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Book & Job
"Established in the summer of 2012, Book & Job Gallery is a space fully committed to the advancement of all forms of contemporary art, with a focus on providing quality local artists access to a wide range of promotional tools and means of exposure. Located in the eclectic Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco, Book & Job seeks to connect artists of all different styles and mediums more directly to their patrons and visitors, both locally and abroad.

We are proudly at 838 Geary St. in San Francisco & you can schedule an appointment by emailing us to view art or even talk shop."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/bookjobgallery/ ]
galleries  sanfrancisco  tenderloin  art 
may 2017 by robertogreco
CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts: David Hammons
"Spirits aren’t something you see or even understand. That’s just not how they work. They are too abstract, too invisible, and move too quickly. They don’t live anywhere, but only run by and pass through, and no matter how old they are, they are always light years ahead. They do what they want, whenever they want. And under specific circumstances, at specific times, in specific places, to specific people, for specific reasons, they make their presence known.

In the Congo Basin in Central Africa, they are called minkisi. They are the hiding place for people’s souls.

David Hammons is a spirit catcher. He walks the streets the way an improviser searches for notes, looking for those places and objects where dormant spirits go to hide, and empowers them again. He knows about the streetlamps and the mailboxes where the winos hide their bottles in shame. Hammons calls it tragic magic—the art of converting pain into poetry.

[David Hammons. "Spade With Chains," 1973.]

Much has been said about the materials Hammons uses in his work. Most are taken from the street and cost very little—greasy paper bags, shovels, ice, cigarettes, rubber tubes, hair, rocks, basketballs, fried food, bikes, torn plastic tarps, Kool-Aid. Some of them are (knowingly) borrowed from the vocabulary of other artists, while others are closely tied to his own life and chosen surroundings in Harlem. Much has also been said about the meaning of his work—its arguments, its politics, what it’s “about.” And while much of what has been said has been useful, it has also been partly beside the point.

Materials are something one can see, and arguments are something one can understand, and that’s just not what Hammons is after. He’s interested in how much those wine bottles still somehow contain the lips that once drank from them. He’s after the pun on spirit—as in the drink, but also as in the presence of something far more abstract.
Black hair is the oldest hair in the world. You’ve got tons of people’s spirits in your hands when you work with that stuff.

[David Hammons. "Wine Leading the Wine," 1969. Courtesy of Hudgins Family Collection, New York. Photo: Tim Nighswander/IMAGING4ART.]

If Hammons is suspicious of all that is visible, it might be because the visible, in America, is all that is white. It’s all those Oscar winners, all those museum trustees, and all those faces on all those dollar bills. Some artists work to denounce, reveal, or illustrate racial injustice, and to make visible those who are not. Hammons, on the other hand, prefers invisibility—or placing the visible out of reach. He doesn’t have a lesson to teach or a point to prove, and his act of protest is simply to abstract, because that’s what will make the visible harder to recognize and the intelligible harder to understand.

If Duchamp was uninterested in what the eye can see, Hammons is oppressed by it—it’s not the same thing.

[David Hammons. "In the Hood," 1993. Courtesy of Tilton Gallery, New York.]
I’m trying to make abstract art out of my experience, just like Thelonius Monk.

For Hammons, musicians have always been both the model and the front line. When George Lewis says that “the truth of improvisation involves survival,” it’s because improv musicians look for a way forward, one note at a time, with no map to guide them and with no rules or languages to follow other than ones they invent and determine themselves. It forces them to analyze where they are and forces them to do something about it, on their own terms. Doesn’t get much more political than that.

Or, as Miles Davis once put it, “I do not play jazz.” He plays something that invents its own vocabulary—a vocabulary that is shared only by those who don’t need to know what to call it or how to contain it. And just as Miles Davis doesn’t play jazz, David Hammons doesn’t make art.

[David Hammons. "Blue Rooms," 2000 (installation view, The Centre for Contemporary Art, Ujazdowkski Castle, Warsaw).]
I’m trying to create a hieroglyphics that was definitely black.

Hammons goes looking for spirits in music, poetry, and dirt. He knows they like to hide inside of sounds, lodge themselves between words or within puns, and linger around the used-up and the seemingly worthless. He knows he’s caught some when he succeeds in rousing the rubble and gets it to make its presence felt. Like Noah Purifoy, he ignores the new and the expensive in favor of the available. Like Federico Fellini, he spends his time in the bowels of culture and makes them sing.

[David Hammons. "(Untitled) Basketball Drawing," 2006.]

There are the materials that make the art—those are the foot soldiers—but there is also the attitude that makes the artist. Hammons has his way of thinking and his way of behaving, which is once again not something one sees or necessarily understands, but is something that makes its presence known, the way spirits make their presence felt. There will be some who won’t recognize it and others who do—and his work is meant only for those who see themselves in it.
Did you ever see Elvis Presley’s resume? Or John Lennon’s resume? Fuck that resume shit.

Ornette was Ornette because of what he could blow, but also because he never gave into other people’s agendas or expectations.

What matters even more than having your own agenda is letting others know that it doesn’t fit theirs. “To keep my rhythm,” as Hammons puts it, “there’s always a fight, with any structure.” The stakes are real because should you let your guard down, “they got rhythms for you,” and you’ll soon be thinking just like they do. And in a white and racist America, in a white and racist art world, Hammons doesn’t want to be thinking just like most people do. His is a recalcitrant politics of presence: where he doesn’t seem to belong, he appears; where he does belong, he vanishes.

In short: don’t play a game whose management you don’t control.

[David Hammons. "Higher Goals," 1987. Photo: Matt Weber.]
That’s the only way you have to treat people with money—you have to let these people know that your agenda is light years beyond their thinking patterns.

The Whitney Biennial? I don’t like the job description. A major museum retrospective? Get back to me with something I can’t understand.

Exhibitions are too clean and make too much sense—plus the very authority of many mainstream museums is premised on values that Hammons doesn’t consider legitimate or at least does not share. He is far more interested in walking and talking with Jr., a man living on the streets of the East Village, who taught him about how the homeless divide up their use of space according to lines marked by the positioning of bricks on a wall. Those lines have teeth. In a museum, art is stripped of all its menace.

[David Hammons. "Bliz-aard Ball Sale," 1983. Photo: Dawoud Bey.]

The painter Jack Whitten once explained of how music became so central to black American life with this allegory:
When my white slave masters discovered that my drum was a subversive instrument they took it from me…. The only instrument available was my body, so I used my skin: I clapped my hands, slapped my thighs, and stomped my feet in dynamic rhythms.

David Hammons began with his skin. He pressed his skin onto paper to make prints. Over the subsequent five decades, he has found his drum.

[David Hammons. "Phat Free," 1995-99 (video still). Courtesy of Zwirner & Wirth, New York.]"
davidhammons  anthonyhuberman  art  jazz  ornettecoleman  milesdavis  theloniousmonk  material  rules  trickster  outsiders  artworld  resumes  elvispresley  johnlennon  insiders  race  racism  us  power  authority  jackwhitten  music  museums  galleries  menace  homeless  nyc  management  structure  presence  belonging  expectations  artists  fellini  noahpurifoy  availability  culture  hieroglyphics  blackness  georgelewis  improvisation  oppression  marcelduchamp  visibility  invisibility  souls  spirits 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Minnesota Street Project
"Located in San Francisco’s historic Dogpatch district, Minnesota Street Project offers affordable and economically sustainable spaces for art galleries, artists and related nonprofits. Inhabiting three warehouses, the Project seeks to retain and strengthen San Francisco's contemporary art community in the short term, while developing an internationally recognized arts destination in the long term.

Founded by entrepreneurs and collectors Deborah and Andy Rappaport, Minnesota Street Project was inspired by the couple's belief that philanthropic support for the arts today requires an alternate model—one suited to the innovative nature of Silicon Valley and the region as a whole.

Their vision of a dynamic, self-sustaining enterprise that shares its economic success with arts businesses and professionals aims to encourage heightened support for the arts from newcomer and established patrons alike.
FAQs

WHERE IS MINNESOTA STREET PROJECT?
You can find us at our public building on 1275 Minnesota St. The Artist Studio Program at 1240 Minnesota St is not open to the public.

HOW LONG SHOULD I PLAN TO VISIT?
We recommend setting aside at least two hours to visit the space.

DO ALL OF THE GALLERIES MAINTAIN THE SAME HOURS?
No. Each gallery has individual hours, posted here.

ARE THE TEN CHARTER GALLERIES THE ONLY EXHIBITORS AT 1275?
No. In addition to our ten permanent galleries, 1275 Minnesota St offers spaces to rent on a short-term basis. We welcome proposals from outside arts organizations, galleries and curators.

