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robertogreco : gifs   51

A Business With No End - The New York Times
"Where does this strange empire start or stop?"



"Trying to map the connections between all these entities opens a gaping wormhole. I couldn’t get over the idea that a church might be behind a network of used business books, hair straighteners, and suspiciously priced compression stockings — sold on Amazon storefronts with names like GiGling EyE, ShopperDooperEU and DAMP store — all while running a once-venerable American news publication into the ground.

While I searched for consistencies among disparate connections, the one thing I encountered again and again on websites affiliated with those in the Community was the word “dream.” “Find the wooden furniture of your dreams” (Hunt Country Furniture). “Read your dreams” (Stevens Books). “Our company is still evolving every year, but our dream never changed” (Everymarket). “The future belongs to the one who has dreams; a company with dreams achieves the same” (Verecom).

Indeed, at some point I began to feel like I was in a dream. Or that I was half-awake, unable to distinguish the virtual from the real, the local from the global, a product from a Photoshop image, the sincere from the insincere.

Still harder for me to grasp was the total interpenetration of e-commerce and physical space. Standing inside Stevens Books was like being on a stage set for Stevens Books, Stevens Book, Stevens Book Shop, and Stevensbook — all at the same time. It wasn’t that the bookstore wasn’t real, but rather that it felt reverse-engineered by an online business, or a series of them. Being a human who resides in physical space, my perceptual abilities were overwhelmed. But in some way, even if it was impossible to articulate, I knew that some kind of intersection of Olivet University, Gratia Community Church, IBPort, the Newsweek Media Group, and someone named Stevens was right there with me, among the fidget spinners, in an otherwise unremarkable store in San Francisco."
jennyodell  2018  internet  olivetuniversity  amazon  business  scams  fraud  storytelling  gifs  animatedgifs  sanfrancisco  newjersey  nyc 
november 2018 by robertogreco
The Art Assignment - YouTube
"The Art Assignment is a weekly PBS Digital Studios production hosted by curator Sarah Green. We take you around the U.S. to meet working artists and solicit assignments from them that we can all complete. Check for new episodes every Thursday!"

[via: "3. Intimate, Indispensable GIF - Toyin Odutola"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgTWPkK5wvo

"In which The Art Assignment visits New York-based artist Toyin Odutola and receives the challenge to create a GIF! But not just any GIF--it must articulate something intimate that is indispensable to you.

EPISODE 03 INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Think of something intimate that is indispensable to you. (It doesn't have to be a body part. It can be an object, place, memory, anything.)

2. Depict it in the form of a GIF. You don't have to make drawings-you can use photographs, make a sculpture, or whatever you like.

3. Upload it using #theartassignment

4. Fame and glory (your response might be in a future episode)

Find and follow Toyin online: @obia_thethird, toyinodutola.com
and learn more about her work here: http://www.jackshainman.com/artists/toyin-odutola/ "]
art  classideas  gifs  motion  animation  toyinojihodutola 
july 2017 by robertogreco
GifCities
"GifCities is a special project of the Internet Archive to celebrate 20 years of preserving the web. Internet Archive is a non-profit digital library of millions of free books, movies, software, music, websites, and more. Please donate to help us in our efforts to provide “Universal Access to All Knowledge.”"
gif  geocities  nostalgia  culture  archives  internetarchive  gifs 
october 2016 by robertogreco
The Mystery Is Resolved – The Rain That Never Stops
"Everybody loves a good riddle, but when you design one, you never know how it will be perceived until you try it out. The new Smashing Mystery Riddle didn’t emerge over night, and after weeks of fine adjustments and many — many — test runs, we prepared some coffee, pressed that shiny “Publish” button and, you know, started waiting for tweets. And now, exactly two days later, it’s time to reveal the mystery and announce the winners. Oh, you want to figure it out first? Well, then please close this tab since there are (obviously) spoilers in this post."
gifs  puzzles  smashingmag  twitter  via:senongo  2016  fun  riddles  classideas  treasurehunts 
august 2016 by robertogreco
How to create your own 3D GIFs | The Daily Dot
"We're living in the age of 3D GIFs on Tumblr. These images, which use optical illusions to make visuals appear to pop out of the screen, have gotten to be so popular on the website that last year Tumblr's official year in review roundup devoted an entire category to them.

But even though they've been making the rounds on Tumblr for ages, 3D GIFs are only just now making their way into other parts of the Internet. Luckily for you, it's easy to impress other non-Tumblr users with their special magic: All you really need to make one is a few minutes and a copy of Photoshop."
via:sha  tumblr  3d  3dgifs  gifs  howto  photoshop 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Official Google Blog: Meet Gboard: Search, GIFs, emojis & more. Right from your keyboard.
"iPhone users—this one’s for you. Meet Gboard, a new app for your iPhone that lets you search and send information, GIFs, emojis and more, right from your keyboard.

Say you’re texting with a friend about tomorrow’s lunch plans. They ask you for the address. Until now it’s worked like this: You leave your texting app. Open Search. Find the restaurant. Copy the address. Switch back to your texts. Paste the address into a message. And finally, hit send.
Searching and sending stuff on your phone shouldn’t be that difficult. With Gboard, you can search and send all kinds of things—restaurant info, flight times, news articles—right from your keyboard. Anything you’d search on Google, you can search with Gboard. Results appear as cards with the key information front and center, such as the phone number, ratings and hours. With one tap, you can send it to your friend and you keep the conversation going.


You can search for more than just Google search results. Instead of scrolling to find💃 or 👯 , search for “dancer” and find that emoji you were looking for instantly. Even better—you can search for the perfect GIF to show people how you’re really feeling. Finally, Gboard has Glide Typing, which lets you type words by sliding your finger from key to key instead of tapping—so everything you do is just a little bit faster.


Gboard works in any app—messaging, email, YouTube—so you can use it anywhere on your phone. Get it now in the App Store in English in the U.S., with more languages to come."

