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robertogreco : german   28

Robert Macfarlane on Twitter: "The contrast-term to "Kulturfolger" is "Kulturmeider", culture-avoiders, those species that cannot survive in humanly made habitats. https://t.co/MXlpmglEEn"
"The contrast-term to "Kulturfolger" is "Kulturmeider", culture-avoiders, those species that cannot survive in humanly made habitats."

[See also: "Word of the day: "Kulturfolger" - a species that adapts well to living among humans & their habitats (lit. 'culture-follower', German)."
https://twitter.com/RobGMacfarlane/status/912557474242334720 ]
words  german  culture  multispecies  entanglement  humans  nature  wildlife  anthropocene 
september 2017 by robertogreco
STET | Speaking in tongues
"A counterpoint (or sometimes complement) to Jakobson’s “referential function” of language is what he calls the “poetic function” of language. They aren’t mutually exclusive, but the poetic function of language is not about communication. It’s about language as a pure material. Perhaps this is why poets are among the most notorious code-switchers. The Cantos of Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” are good examples, frustrating and bewildering undergraduates for decades with their seemingly snobbish hodgepodge of languages alive and dead. But language isn’t always about clarity of expression. It’s about magic. That feeling of recognition you get, when someone says something you might not exactly understand or feel able to paraphrase, and yet it makes perfect sense. (These, by the way, are the kinds of thoughts I have while I’m in a boat on a river zooming towards what I can only assume is yet another bad decision.)"



"And this is where it gets a little tricky. Because even though linguists are fairly strict with their definition of code-switching, there are anthropologists and sociologists and philosophers and theorists who persuasively suggest that you can code-switch within a language depending on who you happen to be talking with, or your intention, based on relationships and personal and communal identities. Some recent sociolinguistic studies suggested that people have a few basic reasons for code-switching. For one thing, we want to fit in, so we often code-switch as a way of showing solidarity. We sometimes code-switch subconsciously in this kind of situation. I’d intuitively choose the word “try,” for instance, when I’m sitting on the Greyhound bus out of Salt Lake City, talking to the friendly trucker next to me who’s deadheading back from LA to Indianapolis. We talked for, like, two hours about how to make the perfect Bolognese, and disagreed only about whether or not the milk was really important. But I’d probably intuitively go with “attempt” if I were asking a question of a panelist at an academic conference. Well, depending on the panel. People code-switch for all kinds of contexts, including social class, age, race, and other kinds of origin. A lot of us have identities that belong to more than one discourse. Of course, the darker side of solidarity is less about belonging and more about hiding. Or perhaps more aptly, passing."
culture  german  identity  language  languages  codeswitching  2014  spanish  portuguese  español  portugués  juncen  rebeccalindenberg  conversation  onomotopoeia  romanjakobson  brasil  brazil  argentina  germany  poetry  poeticfunction  words 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Bildungsroman - Wikipedia
"In literary criticism, bildungsroman (German pronunciation: [ˈbɪldʊŋs.ʁoˌmaːn]; German: "formation novel")[1] or coming-of-age story is a literary genre that focuses on the psychological and moral growth of the protagonist from youth to adulthood (coming of age),[2] and in which character change is thus extremely important.[3] The term was coined in 1819 by philologist Karl Morgenstern in his university lectures, and later famously reprised by Wilhelm Dilthey, who legitimized it in 1870 and popularized it in 1905.[1][4] The genre is further characterized by a number of formal, topical, and thematic features.[5] The term coming-of-age novel is sometimes used interchangeably with Bildungsroman, but its use is usually wider and less technical."
german  words  wikipedia  comingofage  bildungsroman  literature 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Learn 40 Languages for Free with Free Audio Lessons | Open Culture
"How to learn languages for free? This collection features lessons in 40 languages, including Spanish, French, English, Mandarin, Italian, Russian and more. Download audio lessons to your computer or mp3 player and you’re good to go."
languages  language  learning  arabic  spanish  bulgarian  catalan  chinese  mandarin  danish  dutch  english  esperanto  finnish  french  free  gaelic  german  greek  hebrew  hindi  hungarian  indonesian  irish  italian  japanese  korean  latin  lithuanian  luxembourgish  maori  norwegian  polish  portuguese  romanian  russian  swedish  tagalog  thai  ukranian  urdu  vietnamese  yiddish  lessons  māori  catalán 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Poems and related texts ["Everything makes more Everything makes more Everything makes more Everything makes more Everything makes more", Rolf Dieter Brinkmann, 1975]
[Google translation] "The storytellers go on, the auto industry carries on, the workers continue to
Governments continue to rock & roll singer keep going, the prices go, the
Paper further makes the animals & trees to keep going, day & night carries on, the moon rises,
the sun rises, her eyes go door to go, his mouth opens, one speaks, one does
Signs, signs on the walls of houses, signs on the street signs in the machinery that moves
are movements in the rooms…
old newspapers blowing across an empty parking gray, wild bushes & grass grow in the
are left behind debris land in the middle of the inner city, a construction fence has been painted blue, to
the fence is a sign nailed to stick posters of prohibition…
go on, go on the elevators, the walls of houses continue, the city makes
Next, the suburbs continue ... All the questions continue, as will make all the answers.
The space will continue. I make eye on & look at a white piece of paper."
1975  via:cervus  poetry  german  rolfdieterbrinkman  storytelling  writing  continuity  suburbs  life 
june 2011 by robertogreco
A.E.I.O.U. - Wikipedia
"AEIOU, or A.E.I.O.U., was a symbolic device utilised by the Habsburg emperors. Emperor Frederick III (1415-93), who had a fondness for mythical formulae, habitually signed buildings and objects with the acronym.[1] Frederick III did not explain its meaning at the time, though shortly before his death, he claimed it stood for (German) "Alles Erdreich ist Österreich untertan" (MKL 1890)[2] or "All the world is subject to Austria." However other interpretations have been put forth. Most interpretations proceed on the assumption that it was meant as a political slogan, from the Latin phrases…"
aeiou  habsburgs  history  austria  latin  german 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Lebenskünstler « Lebenskünstler
"The word is “Lebenskünstler.” It is a German word and connotes a person who approaches life with the zest and inspiration of an artist, although he or she may not be working recognizably as an artist.