WHAT ELSE WILL I FIND AT THE PROJECT?
This fall, 1275 Minnesota will open a bar and restaurant run by chef Daniel Patterson. Additionally, the Project's Atrium offers bleacher seating and free wi-fi, welcome to public use.

WHAT ELSE WILL I FIND IN DOGPATCH?
Our Visit page lists the wonderful art spaces, businesses and restaurants you can find in our neighborhood and the surrounding area.

IS THE SPACE AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTY RENTALS?
Yes. For more information on our event space, please visit here.

IS THIS IS A NONPROFIT ENDEAVOR?
No. If operating as a non-profit provided the best opportunity to serve the local arts in San Francisco, Minnesota Street Project would operate as such. But we believe a new approach is needed.

HOW DOES THE PROJECT FUND ITS OPERATIONS?
Our unique model includes a state-of-the art Art Services and Storage business. 100% of profits are used to support the artists, galleries, and institutions in the Minnesota Street Project. Please visit here for more information.

DO I HAVE TO BE A COLLECTOR TO VISIT?
Absolutely not. While we are committed to helping our gallerists and artists sustain business through the sale of artwork, we are equally dedicated to educating the public through open, accessible engagement with exhibitions and programming.

HOW DO I STAY INFORMED?
Please sign up for our newsletter to receive updates on exhibitions, events and news."
sanfrancisco  art  galleries  dogpatch 
june 2016 by robertogreco
CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts
[via: http://caterina.net/2016/02/04/ellen-cantor-at-the-wattis/

"The Wattis is one of the best things about the San Francisco art scene–Anthony Huberman moved out here from P.S.1. in New York just over a year ago, and was joined by Jamie Stevens, formerly of the Serpentine Gallery in London, who are doing great work bringing artists to San Francisco who’ve yet to have big solo shows in the U.S. or West Coast. I am looking forward to the upcoming Wang Bing show as well."]

[See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wattis_Institute_for_Contemporary_Arts ]
art  sanfrancisco  museums  education  tovisit  galleries 
february 2016 by robertogreco
MoMA to Organize Collections That Cross Artistic Boundaries - The New York Times
"Within the Museum of Modern Art’s announcement on Tuesday of coming exhibitions were signs of a seismic shift underway in how it collects and displays modern and contemporary art — changes that are expected to have a powerful impact on the museum’s renovation.

While curatorial activities used to be highly segregated by department, with paintings and sculpture considered the most important, the museum has gradually been upending that traditional hierarchy, organizing exhibitions in a more fluid fashion across disciplinary lines and redefining its practice of showing art from a linear historical perspective.

Next spring, for example, when the Picasso sculpture show moves out, MoMA will reinstall its fourth-floor galleries with works from the 1960s, mingling artists and objects from around the world — from a Jaguar to a James Rosenquist painting. They will be selected by six departments in a more experimental, intuitive style that Ann Temkin, a chief curator, referred to as “unlearning what we’ve learned.”

This new, less siloed way of doing business is shaping the museum’s renovation and building expansion with the firm Diller Scofidio & Renfro. Galleries could be more flexible and open, like those in the Whitney Museum of American Art’s new building. Perhaps departmental names designating the galleries could be eliminated altogether.

“All of these exhibitions and efforts to look at the collection afresh will inform the installation of the exhibitions in the new building,” said Glenn D. Lowry, the museum’s director.

“How do we become more nimble — willing to peel open departmental practices?” he added. “Yes, we can change. There was no tablet from Moses that said this is the way we have to be structured.

“It’s not ‘Painting and Sculpture,’ ‘Drawings and Prints.’ It’s the collection of the Museum of Modern Art.”

This looser version of MoMA counters the conventional wisdom that has grown up around the museum, one that Roberta Smith, an art critic at The New York Times, described in 2010 as “a reluctance to question the linear unspooling of art history according to designated styles that remains the Modern’s core value and its Achilles’ heel.”

The evolving multidisciplinary — indeed, uncorporate — approach has not been tried by many encyclopedic art museums, although the smaller Walker Art Center in Minneapolis often shook up art-historical orthodoxies under its former director Kathy Halbreich (now the MoMA’s associate director).

Ms. Temkin, MoMA’s chief curator of painting and sculpture, said the museum was “reflecting a more widespread shift from thinking in categories — or thinking in so-called canonical narratives — to thinking about multiple histories. Having a sense of curiosity, rather than a desire for pronouncement.”

There is evidence of the new approach in shows like the Jackson Pollock survey, which is in the print galleries and was organized by the print curator, but also features paintings.

“It’s changing the idea that prints are something secondary and instead are really integral to the artist figuring out what he or she is doing,” Ms. Temkin said. “That could not have happened 20 years ago here or anywhere else.”

Similarly, the show “Transmissions” focuses on the connections among artists in Latin America and Eastern Europe during the 1960s and 1970s. Tellingly, the exhibition was organized by curators from a mix of departments: media and performance art, photography, and drawings and prints.

And the exhibition “Soldier, Spectre, Shaman: The Figure and the Second World War” is in the print gallery, but includes drawings, photography, painting and sculpture.

Time was when curators seeking to use a piece of media from a different department had to fill out a formal loan form.

But for the last year, curators in all departments have been engaging one another in workshops to discuss coming exhibitions. “We brainstorm,” said Martino Stierli, the chief curator of architecture and design.

This boundary-crossing approach partly reflects a generational shift; all seven of the current chief curators have been at MoMA for less than 10 years. They have come of age in the art world at a time when lines are blurring — an artist who makes sculpture might also make video — when influences are less Eurocentric, and when top-down pronouncements about what is and isn’t art seem outdated.

“I’m not naïve about the fact that the Museum of Modern Art is a very influential institution, but I think the way we can be influential today is different,” Ms. Temkin said. “It’s not, ‘This is good; this is bad.’ It’s that ‘This is worth looking at.’”

She added, “And these things are in relation to other things — whether it’s putting works by women on the wall or putting a print next to a painting.”"
moma  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  2015  museums  art  arthistory  silos  anntempkin  martinostierli  galleries 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The Museum Interface - Magazine - Art in America
"It's no longer a question of whether art institutions should have a virtual presence. Rather, the onus is being placed on designers to facilitate meaningful interactions with art that might occur in the gallery, via Web-based applications or in new hybrid spaces that merge the real and the virtual. Any attempt to augment an encounter with artwork using technological means invariably raises questions about the values we assign to certain modes of viewing. After all, isn't visiting a museum inherently tied to a very deep, very primary real-life experience? The promises and pitfalls of new technologies are forcing museums to rebalance their traditional mandates to care for a collection of physical objects while enabling scholarship and providing the wider public an opportunity to engage with works of art. —R.G. and S.H."



"HROMACK The Walker's model is very interesting to me and has been for years. Reading from afar, I often wonder about the relationship between the museum and its local community and whether the same model would work in New York, the city where I live and work. Museums consider the notion of public engagement very carefully, and the social web provides an ideal space for the institution to project its own feelings about how openly or generously or successfully it interacts with people-whether those notions are functionally true or not.

I am not entirely convinced that museum-run publications-as-social-spaces-the Whitney Stories publication and video series that we run out of my department, for instance, or MoMA's Post project-can unilaterally engender genuine, self-selected digital communities, regardless of how much we hope and believe otherwise, on an institutional level. At this point in the history of the Internet, the major social media platforms command a sheer level of user engagement that individual, organization-specific platforms simply cannot, unfortunately; it's our job to figure out how to harness that monopoly, both socially and technically, through smart social integration and interface design.

Researchers such as Sherry Turkle (MIT) have worked for decades to both understand and caution against the complex psychological relationships people develop with their devices.

Yet, the future of museum visitor engagement will continue to mimic current technology trends: smartphones, "wearables" and proximity-based technologies such as the iBeacon. MoMA's most recent mobile application, Audio +, is a strong example of an institution recognizing a now—natural human behavior—in this case, the propensity of in—gallery photography—and designing for that behavior rather than sanctioning against it. Likewise, the soon-to-reopen Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum will proffer an interactive pen, co-designed with Hewlett-Packard, to each visitor who will in turn be permitted to "collect" objects throughout the institution by scanning museum labels, thereby "capturing" their visit to the museum for later access on a web address printed on their admission ticket. These digital experiments don't always work, and they certainly challenge still-held ideas about how people should and shouldn't behave in museums. But art institutions aren't churches, and the enthusiasm we see among visitors for bringing digital technology into the gallery suggests that we're witnessing a transformation in how the museum relates to its public. The assumptions and biases that will be overturned in that process remains another question entirely."
museums  sarahhromack  robgiampietro  art  interface  technology  web  online  galleries  design  interfacedesign  walkerartcenter  2014  via:ablerism  via:caseygollan 
november 2015 by robertogreco
White Hole Gallery
"White Hole is a platform devoted to the production and dissemination of critical investigations into the relationship between technology, authority, the landscape and everyday life.