[See also: https://itunes.apple.com/app/gboard-search.-gifs.-emojis/id1091700242 ]
ios  google  search  gifs  emoji  gboard  via:ableparris  2016 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Cameron's World
"A love letter to the Internet of old

Cameron's World is a web-collage of text and images excavated from the buried neighbourhoods of archived GeoCities pages (1994–2009).

Graphics and text are from various GeoCities archives
Collected and assembled by Cameron Askin
Javascript/backend development by Anthony Hughes
Music by Robin Hughes

GeoCities was a web-hosting service that made it possible for people to build their own home pages. During the 90s, users from all over the world created personalized corners of the Internet.

By the time the U.S. service shut down in October 2009, there were over 38 million GeoCities pages. Cameron’s World brings together archived material from thousands and thousands of these sites.
In an age where we interact primarily with branded and marketed web content,

Cameron’s World is a tribute to the lost days of unrefined self-expression on the Internet. This project recalls the visual aesthetics from an era when it was expected that personal spaces would always be under construction.
via:ableparris  webrococo  geocities  web  gifs  internet 
march 2016 by robertogreco
The Future of Video Is a Wonderful Mess -- Following: How We Live Online
"As video — and livestreaming in particular — grows in popularity on the web, we can expect to see more of this: people becoming their own professional broadcasting operations, warping and tweaking the aesthetic of their stream to fit their brand in a way similar to a cable news channel, and piling loads of extraneous information into the frame. This is exciting! The idea that users want a tidy, uniform experience across a service is mostly an idea clung to by technologists — the average social-media user doesn’t care about cleanliness. If they did, we wouldn’t be seeing an astonishing amount of compression rot in the multimedia passed around on Facebook and Instagram and Twitter and Tumblr.

Twitch is, as of now, the best indication yet that the web is ebbing back toward Myspace on the Myspace-Facebook spectrum. The reasons for this are both technological — rendering and processing video is expensive — and cultural. As more and more people come of age using the web and using technology, uniformity in design and aesthetic isn’t as necessary. Facebook emerged as a service friendly to people who had never used a social network before, and that population is rapidly dwindling. We’re moving toward visual cacophony because we now have the ability to parse that mess easily. That beautiful mess is something to look forward to."
video  web  online  future  messiness  myspace  aesthetics  facebook  gifs  geocities  webrococo  snapchat  twitter  socialmedia  netflix  hulu  twitch  minecraft  ui  hud  annotations  tumblr  instagram  brainfeldman  multiliteracies 
february 2016 by robertogreco
NewHive
[See also: “Beautiful disasters: NewHive is making the web weird again”
http://www.theverge.com/2014/2/18/5420246/can-newhive-make-the-web-weird-again-zach-verdin ]

"NewHive is a multimedia publishing platform. We provide a blank space and custom tools to simplify the process of creating rich multimedia experiences on the web.

Get started with our User Guide [http://newhive.com/newhive/user-guide ] and Frequently Asked Questions [http://newhive.com/newhive/faq ].

Say hello. Ask about job opportunities. Get in touch with our press and media team. Inquire about partnership and business development opportunities.

We are committed to supporting creators on the NewHive platform.
We do this in a variety of ways, including:

Commissioned Projects

NewHive regularly commissions multimedia mixtapes, singles, zines, ebooks, curated exhibitions, and solo projects by emerging and established artists engaged with the Internet. Creators receive a stipend and technical support. Proposals are reviewed on a rolling basis. Get in touch: m@newhive.com.

Interview Series

NewHive publishes interviews on a weekly basis. These conversations focus on the creative process, and aim to promote a better understanding and appreciation of the arts. Search #interviews to read about the community on NewHive.

Events / Exhibitions

NewHive partners with institutions to increase the profile of our creators. Most recently we collaborated with the Goethe-Institut San Francisco on Image as Location, an exhibition that showcased artists who are remixing their favorite works of art. Previously we teamed up with Gray Area to co-organize UPLOAD.gif, a weekend-long festival celebrating the animated GIF file format.

ZACH VERDIN
Cofounder / CEO

CARA BUCCIFERRO
Cofounder / Designer

ABRAM CLARK
Cofounder / Engineer

MELISSA BRODER
Director of Media

info@newhive.com "

["What is NewHive?

NewHive is a multimedia publishing platform for the easy creation of webpages called newhives. These pages are artist-controlled, embeddable, and may be simply compiled into collections. We provide an intuitive and easy-to-use, graphical user interface. To put it simply, NewHive allows users to create webpages without having to write code or use a rigid interface.

Do I have to pay to use NewHive?

NewHive is totally and completely free!
How do I create a newhive?

To create a newhive page, click on the create icon in the bottom right-hand corner. For help creating a newhive click on the ? while in the editor."]
newhive  multimedia  webrococo  remixing  web  webpublishing  online  internet  remixculture  gifs  gif  animatedgifs  zachverdin  abramclark  carabucciferro  melissabroder  upload.gif  webdev  ebooks  zines  mixtapes  art  community  onlinetoolkit  classideas  multiliteracies  webdesign 
january 2016 by robertogreco
DIGITAL-MATERIALITY-OF-GIFS
HI, my name is Sha.

I love gifs.

Some of my best friends are gifs. One of my sideprojects is GifPop, a site where people upload gifs to print animated cards.

But that's a longer story.

What I do want to talk about is animated gifs as a design material.

But first off, a quick reminder: no one owns language.

People argue about gif or jif, but it doesn't matter. No one owns language, and even if anyone did no one is a jraphic designer or jraffiti artist.

What i love about gifs are their history and their materiality.

First specified in 1987, the creators later stated in their 1989 revision that "the graphics interchange format is not intended as a platform for animation, even though it can be done in a limited way."

And what a gloriously, gloriously limited way it is.

Animated gifs, whether you are hypnotized by them or nauseated by them, have become a visual language unto themselves, an emotive vocabulary made out of culture.

Gifs are now a medium, and their portability and accessibility to anyone allows for endless remixing and reinterpretation.

Gifs weren't always this way.

We all remember the various under construction or dancing baby gifs from the 90s, and all the bedazzled backgrounds on myspace pages.

The gif spec limits color palettes to 256 colors, and must store the pixels that have changed for every frame of animation.

