile into small, sun-baked boats off the coast of Baja California every spring to see the blue whales that pass through the Sea of Cortez: to spy for yourself a rare colossus that’s impossible to forget once you’ve seen it in the flesh."
food  anaheim  orangecounty  mexican  restaurants  2019 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Fancy Convenience Store Trend Is Spreading - Eater
"With their quinoa bibimbap bowls and $18 “vegan-friendly” condoms, these upscale mini-marts are no replacement for the traditional bodega"



"Concepts like these are sometimes called “bougie bodegas” in the media, and while appealingly alliterative, that phrase is also oxymoronic: Bodegas are for everyone, the kind of low-key corner stores found in every neighborhood, where blue-collar workers and Wall Street bros alike can rub shoulders whilst acquiring their morning bacon-egg-and-cheese or on a late-night emergency run for Twinkies and a box of Kraft mac and cheese. (That’s precisely why the ill-conceived startup Bodega, a line of “high-tech” vending machines intended to make corner stores obsolete, struck such a nerve; it has since changed its name to Stockwell.) These fancy mini-markets, on the other hand, sell the kind of items that only a very particular subset of the population likely sees a need for, let alone can afford.

But not all of these types of stores are quite so aspirational, with prices to match: The Goods Mart in Los Angeles’s Silver Lake neighborhood bills itself as a “socially conscious alternative to the modern convenience store,” and much of its pricing isn’t wildly out of line with what’s stocked at a 7-Eleven or mini-mart. Natural alternatives to popular candies like Starbursts and Kit-Kats clock in around two bucks, while burritos from local restaurant Burritos La Palma are $4; a four-pack of Seventh Generation toilet paper costs $5.95.

“Natural food always costs a little more because of the quality of the ingredients, but for us, we don’t want any food items in our store over $20,” owner Rachel Krupa says. “So [the key is] finding the cool partners that have great products [with more accessible pricing]. Like our cups of La Colombe drip coffee for $1.25 — sure, it’s not single-origin, but … our goal is having a better-for-you convenience store and we want people to actually be able to afford it.”

Everything at the Goods Mart is non-GMO, and there’s a focus on reducing use of plastics: All single-serve beverages come in Tetra-pak, aluminum, glass, or paper cups. Krupa says she wants to open 50 locations in the next five years, rattling off a list of cities that includes Detroit, Oklahoma City, and Nashville.

But while places like the Goods Mart may intend a certain level of egalitarianism, all these types of gussied-up convenience stores — whether they carry $6 toilet paper or $100 tins of caviar — are inextricably linked to gentrification. It’s no coincidence that these types of stores are opening in cities where rent prices are on the rise, with their target market being the type of consumer that cares about purchasing allegedly healthier snacks and so-called wellness products — and has enough disposable income to support those desires.

The emerging generation’s taste for health and wellness products also has a lot to do with it: Studies have shown that millennials and members of Generation Z in particular are prepared to pay premium prices for food they perceive as healthy, including GMO-free, organic, sustainable, and gluten-free items. (Emphasis on perceive: Many food companies are guilty of greenwashing, or making foods appear to be healthier or more “natural” than they actually are. Similarly, many small food startups get acquired by big corporations, meaning shoppers who think they’re buying from an indie company are actually handing their money over to the huge conglomerates they may actively be trying to avoid.)

As the neighborhoods served by corner stores gentrify and more young professionals move in, it makes sense that the markets themselves will change to suit the tastes of their residents — whether that simply means a 7-Eleven that ramps up its product selection with organic cold-pressed juices, or the opening of a new mini-mart carrying locally made doughnuts and fair-trade coffee.

The move toward corner stores carrying healthier food certainly isn’t unwelcome, and it’s also been many years in the making. Back in 2005, the NYC Department of Health launched the Healthy Bodegas Initiative, aimed at getting bodega owners to stock items like multigrain bread, low-fat milk, and fresh produce. Eight-dollar bottles of kombucha and house-made quinoa tagliatelle probably aren’t quite what the DOH had in mind.