It operates through an international network of people invited to curate one-month exhibitions, combining strategies of artistic practice and journalism to investigate, document and debate the forces — visible and invisible — that shape society and the landscape.

The space functions as a remotely-controlled micro-gallery. Borrowing from the theory of general relativity, in which a white hole is a hypothetical region of spacetime which is inaccessible from the outside, the space itself cannot be entered, although matter and light can escape from it. It projects critical debate, increasingly confined to the online realm, into the public domain.

The network of people contributing to the gallery operates as a peer-to-peer system, exchanging, producing or commissioning new contents that is fed into the network through a Dropbox folder activating and controlling the gallery from distance.

The first White Hole project space opened in Genoa, Italy, on January 31st, 2015 and will run until January 31st, 2016. It will exhibit 12 works over the course of its lifespan, displaying each piece for the duration of one month.

White Hole is a project by Lorenza Baroncelli, Marco Ferrari, Joseph Grima, Antonio Ottomanelli, Elisa Pasqual, in collaboration with Fitzgerald G. Saenger. Scientific direction by Simone C. Niquille.

The logo animation is by Aaron Siegel."



""White Hole is a new research platform and a project space in Genoa, Italy, which opened on January 31st, 2015, and will run until January 31st, 2016.

White Hole is a project by Lorenza Baroncelli, Marco Ferrari, Joseph Grima, Antonio Ottomanelli and Elisa Pasqual, in collaboration with Simone C. Niquille and Fitzgerald G. Saenger.

The third exhibition, Drone Strikes. The Miranshah Case by Forensic Architecture, will be on show from March 28th to April 24th, 2015. The opening will be on Saturday, March 28th at 7 PM in the square in front of the gallery."



"Environmental Migrants [28.02—27.03.2015]

As the pace of climate change accelerates, each year millions of people are forced to abandon their places of origin. By 2050, of the six billion people who live in cities, two hundred million will be climate refugees: six times more than political refugees. It is a phenomenon that is destined to become the humanitarian emergency of this century.

Environmental Migrants is a unreleased video recorded by Alessandro Grassani between Mongolia and Bangladesh. The video, edited by White Hole, is an uninterrupted sequence of discontinuous material sampled from Grassani’s archive. It is divided in two chapters, each of which dedicated to one country.

As the photographer reported: “The choice of these two sites was dictated by the desire to represent the different types of climate change that cause environmental migration to the cities, in the geographic areas most affected by this new phenomenon: from the extreme cold of Mongolia, through floods, cyclones and sea level rise in Bangladesh.”
whiteholegallery  italy  genoa  italia  galleries  technology  landscape  authority  everyday  everydaylife  lorenzabaroncelli  marcoferrari  josephgrima  antonioottomanelli  elisapasqual  simoneniquille  fitzgeraldsaenger  refugees  climatechange  migration  mongolia  nomads  alessandrograssani  bangladesh  urbanization  cities  environment  drones 
march 2015 by robertogreco
A SHIP IN THE WOODS
"A SHIP IN THE WOODS is a non-profit art entity working to engage critical art and cultural dialogues through curated events within a domestic setting.

These events, the residency program, and other shared initiatives are the primary components in WSOHOIDPS's platform for supporting a community of artists, designers, musicians, filmmakers, writers, researchers and other creatives dedicated to advancing an ever evolving experience of the world."



"In the fall of 2010, a group of artists and creative professionals sought out residency in a mid-century home in the hills of Del Mar, CA with the notion of creating an environment for critical dialogues in art and culture. Set on an acre of densely vegetated land, the house presented an opportunity to have these discussions in a unique setting and after a substantial renovation project, the property was transformed into a venue worthy of displaying world-class works from both established and up-and-coming artists.

The house was originally built as a summer home for the actor George Brent. It then served as a satellite to the North County Repertory Theatre company, offering lodging to visiting actors and performers. After decades spent quietly as a domestic dwelling, the property was purchased and it's structures scheduled for eventual demolition. It was with this inevitable future already in place that a new collection of individuals would move in to conceive of the house's final iteration and initiate its' last life as A SHIP IN THE WOODS.

Today the SHIP continues to function as a home and venue for art, music, lectures, communal dinners, and various gatherings in pursuit of critical discourse. The HELM solo project series, running through February 2014 will be among the final events at our current location.

While a pending future location is still undetermined the WSOHOIDPS mission remains steadfast and on course - building a community and platform to support artists, designers, and other cultural researchers as they extend their own creative visions into the physical world."
galleries  sandiego  delmar  art  glvo  residencies 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Museum as Hub: Interview with Beta-Local by Ruba Katrib :: New Museum
[See also: http://www.conboca.org/2012/05/29/entrevista-a-michelle-marxuach-y-beatriz-santiago-de-beta-local/
and http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/greathomesanddestinations/14gh-puertorico.html ]

"Beta-Local is a nonprofit center for contemporary art initiated in 2009 and located in the heart of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. I met the three cofounders, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz, Michy Marxuach, and Tony Cruz in 2010 in their storefront space, which was filled with long tables and chairs, surrounded by bookshelves packed to the brim, sofas, and a small kitchen. While Beta-Local doesn’t exhibit art, it is an essential site that fosters interdisciplinary production and dialogue within Puerto Rico. While I was there, international visitors (myself included) were using the space to have studio visits with local artists; meanwhile, the São Paulo-based artist Carla Zaccagnini led a course. In a time when the university system in Puerto Rico is especially volatile, Beta-Local has become a safe haven for artists and others interested in education and exchange. I was invited to interview Beta-Local for Museum as Hub, who feature the space in their Art Spaces Directory.

Ruba Katrib: Can you talk a little bit about why you started and what you consider to be the central focus of your program?

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz: Beta-Local grew out of our interest in rethinking aesthetic thought and artistic practice from our local context. We began the project in 2009, during the economic crisis. We viewed the lack of local institutional support structures, such as contemporary galleries, museums, and art schools—along with the crisis in traditional modes of production and art economies—as an opportunity to develop alternative support structures for art and vernacular pedagogies. We insist on artistic practice and aesthetic thought as an essential social and political practice part of life.

Beta-Local is organized around three main programs: La Práctica, a nine-month production-based program, The Harbor, a residency program, and La Ivan Illich, an open school through which anyone can propose a class that they want to take or teach. These three programs generate many independent projects from performances to seminars, concerts to collective meals.

Our most important role is to support artists in making work. This making/thinking happens in the midst of projects, classes, lectures, and research. The multiple directions that the conversation can take can be disorienting, but we think this is a good thing.

We wanted to create a space that supported art-making—very broadly defined—and we wanted to do this while responding to and rethinking our physical context, the places where we live, our relationship to the people we collaborate with, their abilities and interests, as well as their imaginative visions of what was possible. We wanted to think about and create links across disciplines, and find connections between artistic practice and other ways of thinking and doing.

When we began the project, it was important for us to emphasize the lack of functionality in institutions, not a lack of exhibition space. We really looked to bring home the point that if there was no functionality in institutions, if the museums provided neither the resources, the relationship to a public, nor the critical context, than your living room—a street corner or a factory was just as good or perhaps an even better space for exhibition/presentation. We also wanted to de-emphasize the exhibition as the only point of contact between public and artist by opening up the process of production to the public, and allowing it to be challenged and enriched in the process.

We do actually orchestrate exhibitions/presentations when that is the logical end result of a project. We have brought in Alia Farid, a young curator living in Barcelona and Kuwait, to work with artist Rosalin Suero on the exhibition “Almacén/Habitación,” which took place in an industrial park. We also collaborated with the local Association of Architects to present Ashley Hunt’s lecture/performance Notes on the Emptying of a City and we presented Jeanine Oleson’s performance La Gran Limpia in contested public spaces and published a related text—these are just some examples. Generally, we don’t present work in our space; this forces us to create collaborations and open up other spaces for art. In general, these spaces have the resources, the space, and the electricity bills, they just don’t have the programming.

RK: With these different components comprising your structure, how do you balance the courses and workshops that are initiated by Beta-Local (that have your interests in mind) with the more “user-generated” elements of the program? Do these aspects of the program correlate or do you see them as separate initiatives entirely?

BSM: It is very hard to disentangle the two as there is a certain flow and synchronicity between them. Beta-Local has some clear interests—they are evident in the structure of Beta-Local, in the physical space, in our personal work as artists and cultural producers—but as the community of participants grows, those interests also grow, overlap, and meander. We follow our interests, but we leave all sorts of doors open for others to do the same. We are moved by the commitment of others to their own work and vision.

