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robertogreco : git   13

Brent Jackson on Twitter: "New phone who dis… "
“New phone who dis [image: "iPad Pro connected to Raspberry Pi 4 running Gatsby develop with Theme UI docs site open"]

Basic setup:
- iPad Pro 11" (with USB-C)
- Raspberry Pi 4 (ssh + power via USB-C)
- Blink Shell for SSH
- Raspian with Node.js, Git, Vim, etc.

The most frustrating part is that I know the iPad’s hardware is fully capable of what the Raspberry Pi is doing here

To run Gatsby develop and view in it iOS, I use the `--host 0.0.0.0` flag and open the dev server at `raspberrypi.local:8000`– webpack hot reload works most of the time but sometimes needs a hard refresh

To install Node.js, I use `wget` to download the tar from http://nodejs.org , extract it and manually move it to /usr/local/bin

Setting up the RPi4 to run in OTG gadget mode, the steps are very similar to how you do it for the Pi Zero (there’s a few guides out there)

Download the image from http://raspberrypi.org and write to an SD card.
- Add dtoverlay=dwc2 to /boot/config.txt
- Add modules-load=dwc2,g_ether to /boot/cmdline.txt (after rootwait)
- touch /boot/ssh to enable ssh

For vim, I cloned the repo from github and built locally according to the instructions in the readme

I tried to build Zeit Now CLI, but it didn’t work and I couldn’t find any relevant documentation

Also ran into issues where some USB-C cables just did not work at all (sounds like an issue with the RPi), so if you don’t see a light, try another cable. Currently using the Apple MacBook USB-C charge cable (iPad cable was a no-go)”

[via: https://www.are.na/block/4577252 ]
ipad  ipadpro  programming  coding  whatisacomputer  2019  brentjackson  raspberrypi  gatsby  node.js  vim  usb-c  git  ios  ipados 
11 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Mindset Mindset: Passion and Grit as Emotional Labour - Long View on Education
"This overall pattern of thought, offloading socioeconomic issues onto the education system and then blaming the issues on individuals who don’t ‘stay foolish’, is known as privatizing public issues. In The Sociological Imagination (1959), C. Wright Mills makes an important distinction between troubles which “occur within the character of the individual”, and issues which concern the “institutions of an historical society as a whole.” As Mills observes, “people do not usually define the troubles they endure in terms of historical change and institutional contradiction,” and so the job of the sociological imagination is to illuminate our internal struggles in the context of history and institutions. Henry Giroux calls our growing inability to do so the ‘new illiteracy‘: tired teachers and under-performing students suffer from character defects – lack of passion or grit – rather than signal issues with the larger system of neoliberal economic and social forces. And just like that, social issues of overwork and inequality become private troubles."



"Careful, empirical studies like Mazzucato’s and Gregg’s can help us see beyond the mythology that innovation and success can be reduced to a ‘mindset’, ‘grit’, or passion. More importantly, they help us understand the effects of that mythology on our lives. If we recognize the massive public role in assuming the risk behind many innovations, we might just see a Universal Basic Income as a right, as a return on investment. If we understand the inherent structural inequalities that lurk below the surface of emotional labor, we might all hesitate before asking teachers and students to pledge their allegiance to passion and grit."
grit  emotionallabor  labor  benjamindoxtdator  2017  overwork  inequlity  universalbasicincome  henrygiroux  cwrightmills  economics  education  policy  us  politics  passion  git  robinbernstein  christineyeh  stevejobs  thomasfriedman  gertbiesta  georgecouros  marianamazzucato  ubi 
april 2017 by robertogreco
GitBook · Writing made easy
"GitBook is a modern publishing toolchain. Making both writing and collaboration easy."

"Simple to update, publish and update your books easily using Git or the web book editor.

Version Control, GitBook is based on GIT scm. A simple "git push" is enough to publish a new version.

Markdown, books are written using the markdown or AsciiDoc syntax. We fully support TeX/Math equations.

GitHub, write your book on GitHub and publish it in seconds through GitBook.

Our Analytics measure page views and downloads giving you powerful insight.

Editor, Edit your content using a web editor, preview before updating it.

Personalize branding with personalized landing page and custom domain names.

Collaboration helps structure your workflow, securing access control ..."
via:soulellis  books  publishing  git  markdown  tex  gitbook 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Gazler/githug · GitHub
"Githug is designed to give you a practical way of learning git. It has a series of levels, each requiring you to use git commands to arrive at a correct answer."
git  tutorials  github  howto  githug 
august 2015 by robertogreco
GITenberg.github.io by GITenberg
"Project GITenberg is a Free and Open, Collaborative, Trackable and Scriptable digital library. It leverages the power of the Git version control system and the collaborative potential of Github to make books more open.

Currently there are over 43,000 books in GITenberg.

Why?

-Free and Open

Our mission is to curate a free and open library of books. All books are in the public domain and can be corrected, pulled, and forked for any purpose.

-Collaborative

Programmers already have a tried-and-true way to collaborate on projects, Git. Github allows this collaboration to be open and social, allowing anyone with a username to maintain our large collection of ebooks.

-Trackable

Leveraging the Git version control system, we can keep track of changes, track open issues with any book, and track contributions.

-Scriptable

Serving books the way we serve code has its benefits. We can use Git and the Github Api, to do things like automatically generate epub and pdf files whenever there is a change stored in Git.

Interested in Contributing?