This makes them very inefficient for rendering or storing entire movies, but has made them nicely equipped to capture the most delicate of moments.

Because gifs can specify an infinite loop, they both break time and increase legibility, creating the beauty we call a reaction gif.

But gifs aren't just about cutting up bits of media.

The inefficiency of the file format and the upload limits of the social networks themselves have created a whole ecosystem of experimentation and juggling around constraints.

In Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg's work, they realized that by isolating movement they could make gifs at a much higher quality than most, and still fit Tumblr's strict upload requirements, creating the style they call cinemagraphs.

Sports editors like @dshep25 have taken this technique even further, taking advantage of controlled camera angels to collapse and collage many similar shots into a single gif, like this one of Lebron James.

Artists of course are leading this exploration.

The work of dvdp and 89-a both explore extremely limited color palettes while using tight loops and large swaths of black to reduce file size.

The work of Nicolas Fong explores this dense looping to a ridiculous extreme, creating hyperintricate animations that evoke the phenakistoscopes of the 1800s.

And we even see the seams of the network in the content that's posted.

On Tumblr, where upload limits are small but multiple side-by-side gifs are permitted, people collage snippets of dialogue together.

On Imgur, the preferred uploader for redditors, upload limits are much higher, enough for entire scenes to be remixed.

Here on Newhive, artists like molly soda take advantage of the support for transparency and collaging to make pieces like this, displaying messages from her Okcupid inbox.

Content like this just explodes, and with attention comes money.

Newer networks like Vine have popped up, creating their own medium of looping video.

These days for every Vine THERE are a dozen competing looping apps trying to capitalize on this meme economy.

But while these advances are exciting, the mainstreaming of gifs is not without its losses.

Tumblr now has a minimum resolution size.

Imgur is now promoting its own videogif format.

Facebook and Twitter have started converting gifs to video by default.

While individually these decisions to decrease file sizes or stop gifs from autoplaying make sense, this desire to optimize as well as commercialize gifs ends up siloing these animations from each other, removing the portability and ease of remixing that makes gifs exciting at all.

Gifs are a dumb, limited file format, and in the end this is why they are important:

They do not belong to anyone.

Because of their constraints they become a design material, to be played with, challenged, and explored. to try and domesticate them would be missing the point.

This was written BY SHA HWANG For a Pecha Kucha talk in Brooklyn and made into a remixable newhive. The ideas are from the internet.

Thank you to animatedtext for creating the amazing title gif. more detailed sources are INLINE ON THE PAGE to the right >>>>>>>>>

[Also at this URL: http://newhive.com/shashashasha/digital-materiality-of-gifs ]
shahwang  gifs  animatedgifs  internet  web  facebook  vine  twitter  fileformats  constraints  art  webart  tumblr  memes  remixing  portability  video  animation  emotions  imgur  okcupid  redit  newhive  phenakistoscopes  dvdp  89-a  @dshep25  cinemagraphs  jamiebeck  kevinburg  history  media  legibility  resolution  reactiongifs  accessibility  1987  1989  gifpop  culture  remixculture  multiliteracies 
january 2016 by robertogreco
The Untapped Creativity of the Chinese Internet | VICE | United States
"[image]

Somewhere in mainland China, a kid in the grips of puppy love posts one of those raw, unmediated posts so saccharine it's both unbearably endearing and ridiculously funny. It's so completely melodramatic that other users stumble across the post and begin adding their own feelings and thoughts, remixing it to be even funnier. The words are skewed, images and music added, and finally uploaded to Bilibili.com, where users overlay their own comments onto the video in real-time.

The resulting GIFs, poems, videos, and comments spread through the Chinese internet on Sina Weibo and WeChat in a flurry of color and flashing animations. This is So in love, w​ill never feel tired again, an online exhibition of work by Chinese new media and net artist Yin​​g Miao, and it serves as a counterpoint to the West's view of the Chinese internet as bland and heavily censored. Despite all that I've been told in the West, the internet here looks incredibly fun and vibrant to me.

[image]

"The Chinese internet is really raw," Miao tells me. "It's so unlimited but also limited. It's really rich material." We are sitting in a café with our laptops open in downtown Beijing, a brief bike ride from Tiananmen Square. Miao is walking me through her artwork in preparation for the launch of the online exhibition series Ne​tizenet. Miao impresses upon me the depth of creativity on the Chinese internet, showing how memes emerge and morph across platforms and ideologies and around censorship.

While I'm becoming accustomed to relying on my VPN or Tor to use boringly functional sites like Gmail, Miao is taking me on an unblocked tour of her inspirations, the wildest and weirdest of the Chinese internet from behind the so-called Great Firewall. Here, everything can be remixed and .GIFs are always welcomed. Conversations on WeChat (the most popular messaging platform here) are an endless stream of reaction .GIFs that put Tumblr to shame.

[image]

In the series, LAN Love Poem, Miao explores her complicated feelings around the Chinese web. LAN stands for local area network and is suggestive of the localized nature of the internet, in both law and culture, that we in the West are rarely confronted with. Miao uses type inspired by Taobao.com (a site akin to eBay) and intentionally poor English translations of odes to her censored net.

The extreme creativity and vibrancy on the Chinese internet is hard to grasp as a Westerner who is a devout defender of free speech. My ignorance of Miao's raw material, and the many other aspects of Chinese net culture that are difficult to grasp is what Netizienet (or 网友网 in Mandarin and Wǎngyǒuwǎng in Pinyin) is all about.

[image]

Using NewHive, a multimedia publishing platform, Netizenet will examine the internet as a medium from within China, an internet very different from what I grew up with in the States. Through an ongoing series of online exhibitions by Chinese and international artists--of which Miao is the first--Netizenet asks important questions about creativity, differing online aesthetics, and location-based web access. Is the Chinese internet uniquely different from the rest of the world's, or does every country's web have its own unique aesthetics and traits?

The curator behind Netizenet is Michelle Proksell, an independent curator, researcher, and artist currently based in Beijing. Proksell was born in Saudi Arabia to expatriate American parents, and moved to the United States when the Gulf War was starting. Proksell loved traveling through Asia as a kid and this is why she eventually returned and has lived in China for over two years.