For example, we have received a lot of proposals related to bike culture, from mapping routes to bike mechanics. There is also a community of architects who are interested in experimental practices and architecture as research who participate regularly in programming, proposing, and leading classes; we have had classes and lectures proposed by economists, neuroscientists, ninety–year-old cooks, and teenagers. During 2011–12, we had a movement researcher participating in La Práctica. She initiated a project that involved the participation of many dancers, improvisers, and other movement researchers. This project opened the door to a local history of movement practices and all of a sudden we were in the middle of the dance community—not a place we could have anticipated at all. Similar instances have happened, all branching out in many directions—the space attracts like-minded people from other disciplines.

On the other hand, we also have found ways to pursue a sustained investigation into ideas of interest to Beta-Local. This year, we have begun a new series of intensive seminars anchored in our specific geography, local knowledge, and emerging art practices. This January, we are holding our first two-week session on the subject of land, place, and its visual representation. The ways in which our landscape is read and reinscribed through images is a subject that has come up a lot in the work of artists that we admire. The seminar puts together geographers, artists, and others who have been working on these ideas, including Chemi Rosado, Javier Arbona, and many others. We hope it will be the first of many. We have also pursued research and collaboration into experimental pedagogy, and have sustained long-term collaborations with artists and researchers whose work we are interested in exploring more in-depth.

In the most practical sense, we can do this because we are wiling to literally and figuratively lend them the keys. During our first and second year, we had so many proposals for courses (interesting ones!) and programming that we had to decide early on how to handle this. We would have collapsed if one of the three of us had to be there for everything. Andrea Bauzá, an architect who participated in La Práctica during our first year, organized an eight-week course on architecture, public space, and activism. We gave her the key to the space and from that point on we have done it many other times. On the one hand, it solves a practical problem, on the other, it really gives programming autonomy to the public school project. Also, all La Práctica participants have the ability to program the space and pursue their interests through programming. As we bring more people in, we have more and more reliable collaborators who can run programs, create projects, and teach classes.

RK: How do you believe Beta-Local’s program is perceived locally? There is a dynamic community of artists, curators, and collectors in Puerto Rico, what role do you think your program plays in the local art scene?

BSM: We have been very lucky to have the support and collaboration of the local community of artists and curators—as well as architects, designers, and non-art neighbors. They create programs and are our main audience and participants. Without their support and participation this simply would not work. This, in part, has to do with the fact that the public or La Práctica participants propose at least half of our programming. Establishing a steady connection with collectors is a bit trickier. We are not a traditional presenting institution. Some unconventional collectors avidly support our programs and regularly participate in events. We have also collaborated with Espacio 1414, a private collection, in creating a public program, which was very successful. But more conservative collectors may still be working on figuring out what we do and how this supports a healthy art community. Our place in the local ecosystem is as an engine through which new art and other relationships are forged, tested, and experimented with.

RK: Beta-Local is very integrated into the regional fabric; much of your program is a direct response to the immediate needs of the community in San Juan. But you also have international aspects to your program, how do you connect and communicate your activities to a broader contemporary art context?

BSM: We invite artists to Beta-Local whose work has interesting ties to or challenges local practices, Ana María Millán/Helena Producciones, Amílcar Packer, Carla Zaccagnini, Pablo Guardiola, Adriana Lara, Alia Farid, Center for Land Use Interpretation, Felipe Mujica, and … [more]
via:javierarbona  2014  beta-local  sanjuan  puertorico  beatrizsantiagomuñoz  art  openstudioproject  lcproject  glvo  tonycruz  michymarxuach  studios  studioclassroom  freeschools  education  community  ivanillich  residencies  rubakatrib  funding  fundraising  galleries  local  pedagogy  vernacularpedagogies  openschools  open  place  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  multidisciplinary 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Think Tank brings on the news
"The creative minds behind Think Tank include MCASD’s Robert Pincus, Jill Dawsey and Cris Scorza; Perry Vasquez, co-director of Southwestern College; and representatives of 20 of San Diego’s edgier arts organizations, including The Spot, Periscope Project and Double Break Gallery.

Think Tank had been working on a zine that explores these alternative art outlets when Laurie Mitchell from the city of San Diego’s Arts and Culture Commission reached out about a public art exhibit she’s helping organize called Art Boxed. The exhibit includes nine POD storage units that are being transformed by local artists into mini-galleries that will pop up throughout San Diego during Fall for the Arts month."
sandiego  art  thinktank  mcasd  robertpincus  jilldawsey  crisscorza  perryvasquez  thespot  periscopeproject  doublebreakgallery  lauriemitchell  publicart  artboxed  2012  galleries  glvo 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Around the Counties: Mapping San Diego County Arts with Kinsee Morlan | San Diego | Artbound | KCET
"What makes San Diego County so attractive?

It's desert meets beaches. You can literally be out hiking in 100 degree temperatures, enjoy cacti and native scrub and later that day you'll be at the beach swimming in 60 degree water. I think that's unique to San Diego. San Diego is known as the "City of Villages." One complaint about San Diego is that there's no heart or soul of the city but really there's like 100 different little hearts and souls in San Diego. You've got South Park, Normal Heights, University Heights, Golden Hill. You'll definitely run into someone you know and it's like you're in a little town instead of this big ol' San Diego. I really like that about our city."

"Do you see any art trends in San Diego County?

• We've got these giant universities in San Diego. I think that's probably the biggest influence on our art scene here. UCSD is turning out these highly experimental conceptual artists. Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) also has this amazing art program and they're turning out some really interesting conceptual work. San Diego State University and Woodbury University, an architectural university, both are creating furniture designers. They make these pieces that I would categorize as art rather than design. So, in terms of trends we're seeing more experimental conceptual and then really high quality furniture art. We have a lot of active artists and it's hard to be a working and living artist but when you're in school you kind of have that time to dedicate to just doing your work.

• Tijuana, Mexico is right there so, I would say, you definitely see the Mexican influence on art in San Diego."
kinseemorlan  sandiego  art  tijuana  museums  galleries  vozalta  mcasd  sdsu  ucsd  quintgallery  thumbprintgallery  meyerfineart  jdcfineart  architecture  design  pointlomanazareneuniversity  periscopeproject  space4art 
march 2013 by robertogreco
ICE Gallery
"ICE Gallery is an artist run experimental exhibition space located in the North Park area [no more] of San Diego, California.

ICE Gallery was formerly the residence of a dry ice manufacturer, and then for many years later an affordable bare bones studio/gallery space for many local artists. It is in the spirit of the buildings former residents that we carry on the “ICE Gallery” title. However, ICE is not a traditional for profit gallery. It exists for the sole purpose of being a solo exhibition space for the 4 artists involved; Thomas DeMello, Lee Lavy, Michael James Armstrong, and Joseph Huppert.

The ICE space provides a unique experience for us to experiment with and refine our respective artistic aspirations with complete freedom. No rigid exhibition schedules, no pressure to create saleable objects, no set hours, no wine, no cheese, etc. Our only consistent hindrance is finding a way to fund each exhibition out of pocket, but we all chip in monetarily and physically to help each others exhibitions become a reality. Having the full support of everyone involved allows for each of us to create projects that would otherwise, as an individual artist, be nearly unattainable."
galleries  art  sandiego  thomasdemello  leelavy  michaeljamesarmstrong  josephhuppert  northpark  loganheights 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Beginners – New Greenpoint Gallery | Greenpointers
"The members leased the space for a year when the storefront on Meserole became vacant, and are ready to see where it takes them. The first exhibition was a group show aptly titled “The Beginning”—each of the seven curators picked several artists (29 total) that they wanted to show. With no unifying theme or concept and a widespread array of mediums, including but not limited to painting, drawings, “marks on paper and cloth,” and 3D installations, the show was a chance to brainstorm onto the empty walls and invite the public in to make of it what they would."

“A big part of the process is figuring out what an art gallery can be –the excitement of showing art and what that means,” said Lee Coates IV “I want to figure it out by doing it.”
2012  emergingartists  art  nyc  andyjenkins  greenpoint  beginners  brooklyn  galleries 
november 2012 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] aren't callback numbers just links? [Too much to quote. GOOD: See these. BETTER: see also those in the Tumblr link. BEST: read it all.]
"I did a paper about Galleries, in 2010, talking about the larger trend of people not only discovering but starting to flex what I called a curatorial muscle.

I talked about how there was a still nascent but very confusing smushing up of the roles and distinctions happening between traditional critics, experts (or curators) and docents. This felt like a similar blurring that had been going on for a while between art and craft and design."

