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robertogreco : formaleducation   5

Ten design lessons from Frederick Law Olmsted, the father of American landscape architecture - (37signals)
"1. Respect “the genius of a place.”…

2. Subordinate details to the whole…

3. The art is to conceal art…

4. Aim for the unconscious…

5. Avoid fashion for fashion’s sake.…

6. Formal training isn’t required. Olmsted had no formal design training and didn’t commit to landscape architecture until he was 44. Before that, he was a New York Times correspondent to the Confederate states, the manager of a California gold mine, and General Secretary of the United States Sanitary Commission during the Civil War. He also ran a farm on Staten Island from 1848 to 1855 and spent time working in a New York dry-goods store. His views on landscapes developed from travelling and reading…

…7. Words matter…

8. Stand for something…

9. Utility trumps ornament…

10. Never too much, hardly enough."
design  landscape  fredericklawolmstead  via:lukeneff  art  architecture  latebloomers  cv  autodidacts  genius  philosophy  simplicity  education  utility  yearoff  training  formaleducation  formal  informal  travel  experience 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Born to Learn ~ The Ideas
"Overschooled but Undereducated synthesizes an array of research and shows how these insights can contribute to a better understanding of human learning, especially as this relates to adolescence. By mis-understanding teenagers’ instinctive need to do things for themselves, society is in danger of creating a system of schooling that so goes against the natural grain of the adolescent brain that formal education ends up unintentionally trivialising the very young people it claims to be supporting. By failing to keep up with appropriate research in the biological and social sciences, current educational systems continue to treat adolescence as a problem rather than an opportunity.

This book is about the need for transformational change in education. It synthesizes an array of research from both the physical and social sciences and shows how these insights can contribute to a better understanding of human learning, especially as this relates to adolescence."
research  brain  adolescence  adolescents  learning  independence  tcsnmy  teaching  education  change  reform  teens  parenting  lcproject  cv  self  self-directedlearning  formaleducation 
april 2011 by robertogreco
How College Kills Creativity; Nothing Succeeds Like Failure - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"If the sources of genius remain something of a riddle, Robinson is emphatic about what does not contribute to creative excellence: higher education…academy's emphasis on specialization & its "inherent tendency to ignore or reject highly original work that does not fit existing paradigm" is an impediment to creativity…points to several intriguing studies. One, by Dean Keith Simonton, a professor of psych at UC Davis, suggests that creativity flourishes best among those w/ equivalent of 2 years of an undergraduate education—no less, no more. Csikszentmihalyi, a professor of psychology at Claremont Graduate U, has also looked at the relationship btwn education & innovation. In his 1996 book, Creativity: Flow & the Psychology of Discovery & Invention, he argued that formal education has historically had little effect on the lives of creative people. "If anything," he wrote, "school threatened to extinguish the interest & curiosity that the child had discovered outside its walls.""

[text here: http://www.stevepavlina.com/forums/personal-effectiveness/55236-nothing-succeeds-like-failure-how-college-kills-creativity.html ]
creativity  education  practice  psychology  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  learning  unschooling  deschooling  flow  failure  colleges  universities  schools  schooling  innovation  specialization  generalists  curiosity  interested  lcproject  formaleducation  schooliness  invention  discovery  adversity  highereducation  highered  specialists  interestedness 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Attention versus distraction? What that big NY Times story leaves out » Nieman Journalism Lab
"question, though, is: distraction from what? & also: What’s inherently wrong with distraction?…What that framing forgets, though, is that the other side of fragmentation can be focus: the kind of deep-dive, myopic-in-a-good-way, almost Zen-like concentration that sparks to life when intellectual engagement couples with emotional affinity…Formal education, as we’ve framed it, is not only about finding ways to learn more about the things we love, but also, equally, about squelching our aversion to the things we don’t — all in the ecumenical spirit of generalized knowledge…The web inculcates a follow your bliss approach to learning that seeps, slowly, into the broader realm of information; under its influence, our notion of knowledge is slowly shedding its normative layers…Community, after all, needs the normative to function; the question is where we draw the line between the interest and the imperative…what we really want from digital world = permission to be impulsive."
attention  distraction  unschooling  deschooling  control  impulsivity  impulse-control  apathy  focus  learning  education  culture  information  socialmedia  technology  digitalnatives  constructivism  psychology  21stcenturyskills  criticism  lcproject  schools  formaleducation  informallearning  motivation 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Formal vs informal education - Joi Ito's Web
"[My sister an I] were discussing formal learning vs informal learning & how I probably survived because I had the privilege of having access to smart people & mentors, support of an understanding mother, an interest driven obsessive personality & access to the Internet. I completely agree that improving formal education & lowering dropout rates is extremely important, but I wonder how many people have personalities or interests that aren't really that suited for formal education, at least in its current form.

I wonder how many people there are like me who can't engage well w/ formal education, but don't have mentors or access to Internet & end up dropping out despite having a good formal education available to them. Is there a way to support & acknowledge importance of informal learning & allow those of us who work better in interest & self-motivated learning to do so w/out the social stigma & lack of support that is currently associated w/ dropping out of formal education?"
joiito  mimiito  formal  informal  informallearning  informaleducation  networkedlearning  formaleducation  tcsnmy  support  lcproject  learning  unschooling  deschooling  mentorship  apprenticeships  learningstyles  learningnetworks 
february 2010 by robertogreco

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