Proksell sees a ton of potential in Beijing and Shanghai for the arts, especially net art, and wants to help cultivate the scene. She was fascinated by how the Chinese internet influenced Miao's "artistic aesthetic, process and production," writing that Miao "has a bit of a love affair with the kitschy, low-tech aesthetic, and unreliable nature of this part of the [world wide web.]" ​

[image]

Miao is one of the few net artists in mainland China. She and Proksell have adopted the monumental task of helping to encourage a net art discourse in a country of over 620 million internet users as well as introducing that culture to the West. Proksell tells me, "I really wanted to set a tone for the project by working with an artist who had been intimate with this side of the web early in her art practice."

Miao has certainly been exploring the aesthetics and issues of access in the internet in her work for some time. In 2007, for her undergrad thesis exhibition at the China Academy of Fine Arts near Shanghai, Miao made The Blind Spot, which meticulously documented every word blocked from Google.cn. The piece took Miao three months to make and is a brilliant DIY version of Jason Q. Ng's work documenting blocked words on the popular Chinese social network Sina Weibo. But Miao has no interest in only focusing on the limitations of the Chinese internet, believing there are much more fascinating things underway.

For instance, iPhone Garbage is an incredible convergence of Chinese manufacturing, social media, and ​Shanzhai (slang for pirated and fake goods) culture. A heavily remixed video shows a young entrepreneur aggressively promoting his custom smartphone while continually calling the iPhone "garbage." In Miao's work we see a pushback on Western aesthetics and corporations in favor of a more local flavor.

[image]

Miao suggests that the emerging narrative of Shanzhai might be replicated in net art in China. At first Shanzhai referred only to cheap knockoffs that rarely worked and were an annoying thorn in "legitimate" companies' sides. Now, as Joi Ito has found, Shanzhai merchants are beginning to build entirely unique hardware, offering entirely different capabilities than their Western smartphone counterparts. Miao believes too that Chinese net culture should embrace their differences and push them as far as possible.

In an int​erv​iew between Miao and Proksell, Miao said, "I think there is a bright future for Chinese internet art." Proksell and Miao have an uphill battle proving that to the West, but just as I had never seen many of Miao's influences, this culture is emerging with or without the West's acknowledgement or support. Whether that appreciation comes or not, Netizenet is off to an amazing start and I for one will definitely keep my eyes open for the next show and on Miao."
via:unthinkingly  aesthetic  newaesthetic  internet  web  china  online  accretion  beijing  netart  netizenet  byob  michelleproksell  lanlovepoem  yingmao  newmedia  benvalentine  tumblr  newvibe  gifs  memes  poetry  poems  sinaweibo  weibo  wechat  animation  screenshots  low-techaesthetic  changzhai  socialmedia  joiito  2014  webrococo  newhive 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Adapting to a more global, more diverse Internet » Nieman Journalism Lab
"“Thanks to denser networks that foster better pipelines for attention, the Internet gives communities a pathway directly to newsrooms.”

According to Quartz’s Next Billion vertical, Internet use is projected to double — from 2.5 billion to 5 billion — between 2012 and 2016. That’s next year, and already, the global diversity of the netizenry and how they use the Internet is starting to change people’s relationship with the news. Much of this growth is expected to occur in Asia, while the fastest growth will be in Africa. These so-called “next billion” Internet users are often different from the first 2.5 billion in their background and lifestyles, representing a plethora of languages, cultures, incomes, and methods of technological access. And the implications, I think, will reach many different aspects of journalism.

The news will break on many networks, and these networks won’t be open.

After the explosions in Tianjin this year, GIFs, photos, and videos circulated on Twitter, Facebook and Sina Weibo. But the first person to break the news did so through a private messaging group on WeChat, posting video of fire outside the chemical plant just minutes before the explosion. For minutes afterward, the mobile-first, private platform was the primary place for sharing and discussing.

Increasingly, eyewitness media is discussed and disseminated on private networks like WhatsApp, Line, KakaoTalk, Snapchat, Viber, and Facebook Messenger. This is already having significant effects on newsgathering. At the recent TechRaking conference at MIT, journalist Andy Carvin and others pointed out that, when media do surface on the open web, it’s incredibly difficult to find and source the originator, as the images are often stripped of metadata, compressed, and of indeterminate provenance.

Digital journalism, so accustomed to APIs and tools that aid discovery and aggregation, will likely have to adapt. Partnership and advocacy efforts are likely right — platforms can do more to facilitate journalists’ efforts, and newsrooms can build better tech for these platforms. As well, the technological approach to digital journalism will need be supplemented by the traditional relational skills of newsgathering: cultivating sources, building relationships, and fostering trust.

It won’t be enough to speak just one language, or even three.

As news and reports of the Paris attacks rippled through social media, journalists captured and reported on eyewitness media shared in both French and English. Just a day before, a flurry of tweets and Facebook posts in Arabic, French and English discussed the worst bombing in Beirut since 1990.

News reports of the Paris attacks in French were translated to English:

[tweed embeds]

To Chinese:

[tweet embed]

To Arabic:

[tweet embed]

From French to English and then to Italian:

[tweet embed]

Meanwhile, false reports of a tsunami heading for Japan triggered the trending topic #PrayForJapan. An earthquake had indeed happened, but the Japanese-language reports clearly stated it wasn’t strong enough to trigger a tsunami:

[tweed embeds]

In the hecticness of the day, Spanish newspapers picked up a selfie of a Canadian Sikh man Photoshopped to look like he was wearing a suicide bomber’s vest. In Baghdad, a real suicide bomber killed 18 people. It was a day for hashtag prayers for multiple corners of the world:

[tweet embed]

Every day, global trending topics on Twitter alone appear in multiple languages and scripts — when I glance at them at different times of the day, they frequently appear in Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese, Arabic, Korean, and French, often outnumbering the English-language trending topics. English speakers, once the dominant group on the Internet, will soon become just one of many language speakers online.