Lebensfreude = joy of living
Lebenskunst = art of living
Lebenskünstler = master of the art of living

* Lebenskünstler (“life artist”, someone who masters life in a somewhat eccentric way)
* -meister (primarily satirical usage)

connoisseur of the art of living – Lebenskünstler {m}

Imagine making art, not with paint or clay, but with life itself as your medium. A “life artist,” or “Lebenskuenstler” as the Germans would say, is someone who finds beauty in the colors life puts at their disposal, someone who makes do with the brushes they’ve got and doesn’t pout over a few mistaken strokes."
randallszott  art  artofliving  life  german  words  definitions  lebenskünstler  joyofliving  living  well-being  language 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Los idiomas de Borges « Eterna Cadencia
Nos hemos acostumbrado a tal grado a afirmar que Jorge Luis Borges fue un “escritor universal” que esta expresión y el nombre de Borges han pasado a ser casi sinónimos. Famoso y reconocido por la amplitud y la profundidad de sus obras, Borges fue un escritor a la vez profundamente argentino y cosmopolita.  En sus poemas y cuentos aparecen  compadritos del viejo Buenos Aires, sacerdotes mayas, vikingos de las sagas nórdicas o reyes anglosajones largamente olvidados. El conocimiento que Borges tenía de las diversas literaturas del mundo era poco menos que enciclopédico y las múltiples y diversas fuentes  de su inspiración continúan siendo investigadas por la crítica. Sin embargo, un hecho que a menudo se pasa por alto es que Borges logró acercarse a muchas de estas obras gracias a las numerosas lenguas que estudió durante toda su vida."
borges  language  universality  universalism  cosmopolitanism  languages  english  german  french  italian  portuguese  icelandic  japanese 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Die Luft der Freiheit weht
"This is the text of President Gerhard Casper's "Die Luft der Freiheit weht - On and Off" On the Origins and History of the Stanford Motto on October 5, 1995."
stanford  german  mottos  gerhardcasper  1995  history 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Zettelkasten – Wikipedia
"Der Zettelkasten ist ein Hilfsmittel bei der Erstellung einer literarischen oder wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Wichtig erscheinende Sachverhalte, die man z. B. in einem Buch gefunden hat, werden mit Quellenangabe…"

Google translation: "The card catalog is a tool in creating a literary or scientific work. Appears important issues that we found in a book, for example, has to be the source is noted on slips of paper and kept in boxes and sorted."

By using a list box or a breakdown Editors will read information is not lost. The card catalog serves as a reminder. Card indexes are shown in the qualitative text analysis were used.

A major advantage of a card index with respect to a linear text, in the form of a notebook without references, is the networking of content by indexing and cross-reference is created.

Using electronic media can be obtained by linking with hyperlinks virtual card indexes to create, for example in the form of a wiki or a blog."

