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robertogreco : gameplay   5

Why we need to kill gameplay to make better games - The Astronauts
"What do all these moments have in common?

They are game-free. They are gameplay-less.

That’s right. You heard me.

If we understand gameplay as something that a challenge is a crucial part of, then none of these moments features any gameplay. You just walk, or swim, or ride a horse, but that’s it. You cannot die. You don’t make choices that have any long term consequences. No skill is involved.

There is no gameplay.

In other words, certain things worth remembering from certain video games are not what these video games are all about.

That’s fucked up.

But also great.

Because it means we still don’t understand video games. And if love them so much already, imagine what will happen when one day we will actually understand them."
play  gameplay  design  emotions  adrianchmielarz  2012  srg  edg  gamedesign  videogames  gaming  games 
november 2012 by robertogreco
No Accidents, Comrade – The New Inquiry
"But where fiction generally resists reader alteration, board games take it for granted and depend on it. A fictional narrative remains the same despite how it’s interpreted by readers. The underlying expectation in gameplay, however, is that the player actively constructs a narrative and perhaps even modifies the game’s rules. Meaning for players comes only through the active process of experiencing play. Operating Twilight Struggle’s narrative platform provides a ludic truth — truth through play that gives experiential knowledge using popular, though misleading, historical explanations for the period. It purports to compress the Cold War experience while maintaining some semblance of fidelity to the mentalité of the period, but the chance experienced through gameplay is wed to narrative exposition that clearly embraces a U.S.-centric worldview. Chance narratives help players validate experiential knowledge they acquire during play, but their execution actually inverts the meaning…"
influence  ussr  alternativeplay  bias  toplay  containment  rationalirrationality  distortion  nostalgia  meaning  interpretation  assemblage  narrativeassemblage  narrative  individualism  perception  history  us  opportunity  luck  chance  gameplay  storytelling  fiction  2006  2012  coldwar  boardgames  gaming  games  play  twilightstruggle 
august 2012 by robertogreco
One Time in a Card House with Stephanie Morgan… - Let’s Make Mistakes - Mule Radio Syndicate
"Stephanie Morgan, game producer to the game stars, stops in to chat with Mike and Katie about hot spots, self-flagellation, and not about casino buffets. When they have a few minutes, they discuss "gamification" in it's most meaningful as well as its most useless forms. Stephanie shares her past as a professional card player and some deep analysis of gameplay. This show rocks. As a bonus, Katie doesn't actually throw up in this episode, but Mike tries his hardest to instigate."

“I think twitter is a really interesting example of a very tightly honed game play loop.” [As pointed out here: http://twitter.com/litherland/status/182277474724491264 ]
analytics  facebook  zynga  engagement  badges  incentives  feedback  gamedesign  feedbackloops  katiegillum  mikemonteiro  gameplay  gaming  games  twitter  gamification  stephaniemorgan 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Bohm Teaser on Vimeo
"Bohm is a zen-like and soothing experience about creating a tree.

As a player you explore the level of interaction you have. Discovering the different ways you control and manipulate your tree is all part of the game experience.

Bohm is about slow gameplay. Growing, creating branches, pushing your tree into strange shapes, and discovering how beautiful and relaxing these simple processes can be.

Every tree is generated procedurally while you play. As the tree grows, so does the adaptive music. Both change and evolve over time, under the influence of buttons pressed and decisions made.

Bohm is not about winning, but about letting yourself get carried away in an aesthetic and auditory poetic experience. An interactive homage to the beauty, slowness and peace of nature." [See also: http://bohmthegame.com AND http://monobanda.nl]
bohm  trees  slowgaming  slow  slowgameplay  games  gameplay  play  organic  plants  evolution  nature 
october 2010 by robertogreco
In The Games Of Madness: How Gameplay and Narrative kill Meaning in "Games" [via: http://tale-of-tales.com/blog/2010/01/18/frictional-how-gameplay-and-narrative-kill-meaning/]
"While gameplay at the core of game making, it comes with a lot of baggage & makes certain meanings harder to realize in the medium...most striking issue is the entire failure mechanism that is used in just about any game. You try a certain task, you fail & then have to repeat it. As described in other posts, this can be especially damaging in horror games, where repeating scenes seriously lessens the experience. This mechanism also imposes limits on the player’s rate of progress & effectively tells the player: “Either you complete this or you will not proceed!”. Other baggage include the notion that gameplay must be fun & the need to constantly pose challenges. What I mean with the last point is that players assume that a game will always keep them occupied w/ some kind of obstacle to overcome. This leads to very little interactive content that is added for its intrinsic sake alone. Instead a game’s interactive content almost always have some connection to the goals of the gameplay."
gameplay  gamedesign  games  gaming  narrative  structure  gametheory  thinking  design  storytelling 
january 2010 by robertogreco

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