Global communities will be talking back to media — and demanding better representation.

In recent years, we saw the transformation of #BlackLivesMatter from a hashtag and a nascent movement to a core question in the presidential primary debates. This year also saw #SomeoneTellCNN re-emerge as a satirical hashtag in Kenya in response to the network calling the country a “terror hotbed.” In the past, these tweets yielded minor changes in coverage; this year, a senior executive personally flew to Nairobi to apologize for the statements. And after Facebook turned on Safety Check for citizens of Paris, Beirutis asked why they didn’t get a Safety Check feature, even though their city had just been bombed a day before.

We can expect more of this. Geographically far from most media outlets, people in many regions of the world have historically had few avenues to attempt to improve global reportage of their issues. Thanks to denser networks that foster better pipelines for attention, the Internet gives communities a pathway directly to newsrooms. At its worst, call-out culture can be destructive and foster a herd mentality against the less privileged in society. But at its best, when people organize and amplify their voices to punch up rather than down, they can make real changes in media and media representation. What can we do to listen more effectively?

GIFs won’t be icing: they’ll be the cake.

[gif embed]

Let’s go back to Tianjin. Some of the most powerful images that circulated on WeChat were, in fact, GIFs. While livestreaming video tools like Periscope will push the boundaries of high-bandwidth, high-resolution video, the humble GIF is also on the rise, with built-in tools on sites like Tumblr and Instagram and autoplay features on Twitter now making it easier than ever for people to generate and share compelling moving images.

This matters for global Internet users because GIFs, in addition to being eminently shareable, consume less data — and less data charges. They also work well with smaller screens, whether that’s a low-cost smartphone or an Apple Watch. While cats and dogs will always have a special home on animated media, so will the mews, er, news."
anxiaomina  journalism  2015  messaging  internet  web  socialmedia  language  languages  news  translation  gifs  kakaotalksnapchat  viber  facebook  whatsapp  lineapp  andycarvin  digital  digitaljournalism  online  twitter  arabic  french  english  chinese  mandarin  italian  portuguese  japanese  spanish  portugués  español 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Mooooooving — Animated GIFs by Guy Moorhouse
"Mooooooving is a side project featuring animated gifs I make using Processing and Flash.

My one rule is that the animations must start and end on a blank white frame — I kind of like the idea that they come out of nothing and return to nothing.

Anyway, hope you like them."

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2015/10/05/filtered ]
tumblrs  motion  geometry  design  animation  guymoorhouse  gifs  processing  flash  coding 
october 2015 by robertogreco
On Repeat - Learning - Source: An OpenNews project
"How to use loops to explain anything"



"GIFs in the Future

I am pretty confident that there are many more ways to use GIFs for journalism. And while I’m not sure what sorts of forms GIFs will take in the future, I urge you to think of ways to bring loops into the world of storytelling on the web in a purposeful, insightful, or just plain humorous way. Because who knows what sorts of impossible or magical or transformative experiences we can create—all with the power of loops."
lenagroeger  gifs  journalism  video  looping  visual  history  animation  animatedgifs  eadweardmuybridge  howthingswork  explanation  probability  communication  classideas  repetition  storytelling  exposuretherapy  giphy 
june 2015 by robertogreco
NINE WORLDS GEEKFEST
"Hi! I keep these on my computer and I wanted to make this post for someone… Feel free to add sources - I don’t have them :)

Breathe in and out with this box

imageimageimageimageFollow the brush with your eyesimage"Press" this buttonimageFollow the brush with your eyes (again)"
gifs  animatedgifs  via:tealtan  meditation  anxiety  soothing  gifzen 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Digital Culture is Like Oral Culture Written Down — The Civic Beat — Medium
[via: https://twitter.com/mathpunk/status/554666572716187648 ]

"Digital Culture is Like Oral Culture Written Down: Calling a selfie stick or lunch pic narcissistic reflects a written culture perspective. Here’s how I reframe things.



We’re recognizing, for instance, how social media can facilitate the spread of rumors and misinformation. We’re acknowledging that verbal cyberbullying and online harassment can be deeply painful. Activist hashtagging continues in the tradition of call and response of chants and slogans. Conversation is a key principle in the new Cluetrain Manifesto: “The Net is not a medium any more than a conversation is a medium.”

All these discussions point to how social media has more of an oral, rather than literate, culture. By focusing just on what people post, we’re missing the point: social context, relationships and nonverbal gestures matter as much as the words and images themselves.

In other words, a selfie is never just a selfie. It exists in a broader social context, and just because some people take them narcissistically doesn’t mean that all, or even most, do.

***

Oral Culture/Print Culture
Shift the framework from print culture to oral culture, and much of the way we use social media sounds a little less crazy and little more, well, human. The Out of Eden Walk project is fond of calling its online community a digital campfire. I like that image; like idle chitchat and storytelling around a campfire, the conversations we have on social media often resemble oral conversations written down.

In that vein, here are a few general complaints against social media that I often hear (do they sound familiar?), and a potential way to reframe them (though to be honest, they’re each worthy of an essay). Because I look at images as much as words on the web, I prefer to use the term print culture, by which I hope to encompass both image- and word-based communications before the internet:

Print culture: People waste time posting pictures of their pets.
Oral culture: People tell silly stories about their pets all the time. Photos make those stories easier.

Print culture: Who cares what you’re having for lunch?
Oral culture: Eating food together, preparing food and talking about said food is one of the most fundamentally social things human beings do.

Print culture: Selfies are the height of vanity and narcissism.
Oral culture: Selfies help express emotion and tell stories. The written word lacks all the nuance of the human face, and selfies help fill that gap.

Print culture: There are literally thousands of people documenting this event with their cameras. Why do you need to take a picture too?
Oral culture: I’m taking this photo to share it with friends. It has to come from me, from my perspective, because I’m the storyteller.

Print culture: Punctuation marks help disambiguate meaning, words, and sentences. Be sparing with exclamation marks and semicolons.
Oral culture: Punctuation marks indicate emphasis. And tone… And emotion! And confusion‽‽‽ And. Every. Mode. Of. Expression. Under. The. Sun. ;)

Print culture: Ur spelling iz awful. Write proper English.
Oral culture: Variants of standardized language are probably as old as words themselves.