"The economics around production and distribution that have, until now, buttressed the distinctions between art and craft and design have all but bottomed out today…

As a result one measure of confidence in our ability to judge things has gotten completely messed up and we are still trying to find new bearings.

"the distinction between museums and archives (and by extension libraries) is collapsing in most people's minds. Assuming it ever existed, in the first place."

[Tumbled here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/35249075133/ ]
galleries  flickr  change  digital  design  craft  art  curating  curation  access  distribution  production  texture  service  open  trust  smithsonian  cooper-hewitt  otaku  collections  libraries  archives  museums  2012  aaronstraupcope 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery
"Located in downtown Montréal on the campus of Concordia University, one of Québec’s most culturally diverse universities, the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery focuses on the presentation and critical investigation of Canadian and international art with an emphasis placed on contemporary art. The Gallery has a permanent collection of over 1700 works of Québécois and Canadian art.

Founded in 1966, the Sir George Williams Art Galleries was renamed Concordia Art Gallery in 1984. In 1992, the Gallery was relocated in the newly constructed library complex and inaugurated as the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery in honour of important benefactors to the University.

The Gallery is part of the Office of the Vice-President, Research and Graduate Studies of Concordia University. It is supported by Advisory Council composed of members of the external community and of the university and by expert advisors in programming. Its operating budget is provided by the University but its programming…"
concordia  Quebec  galleries  art  canada  montreal 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Micro Museum
"Micro Museum small venue BIG ART in Downtown Brooklyn is dedicated to interactive, media, visual and performing arts.  A 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, a Registered Trademark with the US Patent and Trademark Office, a Registered Charity for the State of NY.
Micro Museum, was founded in 1986 as the original inter-disciplinary art center for Kathleen & William Laziza and their collaborators. Micro Museum has the longest running kinetic sculpture in the Tri-State Area. A Solar Powered artwork called AC/DC Window can be seen running daily in the second floor window as it has since 1994."
museums  glvo  williamlaziza  kathleenlaziza  micromuseum  galleries  nyc  art  brooklyn 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Beginnings
"Beginnings is a small storefront gallery for art in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, with seven different curators presenting a program of contemporary work in a welcoming environment.

We are independent in politics and philosophy, not aesthetics or business. We are dedicated to exploring all the right ways that art can serve and support its audience and its creators—with thoughtful curation, best design practices and financial transparency."
transparency  glvo  art  via:maxfenton  beginnings  galleries  greenpoint  brooklyn  nyc 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Meta is Murder. Writing and lesser things by Mills Baker. Gombrowicz on Art and Artificiality.
“This is not the first time that the face of art has irritated me by extinguishing the faces of the living.”

“I demand of art not only that it be good art, but also that it be well rooted in life.”

"He says: I admire. I say: You are trying to admire. A slight difference, yet on this slight difference is built a mountain of devout lies. It is in this deceitful school that style is formed. Not just artistic style, but the style of thinking and feeling of the elite which comes here in order to perfect its sensitivity and achieve a sureness of form."

[More from Mills Baker on Gombrowicz:

http://nomore.metaismurder.com/post/28636852893/witold-rita-and-their-dog-listen-everyone-im

http://nomore.metaismurder.com/post/28637151593/should-be-more-widely-read-than-pretty-much-all

http://metaismurder.com/tagged/Witold-Gombrowicz ]
artificiality  stupidity  thinking  spectatorship  appreciation  glvo  millsbaker  witoldgombrowicz  galleries  museums  elitism  leisurearts  art  artleisure 
august 2012 by robertogreco
[SHANGHAI] Plum Gallery | Sugared & Spiced
"Opened by a Taiwanese music video director, Plum is a small gallery inside Jing’an Villa (靜安別墅) dedicated to exhibiting offbeat and unique art. Also serves coffee, tea, plum soda, and wine. A cute place worth visiting!

The exhibition theme changes every 1 or 2 months. Currently, Plum is having an exhibition titled “Post-Ready-Made”, which showcases works from Japanese and Taiwanese contemporary furniture designers Noriko Daishima, Mercy Yeh and Nicole Teng.

Plum serves coffee, tea, plum soda, and wine. If you do choose to have a drink here, you can sit on any of the chairs/sofas/stools displayed in the gallery, all of which you can purchase and take home.

A small corner with various items for sale – cards, book covers, notebooks, art books, etc.

Plum is worth a visit if you are in the Nanjing West Road area, and while you are here, also drop by other quirky spots in Jing’an Villa like Hypo and GZ cafe."
lepetitxiaoxiao  shanghai  lcproject  srg  galleries  nicoleteng  mercyyeh  norikodaishima  cafes  plumgallery  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
showroom 展示室
“showroom 展示室” is a small creative space in Shanghai, run and owned by two creative design projects BRUT CAKE and xiaoxiao, to presents their design works and share creative ideas."
shanghaishowroom  cafes  galleries  design  art  lepetitxiaoxiao  brutcake  shanghai  showroom  norikodaishima  nicoleteng  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Featuring: Dan Augustine | Library as Incubator Project
That is all to say – if I had my druthers libraries would be some amalgamation of gallery and museum and library. Where one could learn and read, but also witness and interact. And I don’t mean gallery as in the massive oil paintings of the stodgy benefactors and philanthropists that funded the facility hung over the reference section. I want to see Hemingway’s self-decimated pages, or Shel Silverstein’s little scribbles, or Tolkien’s manuscripts (incidentally, a good chunk of Tolkien’s work is housed in some secret, underground vault far, far away from the eyes of the general public at Marquette University). All of these things, framed and on display – enhancing the experience of the library.
I take it as valuable on it’s face. An obvious turn-of-phrase. The collective knowledge of the known universe is housed in libraries all over the globe. It only stands to reason that libraries ARE truly incubators. Every idea ever committed to print can be found within the pages of a book in a library somewhere. How incredible to be able to pour through those pages, to gather up and store and ruminate on those conversations and discourses. Oh, and I could be mistaken, but libraries are free, are they not? Free knowledge? The most precious, valuable thing on the planet for free — and not taken advantage of. Astonishing…
Sue also gave me what remains to be one of my favorite children’s books, Kit Williams’ Masquerade. It changed everything for me. Williams gilded an elaborate golden hare, and ornamented the piece with precious jewels and metals. He then buried the treasure in a secret location in England and created a treasure map in the form of a children’s book. On it’s face, the elaborate illustrations told the story of the moon falling in love with the sun, so much so that she offered him a golden gift and entrusted it to a hare to be delivered. But, the hare lost the gift, and now it was up to the reader to find it. Clues in rhymes and visuals were hidden throughout the story and should one properly decipher Williams’ words, they lead right to his gilded golden hare.
storytelling  library  via:tealtan  libraries  incubators  galleries  museums  learning  lcproject  interaction  interactive  danaugustine 
july 2012 by robertogreco
SFMOMA | OPEN SPACE » A Meditation on Space (in Four Parts)
"…architecture school didn’t teach me…much about behavior, and how that behavior can activate and transform the spaces we design. Natalia Ilyin makes the following comment in her wonderful meditation on Modernism, Chasing the Perfect:

"As designers, we have been taught to love the object, love the completedness of the finished masterpiece. But because we have paid so much attention to the outsides of things, we have forgotten the insides.""

"We worked hard and did some decent studio work, but what really mattered is that we knew when to blow it all off. To fuck around and experience life, because life is where all the good ideas come from anyway."
We create devices that distract people from thinking, from working through the fear that accompanies real thinking, from coming out the other side. We help to make people believe they can’t live without movement, communication, distraction. We teach them the exact opposite of truth.
—Natalia Ilyin, Chasing the Perfect

Currently, digital technology is too often the tail that wags the design (and often art) dog, and I worry that it’s distracting us from, rather than connecting us to, what is meaningful. Ilyin is talking about design more generally, but her words are absolutely applicable to today’s digitally saturated context. Not everything needs to be mediated by technology or be “social” (in the contemporary sense of the word). Instead of the iPad, why can’t the new paradigm for a magazine be a live show that is specifically intended not to be documented (like the popular Pop Up Magazine events)? Instead of a Kindle, why can’t the new paradigm for reading a book be a live performance by actors on a stage (as in the play, Gatz!)? Instead of Facebook, why not create a restaurant to connect, engage, and educate a struggling rural community (as the Pie Lab project in Greensboro, Alabama did)?

