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robertogreco : force   9

David Graeber • Dead zones of the imagination: on violence, bureaucracy, and interpretive labor
"We are not used to thinking of nursing homes or banks or even HMOs as violent institutions—except perhaps in the most abstract and metaphorical sense. But the violence I’m referring to here is not epistemic. It’s quite concrete. All of these are institutions involved in the allocation of resources within a system of property rights regulated and guaranteed by governments in a system that ultimately rests on the threat of force. “Force,” in turn, is just a euphemistic way to refer to violence.

All of this is obvious enough. What’s of ethnographic interest, perhaps, is how rarely citizens in industrial democracies actually think about this fact, or how instinctively we try to discount its importance. This is what makes it possible, for example, for graduate students to be able to spend days in the stacks of university libraries poring over theoretical tracts about the declining importance of coercion as a factor in modern life, without ever reflecting on that fact that, had they insisted on their right to enter the stacks without showing a properly stamped and validated ID, armed men would indeed be summoned to physically remove them, using whatever force might be required. It’s almost as if the more we allow aspects of our everyday existence to fall under the purview of bureaucratic regulations, the more everyone concerned colludes to downplay the fact (perfectly obvious to those actually running the system) that all of it ultimately depends on the threat of physical harm."
sociology  violence  davidgraeber  2006  bureaucracy  force  coercion  threat  capitalism  property  ownership  latecapitalism  propertyrights  via:ayjay 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Campaign Zero
"We can live in a world where the police don't kill people by limiting police interventions, improving community interactions, and ensuring accountability.

CLICK THE CATEGORIES BELOW FOR POLICY SOLUTIONS (DOWNLOAD THIS GRAPHIC)"
blacklivesmatter  policing  policy  police  activism  lawenforcement  2016  campignzero  oversight  brokenwindows  force  violence  bodycams  demilitarization 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Mimi Zeiger asks why architects are silent on Ferguson
"Architecture as a practice sits at the juncture of hegemonic structures and the community it serves. It's an uncomfortable position and architecture's social agenda is often viewed as a failure when compared to its formalist counterpart. At times it seems easier to retreat into academia or simply pick one side of the spectrum: tactical urbanism or Dubai high-rises, senior centres or luxury condos, community-based processes or computation. Polarisation, however, hurts the whole discipline.

In 2011, Occupy Wall Street and Cairo's Tahrir Square protests sparked the publication of a spate of architectural texts on the use of public space, the rise of a democratic network culture, and the rethinking of public policy. Perhaps some processing time will produce something similar this time around. Indeed, there is a growing interest in the political as an area of architectural thought.

Recently the Architectural Association hosted the event How is Architecture Political? It featured political theorist Chantal Mouffe in conversation with a quartet of top architectural thinkers: Pier Vittorio Aureli, Reinhold Martin, Ines Weizman and Sarah Whiting. But the deaths of black citizens in New York, Florida, California, Missouri, and others, have yet to incite architectural discourse."



"What about this time? I asked her. At first, McEwen pointed me back to her text where she rallied designers to take on issues of race, violence, and inequality with the same attention that is given to other problems outside the direct scope of architecture, such as climate change or stormwater run-off. And then she weighed in:

"Architects and urban designers can take the #BlackLivesMatter campaign as an opportunity to look deeply into the ways that the tools of the discipline have been defined through attempts to erase black people from American cities," she said. "I don't mean 'in conjunction with', but actually the tools of the discipline emerging through the very acts of controlling, erasing, and displacing black bodies."

These are embedded structural issues that need to be addressed within architecture and design from all sides. Body cameras are not the solution, nor are the smart, tech-centric urban fixes they represent. Koolhaas may have noted that we are past the time of manifestos, but that's no reason to play dumb."
mimizeiger  remkoolhaas  design  3dprinting  architecture  smartcities  urban  urbanism  manifestos  blacklivesmatter  ferguson  2014  surveillance  tacticalurbanism  power  control  security  displacement  police  lawenforcement  force 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Design in Times of Crisis — A Quick Round-Up for a Time of Crisis
"Here’s a quick-and-dirty summary of recent events in Brazil which clearly show where the interest of the capital lies, the situation of human rights, and the creepy, dreadful direction things are taking.

(Last update: 09/June/2014)

• Brazil is living a dystopian present.
Police have “preventively arrested” two youngsters in Goiania (central Brazil) and confiscated “subversive material”, i.e. flyers featuring imagery and slogans against FIFA and the upcoming World Cup;
(ref: https://twitter.com/RMKnabben/status/470361781857435648/photo/1)

• Police in Belo Horizonte (southeastern Brazil) admitted to the use of force and violence to remove homeless people from the vicinity of the stadiums and “FIFA-protected” areas;
(ref: http://noticias.band.uol.com.br/cidades/minasgerais/noticia/100000686346/Militares-admitem-retirar-moradores-de-rua-na-Copa.html)

• Military police have erected a wall that isolates the German national team from the rest of the village their are occupying in Bahia during the World Cup. Villagers were “required” to wear a badge AT ALL TIMES so as to be identified. Maiara Alcântara da Luz, who lives there, said she thinks it is “[…] humiliating. They should identify themselves, for THEY come from outside. I’ve lived here since I was born”.