But whether you call them bougie bodegas, fancy convenience stores, or just another example of the Instagram-fueled wellness craze that propels people to buy $150 yoga pants and water bottles with crystals in them, it’s undeniable that there’s a growing market for these types of stores. Whether or not such stores will actually make any significant contribution toward healthier eating or lessening environmental impact remains to be seen — but for a certain customer, buying a $6 kombucha instead of a Pepsi or an organic Justin’s brand peanut butter cup instead of a Reese’s certainly makes them feel good."
2018  conveniencestores  7-eleven  food  bodegas  classideas 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
7-Eleven Lab Store Experiments With Health Food and Organic Slurpees - Eater
"But 7-Eleven plans to shed its identity as a junk food staple. As America’s obsession with wellness and “clean eating” shows no signs of slowing down, the chain wants to figure out how to change customers’ perceptions that convenience food doesn’t always have to be deep-fried or nutritionally sketchy. In early March, the chain debuted its first “lab store,” a real-time testing ground for new, bougie conveniences, next to a busy Dallas highway, just a stone’s throw away from a tony Italian market and one of the city’s most popular ramen joints. Outside, the store looks largely like any other 7-Eleven, with the familiar signage and gas pumps — until you notice the giant selfie-friendly mural painted by a local artist. Inside, it looks a lot like a Whole Foods or any other sleek modern grocer, with natural wood accents and towers of trail mix ingredients sold in bulk.

Unlike most other 7-Eleven stores, this outpost offers a range of hot and prepared food items that goes far beyond the typical roller-grill hot dogs that have been the chain’s bread and butter for decades. Right next to the roller grill sit warmers full of soups like vegetarian tomato basil and gluten-free chili. Across the aisle awaits what press releases call the “better for you” refrigerator case, filled with grab-and-go lunch items: sandwiches, salads, and plastic bowls filled with a “seasonal blend” of mushy kiwi, grapes, cantaloupe, strawberries, and a single pineapple spear. Thanks to the current dominance of the keto trend, hard boiled eggs; portion-controlled packets of cured meats; cheeses; and cured meats wrapped around cheeses are abundant.

There is also a small restaurant, complete with a sit-down cafe and small patio off to the side of the store, arguably the best place to find food in the place. It’s the first Dallas outpost of Laredo Taco Company, a South Texas mainstay that has been selling serviceable breakfast tacos on freshly made tortillas to working people for years. Laredo Taco was part of the Stripes convenience store chain, which 7-Eleven acquired in 2018. With that came Laredo Taco Company, which has scored praise from Anthony Bourdain.

In the aisles, this 7-Eleven is stocked with enough gluten-free, paleo, vegan, organic, and naturally sweetened options to feed an entire army of wellness-obsessed snackers, with just enough “normal” food to resemble a small grocery store. A $15 jar of Justin’s Chocolate Hazelnut Butter sits on a shelf next to organic stevia ($9), jars of Bonne Maman preserves ($6), organic safflower oil ($12), and single-serve pouches of brown basmati rice are placed alongside staples like Velveeta processed cheese ($4), microwaveable Rice-A-Roni cups, and Wolf brand chili. Elsewhere, gluten-, dairy-, and egg-free cake balls ($14) share shelf real estate with Hostess chocolate cupcakes ($2).

And then, of course, there is the Slurpee, both an American icon and an engineering marvel. The fluffy, frozen beverage is a sweet-tooth staple; the lab store’s innovation is the organic Slurpee, made with “farm to fountain” flavors like coconut, blood orange, and cucumber from Idaho’s Tractor Beverage Company, which boasts that its syrups are USDA certified organic, GMO-free, and “entirely” natural. In the organic Slurpees, buzzy superfoods like celery and turmeric are ingredients in the cucumber flavor; allegedly stomach-soothing licorice root adds an extra veneer of health to the cherry cream flavor; the blood orange flavor also features turmeric, along with black carrot. Unlike most of the original flavors, the organic options are not carbonated, which means they lack the fluffy, smooth texture of a typical cherry Slurpee. Instead, they’re packed with crunchy ice crystals that always seem to find their way to the most sensitive parts of your teeth.