"Instead of listening to a museum audio tour, why not discover art unencumbered by commentary? Instead of viewing art online, why not live with it in your own house? Or within the—gasp—four white walls of a gallery? Sounds downright radical, no? If it seems as if I am reneging on my earlier anti-white wall gallery stance, I am. New technology has dramatically changed the context of the white cube, and as designers we need to be aware of the increasingly distraction-filled environments people are coming from when they enter the art spaces we help articulate."
I have nothing to say and I am saying it and that is poetry. We need not fear these silences. We may love them.
—John Cage, Silence, 1961
digital  johncage  pielab  marinaabramoviç  tinosehgal  markhansen  benrubin  johnbaldessari  experience  communication  socialmedia  2012  sfmoma  participatory  paticipation  jochengerz  esthergerz  shimonattie  tiborkalman  rigo23  society  jasonbrenner  jaquestati  morphosis  johndewey  nataliailyin  galleries  museums  graphicdesign  design  art  glvo  life  architecture  ericheiman  ncm  participatoryart 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) | An international research centre and museum devoted to architecture
"The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) is an international research centre and museum founded by Phyllis Lambert in 1979 on the conviction that architecture is a public concern.

Based on its extensive Collection, exhibitions, programs, and research opportunities, the CCA is a leading voice in advancing knowledge, promoting public understanding, and widening thought and debate on architecture, its history, theory, practice, and role in society today."
exhibitions  collections  montreal  galleries  research  museums  canada  design  architecture  cca 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Gowanus Ballroom – An Alternative Art Space in Brooklyn New York
"The Gowanus Ballroom is an alternative exhibition space located along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, NY.

Once operated as a steel mill in the 1800′s, this 12,000-square-foot space sits beneath 50-foot cathedral ceilings with a 4,000-square-foot mezzanine overlooking the lower gallery. In 2010, Josh Young of Serett Metal retooled the space and founded Gowanus Ballroom.

The space now serves both as a metal fabrication shop that frequently opens its doors to artists and assists or teaches them to build, and as a creative exhibition space that showcases the talents of emerging artists and designers in the Brooklyn area."
performances  music  lcproject  openstudios  education  design  fabrication  metal  metalfabrication  venues  galleries  studios  glvo  architecture  engineering  gowanuscanal  gowanus  studiospace  nyc  art  brooklyn  via:maxfenton 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Mildred's Lane
"…a rustic, 96-acre site deep in the woods of rural northeastern Pennsylvania, in the upper Delaware River Valley, which borders New York state. It is an ongoing collaboration between J. Morgan Puett, Mark Dion, their son Grey Rabbit Puett, and their friends and colleagues. It is a home and an experiment in living. Mildred’s Lane attempts to coevolve a rigorous pedagogical strategy, where a working-living-researching environment has been developed to foster engagement with every aspect of life.

The entire site has become a living museum, or rather – a new contemporary art complex(ity). It is now important to sidestep the debates around what is art ( or design, architecture and fashion) in order to activate these turbulent multiplicities. It is more a question of praxis and action, is it in an institution? Storefront? A gallery? Deep in the woods? At Home?

The Mildred’s Lane site is a home where the Artist/Practitioner, the Student and the Institution have collapsed…"
deschooling  unschooling  storefronts  galleries  life  worklive  pedagogy  mildred'slane  greyrabbitpuett  markdion  jmorganpuett  glvo  pennsylvania  via:salrandolph  lcproject  leisurearts  art  creativity  livework  howwework  workstyles  education  alternative  alternativeeducation  altgdp  artleisure 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Soapbox Gallery
"Soapbox Gallery is dedicated to providing a forum for visual artists to engage in the issues of our time and express themselves publicly without censorship. In the tradition of the humble yet mighty soapbox that encouraged free speech and played a role in the development of our social contract, provocative work can stir public debate, raise consciousness, and even spur social evolution. Too many of us despair at the lack of content in work celebrated by the ART world. Soapbox Gallery challenges artists to speak out and be relevant."
via:salrandolph  nyc  galleries  art  brooklyn 
june 2012 by robertogreco
threewalls
"threewalls is a 501(c)3 organization dedicated to increasing Chicago’s cultural capital by cultivating contemporary art practice and discourse. Through a range of exhibition and public programs, including symposiums, lectures, performances and publications, threewalls creates a locus of exchange between local, national and international contemporary art communities."
art  events  exhibitions  galleries  residencies  chicago  threewalls 
may 2012 by robertogreco
DOUBLE BREAK
"Double Break is a gallery and shop located right next to San Diego’s Balboa Park. We feature monthly art exhibitions, books, design objects, gifts, clothing, jewelry, cards, and more!"
glvo  gifts  shopping  california  galleries  art  sandiego 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Headlands Center for the Arts
"Headlands Center for the Arts is a multidisciplinary, international arts center dedicated to supporting artists; the creative process; and the development of new, innovative ideas and artwork.

Where we are is as important as what we do. Our campus comprises a cluster of artist-rehabilitated military buildings, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge at historic Fort Barry in the Marin Headlands, a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

Headlands artists programs support artists of all disciplines—from visual artists to performers, musicians, writers, and videographers—and provide opportunities for independent and collaborative creative work. Our impact is evident in the lives and careers of the artists who have participated in our programs and the experiences of our visitors."
via:javierarbona  headlandsartcenter  headland  fortbarry  museums  galleries  residencies  community  art  marin  sanfrancisco  bayarea  glvo  marincounty 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Newspace Center for Photography
"Newspace Center for Photography is an educational and cultural nonprofit that is dedicated to promoting photographic education and appreciation to the public as well as providing a space and building a community where photo enthusiasts can learn, create, discuss and show their work."
via:charlieloyd  oregon  galleries  education  art  portland  photography 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Jen Bekman: Observer Media: Design Observer
"Jen Bekman is a New York City gallerist, entrepreneur and writer. After building a successful internet career with companies including New York Online, Netscape, Disney and Meetup, Jen turned her internet experience and fresh perspective on to the art world. She is the founder of Jen Bekman Projects which encompasses three ventures: her eponymous gallery in NYC, Hey, Hot Shot!, a photography competition, and the pioneering e-commerce fine art print site, 20x200. 20x200's launch was entirely bootstrapped, and it quickly grew into a profitable, million dollar business. Jen was named one of Forbes.com’s Top Ten Female Entrepreneurs to Watch, as well as Fast Company’s Most Influential Women in Technology."
dotcomboom  learning  education  affordability  nyc  galleries  community  accessibility  entrepreneurship  adhd  add  dropouts  glvo  art  design  email  web  online  jenbekman  via:litherland 
march 2012 by robertogreco
wagmag : Brooklyn Monthly Art Guide : wagmag
Big listing of Brooklyn art galleries (including hours, phone numbers, and what's on)
nyc  brooklyn  art  galleries  directories  via:jbushnell 
january 2012 by robertogreco
HELMUTH PROJECTS | saying the least and saying it loud.
"Helmuth is an underground project space. A residency program focused on promoting difficult work. We’re here to collaborate with artists and curators experimenting with ideas that might not be easily presented in a commercial setting. It’s a clean well-lighted space for whatever.

Open as advertised for workshops and exhibitions."
laurenpopp  friends  galleries  art  sandiego 
december 2011 by robertogreco
the pop-hop: books & curio
"In early 2012, we will launch Pop-Hop Books & Curio, a creative retail space merging a bookshop and print studio in the Highland Park neighborhood of northeast Los Angeles. As a bookshop, we will specialize in art editions, literature, children's books, zines, and books as unique art objects. As a studio, we will offer workshops such as screen printing and book binding, as well as a forum for talks, readings, screenings and other creative programs and performances. It will be an environment that is inviting and approachable, dynamic and stimulating, a place that fosters inspiration and action in equal measure."

[See also: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/361643327/pop-hop-books-and-curio ]
glvo  srg  lcproject  galleries  bookstores  booksellers  highlandpark  print  printing  books  losangeles 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Proteus Gowanus: An Interdisciplinary Gallery and Reading Room
"…interdisciplinary gallery & reading room…Exhibits of art, artifacts & books organized around a yearlong theme are exhibited in The Proteus Room, our central gallery space.

In adjacent spaces, eight additional projects-in-residence have grown out of our thematic exhibitions & partnerships. These projects share with Proteus a love of books, a wide-ranging intellectual curiosity, & a desire to engage the community in their multifarious investigations.