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago.
(ref: http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/esporte/folhanacopa/2014/06/1467170-alemanha-cria-muro-de-berlim-na-bahia.shtml)

• The extreme right wing christian section (let’s call them for what they really are) of the brazilian congress has suspended the bill which guaranteed state-covered medication and abortion in cases of sexual violence, life-threatening pregnancies or foetus anencephaly; their next move is to exempt public healthcare from providing emergency care for victims of sexual abuse. This will effectively cut off the majority of the population from receiving any kind of health care following an episode of sexual violence, and make it even more difficult to file police reports and prosecute sexual predators;
(ref. http://www.revistaforum.com.br/blog/2014/05/portaria-referente-ao-aborto-legal-durou-uma-semana/ and http://mairakubik.cartacapital.com.br/2014/06/06/corpo-nao-pode-ser-trocado-por-voto/)

• Human rights violations related to the preparations for the World Cup: http://rioonwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/2012-World-Cup-Olympics-Dossier-English.pdf "
worldcup  2014  brazil  brasil  policestate  protest  force  militarization  control  power  humanrights  stateofexception 
june 2014 by robertogreco
minimum force, corporeal anticipation |
“For it is Sennett’s contention that “nearly anyone can become a good craftsman” and that “learning to work well enables people to govern themselves and so become good citizens.” This line of thought depends, among other things, upon the Enlightenment assumption that craft abilities are innate and widely distributed, and that, when rightly stimulated and trained, they allow craftsmen to become knowledgeable public persons.

And what is it that such persons know? They know how to negotiate between autonomy and authority (as one must in any workshop); how to work not against resistant forces but with them (as did the engineers who first drilled tunnels beneath the Thames); how to complete their tasks using “minimum force” (as do all chefs who must chop vegetables); how to meet people and things with sympathetic imagination (as does the glassblower whose “corporeal anticipation” lets her stay one step ahead of the molten glass); and above all they know how to play, for it is in play that we find “the origin of the dialogue the craftsman conducts with materials like clay and glass.”

The assumption that craft abilities are widely diffused leads Sennett into a meditation on our love of those intelligence tests by which we supposedly single out the very smart and the very stupid so that some will go to college and others go to bagging groceries. Sennett points out that such sorting ignores the “densely populated middle ground” where most of the population is actually found. Rather than celebrating a “common ground of talents,” we tend to inflate “small differences in degree into large differences in kind” and so legitimate existing systems of privilege. Thinking of the median as the mediocre creates an excuse for neglect. This is one reason, Sennett argues, that “it proves so hard to find charitable contributions to vocational schools” while currently the wealth of the Ivy League schools is compounding at an astounding rate.”

[from http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/06/books/review/Hyde-t.html?pagewanted=all ]
crafy  autonomy  craftsmanship  richardsennett  authority  resistance  force  forces  minimumforce  imagination  sympathy  play  materials  making  middleground  talent  talents  privilege  mediocrity  median  vocationalschools  wealth  knowing  knowledge  understanding  enlightenment  sarahendren  citizenship  openstudioproject  glvo  lcproject  cv  corporealanticipation  learning  work  tcsnmy  progressiveeducation  elitism  2008  lewishyde 
march 2013 by robertogreco
peterme.com: Way more about paths at UC Berkeley than you'd ever want to read.
"For shame!

There's another interesting development. Look at the center of the first birdseye photo, and the bottom-right of the second. In the first, there's a wide dirt path cutting across the corner. In the second, there's a darker green patch, showing where it's been re-sod.

For some reason, Berkeley would rather spend it's money reinforcing it's poor landscape architecture with barriers and re-sodding, then recognizing that the paths suggest a valuable will of the people.

Though, this is not always the case. In another part of the campus, diagonal concrete paths were laid where it was clear that people walked, and are still in use:"
design  architecture  social  desirelines  elephantpaths  2003  force  coercion  berkeley  ucberkeley  ucsb  unschooling  deschooling  human  humans  travel  walking  anarchism 
june 2011 by robertogreco
What Conservatives Really Want
"basis of American democracy: empathy—citizens caring for each other, both social & personal responsibility—acting on that care, & an ethic of excellence. From these, our freedoms & way of life follow, as does role of government: to protect & empower everyone equally. Protection includes safety, health, the environment, pensions. Empowerment starts w/ education & infrastructure. No one can be free w/out these, & w/out commitment to care & act on that care by one's fellow citizens.

…Conservatives believe in individual responsibility alone, not social responsibility.…don't think government should help citizens.…don't think citizens should help each other…part of government they want to cut is not military, not government subsidies to corporations, not aspect of government that fits their worldview…want to cut part that helps people…Because that violates individual responsibility.

But where does that view of individual responsibility alone come from?

…strict father family…"
politics  economics  conservatism  republicans  democracy  empathy  socialsafetynet  society  compassion  individual  individualism  wisconsin  education  caring  2011  taxes  government  force  markets  unions  environment  georgelakoff  policy  values  conservatives 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Why KIPP works « Re-educate
"There’s very little of the progressive education theory that I support, but their success is undeniable. I think this is why: before enrolling a student, a teacher or principal will go to their home to visit with the family. The KIPP program is explained in detail, & the family members must sign a contract stating they will do everything in their power to help the child go to college...success is grounded in an agreement: This is what we do. If it’s not for you, then don’t sign up...& this is the great failure of traditional education. There’s no agreement, no contract. Students are told what to do & where to go, & because they don’t perceive that they have a choice, it feels oppressive...That’s what school is like for a lot of kids. If you look at it that way, KIPP schools are very progressive. They start with the basic principle of allowing students to choose how they’re going to learn."
kipp  progressive  agreement  compulsory  learning  education  force  choice  success  schools  schooling  tcsnmy 
january 2010 by robertogreco

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