It’s not surprising that even the Slurpee, much maligned for its hefty sugar content and the presence of preservatives like sodium benzoate, is getting the organic treatment. 7-Eleven is a corporation interested in making profits, and the organic food market is currently worth upwards of $45 billion. But there is something deeply unsettling about seeing the Slurpee stripped of its vibrant colors and cloyingly sweet flavors. It’s depressing to think that, someday, the Slurpee won’t represent a decadently sweet treat, but just another way to get in your daily dose of superfoods. It’s like if all the milkshakes in the future were Soylent, and every Red Bull was replaced with 7-Eleven’s locally-sourced “Yerbucha,” a mix of kombucha and yerba mate."



"It is this bizarre juxtaposition of the organic and the chemical-laden, the sacred and the profane, that makes 7-Eleven’s “lab store” such a fascinating — and disorienting — concept. In attempting to please literally everyone — gentrifiers, working-class families, young professionals, and kids looking for after-school snacks — it’s possible that they’re going to alienate everyone. No one on a tight budget wants to accidentally pay $2 more for organic tomatoes when they meant to grab the cheap ones, and no one wants to be tempted by the allure of a quick Velveeta and Rotel queso served with fried tortilla chips when they’re trying to eat “virtuously” and choose the gluten-free granola instead. Being guilt-tripped into buying fruit and hard-boiled eggs is particularly dehumanizing when you can only afford nachos.

Between its fancy coffee machines that grind beans to order, a dessert bar serving soft-serve gelato and non-fat frozen yogurt, and counters serving kombucha, nitrogen-infused hibiscus tea, and cold brew made with fair-trade, organic coffee beans, this store is also a panic attack in four walls. While browsing for more than an hour, I actually longed for a regular 7-Eleven, one where the cashiers would definitely look at me like a lunatic for asking where to find the cold brew coffee on tap, a place where it’s perfectly normal to buy three different types of gummy candy. If 7-Eleven truly wanted to improve upon its model in a meaningful way, it would look to its own stores in Japan: The food there — sandwiches stuffed with fluffy egg salad, soba noodles, and onigiri — has earned a cult following because it is cheap, varied, and most importantly, of high quality."
7-eleven  retail  conveniencestore  food  2019  japan 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
Ultimate Wasabi Guide ★ ONLY in JAPAN 究極のワサビ #28 - YouTube
"Let's travel to a valley in the Japanese alps in Nagano to get some organically grown wasabi from the farm! Just how is wasabi grown?
Daio Wasabi Farm is one of Japan's largest and is a great place to find out – and try wasabi cuisine!

There are few produce directly associated with Japan.
Wasabi is one of the most widely known and the flavor is found more and more in snacks because of it's spicy kick.
It's also used in sushi, mixed in the soy sauce.

There is a big different between the processed wasabi found in some restaurants and the fresh kind which is traditionally ground on a shark skin grater and collected. The color and smell. The texture and taste.

Why does fresh wasabi cost so much?
It takes between 12 to 18 month to grow one and there is no telling what size it will be when pulled from the ground.
The wasabi needs to be in the shade and have constant fresh water. The minerals from the melted snows of the Japanese alps surrounding Daio Wasabi Farm are perfect to make the worlds most delicious wasabi.

What else can you do at the wasabi farm?
You can hike around the beautiful area and also grab a bite to eat in the food plaza. They have:
Wasabi beer
Wasabi ice cream
Wasabi burger
Wasabi don
Wasabi juice
Wasabi wine
Wasabi leaf salad
Wasabi croquet
and yes ... just plain wasabi!
This is wasabi heaven!

Daio Wasabi Farm
URL: http://www.daiowasabi.co.jp/ (Japanese only)

This show has been created and produced by John Daub ジョン・ドーブ. He's been living and working in Japan for over 17 years and regularly reports on a TV show for Japan's International Channel."
wasabi  2015  japan  farming  agriculture  food 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Truth About Wasabi - YouTube
"Have you ever eaten wasabi?

If you answered “yes” to that question, you are likely mistaken. Most sushi eaters—even in Japan—are actually being served a mixture of ground horseradish and green food coloring splashed with a hint of Chinese mustard. Worldwide, experts believe that this imposter combination masquerades as wasabi about 99% of the time.