Like Proteus, the Greek sea god who could change form, PG is an ever-changing organism…located at the edge of the Gowanus Canal, a similarly evolving post-industrial waterfront area with a thriving artistic community & history dating to the Revolutionary War & before…

…seeks to create an alternative, culturally rich environment designed to stimulate the creative process; a place where the boundaries between the artist & non-artist fade, where images & ideas from disparate disciplines are juxtaposed to create new meanings…"
brooklyn  nyc  art  venues  lcproject  glvo  interdisciplinary  culture  exhibitions  proteusgowanus  galleries  crossdisciplinary  residencies  projectideas 
november 2011 by robertogreco
The Gopher Hole | Popular Culture Across Borders
"A collaboration between aberrant architecture and Beatrice Galilee, our agenda is to explore new ways of curating ideas in popular culture and to provide a forum for critical debate on the arts and society"
lcproject  thegopherhole  aberrantarchitecture  design  education  galleries  glvo  curating  art  london  uk  beatricegalilee  popculture  discourse  debate  society  arts  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary 
october 2011 by robertogreco
17 Dexter Sinister: From the Toolbox of a Serving Library — Program Information — The Banff Centre
"In 2006 Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt & Stuart Bailey) established a workshop & bookstore of same name in NY, & have since explored aspects of contemporary publishing in diverse contexts. As well as designing, editing, producing & distributing both printed & digital media, they have also worked w/ ambiguous roles & formats, usually in live contexts of galleries & museums. These projects generally play to some form of site-specificity, where a publication or series of events are worked out in public over a set period of time.

Dexter Sinister intend to slowly dissolve all such activities into one single institution, The Serving Library. This overarching project is founded on a consideration of how the role of the library has changed over time—from fixed archive, through circulating collection, to point of distribution. As much about The Library as social furniture as it is a specific model, the project ultimately returns to its point of departure: as a place for learning…"
dextersinister  davidreinfurt  stuartbailey  libraries  residency  bookstores  booksellers  nyc  publishing  art  galleries  museums  situatedart  situated  theservinglibrary  distribution  collections  circulation  archives  change  evolution  lcproject  learning  performance  exhibitions 
july 2011 by robertogreco
not an alternative
"Not An Alternative is a hybrid arts collective and non-profit organization with a mission to affect popular understandings of events, symbols, and history. We curate and produce work that questions and leverages the tools of advertising, architecture, exhibit design, branding, and public relations. Programs are hosted at a variety of venues, including our Brooklyn-based gallery No-Space (formerly known as The Change You Want to See Gallery).

No-Space is host to free lectures, screenings, panel discussions, workshops and artist presentations. The space also consists of a production workshop, filming studio and video editing suite. During the day it is a collaborative office space (aka coworking) for freelancers and cultural producers."
activism  nyc  research  urbanism  art  architecture  brooklyn  galleries  no-space  notanalternative  coworking  studios  hackerspaces 
april 2011 by robertogreco
JUNE FITZPATRICK GALLERY, Portland, Maine
"exhibiting contemporary drawings, paintings, prints, and sculpture by established artists and selected newcomers"
maine  art  galleries  glvo  junefitzpatrick 
february 2011 by robertogreco
SPACE Gallery
"SPACE GALLERY IS A NONPROFIT CONTEMPORARY ART SPACE IN PORTLAND, MAINE featuring visual arts, live music and performance, film, artists features and more."
maine  portland  art  music  galleries  glvo 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Art Produce Gallery - North Park [See also: http://www.lynnsusholtz.com/]
"…a unique artist run storefront exhibition space and public art experience in North Park, a diverse and historic urban community of San Diego. The gallery is entirely visible from the sidewalk and was designed to accommodate sculptural installations, cross-disciplinary works, digital media, and performance events. The space allows for unconventional presentation opportunities for artists and unexpected art encounters for viewers. Intended to enliven the experience of the pedestrian it is an experiment in public art that is accessible to everyone in the community - an attempt to render visibility and transparency into the art process itself.

Originally built as a market, the ART Produce building now houses the storefront gallery, artist’s studios, a community room, Caffe Carpe Diem, the San Diego Shambhala Meditation Group, & Stone Paper Scissors studio. The community room is utilized for public meetings, classes & workshops, film screenings & performance events."
sandiego  art  galleries  northpark  lynnsusholtz  glvo 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Institute of Contemporary Arts : Gazetteer : Artist-run spaces (London)
"A selection of spaces currently operating in London, with descriptions written by the people who run them."
art  london  artist-run  artists  glvo  uk  spaces  galleries  studios  agitpropproject  the2837university 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Sushi Performance & Visual Art
"Sushi Performance and Visual Art, founded in 1980, is a San Diego-based nonprofit multi-disciplinary presenting organization, which cultivates alternative voices in the contemporary arts. Sushi is committed to providing its artists and audiences with a laboratory where creative exploration, community engagement, and new ideas flourish."
sandiego  art  music  performance  galleries  community  residencies  glvo 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Frieze Magazine | Archive | Mexico City Report
"From new museums to project spaces and pop-up music events, nothing stands still in one of the largest cities in the Americas "

"Mexico City doesn’t feel alive so much as impossibly animated, scary in a way that you want to interact with rather than shy away from. D.F. is as much its bricks and mortar infrastructure and fantastically variegated architecture as the myriad ways people have of negotiating it. A hole-in-the-wall becomes a bar becomes an experimental music store, for a few hours once a month, or a penthouse gets repurposed as an ephemeral gallery."
mexico  mexicodf  art  glvo  museums  galleries  events  df  alias  damiánortega  soma  contemporary  music  popup  pop-ups  mexicocity 
december 2010 by robertogreco
DropMocks
"DropMocks is the easiest way to create and share beautiful image galleries online"
html5  hosting  free  images  galleries  photography  dropmocks  via:robinsloan 
december 2010 by robertogreco
San Diego Art News « Last Blog On Earth
"Hey art addicts—get ready to start making longer drives down south. If you want to keep up with the most interesting art shows in town, you’re going to have to add the Southwestern College Art Gallery to your list of go-to venues.

Longtime artist Perry Vasquez has stepped in as co-director of the gallery alongside John Lewis. Vasquez just sent CityBeat a list of upcoming exhibitions, and there are definitely some shows you won’t want to miss. What else would you expect from an artist like Vasquez, a guy whose poster images have proliferated around the globe (see “Keep on Crossin” pictured right) and whose performance art is always somewhat shocking?"
art  sandiego  togo  todo  galleries  southwesterncollege 
september 2010 by robertogreco
alien california - a gallery on Flickr
"i have some vague ideas about how a lot of science fiction tv shows are based in southern california, so location shooting for "alien" planets often features california landscapes.<br />
<br />
maybe eventually i'll elaborate on this."
classideas  california  brittagustafson  photography  fiction  space  sciencefiction  scifi  galleries  landscape  socal  tv  television  tcsnmy 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Community / SPACE
"Community / SPACE was founded by local entrepreneurs Chris Clements and Dustin Liedl in early 2010. Located in the East Village neighborhood of downtown San Diego, Community / SPACE is a small industrial building where Chris Clements The Machine Shop Gallery Founder and Dustin Liedl Pure Concrete Studio Owner have established a workshop and Urban Art Gallery. With hopes to give the San Diego art scene and local artist a platform to show off talent and new work. Community / SPACE features The Machine Shop an event style gallery and the workshop for Pure Concrete Studio a prefabricated concrete company. With a combined total of over 1500 square feet Community / SPACE is a Diamond in the rough and an up and coming creative adventure."
sandiego  events  galleries  art  themachineshop 
august 2010 by robertogreco
David Byrne's Journal: 05.29.10: Arts ’n’ Crafts
"artists who work in certain materials have, for decades, usually had trouble being taken seriously as fine artists. Glassblowers, ceramicists, textile workers, furniture makers &, until a few decades ago, photographers were all not usually welcome in fine art galleries or the museums that show fine art… unless it was a show dedicated to only ceramics, for example.

There were exceptions, but until quite recently those were rare. If we ignore Duchamp, whose work implied that anything could be art if he said it was, the restrictions have held firm, though photography broke the barrier first in a big way.

...

Part of this snobbish attitude goes back to the Renaissance. In order for painters to separate themselves from the various craft guilds, & establish their own worth, they had to form the idea that expression, concept and idea were worth at least (and maybe more, in their opinion) as much as skilled craftsmanship..."
crafts  davidbyrne  photography  art  glvo  ceramics  textiles  cv  snobbery  artworld  glass  furniture  renaissance  history  guilds  galleries  apprenticeships 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Archives & Museum Informatics: Museums and the Web 2010: Papers: Cope, A.S., Buckets and Vessels
"With the mass of digital "stuff" growing around us every day and simple tools for self-organization evolving beyond individuals into communities of suggestions, is the curatorial prerogative itself becoming a social object?