Print culture: Use hashtags to express topicality.
Oral culture: Use hashtags to #chant, to have a #metaconversation. Or #justbecause. #somanywaystousehashtags

Print culture: Think carefully about how you arrange words to convey exactly what you mean to say.
Oral culture: I has the feels. Here’s a GIF.

***

There are major differences between digital culture and oral culture, of course.

For one, you can’t index what people are saying in aural space (unless you’re using voice recognition software or audio recordings, etc.). Something you say in one place rarely escapes the physical constraints of sound; in digital culture, one sentence or image can go global rather quickly.

As well, print culture is still an important part of the dialogue, as it always has been, because digital technologies evolved from print technologies and share much of the same functionality. Digital culture has a permanence that’s as helpful for cultural heritage as it is for surveillance.

As law professor James Grimmelmann has written in response to some of my Tweets on this subject, this also has significant effects for the law:

Observers who expect that social media should have the dignity and gravity of the written word can feel affronted when others use social media more informally.

I see this slippage at work in Internet law all the time. The legal system repeatedly asks itself whether social media should be taken seriously.

In general, I find it more helpful, when looking at how people live and interact online, to take an oral culture orientation. We shouldn’t stop there, of course, because digital culture is not exactly oral culture. But with a better frame, we can then dive into the specifics of each practice to try to figure out what’s going on.



So back to the selfie stick.

In general, as we see more people from different cultures coming online, my guess is that cultures with rich oral traditions are more likely to be early adopters of practices that might initially seem odd to the more writerly types. Emoji, GIF stickers, walkie talkie text messages and selfie sticks all come to mind—there’s a reason these have tended to be more popular in Asia initially, where oral culture flourishes online (h/t selfie writer Alicia Eler). Especially when it comes to selfies and group photos, photos don’t end with the picture taking. Rather, everything about these photos — from taking them, sharing them and talking about them — is a vehicle for social bonding, storytelling, talking, etc.



Print culture: Selfie sticks help us extend our narcissism to new heights.
Oral culture: Selfie sticks help us tell better and more varied stories about what we’re up to. We can include a larger group of people. More of the background and scenery. The more detail, the better. Selfies allow us to take and frame the picture as a social experience with friends, making sure it comes from our own perspectives, not that of a stranger.

Oh, and they’re fun, to boot."

[Related: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:42a64d5690c1
https://medium.com/why-2015-wont-suck/26-you-will-mock-then-purchase-a-selfie-stick-ea57f41dfda ]
emoji  selfies  selfiesticks  anxiaomina  2015  culture  orality  conversation  internet  socialmedia  online  web  print  publishing  literacy  multiliteracies  punctuation  spelling  language  communication  hashtags  gifs  storytelling  interaction  relationships  chitchat  photography  cameras 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Digital Public Library of America » Blog Archive » GIF IT UP Winners Announced
"There’s no better way to wrap up a busy year than with a showcase of awesome GIFs made from open materials. Over the past couple of months we’ve had tons of fun running the GIF IT UP competition with our good friends at DigitalNZ. Thank you to everyone who entered!

All the entries have now been judged by our judges, Adam Green, Editor of the Public Domain Review, and Brian Wolly, Digital Editor of the Smithsonian Magazine."
gifs  dpla  gif 
december 2014 by robertogreco
A Gorgeous New Graphic Novel Made From GIFs | WIRED
"As the GIF continues to evolve into a format favored by artists, rather than just Tumblr users, it’s hard not to wonder: Where is all this going? The recent creative explosion in GIF-making—like this and this—means there’s an endless online bank of animated loops to delight in. But even the most inventive of these are bite-sized visual snacks, not developed narratives.

From the look of this new GIF graphic novel (it’s straightforwardly titled GIF-Novel), the GIF could have a killer future in graphic novel storytelling. French artist Mattis Dovier and British band Wild Beasts teamed up to create it for The Jameson Works, a new online dossier of creative projects sponsored by the whiskey brand.

In GIF-Novel, a tall and slender Martian-like character finds himself (somewhat mysteriously) in an unfamiliar land of volcanic rock and smoke. He (she?) has crash-landed, and stumbles into psychedelic experiences while trying to find his way. The theme—a robotic human confronting a foreign land—developed after Wild Beasts sent two unreleased tracks to Dovier, and asked him to pick one and build a visual story around it. “It was hard to choose, and in discussion with the band, I realized that they were complementary in their themes. Blood Knowledge is alluding to the human and the past, and Soft Future is referring to the future, the machine, the digital,” Dovier says. They ended up using both tracks.

A teaser video from Jameson offers a quick behind-the-scenes look into how Dovier created the GIFs. With a calligraphy pen and paper, he first sketches out the characters, objects, and setting. GIF-Novel is created in the style of Japanese manga (or animé), but is much more pixelated. Dovier introduced the pixelated look both to nod at retro pixel art, and to create a grid that would let him animate more efficiently. Once the visual elements are decided on, he transfers drawings to his graphic tablet.

This isn’t the first time an animator has used GIFs to create a graphic novel. In 2012 Ryan Woodward created Bottom of the Ninth, calling it the first animated novel. In the futuristic baseball-themed story, frames animate in tiny loops while the bulk of the story gets told in speech bubbles—a traditional comic book tool that Dovier leaves out of GIF-Novel. Instead, his relies on the Wild Beasts’ music and longer and more intricate loops of animation to advance the narrative. It’s exciting new terrain for animators: Even within the design constraints of the GIF, there’s ample room for manipulating the length of the loop, how it repeats, and how text plays (or doesn’t) a role. “This format can be an interesting alternative to video and fixed image,” Dovier says. “It doesn’t replace them, of course, but it can draw some characteristics from them, and by linking them, it may lead to something else.”