The reason boils down to supply and demand. Authentic wasabi, known as Wasabia japonica, is the most expensive crop to grow in the world. The temperamental semiaquatic herb, native to the mountain streams of central Japan, is notoriously difficult to cultivate. Once planted, it takes several years to harvest; even then, it doesn’t germinate unless conditions are perfect. Grated wasabi root loses its flavor within 15 minutes.

The Japanese have grown wasabi for more than four centuries. 75-year old Shigeo Iida, the eighth-generation owner of his family’s wasabi farm in Japan, takes pride in his tradition, which is profiled in Edwin Lee’s short documentary "Wasabia Japonica," co-produced by Japan Curator. “Real wasabi, like the ones we grow, has a unique, fragrant taste that first hits the nose,” Iida says in the film. “The sweetness comes next, followed finally by spiciness.” Read more: https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/585172/wasabi-fake/ "
wasabi  film  documentary  farming  japan  2019  agriculture  food  classideas 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
La Oaxaqueña- 2128 Mission St, Mission, San Francisco, CA - Yelp
[See also: http://oaxaquena.yolasite.com/ ]

["There are three things to know about the Mexican hot chocolate at La Oaxaqueña. First, is that it's made from pulverized blocks of cacao that are mixed with almonds and cinnamon, dissolved in steamed milk, and then frothed so that it's light and airy. Second is that you should add the guajillo chile powder for a kick of heat that doesn't overpower the drink. And third, is that it is served in a pitcher that fills two mugs, which makes it by far the best value on this list."
https://sf.eater.com/maps/best-hot-chocolate-san-francisco ]
food  restaurants  themission  sanfrancisco  mexican 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
Liberation Under Siege | Liberación Bajo Asedio on Vimeo
"Following the triumph of the Cuban Revolution, which successfully fended off imperial aggression by the United States, the United States imposed an economic trade blockade as punishment, which has continued to be in place for the past 60 years. The US has undertaken repeated attempts to plunder the Cuban people through genocidal measures, which has been met with the staunch resilience of the Cuban people, who continue to have faith and confidence in the socialist principles of the Revolution, despite the blockade materially impacting their everyday lives.

“Liberation Under Siege” examines the material conditions cultivated by the destructive blockade through the experiences and stories of everyday Cubans, and reclaim the imperialist narrative pushed by the United States through billions of dollars.

Filmed, Directed, and Edited by:

Priya Prabhakar
Reva Kreeger
Sabrina Meléndez"
cuba  2019  excess  us  foreignpolicy  interviews  education  healthcare  medicine  socialism  food  highereducation  highered  politics  blockade  embargo  poverty  equality  economics  race  gender  sexuality  priyaprabhakar  revakreeger  sabrinameléndez  video  small  slow  consumerism  materialism  capitalism  less  environment  values  success  health  imperialism  media  propaganda  resourcefulness  trade 
11 weeks ago by robertogreco
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Pomological Watercolor Collection
"The USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection documents fruit and nut varieties developed by growers or introduced by USDA plant explorers around the turn of the 20th century. Technically accurate paintings were used to create lithographs illustrating USDA bulletins, yearbooks, and other series distributed to growers and gardeners across America.

Fast Facts:

• Time period: 1886 to 1942, with the majority created between 1894 and 1916.
• Content: 7,584 watercolor paintings, lithographs and line drawings, including 3,807 images of apples.
• Fruit origins: The plant specimens illustrated originated in 29 countries and 51 states and territories in the U.S.
• Artists: The paintings were created by approximately twenty-one artists commissioned by USDA for this purpose. Some works are not signed."
archives  art  food  illustration  fruit  nuts  drawing  lithographs 
february 2019 by robertogreco
okonomiyaki
"Okkon Japanese Street Food is an Oakland based husband and wife team interested in sharing okonomiyaki, a popular street food from Japan.

The basic pancake comes with pork belly, mountain yam, cabbage, tempura, green onions, egg and flour. The dashi broth is made with four types of fish and kombu seaweed. Okkon cares deeply about the quality of the food, so organic and local ingredients are used as much as possible."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/okkonpopup/

via: https://www.instagram.com/p/Bt9GuaJBUFm/ ]
food  oakland  popups  togo  restaurants  japanese  okonomiyaki 
february 2019 by robertogreco
The official fast food French fry power rankings - Los Angeles Times
"Look, it’s been a long two years for everyone. We’re tired, our brains have been melted to a thin pap by the news cycle, and we’ve soundly backslid into our slothful ways despite resolving to exercise off all the cookies we cry-ate over the holiday. During times like this, it’s necessary to celebrate small victories. Celebrate the fact that you woke up this morning, and did or did not remember to bathe. Celebrate the fact that your insurance company has decided that therapy “should” cost $50 per session.