Awesome! For now there are a few things you can do depending on your interest and skill level. Firstly, if you find an error or typo in any of the books, report it in the 'Issues' tab on that repo. If you would like to offer changes: fork, edit and create a Pull Request. If you would like to make suggestions, help in another way, or would like to get more involved, you can join the project mailing list."

[via: https://twitter.com/auremoser/status/503230138956673025 ]
projectgutenberg  via:tealtan  books  git  github  free  projectgitenberg  open 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Penflip - collaborative writing and version control
"Write: Focus on writing with our minimalist markdown editor, or work offline with your favorite text editor.

Collaborate: Send a link to gather feedback - no downloads. Easy version control and revision history built right in.

Publish: Download your beautifully formatted ebook with just one click. Compile to PDF, ePub, HTML and more."
collaboration  writing  online.toolkit  markdown  git  epub  pdf  html  collaborativewriting  epubs 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Rendered Prose Diffs · GitHub
"Today we are making it easier to review and collaborate on prose documents. Commits and pull requests including prose files now feature source and rendered views."
via:kissane  github  versioncontrol  git  tools  writingtools  writing  onlinetoolkit 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Reinventing Administration - Notes + Links / Casey A. Gollan
"For months-and-months I’ve been sitting on a slowly-changing monster of an essay draft titled Reinventing Administration, borne out of my experiences in the last couple of years working with and fighting against the people in charge of Cooper Union. Inspired by Heather Marsh’s awesome serialized blog posts on collaboration, today I’m going to start noodling-in-public on different thoughts until this topic is out of my system and my drafts folder. While Cooper is the subject of these writings, it’s kind of interchangeable: an object through which I hope to address the challenge of reforming institutions who seem to have…gotten away from themselves. The problems here are not unique, and the questions we (the community of students, faculty, staff, alumni, and neighbors) have had to ask form a kind of rubric against which to check out-of-whack leadership at schools everywhere.

Here are some topics that come to mind, which I’ll link up like a table of contents if they come into existence, and add to as I go:

• How did Cooper Union get into a death spiral?
• Is all money dirty? Or, how can anybody sleep at night knowing that an egalitarian institution is funded by businessmen who’re widening inequalities elsewhere?
• Legacy, as in cobwebs.
• Preservation vs. building a new city.
• Transparency, accountability, and other cans of worms.
• Asynchronous collaboration walks into a meeting an falls over laughing.
• Community theater (as in appeasement and “fake consensus” not showtunes. Okay, well, maybe showtunes.)
• Bottlenecks. (Hierarchies vs. networks)
• Who are administrators? Where did they come from? And could we do this without them?
• Who does a bland Public Relations department serve?
• A look at work by others on “Open Government” and “Open Society”
• Git and Github as a metaphor and possibly a working toolkit for Open Government
• Where to stop the technological steamroller
• Pushing the right leverage point — growth — in the wrong direction. Or, growing down and replicating as an alternative to fattening up.
• Does everything inevitably get away from you in the worst possible way, Peter Cooper? Or can you design a non-stifling system that supports its original intention.
• Do we need classroom teaching? An imagined debate between John Taylor Gatto, who learned everything he needed to know smoking cigarettes by the river, and Margaret Edson, whose experiences with schooling are heartwarming rather than traumatic.
• Can classroom teaching be saved? (Picking IRL education up where Clay Shirky left off…and kicked it while it’s down.)"
caseygollan  cooperunion  2013  administration  education  highered  teaching  learning  schools  schooling  deschooling  unschooling  clayshirky  hierarchy  hierarchies  leadership  management  bottlenecks  communitytheater  collaboration  asynchronous  legacy  egalitarianism  inequality  technology  git  github  opengovernment  transparency  johntaylorgatto  petercooper  systems  systemsthinking  opensociety  adminstrativebloat  questions  anarchism  governance  heathermarsh 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Push
"Push is a journal dedicated to publishing original research on writing with source code.

Push’s mission is:

* to help develop writers and researchers working with source code, both through the published issues of the journal and the active, open process by which submissions are reviewed and improved on the road to publication;

* to advocate for individuals working to incorporate source-level writing into their research, classrooms, and professional development;

* and most of all, to improve the sophistication of digital writers writing in a software-neutral, source-level way.
github  open  push  source-levelwriting  sourcecode  digitalwriting  digital  journals  writing  git  code  via:savasavasava  openaccess 
october 2012 by robertogreco
The Git Parable
"The following parable will take you on a journey through the creation of a Git-like system from the ground up. Understanding the concepts presented here will be the most valuable thing you can do to prepare yourself to harness the full power of Git. The concepts themselves are quite simple, but allow for an amazing wealth of functionality to spring into existence. Read this parable all the way through and you should have very little trouble mastering the various Git commands and wielding the awesome power that Git makes available to you."
tutorials  howto  tips  versioncontrol  tutorial  programming  git  via:tealtan 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Git Reference
"This is the Git reference site. This is meant to be a quick reference for learning and remembering the most important and commonly used Git commands. The commands are organized into sections of the type of operation you may be trying to do, and will present the common options and commands needed to accomplish these common tasks.

Each section will link to the next section, so it can be used as a tutorial. Every page will also link to more in-depth Git documentation such as the offical manual pages and relevant sections in the Pro Git book, so you can learn more about any of the commands. First, we'll start with thinking about source code management like Git does."
via:tealtan  tutorials  howto  cheatsheet  versioncontrol  development  programming  tutorial  documentation  reference  git 
february 2012 by robertogreco

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