Check out GIF-Novel in its entirety at The Jameson Works."
gif  gifs  graphicnovels  comics  2014  gif-novel  mattisdovier  wildbeasts  thejamesonworks 
december 2014 by robertogreco
A Comprehensive Glossary Of Gifs
"What sets the internet apart from other modes of communication—video, audio, text, imagery—is the way it translates a combination of forms into meaning through the use of animated gifs. Here, we present a glossary of their definitions.

Gifs—"graphics interchange formats"—are unique to the internet, in that they utilize a short loop of soundless video-like motion to convey thoughts, feelings, memes, or retorts. While a picture says a thousand words, a gif gets the point across much more succinctly.

Note: You can use all of these gifs yourself! Just right-click and copy the image code, or drag the image itself to the space where you want to insert the code."
gifs  gif  glossaries  images  reactiongifs  humor  emotions  reactions  internet  online  web 
october 2014 by robertogreco
The Reaction GIF: Moving Image as Gesture • Jason Eppink's Catalogue of Creative Triumphs
"Computer-mediated communication increasingly informs the way we interact with friends and peers. Email, text message, chat, and any number of social websites and mobile apps focus conversation primarily into text, supplanting the many nonverbal cues like rhythm, intonation, volume, and gesture that humans have used to communicate for many millennia.

But over the last few years, the reaction GIF has emerged as a form for communicating with short moving images in response to, and often in lieu of, text in online forums and comment threads. These animated GIFs consist of brief loops of bodies in motion, primarily excerpted from recognizable pop culture moments, and are used to express common ideas and emotions. Understood as gestures, they can communicate more nuance and concision than their verbal translations. While many reaction GIFs are created, deployed, and rarely seen again, some have entered a common lexicon after being regularly reposted in online communities.

In February 2014, the Museum invited members of the popular social news website Reddit to identify the most frequently deployed reaction GIFs and their commonly understood translations. The 37 GIFs selected for exhibition in The Reaction GIF: Moving Image as Gesture represent the broad range of the reaction GIF: animated GIFs used not for artistic expression but as an element of nonverbal communication, as performed language."
2014  gig  gifs  reactiongifs  emotions  gestures  language  communication  jasoneppink  chat  internet  online  web 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Reaction Gif
"For gif stories or for a reference of gifs to use when words just don't express how you really feel."
gifs  reactiongifs  gif  emotions  glossaries  gestures  communitcation  internet  online  web 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Kenyatta Cheese - How Visual Media Affect Culture and Identity Globally - Video Archive - The Conference by Media Evolution
"Prepare to fall in love with .gif!

The shift to imagery and animation as a primary mode of communication on the web is a fun, creative shift from the primacy of text online. It is also having numerous effects on identity, civic engagement and creative expression. In this session we want to look at the broader implications of this shift, and what it can mean for brands, governments, organizations and anyone else working in this space.

Kenyatta Cheese is a professional internet enthusiast. He studies the ways that ideas spread through culture. Kenyatta is also the co-founder of Everybody at Once which develops audiences for television, media, and sports. In a past life Kenyatta co-created the internet meme database Know Your Meme."
kenyattacheese  2013  gifs  gif  tumblr  internet  web  reactiongifs  communication  elasticself  online 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Turn Any YouTube Video Into A GIF By Just Adding “GIF” To The URL | TechCrunch
"Want to turn something on YouTube into a GIF, but don’t want to futz with downloading third-party apps or digging around for an online converter?

Here’s a handy, easy to remember trick: just add “GIF” to the beginning of the URL. After “www.” and before “youtube.com”

Like so:

So, for example, you’d turn:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ

into:

www.gifyoutube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ

and hit enter. Tada!

To be clear, this isn’t an official YouTube tool (though I’d still argue that YouTube really, really ought to build one) — so don’t be surprised if it doesn’t work forever , particularly if YouTube’s legal team gets too bummed about the use of their trademark right in the domain. This is a side project by the team behind the super GIF-centric messaging app Glyphic.

One catch: in the current build, you can set the start time and GIF duration, but you can’t get super precise about it. If you want frame-by-frame control for that sweet, sweet perfectly timed loopage, you’ll probably want something like GIFGrabber or GIFBrewery"
gifs  animatedgifs  youtube  onlinetoolkit 
august 2014 by robertogreco
AnimGIFs need a better codec
"Short, looped silent video clips have become a medium. They're a way to quote, remix and comment on longer videos. They're a way to share jokes and cats' mishaps. AnimGIFs are to videos what Twitter is to blogs.

The problem is that the video codec powering this medium is horribly outdated and inefficient. Browsers already support better video codecs natively, but due to historical reasons, they're not allowing animGIFs to take advantage of the better technology.

The divide between "animations" and "proper videos" is a false dichotomy and creates needless complexity. Plenty of GIFs are conversions from YouTube and other videos. 4chan allows GIF-like WebM clips. Websites like gfycat and Twitter convert GIFs back to H.264 or WebM to save bandwidth.

RealPlayer is gone, codecs are not a pain any more

Annoying plug-ins from the '90s have left a long-lasting impression that video codecs must be slow, clunky and could not be played without a special ceremony. It's not true any more.

The latest codecs are not only much more bandwidth-efficient, they can be cheaper to decode as well (thanks to hardware acceleration and ability to seek). There is no reason to keep GIF as the only video codec with special privileges and force faster codecs to have limited usefulness."
gifs  animation  webdev  codecs  video  internet  webdesign 
july 2014 by robertogreco
GIF hearts Tumblr: a fairytale for the internet age (Wired UK)
""The reason everyone thought MySpace was going to die, was because these (GIFs) are really ugly," says meme-master general Kenyatta Cheese, speaking at Story Festival in London. Cheese helps to run the Doctor Who Tumblr for BBC America, the second biggest Tumblr in the world, and was also a cofounder of Know Your Meme.

Cheese describes himself as being "of the internet", but says he is mainly interested in the way people do things online. "Our myths that we have don't necessarily reflect the things that we do, so I want to create new myths," he says.

The GIF, he continues, is a 30-year-old file format, which is woefully inefficient and yet despite all the innovation in technology, is used to tell stories all over the internet today. When he looked it up on a Wikipedia, all that was there was was a description of what it was and where it came from, but a disappointing lack of insight into its cultural significance. "I don't think it's the facts that are important," he continues. The GIF has a story of its own -- a fairytale, in fact -- but it is a story based on emotion, not fact.