And celebrate the fact that I bring tidings of great joy. After a barely noticeable hiatus, I’m happy to announce the return of the food power rankings just in time for February, our shortest, drizzliest and most romantic month. That’s right, my friends, I am pleased as punch to announce the authoritative, totally not subjective, incontrovertibly definitive and 100% correct L.A. Times Fast Food French Fry Rankings.

French fries, a.k.a. chips, aka freedom fries, aka 炸薯条, are a delightful treat enjoyed the world over, and they’re a staple of the fast-food meal. And what is fast food, exactly? For the purposes of this survey, I've selected chains where there’s an emphasis on speed of service, you’re not waited on at a table, and where there are at least a couple hundred locations, if not more. I ordered medium- or regular-sized fries (when available) and judged them based on the two metrics: (1) taste and (2) texture, which includes fry shape and mouthfeel."
fries  food  comparison  classideas  2019  lucaskwanpeterson  restaurants  fastfood  rankings 
february 2019 by robertogreco
An Interview With Samin Nosrat: ‘I Identify as a Californian’ - The New York Times
"I’m curious about how growing up in California informed your worldview and your work now.

That was all I knew. I really love the beach. The beach has always been a constant in my life. And you asked about how being a Californian has influenced me: Above any other way of identifying, like above race or religion or anything — or nationality — I identify as a Californian. This way that I’ve gotten to spend so much of my life outside, in different landscapes, has absolutely affected me. Agriculture has affected me. The way there are so many different kinds of people from all over the world — I’m so, so grateful for that. I remember being sick of the fact that it was always sunny in San Diego. My dad said to me: “What’s wrong with you? Everyone in the whole rest of the world aspires to live in California.”

I don’t know — I mean, I love Mexican food so much. I could probably go on for a long time about the differences between Northern California and Southern California Mexican food."
saminnosrat  california  food  saltfatacidheat  2019 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Chevanni Davids on Unschooling - YouTube
"Chevanni's comments on unschooling, critically looking at a quest for humanity through self directed education."

[from this longer video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3z6z0dyX0U ]
unschooling  chevanni  2018  history  self-directed  self-directedlearning  education  learning  indigeneity  socialjustice  classism  humanism  english  schooling  nature  everyday  food 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Saucy Asian
"Around-the-World Korean Remix

Shameless flavor mashups served with Korean style and a California kick in the buds.

It starts with a global base—think Asian, Latin and Cali classics. Give it a Korean remix by throwing in K-Mom’s meats and veggies. Top it off with a world tour of awesome sauces.

Carnivore friendly.
Herbivore approved.
Authentically inauthentic."

[See also: https://www.yelp.com/biz/saucy-asian-san-francisco ]

