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The Edgeless & Ever-Shifting Gradient: An Encyclopaedic and Evolving Spectrum of Gradient Knowledge
"A gradient, without restriction, is edgeless and ever-shifting. A gradient moves, transitions, progresses, defies being defined as one thing. It formalizes difference across a distance. It’s a spectrum. It’s a spectral smearing. It’s an optical phenomenon occurring in nature. It can be the gradual process of acquiring knowledge. It can be a concept. It can be a graphic expression. It can be all of the above, but likely it’s somewhere in between.

A gradient, in all of it’s varied forms, becomes a catalyst in it’s ability to seamlessly blend one distinct thing/idea/color, to the next distinct thing/idea/color, to the next, etc.

In this sense, it is the gradient and the way it performs that has become a model and an underlying ethos, naturally, for this online publishing initiative that we call The Gradient.

Similarly, it’s our hope that this post—an attempt to survey gradients of all forms and to expand our own understanding of gradients—will also be edgeless and ever-shifting. This post will evolve and be progressively added to in an effort to create, as the subtitle says, an encyclopaedic and evolving spectrum of gradient knowledge."
gradients  art  2017  ryangeraldnelson  color  blending  spectrums  nature  design  gender  genderfluidity  computers  music  photography  graphics  graphicdesign  thermography  iridescence  brids  animals  insects  snakes  cephlalopods  reptiles  chameleons  rainbows  sky  math  mathematics  taubaauerbach  science  tomássaraceno  vision  brycewilner  alruppersberg  germansermičs  glass  ignazschiffermüller  lizwest  markhagen  ombré  rawcolor  samfall 
july 2017 by robertogreco
The “parenting happiness gap” is real, new research confirms — Quartz
"It’s an almost immutable fact: Regardless of what country you live in, and what stage of life you might be at, having kids makes you significantly less happy compared to people who don’t have kids. It’s called the parenting happiness gap.

New research to be published in the American Journal of Sociology shows that American parents are especially miserable on this front, posting the largest gap (13%) in a group of 22 developed countries.

But the research also shows that it doesn’t have to be this way. Every other country had smaller gaps, and some, including Russia, France, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Spain, Hungary, and Portugal, actually showed happiness gains for parents.

The researchers, led by Jennifer Glass at the University of Texas, looked at what impact policies such as paid sick and vacation leave and subsidized child care have on closing that gap. It was 100%.

“As social scientists we rarely completely explain anything, but in this case we completely explain the parental happiness gap,” said Glass. In countries with the strongest family-friendly policy packages, “the parental deficit in happiness was completely eliminated, accomplished by raising parent’s happiness rather than lowering nonparents’ happiness,” the authors wrote.

It’s not just one policy, like paid parental leave, that makes the difference. It’s the magic of a package of policies spanning over a lifetime, that allow people to care for children, support them financially, and even enjoy them every once in awhile on a holiday.

The study looked at 22 European and English-speaking countries using surveys from prior to the recession, including the International Social Surveys of 2007 and 2008 and the European Social Surveys of 2006 and 2008. The group created a a three-item policy index including combined paid leave available to mothers, paid vacation and sick leave, and work flexibility, and then looked at the effect of the basket of policies, as well as the impact of each individual one, on closing the happiness gap.

They found that in countries high on the comprehensive policy index, there was no gap, or, parents were even happier than non-parents. Countries low on that index were less happy.

All policies are not created equal. Paid sick and vacation leave and subsidized child care showed the largest impact on improving the happiness of non-parents as well as parents, Glass said. This is important, because policies that spend tax money to help parents at the expense of non-parents tend to be less popular.

Studies like this present some obvious challenges. For one, people in the US are actually a weirdly happy lot overall. On a scale from 1-10, they log in around the 8-10 range. People in France rate their happiness in the middle of the scale, from 5-7. “We aren’t sure if this means the French are truly less happy than Americans, or just don’t think it is appropriate to use the extremes of any scale,” Glass wrote.

To allow for these cultural differences, the research focused on the differences between parents and non-parents in the same country. They asked: “What factors are associated with parents being less happy than nonparents, given their country’s overall average level of happiness?” The key is association (or correlation), and not causation, which is impossible to prove in studies like this.

It’s no big surprise that parents in Sweden, with its dreamy parental leave policies, are happier (compared to their non-parent peers) than parents in the US, where there is no paid leave for anything—having a baby, much less raising it. But the research helps point to which policies could help most.

Glass says it’s not that parents are unhappy. They often find parenting fulfilling, and wouldn’t have it any other way. But their stress levels tend to be high, which can overshadow any happiness to be gained from shepherding another human being through life.

And why should we even care about whether parents are happy? “Parental happiness does in fact determine our fertility rates, it does determine the types of bills we get for stress-related diseases,” Glass said. “When you have a system that is not very efficient in supporting parents, you can expect to have problems motivating people to have children and care for them.”

Conversely, she said, “People want to have more children when you make it possible for them to be effective parents and effective workers.”"