"There was a king named browser and a queen named CompuServe," he begins. The king and queen have a daughter called GIF, who is considered a novelty, but is not taken seriously as "she can render rainbows and unicorns", even though all she wants to do is be useful. When the queen dies, the king remarries and his new queen -- Queen Flash -- decides to banish GIF to the subculture forest, as her magic mirror on the wall -- the tech blogs -- tell her she is no longer the most useful format of them all.

Fortunately for GIF, the trolls take her in and she makes her GIFs again using viral video clips and NSFW webcam footage, which lays the foundation for the viral web. The forum users get to work making GIFs, simply for the purpose of having fun and expressing themselves. "This is creating these small moments in time that we're able to share with one another," says Cheese. "You're now using GIFs on forums instead of writing a 200-word response."

While even Queen Flash realises her reign is over, along comes Prince Tumblr into the subculture forest, where he meets and falls in love with GIF (Prince Tumblr: "Your work gives me all the feels"; GIF: "lol thanks").

It is this union that spread the culture of GIF creation far and wide. "What happens on the internet is when people migrate from forum to forum they take their culture with them," says Cheese. It has led to people making GIFs in all kinds of different contexts -- as works of art, as sets of instructions and even for making porn, says Cheese. It also resulted in people using and reappropriating GIFs to suit their own purposes.

"GIFs were perfect for Tumblr, because people started using them in ways not just to express themselves but in a reblog so they spread really fast," Cheese explains. People might create a GIF set of their favourite scene from a film and that post gets flagged and reposted, and then somebody might take one of those images, save it to their hard drive and use it as a reaction GIF. "All of a sudden it's used everywhere," he says.

Since that's happened all the other kingdoms on the internet have realised that they too can use GIFs, including journalism -- from Buzzfeed writers to data journalists.

"This becomes a story of a 30-year-old file-format that everyone thought was dead," he says. In all its archaic inefficiency, he adds, it rose up again "not because people thought they could profit off it, but because they wanted to do something useful"."

[See also (another talk): http://videos.theconf.se/video/8580175/kenyatta-cheese-how-visual-media ]
kenyattacheese  gifs  tumblr  web  internet  animation  animatedgifs  2014 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Pop: Introducing Pop
We’re happy to introduce Pop—a new way to have conversations with photos, videos and GIFs. You can download it for free on the App Store!
ios  applications  pop  gifs  animatedgifs  photography  ios7  zeega 
february 2014 by robertogreco
The animated GIF app for your iPhone or iPod touch - Giffer
"we all love a good animated gif. some of us moreso than others.

whatever kind of gifs you like—stop motion, cinemagraphs, text overlays, time lapse, jitter/wiggle gifs—giffer is the best way to quickly and easily create or collect them, whenever you want, wherever you go.

edit with individual frame precision. effortlessly share your favorite gifs to tumblr, twitter, and facebook—all at the same time."

[See also: http://gifferapp.tumblr.com/ ]

[Giffer: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/giffer-the-animated-gif-app/id416952536 ]

[Giffer Pro: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/giffer-pro-animated-gif-app/id521412113 ]
gifs  animatedgifs  ios  applications  tools  images  camera  giffer  iphone  photography 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Zeega
"Zeega is revolutionizing interactive storytelling for a future beyond blogs. Zeegas are a new form of interactive media, enabling anyone to easily combine animated GIFs, audio, images, text and video from across the web.

We’re living in a unique moment. More media than ever is recorded and shared. But the web today is dominated by a few platforms - all stories start to feel the same, trapped in rigid boxes and long lists. Zeega is ushering in an era when the web truly becomes an interactive, audiovisual medium made by everyone.

Interactive Storytelling
Everyone wants to tell stories that allow viewers to interact, but to remain captivated. A great example is how this blog post about urban explorer Steve Duncan is transformed into this Zeega [http://zeega.com/51818 ] that allows you to travel with him beneath New York, Paris and other cities. Or this recent report by NewsHour on the current debates of gun control.

Creating Memories
Anyone can use Zeega to create lasting artifacts of their favorite experiences. A scrolling list of photos on Tumblr, a stream of Instagrams or a photo set on Facebook simply doesn’t fill the same need for narrative memories like the old treasured scrapbook.

One our recent favorites is How I Got To Boston, a personal story of the post-college years.

Playing with the Web
Zeega is also a great platform for playing with the web. A large part of the community is starting to really get into making “audioGIFs,” simple combinations of animations and audio."

[via: https://vimeo.com/66603842 ]
zeega  storytelling  onlinetoolkit  blogging  interactive  media  multimedia  gifs  audio  images  text  video  audiovisual 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Animated GIFs Triumphant - Anil Dash
"The facts about animated GIFs are stark. They only support a palette of 256 colors. No current browser lists support for animated GIF as a codec for the HTML5 <video> tag. That omission is understandable, as GIF compression of animation isn't particularly efficient. They even lived under an unfashionable cloud of patent uncertainty during the web's formative years. And those are just some of the traits I love about the format…

But to my eye, GIF is the most popular animation and short film format that's ever existed. It works on smartphones in millions of people's pockets, on giant displays in museums, in web browsers on a newspaper website. It finds liberation in constraints, in the same way that fewer characters in our tweets and texts freed us to communicate more liberally with one another. And it invites participation, in a medium that's both fun and accessible, as the pop music of moving images, giving us animations that are totally disposable and completely timeless."
culture  history  web  animation  anildash  animatedgifs  gifs  2011  kickstarter  constraints  technology 
july 2011 by robertogreco
GIF SHOP for iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPod touch (4th generation), iPad 2 Wi-Fi, and iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G on the iTunes App Store
"GIF SHOP is the animated .gif maker for your iPhone!

Easily create and edit looping animations, upload to Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr all on the go!"
iphone  animation  applications  animatedgifs  gifs  ios  via:frankchimero 
july 2011 by robertogreco

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