[via: https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/cheap-san-francisco-restaurants#slide-6 ]
food  restaurants  sanfrancisco  korean  thecastro  themission  missiondistrict 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Ethnic markets and community food security in an urban “food desert” - Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, Jaime S Rossiter, Fernando J Bosco, 2017
"In recent years, the concept of food desert has come to dominate research and policy debates around food environments and their impacts on health, with mounting evidence that low-income neighborhoods of color lack large supermarkets and therefore may have limited access to fresh, affordable, and healthy foods. We argue that this metaphor, which implies an absence of food, is misleading and potentially detrimental to the health of poor and racially diverse communities because it ignores the contribution of smaller stores, particularly that of so-called ethnic markets. Current applications of the food desert concept in this setting reflect classed and racialized understandings of the food environment that ignore the everyday geographies of food provision in immigrant communities while favoring external interventions. Our investigation of ethnic markets in City Heights, a low-income urban neighborhood in San Diego with a diverse immigrant population, offers evidence of their positive role in providing access to affordable, fresh, healthy, and culturally appropriate foods. Our results contribute to research by providing a nuanced description of the food environment beyond access to supermarkets, focusing specifically on immigrant neighborhoods, and pointing to ethnic markets as valuable partners in increasing food security in diverse urban areas."
2017  sandiego  cityheights  food  supermarkets  markets  fooddeserts  race  ethnicity  class  culture  geography  immigration 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Ask Umbra’s 21-Day Apathy Detox | Grist
"Does this sound like anyone you know? “Dear Umbra: Since November — and really, for as long as I’ve known about the threat of climate change — I’ve been plagued by this sense of hopelessness and foreboding, and I just can’t shake it. I’ve tried it all: Late-night Facebook fights, splurging on fancy salads, retreats in the woods where I scream at a tree. Now I’m just parked on the couch watching Sex and the City reruns. Can I learn to hope again?” Well, you’ve found the right advice columnist. I’m here to quietly change your Facebook password and not-so-quietly offer the best tools, tricks, and advice to help you fight for a planet that doesn’t burn and a future that doesn’t suck. You’ll build civic muscles, find support buddies, and better your community!

DAY 1: Make a plan
DAY 2: Meet your neighbors
DAY 3: Social media makeover
DAY 4: Support local news
DAY 5: Read up on justice
DAY 6: Protest like a pro
DAY 7: Give green
DAY 8: Ditch the excuses
DAY 9: Green your power sources
DAY 10: Fight city hall
DAY 11: Get offline
DAY 12: Drop dirty money
DAY 13: School food fight!
DAY 14: Vote local
DAY 15: Attack your meat habit
DAY 16: Bug your elected rep
DAY 17: Buy less
DAY 18: Push for affordable housing
DAY 19: Talk climate at the bar
DAY 20: Support the arts
DAY 21: Run for office"

[via: https://go.grist.org/webmail/399522/223022613/dcfc605c05717cdbc5988a2c4d1a5fd7309a781b8364159d968011b54bd8b93b]

[See also (from the same newsletter):

https://coolclimate.berkeley.edu/calculator
https://grist.org/briefly/groundbreaking-study-outlines-what-you-can-do-about-climate-change/
https://slate.com/technology/2014/10/plane-carbon-footprint-i-went-a-year-without-flying-to-fight-climate-change.html
https://www.drawdown.org/solutions-summary-by-rank
https://grist.org/article/scientists-calmly-explain-that-civilization-is-at-stake-if-we-dont-act-now/ ]
climtechange  action  apathy  2018  sustainability  change  globalwarming  flights  transportation  food  energy  electricity  power  consumption  conssumrism  politics  activism  housing  justice  climatejustice  socialmedia  protest 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Dr Sarah Taber on Twitter: "Red Delicious was A+ in its original incarnation. Then folks kept grafting from bud sports (=sometimes a tree throws a branch that's a little different, it's normal) w darker & darker fruit. Selected for color instead of qualit
"Red Delicious was A+ in its original incarnation. Then folks kept grafting from bud sports (=sometimes a tree throws a branch that's a little different, it's normal) w darker & darker fruit. Selected for color instead of quality. 100+ yrs later we now have purple foamballs.

[quoting: "If I had a time machine I would 100% make sure that the person who named the Red Delicious apple was brought to justice"
https://twitter.com/faithchoyce/status/1055944025121771520]

(2/) Weirdly this makes some evolutionary sense. When confronted w a variety of otherwise identical fruit (say, bins of apples at the store), humans go for the darkest red ones.

In nature, that's how you eat the ripe ones & leave bb fruit to mature.

(3/) So. All other things being equal, if you have multiple apple varieties at the store, the darkest red ones tend to sell the fastest. It's not hard to see how that wound up being the priority for deciding which Red Delicious variants to graft.

(4/) Tl;dr a lot of the stuff that the food movement blames on "bad agriculture" or w/e is ... really just the result of a lot of micro-scale human decisions that made sense on their own. Then they snowball into something weird.

(5/) Also when I worked in fruit breeding the weirdest thing would happen. Us in the breeding program would wind up with our favorite cultivars. We liked the ones with a lot of flavor: strong, balanced acidity & sweetness with a lot of aroma.