This paper examines the act of association, the art of framing and the participatory nature of robots in creating artifacts and story-telling in projects like Flickr Galleries, the API-based Suggestify project (which provides the ability to suggest locations for other people's photos) and the increasing number of bespoke (and often paper-based) curatorial productions."
curation  archives  archive  art  flickr  galleries  geotagging  commons  stamen  museums  21stcenturyskills  21stcentury  communities  community  paper  social  data  aaronstraupcope 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Real Estate Bust: How Creatives Are Carving Up L.A.'s Empty Space - Core77
"I bring this up now because probably every designer, architect or artist I've ever spoken with has expressed the desire to open and operate a space: a gallery, a store, a classroom. And I would say this is the time. There's a reason this is the age of the pop-up shop: space is available, and it's yours for the taking. ... Here in Los Angeles, groups like Phantom Galleries (modeled after another group in San Jose) work with artists and temporarily empty businesses to create installations. The entire city of Glendale, an L.A.-adjacent enclave, is launching its own program to fill its (many) empty superstores. Recently the art show Manifest Equality placed the work of 200 artists in a former Big Lots supermarket in the heart of Hollywood. Groups like these are working in every city, looking for designers, architects and artists to activate their vacant spaces."
art  artists  losangeles  realestate  urban  gentrification  entrepreneurship  core77  phantomgalleries  machineproject  lcproject  glvo  temporary  galleries  exhibits  oogabooga  stores  popup  pop-ups 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Park Life
"We are an independent retail store and seperate art gallery based in San Francisco. Our goal is simple; to showcase art and design that we find relevant.
art  culture  design  shopping  sanfrancisco  galleries 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Device Gallery
"The Device Gallery exhibits work that embraces the spirit of invention and ingenuity. Drawn to the juxtaposition between the classical and the unusual, the gallery features work bound by artistry and skill, rather than genre or medium. Established by Gregory and Amy Brotherton, in San Diego, California, whose combined 35 years of experience in fine and commercial art brings a unique perspective to The Device Gallery. A self-taught fine artist, Greg has spent the past 20 years honing his skills as a sculptor while forging a successful and award winning career as a commercial artist in the film industry. Amy’s extensive experience in event planning, fundraising and public relations has provided her the opportunity to work with some of the most celebrated and distinguished artists, writers and filmmakers of our time"
sandiego  galleries  graphicdesign  steampunk  fantasy  futurism  graphics  sculpture  art  lowbrow  illustrator  glvo  barriologan 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Subtext Loves Design
"Subtext is a gallery & bookstore located on the outskirts of dowtown San Diego that showcases urban contemporary, pop surrealist, and lowbrow artists from all around the globe. We also feature select design-based goods with a focus on illustration, art, graphic design, architecture, and photography. From hard-to-find books, to limited edition toys and art, Subtext continues to inspire and inform San Diego’s creative community."
sandiego  galleries  glvo  art  design 
december 2009 by robertogreco
performa hub
"presented by performa, performa hub is a special project located in the new cooper union building in new york’s bowery district. the performa hub was set up to serve as performa’s headquarters during their biennale and was specially designed by berlin-based nOffice. the project will serve duty as the press office, meeting room and a venue for special events. the design consists of an odd shaped room that serves multi-functions simultaneously. the walls have been clad in plywood panels, many of which have windows or alcoves hidden behind them for use during special activities. there is also an amphitheatre made of stepped wooden levels. the performa biennale runs until november 22."
lcproject  schooldesign  tcsnmy  performa  performahub  architecture  design  wood  plywood  nOffice  multipurpose  thirdplaces  glvo  performance  meetingplace  galleries  amphitheater  thirdspaces 
november 2009 by robertogreco
blade runner in san francisco - a gallery on Flickr
"Blade Runner, set in Los Angeles, was inspired by Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, set in San Francisco.

Blade Runner famously overlays its future LA on recognizable landmarks: the elaborate Bradbury Building, the shiny 2nd Street Tunnel, the neo-Mayan Ennis-Brown House, Union Station, etc.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is less celebrated, but it's also fairly specific about its geography, mentioning Lombard, Mission Street, Geary, Sutter, the War Memorial Opera House, etc.

I recently re-read it and tried to imagine its San Francisco laid out over the one I know. This is a mix of imaginary locations for the book and movie. See also: The Philip K. Dick Walking Tour of San Francisco by John Gorenfeld."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/4155 ]
architecture  flickr  bladerunner  photography  scifi  photos  film  brittagustafson  losangeles  remix  remixing  locationscouting  space  sanfrancisco  galleries  narrative  fiction  geography  sciencefiction  remixculture 
november 2009 by robertogreco
LA><ART
"LA><ART is Los Anegeles’ leading independent non-profit contemporary art space, producing experimental exhibitions, publications and public art initiatives with emerging and mid-career local, national and international artists.

Founded in 2005 to support the production of new work by contemporary artists, architects and designers, LA><ART occupies a critical space in the cultural landscape of LA between the larger institutional and commercial sectors.

Support of LA><ART means supporting artists in a direct, intimate and influential way, promoting both risk and dialogue.

Join LA><ART for intimate access to a new generation of artists, curators and thinkers who are shaping the future landscape of contemporary art."
losangeles  art  design  glvo  galleries  exhibitions  museums  artists  contemporary  artcenter  alternative  gallery 
september 2009 by robertogreco
TELIC ARTS EXCHANGE
"Telic Arts Exchange provides a place for multiple publics to engage with contemporary forms of media, art and architecture. For five years TAE has been a platform for exhibitions, performances, screenings, lectures and discussions.

TAE’s program emphasizes social exchange, interactivity and public participation to produce a critical engagement with new media and culture.

Telic Arts Exchange is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization."
losangeles  art  space  lcproject  artists  galleries  design  interaction  generative  chinatown  exhibitions  media  video  culture  conceptual  telic 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Flopdoodle Store: Bispop Gallery
"The official retail location for all TB stuff is located in beautiful Old Town Pasadena, CA. The shop is located inside of the Johnson Motors Store. Bispop Gallery features everything from original artwork to store exclusive items (that means you can't get them anywhere else)."

[See also: http://www.timbiskup.com/photos/Bispop/Bispop.html ]
toys  galleries  pasadena  glvo  losangeles  art  graphics 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Small is beautiful in this age of austerity - News, Art - The Independent
"But now a leading director is urging galleries to rethink the way in which major shows are staged by offering up a single work of art rather than the usual rooms crammed full of gilt-framed Monets, Turners and Caravaggios.
art  small  simplicity  austerity  galleries  museums  exhibitions  via:regine  recession 
january 2009 by robertogreco
ForYourArt™ | HOME
"ForYourArt is an interdisciplinary producer and meta-curator, creating fresh initiatives through its hybrid model of projects, publishing and media platforms.

ForYourArt cultivates patronage and cultural engagement.

ForYourArt media provides tightly edited information from the perspective of cultural insiders. Projects produced by ForYourArt focus on promoting cultural philanthropy as we further develop tools for navigating the cultural landscape. We keep readers current with emerging trends, must-see exhibitions and vital resources in Los Angeles and beyond. "
losangeles  travel  art  culture  design  directory  events  galleries  museums  maps  blogs  architecture  calendar 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Adapta Project
"founded in 2007 as experimental curatorial collective which aims to offer alternate perspective for showing & viewing artistic expression outside of conventional venues. This collaborative initiative of curating and creating art in response to differing
art  glvo  sandiego  space  curation  collaboration  collaborative  events  museums  galleries  todo  architecture  tijuana  mexico 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Lui Velazquez
"Lui Velazques es un espacio que es ha caracterizado por generar diálogos entre diferentes disciplinas, prácticas, artistas, productores, curadores, y públicos sobre temas contemporáneos desde una perspectiva critica."
art  borders  tijuana  sandiego  mexico  politics  galleries  gallery  glvo  shannonspanhake 
may 2008 by robertogreco
San Diego Art Institute
"Our mission, to maintain a center for emerging artists and the visual arts in San Diego, is expressed through some of the programs on the following pages. Click the arrow below to read about some of our other programs."
sandiego  art  museums  galleries  artists  glvo  children  classes  events  balboapark 
may 2008 by robertogreco
SDSU University Gallery
"organizes and presents exhibitions of contemporary art by regional, national and international artists, providing a forum for artwork of a culturally-diverse and issue-charged nature."
art  galleries  sandiego  sdsu  glvo 
may 2008 by robertogreco
arthouse
"mission is to promote growth and appreciation of contemporary art & artists in Texas. Through its exhibitions & programs in Austin and statewide, Arthouse helps nurture artists' careers and deepen public understanding of contemporary art."
art  austin  galleries  glvo  texas 
march 2008 by robertogreco
MOSHi MOSHi Gallery & Store
"Japanese boutique/gallery currently located at 916 W. Burnside St in Portland, Oregon. In addition to exhibiting fabulous art from around the world, we also carry t-shirts, handbags, vintage & modern toys, kaiju, art, letter sets, stickers, stationary an
portland  oregon  galleries  art  illustration  toys  glvo 
march 2008 by robertogreco
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