[See also: http://www.delicious.com/cervus/zettelkasten AND http://www.flickr.com/people/zettel/ AND http://zettelkasten.tumblr.com/ ]
words  german  cardcatalog  notetaking  cv  process  howwework  hypertext  hyperlinks  del.icio.us  pinboard  wikis  blogs  cross-referencing  productivity  science  web  management  tools 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Uncleftish Beholding - Wikipedia
"Uncleftish Beholding (1989) is a short text written by Poul Anderson. It is written using almost exclusively words of Germanic origin, and was intended to illustrate what the English language might look like if it had not received its considerable number of loanwords from other languages, particularly Latin, Greek and French.

The text is about basic atomic theory and relies on a number of word coinings, many of which have analogues in modern German. The title "uncleftish beholding" calques "atomic theory". The text begins:

"For most of its being, mankind did not know what things are made of, but could only guess. With the growth of worldken, we began to learn, and today we have a beholding of stuff and work that watching bears out, both in the workstead and in daily life.""
language  history  english  linguistics  via:migurski  uncleftishbeholding  1989  poulanderson  theory  german  germanic  constraints  classideas  writing  literature 
february 2011 by robertogreco
20 Awesomely Untranslatable Words from Around the World
[via: http://caterina.net/wp-archives/39 ]

"1. Toska [Russian]: At deepest & most painful…sensation of great spiritual anguish, often w/out any specific cause. At less morbid levels…dull ache of soul, longing w/ nothing to long for…

2. Mamihlapinatapei [Yagan (indigenous to Tierra del Fuego]: wordless, yet meaningful look shared by two people who both desire to initiate something but are both reluctant to start

3. Jayus

4. Iktsuarpok [Inuit]: “To go outside to check if anyone is coming.”

5. Litost 6. Kyoikumama 7. Tartle 8. Ilunga 9. Prozvonit 10. Cafuné 11. Schadenfreude

12. Torschlusspanik [German]: means “gate-closing panic,” but…refers to “the fear of diminishing opportunities as one ages."

13. Wabi-Sabi 14. Dépaysement

15. Tingo [Pasquense]: “act of taking objects one desires from house of a friend by gradually borrowing all of them.”

16. Hyggelig 17. L'appel du vide 18. Ya'aburnee

19. Duende: “the mysterious power that a work of art has to deeply move a person.”

20. Saudade"
language  translation  culture  linguistics  words  hyggelig  duende  saudade  tingo  wabi-sabi  schadenfreude  Mamihlapinatapei  toska  litost  tartle  cafuné  portugués  portuguese  español  spanish  russian  german  french  danish  arabic  time  age  precision  art  glvo  scottish  japanese  czech  inuit  yagan  milankundera  vladmirnavakov 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Glass Bead Game - Wikipedia [via: http://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/eight-diagrams-of-the-future/]
"The Glass Bead Game takes place at an unspecified date, centuries into the future. Hesse suggested that he imagined the book's narrator writing around the start of the 25th century. The setting is a fictional province of central Europe called Castalia, reserved by political decision for the life of the mind; technology and economic life are kept to a strict minimum. Castalia is home to an austere order of intellectuals with a twofold mission: to run boarding schools for boys, and to nurture & play the Glass Bead Game, whose exact nature remains elusive & whose devotees occupy a special school within Castalia known as Waldzell. The rules of the game are only alluded to, and are so sophisticated that they are not easy to imagine. Playing the game well requires years of hard study of music, mathematics, & cultural history. Essentially the game is an abstract synthesis of all arts and sciences. It proceeds by players making deep connections between seemingly unrelated topics."
existentialism  fiction  gamedesign  literature  philosophy  lifeofthemind  hermanhesse  german  knowledge  informatics  ideas  books  history 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Politeness: Hi there | The Economist
"Life is getting friendlier but less interesting. Blame technology, globalisation & feminism" ... "So what seems to be happening is that formal politeness, at least in spoken & written exchanges, is on the decline, thanks to globalisation (meaning the rise of flat, nuance-less English as a means of international communication), to social changes and to technology. Replacing it is a kind of neutral friendliness, where human encounters take place devoid of the signifiers of emotional and status differences that past generations found so essential. That may lubricate business meetings. But it makes life outside the workplace less interesting. If you use first names everywhere at work, how do you signify to a colleague that you want to be a real friend? If you sign all e-mails “love & vibes”, how do you show intimacy? Much of the world has an answer to that, at least in their own languages & cultures. English-speakers may have triumphed on one front, but they are struggling on another."
via:cityofsound  politeness  english  humor  society  etiquette  speech  writing  history  language  communication  diplomacy  informality  french  german  internet  culture  technology 
january 2010 by robertogreco
L.A. restaurant has the links to success | Marketplace From American Public Media
"A line snakes around the block in a gritty part of Los Angeles. Hipsters, families and tourists are all waiting to get into a restaurant whose name they can't even pronounce.