(6/) There was this one blueberry that had this amazing rich flavor. Thick, jammy with a little bit of blackberry to it. mmmmmm

(7/) But when we actually did the flavor testing? Let civilians eat our new berry crosses?

They LOOOVED the most watery, insipid, shitty berries. Kept giving them top marks, and our favorite big-flavor berries always wound up in the middle.

(8/) IIRC the top-testing blueberry from that program during my time there was Meadowlark. Bless its heart, it's a great bush- but the fruit is a bland-ass water bean. Its max flavor level is a faint whiff of violets.

(9/) Anyway, it seems like every other thinkpiece about ~food these days~ has obligatory remarks on how The Scientists Are Breeding Crops For Durability Instead of Flavor.

lmao fuck that, we keep TRYING to breed for flavor & getting sabotaged by y'all on the taste panels

(10/) Again, there's some really complex human systems stuff going on in our produce markets. Like asking why so many ppl seem to prefer bland fruit. We'd really be able to help ourselves out if we actually ... looked at that?

(11/) But it wraps the story up in a neat little bow to blame ~science~ so sure let's do that instead.

-cut to scientists hissing Gollum-style over the 3 good berry plants from their field trials that never made it to market because The People Have Spoken- 🤣

(12/) Hrmmm replies have turned into a "let's hate on the plebes who don't appreciate fruit like ~we~ do" sesh.

The entire point of this thread was, there's a HUGE spectrum of flavors out there most of us don't ever encounter & we don't know what we don't know.

(13/) Statistically speaking, MOST OF US in the ol' u s of a are secretly one of those majority of people who like shitty bland fruit, AND WE'LL NEVER KNOW IT."
fruit  science  agriculture  2018  sarahtaber  apples  blueberries  grafting  flavor  food  selection  humans  berries  blackberries 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Netflix’s new ‘Salt Fat Acid Heat’ is unlike any other food show on TV - The Washington Post
"To put it bluntly: Most travel food shows are about white male discovery. And most home cooking shows are about white female domesticity. Nosrat gently rejects all of that.

“There is a really fine line between being the discoverer and being a curious traveler,” she said. Watching depictions of Persian food on TV, “I am very aware of the feeling of having something taken from you, repackaged, and not being given credit for your own tradition. And that’s something that I never want to do to somebody else.”

That means giving more credit to women, too. One of the extraordinary things about “Salt Fat Acid Heat” is how many women appear in the show. They are there as friends and cultural guides for Nosrat, or they’’re the faces of successful artisanal food businesses. Or they’re elderly home cooks, eager for the chance to reveal their secrets. When men do appear, they are often in the background, and only a few of them get a major speaking role.

“The bulk of all cooking has been done by women. And yet, in popular culture and in media, it’s very rarely that women are given credit for that — are honored in any way — and certainly it’s even more rare that home cooks are glorified or dignified or honored in any way,” said Nosrat. Grandmothers are an obvious choice: Not only is it a chance to show a demographic that has historically been ignored on TV, it is a way to get a true expert to show Nosrat what to do. “I feel like there’s something to learn from every single one of them,” she said.

“It was absolutely intentional,” that the show shows mostly women, and especially older women, said Nosrat. “There would be times where the producers would bring me a list of people” that was full of men, and she would tell them to go back to the drawing board. Eventually, “we all sort of got on the same page and understood that that was where this train was headed, to mix my metaphors.”"
2018  saminnosrat  salt  fat  acid  heat  cooking  food  gender  women  maurajudkis 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Cuisine Ingredients | FlowingData
"Looking for the ingredients that make food taste different around the world."
food  ingredients  visualization  dataviz  datavis  data  recipes 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Clint Smith on Twitter: "Question for the foodies out there: What are the best vegetarian dishes for someone who realllyyyyyy loves meat (me👈🏾) but is looking to try and eat more meat-free meals?"
"Question for the foodies out there:

What are the best vegetarian dishes for someone who realllyyyyyy loves meat (me👈🏾) but is looking to try and eat more meat-free meals?

Y’all really can’t through. This is amazing! Enough veggie recipes to last us until the end of time."

[See replies.]
food  recipes  vegetarian  2018 
august 2018 by robertogreco
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