[See also: http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/06/us-has-largest-parental-happiness-gap.html ]
parenting  us  happiness  policy  culture  government  kids  sweden  denmark  france  finland  russia  spain  españa  hungary  portugal  norway  jennifer  glass  paidleave  maternityleave  parentalleave  paternityleave  sociology  europe  vacation  childcare  society 
june 2016 by robertogreco
How the Many Types of Sea Glass Get Their Colors | Design | WIRED
"The ocean is the ultimate recycler: It takes broken ­bottles, ­tumbles them around for decades, and then spits them back as smooth, frosted sea glass. The value of these pieces, which can sell for hundreds of dollars, often depends upon color. Jewelery maker Mary Beth Beuke, author of the new book Ultimate Guide to Sea Glass, has sifted through tens of thousands of fragments, and her earlier color-rarity analysis is used by collectors all over the world. For us, she pulled out her collection and started counting.

Brown When mass production of ­bottles began in the early 1900s, this was one of the cheapest colors to manufacture.

Black Beuke can’t find much on her Pacific Northwest beaches. There’s more near San Francisco, thanks to a longer history of industrial dumping.

Red For centuries, the colorant that turned glass red required actual gold, which made it extremely expensive—and very rare.

Cobalt Not the super rare shade some collectors think it is. ­Bottles for pharmaceuticals—and poisons—were produced in this color."
color  colors  glass  seaglass  2014 
august 2014 by robertogreco
PIXELWHORE.com » Distort Windows
"One-half of an installation that marked the conclusion of Wes McGee and Cathlyn Newell’s Research Through Making grant Glass Cast, Distort Windows explores a number of topics inherent in the warm glass slumping process. The design process and its tools, including an custom fabricated reconfigurable slumping kiln, are as significant to the work as the resultant glass components.

The collaboration brought together a combination of complementary skills that allowed the team to fully integrate design computation, custom manufacturing and artistic intent into a single, coherent workflow. My involvement with the project dealt primarily with the development of the hardware and software components of that workflow."
howwework  make  stebsschinnerer  grasshopper  2012  brandonclifford  lucyolechowski  aaronwillette  matterstudiodesign  alibistudio  wesmcgee  glasscast  making  reasearchthroughmaking  cathlynnewell  materials  collaboration  process  art  glass  via:julianbleecker 
june 2012 by robertogreco
A phone to save us from our screens?
"…The first is an post-apocalyptic vision of humanity stuck with their heads in their mobile devices:

Here’s David Webster, chief strategy officer in Microsoft’s central marketing group, explaining their anti-screen strategy: “Our sentiment was that if we could have an insight to drive the campaign that flipped the category on its head, then all the dollars that other people are spending glorifying becoming lost in your screen or melding w/ your phone are actually making our point for us.”

The problem of glowing rectangles is a subject close to my heart, & Matt Jones has been bothered by the increase in mobile glowing attention-wells.

I think Microsoft & Crispin Porter + Bogusky’s advertising strategy stands out in a world full of slick floaty media. The only problem is that without any strategy towards tangible interaction, I’m not sure the ‘tiles’ interaction concept is strong enough to actually take people’s attention out of the glass."

["Microsoft has two new ads, anticipating their upcoming Windows Phone 7 launch.…] [Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dv-fbO-_xl0 AND http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHlN21ebeak ]
ads  advertising  mobile  phones  screens  iphone  attention  glowingrectangles  mattjones  timoarnall  floatymedia  palm  tangibility  tangibleinteraction  interaction  glass  2010  windowsmobile7  windowsmobile  society  distraction  humanitiy  etiquette  presence  computing 
october 2010 by robertogreco
David Byrne's Journal: 05.29.10: Arts ’n’ Crafts
"artists who work in certain materials have, for decades, usually had trouble being taken seriously as fine artists. Glassblowers, ceramicists, textile workers, furniture makers &, until a few decades ago, photographers were all not usually welcome in fine art galleries or the museums that show fine art… unless it was a show dedicated to only ceramics, for example.

There were exceptions, but until quite recently those were rare. If we ignore Duchamp, whose work implied that anything could be art if he said it was, the restrictions have held firm, though photography broke the barrier first in a big way.

...

Part of this snobbish attitude goes back to the Renaissance. In order for painters to separate themselves from the various craft guilds, & establish their own worth, they had to form the idea that expression, concept and idea were worth at least (and maybe more, in their opinion) as much as skilled craftsmanship..."
crafts  davidbyrne  photography  art  glvo  ceramics  textiles  cv  snobbery  artworld  glass  furniture  renaissance  history  guilds  galleries  apprenticeships 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics - Chips of Broken Glass
"Now chips of broken glass is a sub category in the long tail. It is an activity tracked by the One Machine. In the goodness of time, the web will embrace even the smallest thing we give our attention to. If chips of broken glass don't escape the web's ga
seaglass  glass  kevinkelly  community  culture  information  knowledge  onemachine  online  web  communication  search  social  sea  learning  passion 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Archinect : News : The Heineken WOBO (World Bottle)
"Seems like Heineken was about 50 years too early with the World Bottle concept of brick-shaped bottles that could be upcycled as building materials..."
materials  beer  recycling  sustainability  glass  construction 
september 2007 by robertogreco

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