The name isn't the only unusual thing about Wurstkuche, German for sausage kitchen.
Last fall, as many other restaurants were closing, Joseph Pitruzzelli and his cousin Tyler Wilson, were opening Wurstkuche for fries, beer and, oh yeah, sausage.

JOSEPH PITRUZZELLI: We've got 22 I think in the case today. They range from the traditional brautwurst and botwurst and into the exotics like rattlesnake and rabbit. Buffalo beef and pork."
losangeles  food  restaurants  german  offcampustrips  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
busuu.com | the language learning community | Learn Spanish, Learn German, Learn French
"Connect with native speakers and learn directly from other members of the busuu.com community! Be completely flexible and learn only what you really need! Have fun by experiencing a new way of learning languages and forget those boring grammar books!"
languages  learning  english  spanish  french  german  socialnetworking  community  socialsoftware  education 
march 2009 by robertogreco
eduFire - Live Video Learning
"We have a simple (but not easy) mission: Revolution education.

Our goal is to create a platform to allow live learning to take place over the Internet anytime from anywhere.

Most importantly...for anyone. We’re the first people (we know) to create something that’s totally open and community-driven (rather than closed and transaction-driven).

We’re excited to create tools for people to teach and learn what they love in ways they never imagined possible.

If changing the world is your thing and you’re as passionate about education and learning as we are, please get in touch."
education  learning  technology  online  teaching  tutoring  elearning  languages  videos  translation  tutorials  socialnetworking  communication  e-learning  spanish  italian  german  french  english 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball Linked List: Sitzfleisch
"Tying together yesterday’s link to Brent Simmons’s advice for would-be indie developers (“You need to wear out that chair and then buy a new one and then wear out that one”) and the previous link to Malcolm Gladwell’s conclusion that it is perseverance and above all else extraordinary amounts of practice that separates the great from the not-great, is the wonderful German word sitzfleisch: The ability to endure or carry on with an activity."
perseverance  johngruber  coding  malcolmgladwell  greatness  success  tcsnmy  depth  endurance  german  words  language  depthoverbreadth 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Page F30: Why Norwegian is the easiest language for English speakers to learn
"Persian is easy in terms of grammar, most Western European languages have the advantage of common vocabulary and recognition. Norwegian happens to have both of these, and in this post I'm going to show why Norwegian is the easiest language for your average English speaker to learn."
languages  comparison  norwegian  danish  icelandic  swedish  dutch  german  english  learning  linguistics  norway  language  grammar  via:tomc  persian  arabic  fardi 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Babbel wins funding, enters crowded language market
"So far it covers French, Italian, Spanish, English or German. But it’s about to release grammar feature and tools for educators to create their own tutorials."
language  education  languages  online  learning  elearning  english  spanish  french  german  italian  teaching  tcsnmy 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Germany from the air | World news | guardian.co.uk
"A set of negatives has been discovered in an attic in the Harz region, showing German cities from the air before they were bombed by the allies."
german  history  photography  war  architecture 
july 2008 by robertogreco
"Zerstreutheit" and the Attention Management Cure | 43 Folders
"Every one knows what attention is...taking possession by the mind, in clear & vivid form, of one out of what seem several simultaneously possible objects or trains of thought...implies withdrawal from some things in order to deal effectively with others"
attention  continuouspartialattention  time  organization  focus  gtd  lifehacks  words  german  via:russelldavies 
june 2008 by robertogreco
sprachgefühl: Definition and Much More from Answers.com
"A feeling for language; an ear for the idiomatically correct or appropriate." "Why is this word not used more often? If you are the possessor of sprachgefühl, you have a good sense for language, an eye or a nose for it."
language  german  words  definitions  english 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Impossible Is Nothing, Except Understanding Ads in English | Culture & Lifestyle | Deutsche Welle | 16.11.2007
"After years peddling anglicisms, German advertisers have rediscovered their own language. If the advertising industry is a barometer of the zeitgeist, what does this say about the state of the nation?"
advertising  germany  language  trends  culture  communication  english  german  via:regine 
november 2007 by robertogreco
lingro: multilingual dictionary and language learning site
"Enter website to make all words on page clickable for definiions/translations. Each word you translate is saved in personal word history...create lists of vocabulary you'd like to learn from your word history...play games to review your vocabulary"
dictionary  language  learning  tools  reading  onlinetoolkit  foreign  vocabulary  translation  snsih  english  español  german  italian  polish  french  reference  pronunciation  collaborative  community  creativecommons  languages  foreignlanguage  flashcards  dictionaries 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Weltschmerz: Definition and Much More from Answers.com
"Sadness over the evils of the world, especially as an expression of romantic pessimism."
words  language  german 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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